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Solidaridad The Netherlands 2012 annual report


Contents Foreword Solidarity needs to be robust Vision and strategy A new vision and mission statement Change that matters Monitoring and evaluation Improving rather than proving  Food security A new triple-A food security strategy Food security programme in Bangladesh How we build producer support programmes More ambitious farmer support Product groups Finance and results commodity programmes Global investments and producer support Partner contributions for producer support Coffee Success leads to new projects Tea Mainstreaming sustainability across Asia Cocoa Scaling up cocoa production in West Africa Fruit and vegetables Sustainable juice and food security Cotton Better cotton projects have visible impact Textiles All set for a major scale-up in 2013 Gold Rising profile for fairtrade gold Soy First projects in China and Mozambique Palm oil Global programme starts to bear fruit Sugar cane Important step as ethanol reaches Europe

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Livestock First activities in the livestock programme Regional development Network finance The Solidaridad network gains strength The Solidaridad network financial overview Solidaridad South America Rural Horizons, a new solution for farmers Solidaridad Andes Creating platforms for sustainable trade Solidaridad Central America Roundtables take hold in the region Solidaridad West Africa Smallholder palm oil for local markets Solidaridad Southern Africa Forming partnerships across the region Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa from subsistence to commercial farming Solidaridad South and South-East Asia Food security programme in Bangladesh Solidaridad China Intervention starts with farmers’ ambition Solidaridad the Netherlands Campaigns raise Solidaridad’s profile Solidaridad North America New regional office in San Francisco

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Governance, supervision and finance Communication Solidaridad reaches a broader public Supervision, management and organisation Full supervisory structure nearly in place Organisation development in progress

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Financial report Auditor’s report Glossary

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This annual report is available online in PDF format from www.solidaridad.nl Solidaridad the Netherlands is registered as a foundation at the Chamber of Commerce in The Hague, number 41150939. This annual report can be ordered (free of charge) at the secretariat in Utrecht, the Netherlands.

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Text and editing: David Alexander and Michael Gould – final editing: Michael Gould – design: Daan van Beek – print: Pascal, Utrecht, the Netherlands – photographs Solidaridad, unless otherwise indicated – cover photos: Piet den Blanken

Solidaridad ’t Goylaan 15, 3525 AA Utrecht, the Netherlands tel: + 31(0)30 272 03 13 fax: + 31(0)30 272 01 94 e-mail: info@solidaridad.nl www.solidaridadnetwork.org

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new Vision and Mission statement Today, the world economy is not organized in a sustainable way. Many of us now realise that an unsustainable way of life threatens food security, the planet and businesses. Read our new vision and mission statement.

Cocoa scaling up production in africa

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In 2012 Solidaridad more than doubled investments in its cocoa programme. It took the lead in training trainers in Nigeria and Ivory Coast in multiple certifications of unorganized farmers.

26 South and south-east asia Photo: Annemarieke van den Broek

a shift of focus in Asia Whereas in the past the focus was on sourcing in developing countries for markets in OECD countries, now Asia itself is the main market for most agrocommodities.

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triple-A food security Achieving food security for all, involves tackling a number of inter-related challenges. Solidaridad has developed a comprehensive Triple-A strategy to make this possible. Triple A refers to interventions related to the Availability, Affordability and Accessibility of food.

12 Photo: Marieke Weerdesteijn

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Photo: Annemarieke van denannual Broek report The Solidaridad 2012


Foreword Solidarity needs to be robust Solidaridad is doing well. In 2012 the budget of the network organisation increased to € 26.9 million. An all-time high. This is 25  % higher than budgeted and a considerable growth compared to last year’s budget of € 18.3 million. In 2013 we expect to grow even more, to a budget of over € 40 million.

The global Solidaridad Network was extended with an office in San Francisco – to cover the North American continent – and staff worldwide grew to 190 (FTE) employees and freelancers on five continents. This rapid growth creates new opportunities, but also contains risks. Too rapid, uncontrolled growth can destroy an organisation. So in the past year great effort was invested in developing internal quality systems for the network in order to be able to absorb the budget increase effectively. Adequate financial management and control systems were further developed, as well as a management information system and a high-quality resultsbased management system for monitoring and evaluating our programmes. Through developing these systems and training users, the quality of the organisation increased. For 2013 as well we have developed an ambitious improvement programme to ensure that the organisation is at the desired level. In this way our capacity to innovate and learn will be anchored in the ways of working and in the quality of the Solidaridad staff worldwide. In 2012 – together with many people from Solidaridad regional offices all over the world – a new vision and mission statement were developed. This was a valuable process, since it was encouraging to see that people with different backgrounds can come to a shared analysis of the state the world is in and the challenges associated with offering more people a better chance to achieve a dignified existence. As a result, the mission of Solidaridad was reformulated, leading to a new consensus on what needs to be done. These investments in the quality of the organisation clearly depend on an effective implementation of programmes that can make a difference to people’s lives. Solidarity must be robust. People need ways to move forward – not enslaved in an aid relationship, but independently, using their own resources.

headed by an International Programme Coordinator, who is responsible for developing the global Solidaridad strategy for a specific commodity, aiming at structural change of a sector towards sustainable development. In support of this, agreements can be made with global companies and donors about their contribution to this process. Consequently these plans are translated to the regional context. Each regional programme contributes to the global goals and is held responsible for effective implementation of the agreements made. This is crucial for the Photo: Roger Cremers binding network Solidaridad strives to be: decentralized implementation by local staff – making optimal use of local knowledge which contributes to a jointly formulated global strategy. That is what modern international cooperation should look like. Solidaridad is gaining more and more insight into the results of its programmes. Success rarely comes without failure. But ever larger groups of people are reached and poverty is being combatted effectively. Improved food production, a safer workplace, access to cleaner water, and a better income. More and more actors are being involved in this process of change. Mainly companies. Local authorities are following somewhat hesitantly. Programmes are designed in such a way that finance, knowledge and skills remain available after the programme ends. So continuity is guaranteed. This way, our interventions will become ever more effective and will increasingly contribute to greater welfare for more and more people. Nico Roozen Executive Director Solidaridad Network

In the past year, international commodity teams were formed for the various sector programmes. In these teams all sector specialists throughout the network are linked. The teams are

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Photo: H.P. Alting von 2012 Geusauannual report The Solidaridad


Vision and strategy

• A new Vision & Mission statement

Change that matters

Monitoring and evaluation

Improving rather than proving

food security

A new triple-A food security strategy • How we build producer support programmes

More ambitious farmer support

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A new vision and mission statement Change that matters In 2012 Solidaridad formulated a new vision and mission across the network. This was an intensive process, which took ten months and involved people from around the world.

Redefining values The new statement was necessary because in 2010 Solidaridad returned its historic mandate from the Dutch churches to the bishops and synods. Since we are no longer exclusively connected to the Christian tradition, this created the opportunity to redefine our values. In addition, in recent years, new structures have been developed. Governance and supervision became international, with four continental supervisory boards and an international supervisory board at the global level. Through the establishment of a Board of Directors consisting of the directors from the nine regional centres on five continents, leadership has become a collective responsibility. From now on responsibilities are shared by people with different cultural, political and religious backgrounds. Global responsibilities But perhaps the most important change was the fact that during this period of change Solidaridad has grown considerably – from 30 staff in the Netherlands to over 175 staff located all over the world. Our new vision and mission had to express the commitment and views of these new and culturally diverse staff. It had to connect people working in different regions, in their own context and with their own ambitions. And what’s more, Solidaridad had undergone a rapid process of change in terms of strategy and practices. Most of these changes and developments had been written down somewhere, but we lacked a summary document, a document which we could use both to create internal consensus and for external communication with the rest of the world. Broad discussions The road towards a new vision and mission began with a series of interviews with key people within Solidaridad worldwide. How do they see the network? What does Solidaridad stand for in their view? From these interviews, a common characterisation emerged of what drives us. The outcome has been summarized as effective idealism: we are an organisation with ideals that we want to transform into effective action, leading to results that matter for people around the world. We have discussed our mission as well as our underlying values, exploring questions such as who are we? Or perhaps more precisely, who do we want to be? Our character and style was described as down-to-earth, reliable, a leader, independent and confident. And we wish to be perceived as passionate, focused, open-minded and cooperative. The most intensive discussions related to our vision

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of the world and our analysis of crucial problems. Also about where we are now and where we want to be in the future. These discussions took place in Dhaka in Bangladesh, Antigua in Guatemala, Johannesburg in Africa and in Utrecht in the Netherlands. food security and fossil fuels In our new vision statement a close connection is made between creating food security for the 9 billion people on the planet in 2050 and the end of the era of fossil fuels and the need for a transition towards a bio-based economy. In this way, an issue that is primarily related to hunger and undernourishment is linked to the very basis of modern industrial society. Food and raw materials both need to be produced by farmers. This is possible only by optimising production and making it sustainable. As a result, the old model for development aid has become obsolete. The new focus is on international cooperation in order to jointly solve each other’s problems. Our new vision provides a clear analysis of the problem and an attempt to arrive at a solution; and our mission statement contains a well-defined role for Solidaridad. This includes the decision to form an international network organisation, a learning organisation with the potential to have a real impact, as well as the role of transition manager, engaging with companies and governments. Solidaridad has a distinctive responsibility in its role as a civil society organisation determined to organise market processes in a way that will result in socially and ecologically desirable outcomes. We have a vision of ending poverty, creating opportunities for people, greater prosperity, ending oppression and ensuring that natural resources remain available for future generations. The description of Solidaridad as ‘an organisation for international cooperation that derives its inspiration from the vision, values and capacities of people from all over the world’ will guide us for the decades ahead. Dutch influence is no longer dominant; the search for a new way of relating to each other has begun.


Vision Solidaridad envisions a world where the people who produce the resources on which we all depend can contribute to change that matters. Change that leads to prosperity for all, without harming each other or the environment, and therefore helps to ensure that resources will continue to sustain us for generations to come. Today, the world economy is not organized in a sustainable way. Many of us now realise that an unsustainable way of life threatens food security, the planet and businesses.

The change we seek is a market process that is driven by the private sector. However, civil society organisations and governments play an essential role in enabling and encouraging the process of change. In this process, Solidaridad is a transition manager. It backs farmers who are economically poor but have rich potential, entrepreneurial men and women, and workers who want to build their livelihoods on a fair income. Solidaridad works together with partners throughout the supply chain, so that everyone can be involved creating change that matters.

Mission Many of us now realise that an unsustainable way of life threatens food security, the planet and businesses.

Solidaridad is an international network organisation with partners all over the world. There is one agenda and one strategy: together we learn and progress, together we achieve results, and together we decide on future steps.

With a world population projected to grow to 9 billion people by 2050 we can only be fed if the agricultural sector makes a transition to smart and sustainable land use. And as fossil fuel use becomes increasingly problematic, a transition to a bio-based economy is needed. Farmers worldwide therefore have a bright future as providers of food and suppliers of renewable energy and raw materials. They link as never before the issues of food security for developing countries and prosperity for the world as a whole.

Solidaridad is an organisation for international cooperation that draws inspiration from the vision, values and capacities of people all over the world.

There is one agenda, one challenge. We have to produce more with less, and ensure that it is done in a way that sustains people and the environment. Optimising land use is a good start. Increased production must meet growing demand, but with fewer negative consequences for people and the environment. More efficient production must be coupled with less pollution. There must be greater precision in the use of fertilisers and pesticides, and a reduction in water and energy use. Then waste becomes a thing of the past. Losses in the supply chain are reduced. Forests are no longer cut down and additional land is no longer needed because the existing agricultural land is being used more efficiently. There is one agenda, one challenge. We have to produce more with less, and ensure that it is done in a way that sustains people and the environment.

An inclusive economy - one in which people can participate fully - is needed. It should start with recognition of the potential of smallholder farmers and women, who are often the leading drivers of sustainable change. It will respect workers’ rights, provide a safe and healthy workplace, and support a living income for farmers and workers.

Solidaridad is a transition manager, focusing on producer support, a sustainable supply chain and market development. We partner with those who want to make a difference by changing business practices from being part of the problem to becoming part of the solution. Markets have to work for the poor and companies can be the key change makers. Solidaridad is a transition manager, focusing on producer support, a sustainable supply chain and market development.

Solidaridad’s aim is to make an impact by being the best in building partnerships, piloting and scaling up programmes, and learning and innovation. Without a dream there is no first step. At the beginning there are no paved roads; simply by starting to walk, a path is created. Knowledge and values are needed. Skilled and motivated people are our capital. We are realists with a mission. We turn shared vision into meaningful impact in communities.

From a shared vision to

change that matters

For children, school is the best place to work. Mining and industry need to switch to a responsible means of production. Worker rights must be respected and the environment needs to be preserved for future generations, keeping its potential intact.

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Monitoring and evaluation Improving rather than proving The past year was an exciting one for Planning Monitoring and Evaluation (PME). We have now moved decisively away from single programme management towards a horizontal, learning agenda that focuses on improving rather than proving results. This new approach will involve all regional expertise centres. Learning network In 2012 a shared learning vision was adopted that incorporates new ways to improve organisational performance (see Figure 1). Results-based tools Firstly, we have chosen Results-Based Management (RBM) – an impact-driven planning, monitoring and evaluation meth- odology that is based on principles established by the Donor Committee on Enterprise Development (DCED). At its core is a Theory of Change, which focuses on sustainable interventions (see Figures 1 and 2). This new approach will help us further improve the quality and management of our programmes and better communicate our strategies and results (see Figure 2). The Farmer Support programme, which is currently used for five commodities network-wide, was the first to adopt RBM and by the end of 2013 it is expected that all commodity programmes will have done so. Our partners are also encouraged to work with RBM. For example, the Dutch sustainable training initiative IDH is adopting it in parallel with our initiative. Making our promise a reality Secondly, a new web-based Programme Management Information System (PROMIS), which was developed in 2011, was rolled out network-wide in 2012. We have now reached a crucial milestone in improving our programme cycle management. This system helps us to centralize management information – including financial information and project results – storing it and sharing it throughout the network, allowing

us to monitor progress more efficiently. In 2013, the three founding fathers of PROMIS: Solidaridad, HIVOS and electronic government foundation ICTU will set up a formal platform, allowing us and other organisations that adopt PROMIS to share experiences and further co-develop the software. Learning from each other Thirdly, supported by the Dutch capacity-building organisation PSO, network-wide learning has been enhanced, resulting in shared visions between regions and programmes, as well as support from management in terms of manpower and investments in PME and communication. A Wageningen UR model identifies a shared vision, competences and management support as critical success factors. Another key factor – creating a learning culture – presents a challenge in terms of aligning knowledge networks programme wide. Evaluating our Learning Network In 2012 PSO commissioned an external evaluation to identify lessons learned and assess its own contribution to developing a learning network. PSO has enabled people to meet face to face and thus speed up the development of the network. The Learning Work Trajectory, which ran from 2010 to 2012, encouraged co-development and exchange of tools across programmes and between regions. Findings from the evaluation show that co-development of tools by regions is challenged by cultural differences and that in exchanging practices it is useful to identify constraints and inspire colleagues to align objectives and strategies. Linking this programme to overall network development and adjusting it to meet demand wherever it is strongest are considered to be key.

Figure 1: Why do we learn?

Need for clear, concrete information

Internal purpose

External purpose

• O  perations management (decision and control)

• Accountability in all directions

ImpROVE organisational performance

Need for open information

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• O  rganisational learning • Generation of new knowledge

• E  mpower stakeholders (beneficiaries, policy makers, private partners, etc.) • For communication & PR and to gain support among new stakeholders


Figure 2. The Solidaridad result chain SUSTAINABLE SYSTEMIC CHANGES

Sustainable impact on livelihoods, future perspectives, the environment and economy are ultimate goals.

IMPACT

SUSTAINABLE SECTOR DEVELOPMENT COPYING TARGET GROUP PERFORMANCE

UPTAKE CROWDING IN

BUSINESS MODEL TRIGGER

INTERVENTION

SECTOR ANALYSIS

Sustainable sector development covers sector-wide growth of economic, social and environmental sustainable practices and reduction of bad practices. Target group performance is a change that takes place as a result of adopted new practices such as increasing yields, reducing pesticide use and higher returns on investment. Trigger, and the reaction to it, uptake, are combined in a business model for the target group. Triggers can be, for example, train, sell, build. Uptake can be buy, use, apply. The intervention by Solidaridad or a partner of Solidaridad initiates the change. Sector analysis is an assessment of the target groups and issues in the sector. It identifies key constraints and key actors who can be involved in change.

Reviewing the Tea programme In 2012, LEI at Wageningen UR completed a mid-term review of the Solidaridad/Utz tea programme in Kenya and Malawi. The aim of the review was to gain insights into the mid-term results of the programme. The lessons learned will be taken into account when further developing the tea programmes in Kenya and Malawi and shared with other tea regions. Evaluating the Cocoa programme In mid-2012, Solidaridad, Utz Certified and IDH jointly started a qualitative mid-term evaluation in order to be able to tell the story of their joint Cocoa Improvement Programme from the perspective of stakeholders. This holistic programme, which was organized by Solidaridad, IDH and Utz Certified, is designed to transform the cocoa market in the direction of sustainable change. Between June and December 2012 KPMG interviewed ten internal and external stakeholders in the cocoa sector, ranging from producer cooperatives, extension services and government representatives in producer countries to traders and manufacturers in Europe. Their final report is expected in spring 2013.

The lessons learned from a review of the Solidaridad/ Utz tea programme in Kenya and Malawi will be taken into account when further developing the tea programmes.

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Food security A new triple-A food security strategy Achieving ‘food security for all’ involves tackling a number of interrelated challenges. Solidaridad has developed a comprehensive Triple-A strategy to make this possible. Triple A refers to interventions related to the Availability, Affordability and Accessibility of food.

The rural parts of the world face profound challenges. This is where around three-quarters of the world’s poorest people live and face challenging conditions. These include increasingly limited resources (especially water and land) and migration of younger people to urban areas. Yet, it will be necessary to intensify agricultural production in order to feed a third more people worldwide in the coming decades. We will need to preserve the ecosystem that agriculture has played a part in degrading and to be able to offer communities that deep sense of rootedness which is so valuable to society. To do this, however, farmers cannot continue producing in the same way. Smart, sustainable land use is the way to go. Solidaridad believes that small and medium-sized farmers – including women – should be the primary focus of investment, recognizing that private enterprise will play an important role in many solutions. Achieving ‘food security for all’ involves tackling a number of inter-related challenges. Solidaridad has developed a comprehensive Triple-A strategy to make this possible. Triple A refers to interventions related to the Availability, Affordability and Accessibility of food. Availability We have to define our goals in terms of human nutrition rather than simply ‘more production’. But both volume and quality are important. Sufficient nutritious food must be made available to meet the needs of a projected global population of 9 billion people in 2050, who will expect more nutritious food. It is anticipated that production of the major agricultural commodities will need to be increased by 70 % to 100 % in the next few decades. To achieve this there is simply no other option than optimizing land use in areas already under cultivation as well as in degraded areas. There is hardly any space for expansion because of the potential impact on biodiversity. More efficient production must be combined with significantly less waste throughout the food chain and fewer negative consequences for people and the environment. Maximising agricultural production by combining smart land use and crop selection with increased soil fertility, and adapting to changing climate conditions and reduced availability of water requires rationale choices and good governance. Optimal institutions are essential for success. Affordability In a market economy farmers can only address the urgent need for food if consumers have purchasing power. Farmers

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cannot produce for hungry people who are unable to pay for the food they need. If these issues are not addressed, production will focus exclusively on the rich of the world, leading to a combination of growing obesity in some parts of the world with hunger in others. There is a rise of the consumption of ‘empty’ calories (food of low nutritional value) in many developing countries alongside a dramatic increase in clinically overweight people in industrial economies. Nutritional food must be affordable for the majority, given the fact that 80 % of the world’s population have an income of less than 10 dollars a day. At the same time, food prices must reflect the real costs of agricultural production, including the social and ecological costs. Solidaridad sees this as the core challenge for an effective strategy to provide sustainable, low-cost food. The costs of introducing sustainability must be compensated by higher yields and better nutrition, resulting in healthier food and lower transaction costs. This requires nothing less than a technological revolution, making use of all of the scientific research available, including biotechnology. Accessibility Agricultural products cannot always be produced close to where people live. Due to rapid urbanization most people now live in cities. Countries such as China, which cannot feed their own population because of a shortage of arable land, will become the main importers of food. Effective distribution is the key to bridging the gap between areas where food is produced and where it is consumed. One third of all food produced in the world gets lost or wasted. Effective organisation of the supply chain, including well-developed retail structures, will be decisive in ensuring access to food in all parts of the world.

Solidaridad believes that small and medium-sized farmers – including women – should be the primary focus of investment, recognizing that private enterprise will play an important role in many solutions.


Food security programme in Bangladesh In Bangladesh Solidaridad and Care Bangladesh are pioneering the Sustainable Agriculture, Food security and Linkages programme (SAFaL), which will address 200,000 farmers’ agricultural challenges. It will increase the availability of affordable, nutritious food and comply with food companies’ quality and sustainability requirements. It is funded by the Dutch government and will provide a strong contribution to the Dutch Embassy’s food security programme. SAFaL will involve working with international food companies to create export market access for Bangladeshi shrimp farmers and giving farmers a strong incentive to improve the quality of their produce and introduce sustainable practices. This in turn will boost their income. Professional small-scale farmers who earn a good living can thus make an essential contribution to solving the problems that plague the shrimp sector. Solidaridad will also work with fish farmers. Local prices for farmed Pangasius and Tilapia are good, but quality is low. We will therefore help farmers to increase productivity and quality, so that local access to safe, healthy and nutritious fish products can be improved. To achieve this, we will work closely with local supply-chain stakeholders, such as processors and transporters, as well as retailers in key markets. Together we will invest in efficiency and quality so that more value is added to the local economy, waste is reduced, and the availability and affordability of nutritious and safe food is increased.

Solidaridad and Care Bangladesh will involve working with international food companies to create export market access for Bangladeshi shrimp farmers and giving farmers a strong incentive to improve the quality of their produce.

These chain-wide investments will be a first step towards meeting international standards, so improving the quality of farmed fish for local consumption will also help the entire sector to increase its export potential. A key component of the SAFaL programme’s strategy is the Village Supermarket (VSM). The VSM is a unique marketplace concept linking agro-food chains in South West Bangladesh, serving as a marketplace, service centre and business hub, providing market information and knowledge exchange. As a market it serves local consumers, traders and exporters as well as farming professionals looking for inputs and technical support. It will also provide crucial cooling, icing and storage infrastructure to supply-chain stakeholders. By bundling these crucial functions under one roof, VSMs will increase efficiency and reduce waste in supply chains and thus contribute to the availability, accessibility and affordability of nutritious foods. For more information about the aquaculture, dairy and horticulture initiatives of the SAFaL programme, as well as the VSM, please contact Selim Reza Hasan (selim@ solidaridadnetwork.org).

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How we build producer support programmes More ambitious farmer support In 2012 Solidaridad reviewed its producer support programmes. Monitoring and evaluation had revealed some critical issues, which gave rise to this review. Maximising production in small-scale farming clearly has its limitations.

Certifying poverty is no solution One important lesson learned is the relatively limited impact of the producer support programmes on effectively improving smallholder farmers’ income. The general picture in coffee, tea and cocoa production is that the best performing smallholders (0.2 - 5.0 ha) with an average of 2.5 hectares manage to raise their income through smart and sustainable land use practices from the historical low range of US$ 240 to 800 per year to US$ 2,400 to 3,200 per year. Although this means a significant change – improving liveli-

Re-allotment and spatial planning by local government could accelerate the process of up-scaling.

hoods for farmers and their families – their lives are still poor. To be frank, with an income of less than US$ 10 a day, this is merely a step from extreme poverty to poverty. It confirms an often-quoted criticism of fair trade that, in spite of good intentions and concrete improvements for farmers, the reality for most small-scale farmers is a shift from poverty to certified poverty. However, in the banana, palm-oil and sugarcane sectors we have seen many smallholders improve their income and livelihoods significantly. Maximising production in small-scale farming using the concept of ‘more with less’ clearly has its limitations. A single approach on-farm programme is not sufficient to guarantee structural changes. If we really wish to create new conditions for farming, other issues, such as increasing the scale of production, farm organisation, processing, new technoloPhoto: H.P. Alting von Geusau

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gies and supply chain development are crucial. A more robust agricultural infrastructure and better perspectives for a viable income for farmers – as well as living wages for agricultural workers – are also needed. Create economies of scale While Solidaridad is sensitive to land ownership issues in developing countries, scale is decisive. In many cases laws of succession split farms into even smaller plots. Entrepreneurial farmers must have the opportunity to buy land from less successful neighbouring farmers to create economies of scale. These changes should be accompanied by rural and agri-business development and the creation of employment for those who are no longer on the land. Re-allotment and spatial planning by local government could accelerate the process of up-scaling. Off-farm activities A second lesson learned is related to the external effects of farming on climate and biodiversity. An off-farm programme is needed to address these issues more effectively. Management of high conservation values to protect biodiversity areas requires the development of tools to help the agricultural sector take this responsibility. Carbon stock management for the reduction of greenhouse gases and payments for ecosystem services can contribute to the mitigation of emissions. For these purposes Solidaridad tested and improved the Cool Farm Tool. In spite of these initiatives it’s important to remain realistic about the mitigation versus adaptation agenda. It is unlikely

that the global community will limit global warming to the agreed level of 2 degrees Celsius. The Carbon Tracker initiative calculates the amount of carbon contained in proven fossil fuel reserves (i.e. the carbon stored in reserves that are ready to be used). According to these calculations, just one fifth of this amount is enough to increase temperatures by 2 degrees. So, in order to be safe, 80 % of those reserves should remain under ground. Since this would mean writing off US$ 20 trillion in assets, this is clearly not going to happen. There is simply too much money involved. So, in order to make agriculture future-proof, a sharper focus on adapting agricultural practices to the consequences of rapid climate change is necessary. Spatial planning and resolution of conflicts A third pillar that needs to be included in the transition towards a more sustainable agricultural sector (with the full participation of smallholders) is related to policy development and institution building. The creation of an enabling environment by governments, financial and legal institutions is urgently needed. Sustainable landscaping and spatial planning are crucial instruments for organising effective use of scarce resources. More optimal use of water is also needed. Pressure on limited resources will increase the chances of conflict. Prevention and resolution of conflict and access to justice are indispensable. The coherence of the three-pillar approach reflects the unique contribution which a civil society organisation such as Solidaridad can make, linking the business community, governments and civil society.

Producer support programme for smart, sustainable land and water use On Farm

Off Farm

Enabling environment

Producer development starting from the direct benefits for farmers

Corporate social responsibility in the supply chain

Policy development and institution building

More with less

Markets work for sustainability

Society works for sustainability

Economic issues: • Productivity • Quality • Efficiency

• F armer organisation and capacity building • Supply chain development and marketing • Access to finance through agri-credits and equity • Management of high conservation values to protect biodiversity • Carbon stock management for the reduction of greenhouse gases • Payments for ecosystem services

• L and use and watershed planning • Sustainable landscaping and spatial planning • Policy development on legal issues, institutions, taxes and laws of succession • Integration of sustainability in public sector, private institutions, finance and investment policies • Voluntary regulation through multistakeholder governance system • Conflict prevention, resolution and access to justice • Change international trade policies

Social issues: • Inclusion of small size farmers • Inclusion of women • Exclusion of child labour • Labour rights • Healthy and safe workplace • Living income / wage Environmental issues: • Reduction of: - Water use - Energy • Lower, more precise use of: - Fertilizers - Pesticides • Waste management and reuse • Soil fertility

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Product groups

Finance and results commodity programmes

Global investments and producer support •

coffee

Fundraising leads to new projects

• Tea

Mainstreaming sustainability across Asia • Cocoa

Scaling up cocoa production in West Africa •

Fruit and vegetables

Sustainable juice and food security • Cotton

Better Cotton projects have a visible impact • Textiles

All set for a major scale-up in 2013 • Gold

Rising profile for Fairtrade gold • Soy

First projects in China and Mozambique

Palm oil

Global programme starts to bear fruit • Sugar cane

Important step as ethanol reaches Europe • Livestock

First activities in the livestock programme

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Personnel in FTE per REC

Finance and results commodity programmes Global investments and producer support 10000

Solidaridad develops globally coordinated sector-wide commodity programmes. This global sector strategy, which is rooted in regional activities and expertise, has led to higher investments and better results. This chapter, which provides thorough information about the development of all Solidaridad sector programmes, starts with a global overview of investments and producers supported.

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Direct investments of € 16 million were made in eleven commodity programmes, of which coffee, cocoa, soy and palm oil were the largest. Investments in coffee were in line with the budget. Investments in cocoa exceeded the budget by € 1.1 million, mainly due to activities in Ivory Coast and Nigeria, which were managed from the Solidaridad office in Ghana. Investments in soy were € 0.5 million lower than budget.

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Andes

CAM

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Partner contributions are crucial for developing effective sector programmes. Such contributions include time, knowledge, skills, trade conditions and investments. Solidaridad raised € 8.8 million of partner investments in the Millennium Agreement producer support programme (2009-2012) and hopes to raise another € 39 million in the follow-up Farmer Support Programme (see also Budget 2012

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Actual 2012

Planned 2013

Budget 2012

Actual 2012

Planned 2013

Budget 2012

Actual 2012

Planned 2013

In terms of the numbers of farmers, workers and miners supported by Solidaridad, the coffee, cotton and cocoa programmes are the most extensive. The results shown on page 21 provide an initial idea of the impact of the programmes, since they include activities along the production-consumption chain. solidaridad Network programme investments

5000

Bu

3000

Bu

dg

et 2 dg 012 e Pl t 20 an ne 12 d2 01 3

4000

2000

1000

0

Coffee

Tea

Cocoa

Fruit and vegetables

Cotton

Textiles

Budget 2012

Gold

Soy

Palm oil

Actual 2012

Sugar cane

Livestock

Other

Planned 2013

Coffee

2,238,000

2,269,000

2,525,000

Tea

1,097,000

592,000

601,000

Cocoa

2,488,000

3,625,000

3,651,000

Fruit and vegetables

1,266,000

1,107,000

1,059,000

Cotton

1,396,000

2,391,000

4,115,000

Textiles

127,000

477,000

723,000

Gold

736,000

332,000

894,000

Soy

2,226,000

1,706,000

1,243,000

Palm oil

1,187,000

1,214,000

4,095,000

Sugar cane

1095,000

977,000

1,440,000

Livestock

492,000

138,000

239,000

3,226,000

2,086,000

3,789,000

€ 17,575,000

€ 16,914,000

€ 24,375,000

Other Total programme investments*

* HRM and office costs excluded

18

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report


South America Andes South America Andes Actual programme budget 2012 per region South America Andes South America Andes Colors refer to regions; see the bullets in the table below Coffee

Cocoa

Tea

€ 2,269,000

trica Africa Africa ca

Central America West Africa Central America Africa Central America West West Africa Central America West Africa

€ 592,000

South Africa South Africa South Africa South Africa

coffee coffee coffee coffee Cotton

tea tea teatea Textiles

cotton cotton cotton cotton Palm oil

South Africa South Africa South Africa South Africa

soy soy soy soy

Netherlands Netherlands Netherlands Netherlands fruit fruit fruit fruit Soy

€ 332,000

gold gold gold gold Livestock

€ 977,000

sugarcane sugarcane sugarcane sugarcane

South Africa South Africa South Africa South Africa

soy soy soy soy Other

€ 138,000

palm palm palm palm oiloilo

€ 2,086,000

East and Central Africa South and South East Asia China East and Central Africa South and South East Asia China East and Central Africa South and South East Asia China East and Central Africa South and South East Asia China

palm palm palm oiloiloiloil palm

cotton cotton cotto cotton

€ 1,706,000

Central America West Africa Central America Africa Central America West West Africa Central America West Africa

textiles textiles textiles textiles Sugar cane

€ 1,214,000

trica Africa Africa ca

€ 1,107,000

cocoa cocoa cocoa cocoa Gold

€ 477,000

South America Andes South America South America Andes Andes South America Andes Netherlands Netherlands Netherlands Netherlands fruit fruit fruit fruit

Fruit and vegetables

€ 3,625,000

East and Central Africa South and South East Asia China East and Central Africa South and South East Asia China East and Central Africa South and South East Asia China East and Central Africa South and South East Asia China

€ 2,391,000

South Africa South Africa South Africa South Africa

livestock livestock livestock livestock

Netherlands Netherlands Netherlands Netherlands

other other other other fruit fruit fruit fruit

coffee cocoa coffee tea cocoa coffee tea cocoa coffee teatea cocoa Actual budgets 2012 per commodity and per region (in Euros)

Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad South Andes Central West Africa Southern Eastern South and China the NetherAmerica America Africa and Central South-East lands* Africa Asia

Total

Netherlands Netherlands Netherlands Netherlands Coffee

29,000

221,000

181,000

0

0

1,381,000

31,000

0

426,000

2,269,000

Tea

107,000

0

0

0

71,000

129,000

138,000

67,000

80,000

592,000

8,000

5,000

40,000

3,446,000

0

0

20,000

0

106,000

3,625,000

4,000

29,000

0

6,000

0

1,066,000

0

0

2,000

1,107,000

0

0

94,000

200,000

7,000

11,000

181,000

1,898,000

2,391,000

Cocoa Fruit and vegetables fruit fruit fruit fruit Cotton

0

Textiles Gold

cotton cotton cotton cotton

textiles textiles textiles textiles

gold gold gold gold

soy soy soy soy

0

0

0

0

0

0

36,000

0

441,000

477,000

5,000

59,000

0

130,000

0

37,000

0

0

101,000

332,000

1,334,000

0

0

0

0

0

119,000

40,000

213,000

1,706,000

Palm oil

179,000

20,000

0

784,000

0

0

0

0

231,000

1,214,000

Sugar cane

579,000

0

0

0

160,000

19,000

165,000

0

54,000

977,000

Soy

Livestock

103,000

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

35,000

138,000

Other

424,000

19,000

0

15,000

111,000

32,000

24,000

0

1,462,000

2,086,000

d

soy soy soy soy

* The figures ofoil Solidaridad direct contributions to other Solidaridadlivestock expertise centres. They include some palm sugarcane livestock other palm oiloil the Netherlands excludesugarcane sugarcane livestock other palm oil other palm sugarcane livestock other activities on other continents like the cotton programme in India and Africa that was managed from the Netherlands.

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

19


coffee coffee coffee

tea tea tea

cocoa cocoa cocoa

fruit fruit fruit

Producers supported per programme and perCentral region SouthAmerica America Andes CentralAmerica America South Andes South America Andes Central America Colors refer to regions; see the bullets in the table below

Coffee Tea cotton textiles gold cotton textiles gold cotton textiles gold 230,168 farmers and workers 61,050 farmers and workers

SouthAfrica Africa South Africa South

sugarcane sugarcane Cotton

Cocoa

300 farmers and workers gold gold gold

Number of producers (farmers, workers or miners) supported

palmoil oil palm

40,240 farmers and workers fruit fruit fruit

Livestock

Sugar cane

sugarcane sugarcane

Producers in:

Fruit and vegetables

palmoil oil palm oil palm 4,536 farmers and workers

Soy

2,838 miners cocoa cocoa cocoa

51,756 farmers and workers textiles textiles textiles

SouthAfrica Africa South South Africa

livestock livestock

soy soy soy

Tea (farmers and workers)

127,206

1,156

Cocoa (farmers)

409

Fruit and vegetables (farmers and workers) Cotton (farmers)

9,653

700

other other

89,137

4,172

46,215

8,979

109,630

Total

Soy (farmers and workers)

41

26,054

1,613

500

53,051

3,600

3,185

Sugar cane (farmers and workers)

3,599

Livestock (farmers and workers) Total

20

4,536 56,857

5,478

145,131

5,000

2,600

7,600 2,838

27,000 522

1,912

3,118

21,834

2,169

1,000

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

40,240

12,574

21,311

24,154

51,756 300

300 20,074

61,050 114,039

725

12,240

Palm oil (farmers and workers)

4,000

200

Textiles (workers) Gold (miners)

230,168

4,000

4,336 50

133,718

33,808

139,302

s

56,376

139,877

142,736

13,078

co cot cot

palm palm palm

Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad South Andes Central West Africa Southern Eastern South and China America America Africa and Central South-East Africa Asia Coffee (farmers and workers)

Ea Eas Ea

Netherlands Netherlands Netherlands other other Gold

7,600tea workers tea tea

21,311 farmers and workers cotton cotton cotton

oy y

soy soy soy

114,039 farmers

livestock livestock Textiles

145,131 farmers coffee coffee coffee

Palm oil

uit it t

WestAfrica Africa West West Africa

Eastand andCentral CentralAfrica Africa Southand andSouth SouthEast EastAsia Asia China East and Central Africa South and South East Asia China East South China

palmoil oil palm

cotton cotton cotton

678,969


Partner contributions for producer support From 2009 through 2012 Solidaridad Network, WWF US and the Roundtables for palm oil (RSPO), soy (RTRS) and sugar cane (Bonsucro) carried out a broad producer support programme with a number of companies. This programme resulted from the ‘Millennium Agreement’ of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which funded this € 4.8 million programme. The partner contributions, both from private and public sources, have increased from € 700,000 in 2009 to over € 4.7 million in 2012. In the period 2009-2012, the programme attracted over € 8.8 million of additional funding from partners, increasing the total programme budget to € 13.6 million. A large number of brands and companies have been linked to the activities of the programme: −− In palm oil: New Britain Palm Oil (Papua New Guinea), Grupo Daabon (Colombia), Agropalma (Brazil) Johnson & Johnson, Cono Kaasmakers and Ben&Jerry’s. −− In soy: Gebana (Brazil), APDC (Brazil), a dozen cooperatives in India, S.D. Tata Trust, FrieslandCampina, Keurslagers (the Netherlands), Cono Kaasmakers (the Netherlands), Unilever, Arla, Interchicken and IFC. −− In sugar cane: EID Perry (India) and producer groups in Malawi, Honduras and Pakistan, Suiker Unie and Delicia from the Netherlands The programme was carried out by local partners and managed by Solidaridad South America, Central America,

Southern Africa and South and South-East Asia. In 2012 alone, over 48,500 small-scale farmers were supported in implementing better management practices and more than 12,000 farm workers were made aware of their rights in terms of Roundtable standards. Together with partners, Solidaridad worked in 11 countries: Brazil, India, Honduras, Colombia, Belize, Ghana, Malaysia, Pakistan, Indonesia, Malawi and South Africa. In 2012 alone, over 48,500 small-scale farmers were supported in implementing better management practices and more than 12,000 farm workers were made aware of their rights in terms of Roundtable standards.

Solidaridad has been able to continue and upscale its activities in the Farmer Support Programme, thanks to initial funding worth € 29.5 million. Our ambitious aim is to attract another € 39 million of partner contributions from public and private sources and thus create one of the largest publicprivate partnerships in development cooperation. Through this programme the partnerships with the Roundtables will continue until 2015. Other aspects of the Millennium Agreement include new programmes with IDH, NORAD, the Dutch Embassies and the Sharp initiative (with Sime Darby, IFC, IDH and ProForest). The producer support programme will be evaluated in 2013.

Producer support investments Millenium Agreement (2009-2012)

Producer support investments Farmer Support Programme (2011-2015)

Initial funding: € 4.8 million

Initial funding: € 29.5 million

Partner contribution: €  8.8 million

Expected partner contribution: €  39 million

Total €  13.6 million

Expected total: € 68.5 million

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

21


Coffee Success leads to new projects Innovation and fundraising was a priority in 2012, as several projects came to an end and the main programme, which is funded by Irish Aid, will end in 2013. New projects include Climate Smart Agriculture in Mexico, Peru and Colombia; Food Security in Ethiopia and Kenya; and a sustainable coffee programme in Colombia. Programme setting For most of the world’s 25 million smallholder coffee producers, farming is no longer an attractive or sustainable business using traditional practices. There’s an urgent need to produce more and better quality coffee with fewer negative impacts on people and the environment. Solidaridad provides farmers with practical solutions which make them more resilient to climate change and food insecurity. Solidaridad also develops viable business cases for small-scale producers in collaboration with the private sector. Farmers need economic incentives to improve their agricultural practices and certification can play a role in this. To motivate farmers to change to sustainable practices, the best approach is to start with those aspects that will deliver fast visible results, such as reducing losses during harvesting. Progress The main projects are Irish Aid-funded projects in Central America and East Africa. Both focus on farmer support through training and include market linkage, access to finance and special attention to the role of women. The approval of new proposals has led to four new projects: 1. Bringing agricultural insights to those engaged in mitigating climate change through REDD+. This project focuses on Climate-Smart Agriculture in coffee production in Mexico, Colombia and Peru. It should lead to higher productivity and incomes, better carbon performance and enhanced resilience to climate change. 2. A food security/rural development programme in East Africa, together with farmer organisations, the Kenyan coffee research institute and the coffee companies Nestlé, ECOM and Armajaro. The goal here is to improve farmers’ resilience by combining coffee as a cash crop with intercropping of a selection of food crops for farmers’ own consumption and for sale on local markets. This should lead to more stable incomes for the farmers throughout the year, access to more nutritious food, and increased availability of food on local markets. 3. Solidaridad is bringing Colombian stakeholders in coffee, bananas, flowers and palm oil in a platform together to work towards more sustainable production and to increase trade with the Netherlands. Solidaridad will facilitate and support the convening platform, which is financially supported by the Dutch Embassy in Colombia. 4. Solidaridad is an official partner with Armajaro and ECOM in the Deutsche Investitions- and Entwicklungsgesellschaft

22

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

(DEG) programme in Kenya and Tanzania, which is funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in collaboration with Hivos. The Program of Sustainable Quality (PROCASO) in Honduras matured in 2012 from a donor-supported technical assistance programme run by Solidaridad and SNV into a service organisation that works directly with coffee exporters and cooperatives on certification, professionalising supply chains and making them more sustainable. In Peru an education programme (Good Agricultural Coffee Practices) started at four colleges. The students practice the new techniques on their parents’ farms, resulting in high adaptation rates of sustainable techniques. The local government is exploring ways to expand this programme to other colleges. Strategic partners Nestlé can become a strategic partner for the Solidaridad coffee programme due its considerable influence on the coffee supply chain. Solidaridad is contributing to Nestlé’s CSR strategy by delivering input for rural development and developing projects in countries where Nestlé sources coffee directly from producers. To scale up its programmes Solidaridad works closely with the largest coffee traders, which train farmers such as ECOM, Armajaro and Volcafé. Farmers are supported in India, Vietnam, East Africa and Latin America. Solidaridad provides support for curriculum development, training of trainers in Good Agricultural Practices and cross-cutting issues such as the integration of women in supply chains in East Africa. Solidaridad also works closely with cooperatives, NGOs and coffee boards. Donors The Irish Fair Trade Network supports Solidaridad financially (through a grant provided by Irish Aid) in implementing programmes in Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala, Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. This support started in 2006 and over 120,000 small-scale producers have already received support. In 2013 Solidaridad will apply for a new coffee programme in East Africa. Impact The Centre for International Development Issues Nijmegen (CIDIN) has been asked to carry out a four-year impact assessment of the farmer support programme in East Africa. Publication is expected in the summer of 2013.


Selective hand picking of only the ripe cherries, which is primarily done with the higher quality arabica beans. There’s an urgent need to produce more and better quality coffee, with fewer negative impacts on people and the environment.

Photo: H.P. Alting von Geusau

Market development and communication in Europe

€ 426,000

€ 31,000 -

4,172 farmers and workers supported Mexico Guatemala Nicaragua

India

Honduras € 181,000

Vietnam Ethiopia Uganda

9,653 farmers and workers supported Colombia

Peru

DR Congo

Kenya Tanzania

€ 221,000

€ 1,381,000 89,137 farmers and workers supported

127,206 farmers and workers supported

€ 29,000 Budget 2012 € 2,238,000

Actual 2012 € 2,269,000

Planned 2013 € 2,525,000

230,168  

farmers and workers are being supported in the coffee sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

23


Tea Mainstreaming sustainability across Asia Asians consume 74 % of all of the tea produced in the world. In 2012, Solidaridad initiated a programme funded by the Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH) and Hindustan Unilever Limited designed to sustainably transform half of the tea produced in India. This programme will benefit over half a million smallholders and plantation workers. Creating a sustainable supply for new markets In 2012, a Solidaridad-led consortium (together with Utz Certified and DE Foundation/D.E. Master Blenders 1753) completed a four-year-long intervention – the Tea Improvement Programme (TIP) – which was co-funded by the Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH). The Utz standard has now been introduced in nine major tea producing regions, covering 63,765 MT of certified tea grown on 34,042 hectares. However, due to difficulties in getting certified, smallholders are often left out, so a key focus for the past three years has been on supporting 75,000 tea smallholders in improving their sustainability practices. The emphasis of the programme is now on large-scale rolling out of sustainability initiatives for all markets in order to sustainably transform the sector as a whole Solidaridad’s agenda of domestic tea market transformation, which was initiated in Indonesia and China by establishing national sustainability standards has now been extended to India as well. These interventions in domestic markets have created a strong basis for further development in all three countries. For example, the Indonesian Teh Lestari standard is now well established. The plan is to cooperate with IDH – as well as tea businesses – to transform 50 % of the smallholders in Indonesia. The China tea sustainability standard has been adopted by the China Tea Marketing Association and is being developed into a code. In India, as a follow-up to the TIP programme, a programme has been started with IDH and Hindustan Unilever Limited, which will sustainably transform 500 million kilograms (just over half of the tea produced in India and 20 % of all the black tea in the world). The five-year India Domestic Sustainable Tea Programme (2012-2016) started last year. Solidaridad is the implementing partner, targeting over 600 factories, half a million plantation workers and 40,000 smallholders. It includes the development and implementation of a tea sustainability code. Teh Lestari – the worlds’ first locally developed sustainability standard for tea – was formally registered as a not-for-profit foundation in Bandung, Indonesia. By the end of 2012, Solidaridad, together with its partner Business Watch Indonesia, had certified 11,653 smallholders under this standard, covering 6,575 hectares. This accounts for 18 % of all certified tea in India. Lessons learned In a large-scale market intervention, it’s better to align strategies with key businesses in the sector at the onset rather than adjusting mid-way. Also, to increase productivity through

24

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

certification, small farmers need to make large investments, which may not be repaid by the income they receive from the increased productivity. There’s a need for local ownership of standards, as has been shown with the fast uptake of the Lestari standard in Indonesia and the potentially massive impact of the Indian and Chinese tea standards. Finally, it’s crucial for Solidaridad to engage in tea trade policies and connect the sustainability discourse with crucial demand, supply, quality and price issues at the global level. Strategic partnerships Solidaridad does not have global strategic partnerships with any of the major tea brands or retail companies. This is because of the approach taken until 2010, in which certification standards were leading in developing business relationships. However, there are country-specific partnerships with Hindustan Unilever Limited, whose Brook Bond brand is market leader in India – the world’s largest black tea market – with Sari Wangi in Indonesia and with Sara Lee in Sri Lanka for its Pickwick brand. Donors The Sustainable Trade Initiative-IDH, was the main sponsor for the Solidaridad-led consortium which coordinates the Tea Improvement Programme and one of the key funders of the India Domestic Sustainable Tea Programme, with matching funds from Hindustan Unilever Limited. DE Foundation/D.E. Master Blenders 1753 was one of the major co-sponsors of the Tea Improvement Programme. DE Foundation also supports Solidaridad’s tea programme in Sri Lanka. Impact The Tea Improvement Programme has successfully assisted 82,691 tea smallholders and 36,409 plantation workers with social, economic and environmental issues (on 40,617 hectares). Of these trained groups, 46,134 smallholders were supported in achieving certification under various sustainability standards and most have increased their income by 12.3 %. Together with Utz Certified and LEI, a long-term impact study was started in Kenya and Malawi in 2010. This showed that average sustainability scores have gone up, along with significant improvements in terms of health and safety and environmental issues.


The five-year India Domestic Sustainable Tea Programme, which started in 2012, is designed to support 40,000 smallholders, half a million plantation workers and 600 factories.

Photo: Sjoerd Panhuysen

Market development and communication in Germany, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom

€ 80,000 € 67,000 4,000 farmers and workers supported

China

-

€ 138,000 8,979 farmers and workers supported

India Vietnam

Kenya

Sri Lanka € 129,000

Indonesia

46,215 farmers and workers supported Malawi Mozambique € 71,000 Argentina

€ 107,000

South Africa

1,156 farmers and workers supported

700 farmers and workers supported Budget 2012 € 1,097,000

Actual 2012 € 592,000

Planned 2013 € 601,000

61,050  

farmers and workers are being supported in the tea sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

25


Cocoa Scaling up cocoa production in West Africa The most important development in 2012 was scaling up the programme in West Africa and developing programmes and consortia to increase productivity, rehabilitation and food security, while redressing the gender imbalance. The team in Indonesia strengthened the National Reference Group and was instrumental in developing the Indonesian Sustainable Cocoa Standard. The context Cocoa is mainly grown by 5 million smallholders in West Africa, Asia, Central and South America. Around 70 % of all cocoa comes from West Africa. Many farmers are confronted with declining yields and lack access to technical knowhow and inputs. The annual increase in demand for cocoa is 3 %. Companies can secure their supply through sustainability programmes developed in partnership with Solidaridad. By building supply chain partnerships involving producers, traders, brands, retailers and governments Solidaridad is supporting technology transfer, organisational development and makes sure that farmers get access to services and inputs. Progress In 2012 Solidaridad more than doubled investments in its cocoa programme. It took the lead in training trainers in Nigeria and Ivory Coast in multiple certifications of unorganized farmers and this approach can be replicated elsewhere. The focus on smart and sustainable land use has led to cocoa development centres in Ivory Coast and the formation of a consortium of private sector partners with the government of Ghana for a cocoa rehabilitation programme in 2013. The focus on gender and food security in Ghana has led to women’s groups being engaged in staple crop farming. Solidaridad has further strengthened its relationship with the governments of Ghana, Nigeria and Ivory Coast. In Ghana the second National Stakeholder conference took place with support from companies and COCOBOD. The National Reference Group in Indonesia has developed a national standard and a platform for learning and exchange of information on sustainable cocoa production. In Vietnam the team played an active role in the National Vietnam Cocoa Council and developed training tools and programmes. The close collaboration with Mars in the Netherlands and West Africa led to a documentary on sustainable cocoa on National Geographic channel as part of the ‘For the love of chocolate’ campaign. This campaign reached a total of almost 16 million people and and an advertising value of € 1.3 million. Solidaridad is part of a consortium that is developing a European sustainability standard for cocoa. Public-private partnerships made it possible to train more than 114,000 farmers in good agricultural, social and environmental practices. A programme on rehabilitation and cocoa nurseries started in Ivory Coast and a consortium of companies, CSOs and government was formed in Ghana for a largescale intensification and rehabilitation programme in 2013.

26

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

Lessons learned Building relationships with private sector partners takes longer than expected. Developing consortia and proposals for rehabilitation and a social agenda also takes time, as companies tend to focus on short-term results. Expansion of the programme, especially training farmers in Asia and Latin America, was not as successful as anticipated. Partnerships with companies Solidaridad has formed new partnerships with many companies for programmes in West Africa. The relationship with Mars has been enhanced. As one of the biggest chocolate brands in the world, Mars is leading new thinking on cocoa sustainability. Programmes are being implemented in Ivory Coast and the company played an important role in strategy development for the intensification and rehabilitation programme in Ghana. The relationship with Cargill – one of the major global cocoa buying and processing companies – developed further in 2012. This included a programme on rehabilitation in Ivory Coast and a large-scale training programme in Ghana. Solidaridad and Cargill have signed a long-term agreement and commissioned external impact assessments in Ghana and Ivory Coast. Donors World Cocoa Foundation (WCF) is supporting the programme on food security in Ghana. Numerous trading companies have pledged long-term support and lay the foundations for further intensification and rehabilitation in the years ahead. Impact A baseline assessment of the programme in Ghana was made by Wageningen University. Solidaridad and Cargill are doing the same exercise in Ivory Coast, but the results are not yet available. For all projects Solidaridad made a baseline assessment and mid-term project evaluations. A study by KPMG based on in-depth interviews with stakeholders measured the impact of the cocoa programme on market transformation (2008-2012). The main results are that 151,000 farmers were Utz certified and produced 414,000 tons of cocoa with an average 10 % premium on prices. Stakeholders recognise Solidaridad's important contribution to the debate, investments in the sector and the mainstreaming of certification. In 2009 around 2 % of cocoa worldwide was certified. By the end of 2012 Utz Certified alone covered 10% of the world cocoa production.


Close collaboration with Mars led to a documentary on sustainable cocoa on National Geographic channel as part of the ‘For the love of chocolate’ campaign.

Market development and communication in Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom

€ 106,000

€ 3,446,000

4,000 farmers supported

€ 40,000

Vietnam

Nigeria

409 farmers supported

Yvory Coast Ghana

-

€ 20,000

109,630 farmers supported

Cameroon

Ecuador

Indonesia Brazil € 5,000

€ 8,000

Budget 2012 € 2,488,000

Actual 2012 € 3,625,000

Planned 2013 € 3,651,000

114,039  

farmers are being supported in the cocoa sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

27


Fruit and vegetables Sustainable juice and food security In 2012 a strong partnership was established between Solidaridad and Friesland Campina Riedel (FCR), the market leader in fruit juices in the Netherlands. Solidaridad is supporting FCR in its ‘Route 2020’ programme — moving towards 100 % sustainably sourced products.

The context The world’s fruit and vegetable sector is burdened by soil degradation and excessive water and pesticide use. Productivity is low, and post harvest losses up to 40 % are typical for the sector. Working conditions on plantations are often poor, and smallholders are vulnerable. Fruit and vegetable production in developing countries is not only important for export, but also for local food markets. Solidaridad pursues strategies that build on the synergies between those two markets. Progress The fruit & vegetable sector consists of many subsectors, each with its own characteristics and challenges. In 2012 Solidaridad focused on fruit juice, bananas and food security. There are strong juice brands that are working towards sustainability. Bananas are the only fruit whose production is organized through a round table: the World Banana Forum (WBF). Within the WBF Solidaridad works with leading companies in the banana sector on developing a pre-competitive agenda in order to improve the sustainability of the sector. More concrete Solidaridad supports the WBF in sustainability initiatives, a collaborative research agenda and in designing a web-based tool for learning and exchange. In Peru Solidaridad has worked with 1700 producers to improve production and entrepreneurial skills. This has provided access to international markets, increasing farm incomes. Banana in Peru is produced by small scale farmers (< 1 ha.), which is exeptional in the banana sector. The climate is favourable for organic banana production, which is the market that Peru serves. Peruvian banana exports continue to increase strongly. In Colombia, a national sustainable trade platform is being organized to set joint priorities for improving the sustainability of the sector. Half of the Colombian bananas that are RA certified are not sold under this label. By strengthening market linkages with retailers the platform can improve the share. Fruit and vegetables in developing countries are crucial for the local food supply and only a limited percentage is exported. Solidaridad identified the potential synergy between meeting demand in export markets, generating cash, enabling investments and improving the resilience of food production for local markets. Apart from the agricultural production Solidaridad is identifying bottlenecks in local food distribution chains with local partners. Post harvest losses can be reduced dramatically with relative simple measures. Food security programmes including fruit and vegetable in Kenya and Bangladesh are up and running, and there is potential for more.

28

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

Integral approach There is potential synergy in the production of cash crops such as coffee and local food production. Developing cash crops enables farmers to invest in improving fruit and vegetable production for local consumption. Solidaridad developed a proposal for this, together with private partners in Kenya and Ethiopia. A key development was the roll out of a Horticulture and Food Security programme funded by the Netherlands Embassy in Kenya in which Solidaridad is the leading organisation (as part of a consortium involving Hivos and SNV). In November, Solidaridad received a grant of € 12 million from the Dutch embassy for the four-year Sustainable agriculture Food security and Linkages programme (SaFaL). This will help 200,000 smallholders in Southwest Bangladesh adopt sustainable practices in dairy farming, horticulture and aquaculture, while improving food security. Partnerships Solidaridad has worked with Dutch organisations IDH and ICCO to create a platform of Dutch companies in the fruit and vegetables sector. This resulted in the signing of a covenant for sustainable fruit and vegetables. The companies that co-signed the covenant committed to the goal of 100 % certified sustainable volumes in 2020. Friesland Campina Riedel is taking a frontrunner role in order to improve the sustainability in the fruit juice sector. In the past, the juice sector has focussed on the fruit processing industry and not so much on the farmers that are delivering the fruit. Together with Solidaridad FCR is now integrating the farmers in their sustainability plans. Donors With support from Dutch Embassies Solidaridad develops new programmes in a number of countries. In Kenya and Bangladesh improved fruit and vegetables production and distribution are crucial to improve food security. In Colombia the programme supports the move from aid to trade and includes the banana sector. In Colombia, the funding is designed to support a process of moving from aid to trade, in which four sectors are targeted, including the banana sector. There is a clear commitment from FCR – and interest from other juice companies – to work towards a sustainable juice sector. Supported by FCR Solidaridad analyses issues in the fruit sectors of Ecuador, Brazil, South Africa and India.


Kenya. Abishagy Wanjira Muriithi in front of her house. Developing cash crops such as coffee enables farmers to invest in improving fruit and vegetable production for local consumption.

Photo: H.P. Alting von Geusau

Market development and communication in the Netherlands

-

€ 2,000

€ 6,000

Colombia

Kenya

€ 1,066,000 200 farmers and workers supported

€ 29,000 Peru

4,336 farmers and workers supported

€ 4,000

Budget 2012 € 1,266,000

Actual 2012 € 1,107,000

Planned 2013 € 1,059

4,536  

farmers and workers are being supported in the fruit and vegetables sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

29


Cotton Better cotton projects have visible impact For the last three years, Solidaridad and its partners have been pioneering projects in India, China and Mali under the Better Cotton Initiative (BCI). These are clearly improving farmers’ lives. As planned in 2011, Better Cotton has now been licensed in China. And in 2012, a BCI project was developed in Mozambique, a new country for Solidaridad’s cotton programme. Growing well About 80 % of the world’s cotton farmers are smallholders; between them, they supply less than 50 % of the world’s cotton. Low, unstable incomes prevent them from paying off the debts they incur to make necessary investments in seeds, fertilizers and pesticides. With support from Solidaridad and partners, they can adopt more sustainable practices that will bring real personal and environmental improvements. By providing access to an organised market, these practices also bring the cash that provides farmers and their families with a dignified living. Against this background, it is therefore very satisfying to report that progress in 2012 was much greater than anticipated. Not only did Solidaridad projects attract a lot of interest from donors, there was additional investment from brands and retailers. From 25 in 2011, the number of projects grew to 28 in 2012, including BCI as well as organic/Fair Trade. They also had an internal momentum of their own: as farmers had good results, they attracted new farmers into the programme. By the end of the year, more than 145,000 were participating – up from 100,000 in 2011, which had originally been the target for 2015. Truly a virtuous circle! With the expansion of the ProCotton programme in Uganda and a new BCI programme in Mozambique, Solidaridad extended its cotton activities into East Africa. It is now involved in cotton programmes in nine countries. Solidaridad’s Cotton Solution Network team for India has been working on implementing Better Cotton since 2009. At the General Assembly of the BCI in Istanbul in July, it was honoured to win the ‘Proud to be an Implementing Partner’ award for the clarity, impact and originality of two bestpractice stories. Set in the tribal area of Orissa state, better decision-making and a change in attitude reflect some of the ground-breaking changes farmers are making with the help of Solidaridad’s local partner, Pratibha Syntex. In China, four BCI projects successfully completed the qualification process that started in 2011; all are now licensed to sell Better Cotton. challenges left Apart from the volatility of the cotton market, the greatest difficulties lie in connecting producers and buyers. Smallholder cotton projects are particularly affected by the sheer complexity of supply chains and price negotiations: there are too many players, too little transparency, and too little control. Seen from the farmers’ point of view, there’s a clear busi-

30

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

ness case for sustainable cotton, but too small a supply to turn it into a more mainstream product – which is essential. Seen from a market perspective, downward pressure is needed – to mobilise not only buyers, but also the ginners and spinners; and also to get commitment to longer-term relationships throughout the chain. Strategic partnerships Solidaridad’s activities in the Better Cotton Fast Track Program (BCFTP) are supported by pioneering brands and retailers, such as Adidas, H&M, IKEA, LS&Co and M&S, with their publicly stated target of using 100 % sustainable cotton in their products within the next decade. In this, they actively involve their supply chain partners. In 2012, Bestseller partnered with Solidaridad as a direct investor in a farm project in India. A recent BCI member, Bestseller is the Danish holding company of the Jack&Jones, VILA, Only and Vera Moda brands. Donors IDH (the Dutch Sustainable Trade Initiative) and the Rabobank Foundation are key partners in the BCFTP, a programme that sets strategy to accelerate supply of Better Cotton and that matches private-partner investments up to 100 %. BCI farm projects are also supported by the Farmer Support Programme, a four-year public-private partnership that will run until 2015. Solidaridad’s ProCotton activities in Eastern Africa are supported by the Common Fund for Commodities. Impact Under the BCI, progress is currently being documented on several indictors for all farmers involved, such as net income, reduced pesticide use and women involved. The data are verified, analysed and aggregated. Comparison with control farmers provides valuable information for assessing the impact of the programmes. Through this we learned that BCI farmers in Mali have 8 % higher profits than control farmers. In 2012 a short documentary was made in Mali, the intention being to repeat the exercise a few times in order to demonstrate that real change is taking place.

Progress in 2012 was much better than anticipated. From 25 in 2011, the number of projects grew to 28 in 2012.


China. Temporary workers are transported by the Guoxin – an export-oriented textile and garment company – to the farm. They start in August and will work until harvest is finshed at the end of November.

Photo: Jos Kuklewski

€ 1,898,000 Solidaridad the Netherlands investments mainly relate to programmes in other regions.

€ 181,000 5,478 farmers supported -

€ 11,000 56,857 farmers supported

Mali Ghana € 94,000 26,054 farmers supported 41 farmers supported

Brazil

Uganda Tanzania Zambia

Kenya € 7,000 3,600 farmers supported Mozambique € 200,000 53,051 farmers supported

50 farmers supported Budget 2012 € 1,396,000

Actual 2012 € 2,391,000

Planned 2013 € 4,115,000

145,131  

farmers are being supported in the cotton sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

31


Textiles All set for a major scale-up in 2013 The scene for larger environmental programmes in 2013 – involving 200 mills in Bangladesh and 75 in China – was set by successful pilots with textile-dyeing, washing and finishing factories, resulting in impressive in water, energy and chemicals. In India, Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) partnered with Solidaridad on a programme promoting the rights of garment-factory workers. The benefits of an integrated approach From cotton to finished garment, the textile supply chain is characterised by various social and environmental challenges. By training workers and helping factories implement structural improvements, Solidaridad and its partners work to improve labour conditions, reduce pollution and improve efficiency. And by encouraging fashion brands to buy sustainably produced textiles or actively engage with their existing suppliers on making improvements, they also help improve conditions. In 2012 time was spent on programme design and in a successful search for partners. The pilots for the Cleaner Production programmes showed a clear business case for implementing environmental improvements. Through energy and water savings, for example, considerable cost savings will allow for investing in further social and environmental improvements – thereby benefitting workers, the environment and communities. In Bangladesh, the Royal Dutch Embassy in Dhaka signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the IFC, Solidaridad and nine brands to scale up the programme from 2013. Roughly half of the funding will come from public sources, notably through the embassy, which is matched by the private sector – to a large extent by brands and retailers, though participating factories also contribute. Last year’s factory fires in Bangladesh and Pakistan provided just one reminder of the importance of approaches that tackle root causes simultaneously – including workerprotection legislation, worker training, local government, buying practices, and the attitudes of factory management. The need to raise workers’ awareness of their rights underlay five short training films for garment workers in Bangalore, India, which H&M was instrumental in making. The movies will be rolled out in 2013. Filmed in factories and featuring professional actors, they deal with health and safety; good working environments; overtime; misconduct, abuse and grievance; and workers’ representation. As well as showing the solutions to the problems it presents, each film shows how workers can themselves take a solution-oriented approach to solving them. Lessons learned It takes a long time to create multi-stakeholder partnerships – a particular problem in times of economic recession, when brands, retailers and factories are less able to invest. Despite this, we believe that it was flexibility and an ability to balance

32

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

the interests of all stakeholders that enabled Solidaridad to test the approach developed in 2010-11 and to prepare it for upscaling in 2013. In a similar vein, thanks to Solidaridad’s broad, integrated approach to environmental sustainability, occupational health and safety and labour conditions, we have avoided the trap of slipping into the single-issue management that all too easily follows incidents such as the factory fires in Pakistan and Bangladesh. By consistently focusing on any issue in its wider context, we believe we’re creating a common ground for our vision. Strategic partnerships The partnership with H&M has grown over the years – from a partner on small projects, the company has now become a joint programme developer. As a front-runner in sustainability, it has also taken the lead in getting other brands involved: Carrefour, S.Oliver, Tesco and Wal-Mart all joined the project for training videos in Indian garment factories. Similarly, C&A, G-Star, Inditex (the Zara parent company) and VF Corporation (Lee and Wrangler) will mobilise suppliers for cleaner production. Donors The Dutch Embassy in Dhaka, through the IFC, and private companies are sharing the cost of the Bangladesh Water PaCT, the Partnership for Cleaner Textiles. This four-year, US$ 11 million programme intends to raise awareness on cleaner production practices at 500 textile wet-processing factories, and to implement better practices in 200 factories. Another donor is ASN Bank, whose support is woven into many of Solidaridad’s social and environmental programmes in Bangladesh, China and India. With the financial support of the Ministry of VROM, brands and retailers as well as participating factories, a successful Cleaner Production pilot was concluded in China. Impact The pilot projects with textile dyeing and finishing factories were an excellent test of our approach in China and Bangladesh. The China pilots averaged eight improvements per participant, and invested an average of almost €  25,000. For example one jeans manufacturer reduced steam consumption by 25 % and improved its chemical storage and handling.


The new PaCT programme delivers cleaner production in 200 textile factories in Bangladesh.

Photo: Marieke Weerdesteijn

Market development and communication in Benelux, Germany, Scandinavia, Switzerland, United Kingdom and the USA

€ 441,000 Solidaridad the Netherlands investments mainly relate to programmes in other regions. China

2,600 workers supported -

€ 36,000 5,000 workers supported

Budget 2012 € 127,000

India

Actual 2012 € 477,000

Bangladesh

Planned 2013 € 723,000

7,600  

workers are being supported in the textiles sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

33


Gold Rising profile for fairtrade gold In May, the launch of Fairtrade and Fairmined (FTFM) gold in the Netherlands was a successful awarenessraising campaign. Less visible but no less important were the expansion of the FTFM programme to Africa and a project in South America to test the FTFM standard in mining regions where forced labour is endemic. Strong growth Solidaridad is the only civil-society organisation working with partners in both the industrial and small-scale mining supply chains to test new and better ways of mining. It is now capitalising on jewellers’ increasing awareness of the widespread social and environmental harm linked to gold, such as conflict, bonded labour, unpaid child labour and mercury poisoning. One measure of progress lies in the number of buyers licensed to buy FTFM gold. In January 2012, the Netherlands had none; by December it had nine. Thanks to a joint effort between Fairtrade International, the Alliance for Responsible Mining, Solidaridad and other organisations, the UK, the Netherlands and Denmark are now home to over sixty licensed buyers. The challenge now is to get the message out to jewellery consumers that it’s vital to insist on responsible gold. The Dutch launch of FTFM gold, which at one point featured TV and cinema star Katja Schuurman, was enormously successful in this regard. Media coverage reached 80 million people. The advertising value of the free publicity was more then € 2.3 million. On prime-time TV news, the launch took third place, beaten only by the latest development in the Euro crisis and by the French presidential elections. Dutch licensees are now reporting that consumers are increasingly seeking them out and want to buy FTFM gold jewellery. The expansion of the implementation programme to Ghana, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda – where there is now full training on the ground – meant that capacity training now covers seven countries on two continents. With the other three countries – Bolivia, Colombia and Peru – the total number of miners assisted to date is nearly 5,000; community members number almost 32,000. The African programmes are in the first phase of analysing current practices and alerting miners to what they can do better. The focus for future years lies not just on efficiency, but also on helping mining associations to achieve legality under national legislation. Without it, these groups of small-scale miners will not be able to qualify for FTFM certification. While Solidaridad’s programme is growing very successfully – in 2012, the groundwork was also laid for expansion to Nicaragua and Argentina – the real test is the future uptake of certified FTFM gold by companies, and of Responsible Jewellery Council (RJC) gold by the industrial sector. Activities such as the successful Dutch launch are just one of many keys to this.

34

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

Lessons learned After some setbacks, Solidaridad changed its procedure for identifying industrial mining companies as potential partners. To connect with like-minded organisations, there are now sessions on social responsibility at more international and regional mining conferences. These make it much clearer which mining companies are ready to put leading ideas into practice and to allow verification through models such as the Responsible Jewellery Council. Strategic partnerships Dutch jewellery designer Bibi van der Velden is Gold Programme ambassador. Together with Steltman Jewellers, the Dutch crown jeweller, she was a prime mover behind the launch in May. She has supported the campaign through her bracelet design, and, with Steltman, has produced a line of jewellery in Fairtrade and Fairmined gold. Steltman, who also carry a version in certified gold of the bracelet Bibi designed for Soldaridad, are raising awareness and pushing for better practices in small-scale mining communities. As a leader among Dutch companies, they hope to encourage other jewellery designers, brands and retailers to come on board. Donors In testing innovative approaches to tough challenges in the mining sector, Solidaridad needs visionary partners who are willing to take risks. In a wider programme to test whether it can be effective in stopping forced labour in mining communities, Solidaridad is partnering with U.S.-based Humanity United in gold-producing regions where serious social abuses such as forced labour, trafficking, prostitution and extortion are prevalent. The project – now in the early stages – has identified high-risk communities in Peru and Columbia. Support is badly needed there, but success is far from guaranteed and the project is a big leap for both partners. Impact Though the Gold Programme is still in its early stages, measuring impact is a key goal for the years ahead. In 2013 Solidaridad will commission an external evaluation to measure progress so far. Impact assessments are also scheduled and these will be useful for comparisons with baseline data collected in 2009.


The focus in the African programmes is on efficiency and legalisation. Without a legal entity small-scale miners cannot qualify for FTFM certification.

Photo: Annemarieke van den Broek

Market development and communication in Denmark, the Netherlands, Switzerland ande the United Kingdom

-

€ 101,000

Ghana € 130,000

Colombia

500 miners supported Peru

€ 59,000

Brazil

Uganda

Kenya € 37,000

Tanzania

725 miners supported

1,613 miners supported

€ 5,000

Budget 2012 € 736,000

Actual 2012 € 332,000

Planned 2013 € 894,000

2,838  

miners are being supported in the gold sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

35


Soy First projects in China and Mozambique Soy is a high-volume, low-margin product. Global production increases by 7.5 % each year, mainly because of increasing demand for soy meal in China and its widespread use in animal feed. The impact on land use is considerable.

Programme setting Planting more hectares with soy in South-America contributes to destruction of precious rainforests, while heavy use of pesticides pollutes soil and groundwater. Farmers in China, India and Africa suffer from low productivity. Solidaridad promotes use of scarce land in a smarter, more sustainable way through training and by promoting Round Table on Responsible Soy (RTRS) certification, especially in South America. Progress Solidaridad is supporting soy farmers in an increasing number of countries in South America, Asia and Africa. For smallholders outside South America, who often get relatively low yields, training in Good Agricultural Practices is likely to result in higher productivity. South American soy producers are, however, often reluctant to get involved with RTRS, because they are not sure that there will be sufficient demand (demand for RTRS certified soy is increasing relatively slowly). In South America, where there are very large farms and high productivity, almost 300,000 hectares of soy farming was contracted by Solidaridad for the IDH Soy Fast Track Fund in 2012, creating a supply of responsible soy. Improving agricultural practices A key issue in certification is avoiding deforestation by linking farmers to premium buyers who make this aspect mandatory as part of the RTRS standard. In general, in South America Solidaridad aims to reduce negative impacts, while in the rest of the world it’s more about improving yields in a sustainable way. Outside South America the RTRS standard can be used as a reference. In India and Africa (e.g. Mozambique) farms are much smaller and yields are low. Solidaridad has supported training of 30,000 small-scale soy farmers in India (average farm size: just over 1 hectare) in improving agricultural practices. This has led to 15-20 % higher productivity and improved livelihoods. In 2012 the first Solidaridad soy programme in Africa was started in Mozambique in a cooperative venture with the NGO Technoserve. Over the next three years 25,000 smallholder farmers will be trained in better management, leading to higher productivity and improved soil conservation.

36

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

Breakthrough in responsible soy in China China is the single largest consumer and importer of soy in the world as well as the fourth largest producer. In a country where non-governmental organisations have little influence, achieving higher benefits for farmers with reduced environmental impact is challenging. Two large farms will start working together with Solidaridad towards the first responsibly produced soy in China. The programme focuses on two key challenges: reducing poverty amongst soy farmers, whose annual income is less than € 150 from soy plantation, and on reducing the use of chemicals. In 2015 the programme is expected to result in a 10 % reduction of costs due to lower inputs, a better market price as a result of the introduction of better soy varieties, a 10 % increase in turnover per farm through higher crop quality and 20 % higher incomes for local smallholders. Strategic partnerships Demand for responsible soy lags behind expectations. Not being a consumer product, companies need to be convinced of the advantage of investing in sustainability and Solidaridad is actively working on that. In the Netherlands – the second largest importer worldwide – there is a collective agreement among all companies in the animal production sector that all soy used in the Netherlands should be RTRS certified or equivalent. Dairy company FrieslandCampina has supported Solidaridad soy programme activities in Brazil and India for four years now and is one of the key players in the transition towards 100 % RTRS soy imported into the Netherlands. CONO is a small dairy company (supplying Ben & Jerry’s) and cheese maker, but a frontrunner in supporting Solidaridad farm support programmes in India. Impact Family farmers in Brazil and in India have been supported in their attempts to improve production, while complying with the principles and criteria of RTRS. In India this has resulted in an increase in yield with fewer inputs, thus reducing poverty. In Brazil the main impact has been more balanced use of inputs. The trend is for the biggest brands and retailers on the globe to commit themselves to sustainability and Solidaridad is well placed to deliver services to stakeholders throughout the soy value chain. An external impact study of the India soy programme started at the end of 2012 and results are expected in May 2013.


Soy

Pesticide spraying by a small scale farmer in a large soy growing area. Promoting integrated crop management and reducing the environmental impacts of pesticide use are key issues in the Solidaridad China programme.

Market development and communication in Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Scandinavia, Switzerland and the United Kingdom

€ 213,000 Solidaridad the Netherlands investments include programmes in other regions.

€ 40,000

China

1,000 farmers and workers supported -

€ 119,000

27,000 farmers and workers supported India

Brazil Bolivia Paraguay

Argentina

€ 1,334,000 12,240 farmers and workers supported Solidaridad South America investments include programmes in other regions.

Budget 2012 € 2,226,000

Actual 2012 € 1,706,000

Planned 2013 € 1,243,000

40,240  

farmers and workers are being supported in the soy sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

37


Palm oil Global programme starts to bear fruit Partnerships with main market players in the sector have resulted in a range of projects that started in 2012. Such programmes include better management practices, pilots, working towards standard compliance and market access for smallholders. A highlight was the launch of the Sustainable West African Palm-oil Programme. Programme setting Palm oil has brought impressive wealth to Indonesia, Malaysia and other tropical countries. However, it is also associated with negative impacts, such as deforestation and the exploitation of labour. The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil was set up to address these and other issues, but the standard is not easy for many smaller companies and smallholder farmers to comply with. The Solidaridad palm-oil programme focuses on making the palm-oil trade more inclusive and sustainable: ensuring that smallholders and labourers benefit, while reducing the sector’s negative impact on people and nature. The shift from a buyers’ to a sellers’ market in the past decade and the dominance of Asian consumer markets requires a special focus on Asia. Strategy In producing countries, Solidaridad develops model projects that put farmers’ benefits first and works towards certification where there is a clear business case. In the supply chain, the idea is to work with mills, traders and consumer brands to get smallholders included in supply chains of leading companies and to establish direct links through certificate trade wherever possible. Solidaridad operates both within and outside of RSPO to establish inclusive voluntary sustainability guidelines and works to ensure that RSPO and other standards are credible by ensuring they deliver on their promise. Solidaridad also collaborates with civil society organisations and government agencies to create a level playing field and ultimately make sustainable production and trade the norm. Progress As part of the new Sustainable West African Palm-oil Programme Solidaridad is working with Unilever to integrate smallholders in the supply chain by helping them to produce more sustainably so that the region can become more selfsufficient in palm oil. Preliminary results of the global farmer support programme are promising, with increasing yields and improved supply chain relations in pilot projects in Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Beyond pilots Solidaridad and RSPO support the scaling up of sustainable palm oil production in Colombia and Honduras in collaboration with 13 local plantation companies, industry associations and leading processors of palm oil such as Henkel and Johnson&Johnson.

38

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

Lessons learned Although there is a specific smallholder standard, the RSPO code often inhibits certification of smallholders, even if their social and environmental impact is in line with the spirit of RSPO. By participating in the RSPO’s Principles and Criteria review and the Smallholder Task Force, there is an opportunity to improve RSPO instruments designed to increase smallholder benefits. For lasting improvement, massive investment in replanting of smallholdings and African plantations is needed. This requires a concerted effort from the industry, producers and financial institutions. Strategic partnerships Partnerships have been developed with global companies such as Unilever, training and knowledge institutions such as LPP and IOPRI in Indonesia and engagement in initiatives such as RT-REDD (building bridges between Roundtables and the REDD+ avoided deforestation programme) and SHARP (a partnership designed to improve livelihoods and reduce deforestation). Such partnerships enable Solidaridad to leverage its limited resources. Johnson & Johnson, Cono Kaasmakers and Ben & Jerry’s support the production of sustainable palm oil through the purchase of Green Palm RSPO certificates which benefit certified sustainable growers and through dedicated smallholder projects in Indonesia, Malaysia and Ghana. In Asia, Solidaridad partners Wild Asia and Verité have shown that workers’ concerns (a living wage, health and safety, rights of association, and more bargaining power) need more attention both inside and outside RSPO. Impact The palm-oil programme is relatively new; an evaluation of the 2010-2012 programme will be published in 2013. Pilot projects report significant improvements, even at this stage: for example, the 54 longhouse-dwelling Iban families that participated in an RSPO pilot with Keresa plantations established long-term contracts with mills and increased their sales from 2,100 tons in 2010 to almost 4,400 tons in 2012. Yield increases of about 20 % have been reported as a result of the adoption of better management practices.


“I really appreciate the farmer field school. For the first time, we have been given information about how the mill sorts and grades... We have a manual, photos and real examples of good quality oil palm fruit.” An independent smallholder attending the Solidaridad Farmer Field School in Sekadau, West Kalimantan

Market development and communication in Germany, the Netherlands, United Kingdom and the USA

€ 231,000

1,912 farmers and workers supported*

-

€ 784,000 Honduras

3,118 producers supported Nigeria Ivory Coast

Colombia

Ghana Indonesia

Brazil

12,574 producers supported*

€ 20,000 522 farmers and workers supported

€ 179,000 3,185 farmers and workers supported

* Honduras, Colombia and Brazil implemented projects with funds received in 2011. Indonesia and Malaysia projects were funded by Solidaridad the Netherlands. Budget 2012 € 1,187,000

Actual 2012 € 1,214,000

Planned 2013 € 4,095,000

21,311  

farmers and workers are being supported in the palm-oil sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

39


Sugar cane Important step as ethanol reaches Europe In 2012, Argos Energies, a Dutch importer, bought the first-ever shipment of traceable Bonsucro-certified ethanol from Brazil, thus achieving an ambition set at the start of the programme in 2009. This represents enormous progress: just three years ago it would have been impossible even to certify sugar cane.

Sugar-cane programme coming of age Sugar cane has a huge potential for replacing petroleum as the key ingredient for many fuels and materials. But to achieve its full potential, the industry needs to leave its negative history behind – a dark past of labour-rights abuses, poverty and environmental damage. To alleviate poverty, farmers can achieve a great deal through better productivity – of labour, soil, water and other inputs. Solidaridad’s support is designed to find ways in which famers, other supply-chain partners and civilsociety stakeholders can work towards this common goal. Argos’ purchase of Bonsucro-certified ethanol showed that the sugar-cane programme is coming of age. In 2012, Solidaridad was involved in sugar-cane programmes in 11 countries worldwide, and had become a recognized and valued partner for working with industry, government and other stakeholders. A cornerstone of its work is the project with Argos, which made it possible to identify a mill, work on a pilot, and find a supplier to build a Bonsucro chain of custody – the first from Brazil to Europe. This process was very instructive for all concerned and has produced excellent results. As another aspect of this work, Solidaridad and its partners have worked to develop tools for farmer support. These are based on similar principles around the world, but are always specific to local farmers’ circumstances and experience. They enable famers and millers to assess their performance in business terms, and also in terms of its social and environmental impact. Performance gaps can be identified, and then closed through training and practical advice. These tools are attracting the attention of farmers’ organisations, mills and government extension services. In the years ahead, we are confident they will drive further progress. In 2012, Solidaridad’s activities were extended to three new countries – Tanzania, Swaziland and Malawi – and also gained greater focus and consistency. Better understanding of the sector showed how to use our very modest means to make a real difference. Successful pilots spawn imitators, made it possible to move up the supply chain, attracting millers and industry organisations. In Bolivia, such an approach helped a large mill – a farmer and worker-owned co-operative – to unite forces and reduce child labour by 80 % relative to 2011. The mills are the key to improvement Large end-users have been hesitant about getting engaged, mainly because the sugar market is mature and well established, involves a highly standardised product, and is primarily price-driven. And with a growing palette of competing sweet-

40

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

eners to choose from, sugar is strategically less important than commodities such as coffee, cocoa or fruit, which cannot be replaced by alternatives. In most cases, Solidaridad has therefore gone straight to the sugar-cane mills – the link in the supply-chain whose past investments give them the greatest interest in better cane production. Each of the six new sugar-cane projects started in 2012 – in Brazil, Mexico, Africa and India – had at least one mill as a partner. Recognising the importance of such projects, end-users are now indicating a willingness to treat these mills as preferred suppliers. Strategic partnerships The world’s largest ethanol producer, Raízen – a joint venture between Shell and Cosan – has set itself time-bound targets to certify all of its operations to Bonsucro standards. Over 4,000 outgrower farmers will be included. In Brazil, Raízen and Solidaridad have developed a self-assessment system for sugar-cane farmers. This helps them to make improvements in the field, if necessary with aid from the mills or farmers’ associations. International Finance Corporation (IFC; part of the World Bank Group) and Solidaridad South & Southeast Asia joined forces in five Indian states to help 14 sugar mills and the farmers who supply them to improve their sugar-cane cultivation and milling practices. Four mills and their farmers will seek Bonsucro certification before 2015. Donors Through the Farmer Support Programme, the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs supported projects in eight countries, as well as work on market transformation and the development of platforms such as Bonsucro. Through the Global Sustainable Biomass Fund, Agency NL supported pioneering work on the certification of a mill in Brazil, bringing certified ethanol to Europe for the first time, retraining expelled cane cutters – especially women and people with a low education – and developing a self-assessment tool together with Raízen. Impact Although no impact studies on the sugar-cane programme were conducted in 2012, and none were prepared, Solidaridad worked with some 35,000 farmers worldwide to improve their practices and incomes. Project-based monitoring indicates that productivity increases and input-cost savings raised net incomes across the board by between 10 and 15 %.


The sugar-cane industry needs to leave its negative history behind it – a dark past of labour-rights abuses, poverty and environmental damage.

Photo: Piet den Blanken

Market development and communication in Germany, the Netherlands, Scandinavia, Switzerland and the United Kingdom

€ 54,000 Solidaridad the Netherlands investments include programmes in other regions.

-

€ 165,000 Belize Honduras

India

24,154 farmers and workers supported

21,834 farmers and workers supported € 19,000 Tanzania

Brazil

Zambia Bolivia Paraguay

Malawi Mozambique Swaziland

Argentina € 579,000 3,599 farmers and workers supported Solidaridad South America investments include programmes in other regions.

€ 160,000 2,169 farmers and workers supported

Budget 2012 € 1,095,000

Actual 2012 € 977,000

Planned 2013 € 1,440,000

51,756  

farmers and workers are being supported in the sugar-cane sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

41


Livestock First activities in the livestock programme In 2012 the first concrete activities in the livestock programme got underway, including a project in eastern Xingu Basin in Brazil for smallholders, which focuses on the management of beef herds and improving the livelihoods of indigenous people.

The context The livestock sector meets a significant proportion of global protein requirements, but the social and environmental impacts can be considerable. Improved management can reverse land degradation and increase productivity and efficiency, thus reducing environmental pressure while feeding more people. The sector is significant worldwide, both in terms of land use and livelihoods. Progress The focus within the programme is currently mainly on beef, but dairy will be included, also because of the interrelationship. Solidaridad contributed to the Global Roundtable on Sustainable Beef, which was formally launched in 2012 and set up a working group with Consumer Goods Forum to support the goal of zero net deforestation. The first Solidaridad livestock project started in Brazil – in cooperation with Aliança da Terra – and projects in Uruguay, Paraguay, Brazil and various countries in Africa are being prepared. Attempts to get European retailers involved in enhancing the sustainability of beef production in South America and Africa – either by investing in producer support or through certification – have not yet been successful. This is partly because consumer pressure is stronger for other types of meat and the fact that relatively little beef is imported. The Xingu project In a settlement in one of the poorest municipalities of the Eastern Xingu in Mato Grosso, Brazil, this project is using the beef market to support more than 300 families. In this cooperation with Solidaridad, Aliança da Terra (Land Alliance), has artificially inseminated 500 head of cattle with high-quality semen and plans to inseminate more than 25,000 during the life of the project. Community associations have been established and technical assistance is being provided. Most importantly, they are beginning to negotiate joint sales to generate a higher price for their animals. This partnership is leading the way for other small-scale producers in Brazil and possibly abroad. Private sector partnership Zandbergen World’s Finest Meat is one of the largest importers of beef in Europe, selling beef to retailers in many European countries. They import from all over the world, including from Uruguay, Brazil, and Namibia, where Solidaridad is setting up programmes. There is a Memo of Under-

42

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

standing with Zandbergen for cooperation on promoting social and environmental sustainability in beef production and they are also a partner in a programme in preparation in Uruguay. The main donor for livestock projects is the Farmer Support Programme, which is funded by DGIS. Impact Solidaridad is focusing on continuous improvements at the farm level. At least six programmes will begin in 2013, in Central and South America and Africa, involving multi-million budgets.

Solidaridad contributed to the Global Roundtable on Sustainable Beef, which was formally launched in 2012, and set up a working group with Consumer Goods Forum to support the goal of zero net deforestation.


Mato Grosso, Brazil. The first Solidaridad livestock project started in Brazil – in cooperation with Aliança da Terra – and projects in Uruguay, Paraguay, Brazil and various countries in Africa are being prepared.

Photo: Pieter Sijbrandij

Market development and communication in Germany, the Netherlands, Scandinavia and the United Kingdom

-

€ 35,000

Brazil

Paraguay Uruguay € 103,000 300 producers supported Budget 2012 € 492,000

Actual 2012 € 138,000

Planned 2013 € 239,000

300  

farmers and workers are being supported in the livestock sector

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

43


44

Photo: Keke Keukelaar2012 annual report The Solidaridad


Regional development

• Network finance

The Solidaridad network gains strength •

Solidaridad South America

Rural Horizons, a new solution for farmers •

Solidaridad Andes

Creating platforms for sustainable trade

Solidaridad Central America

Roundtables take hold in the region •

Solidaridad West Africa

Smallholder palm oil for local market

Solidaridad Southern Africa

Forming partnerships across the region •

Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa

From subsistence to commercial farming •

Solidaridad South an South-East Asia

Food security programme in Bangladesh •

Solidaridad China

Intervention starts with farmers’ ambition •

Solidaridad The Netherlands

Campaigns raise Solidaridad’s profile

Solidaridad North America

New regional office in San Francisco

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

45


Network finance The Solidaridad network gains strength The growth of the Solidaridad network is reflected in increased income, investments and personnel. This chapter opens with a global overview of these key figures for the network, followed by comprehensive reports on the organisational development of all Solidaridad regional expertise centres.

In 2012, Solidaridad Network’s income was € 26.9 million. This was raised mainly by Solidaridad the Netherlands (€ 19 million), but the other organisations have started to contribute in a significant way (€ 7.9 million) and the forecast shows an increase in fundraising throughout the network. Investments in sustainable value chains amounted to € 23.4 million in 2012. € 16.9 million was directly invested in commodity programmes; € 4.1 million was invested in personnel. Around 50 % of the personnel costs (€ 2.1 million) relate to Solidaridad the Netherlands; much of the remaining personnel budget (€ 1.9 million) goes to local programme managers, who manage and support projects in the field. Other costs (€ 1.8 million) are mainly (61 %) investments by the Dutch office in communication, SAM Andes CAM West Afr travel and office costs.

Southern AfrEast&central Southe Africa

The total workforce of the Solidaridad network (employees and long-term contractors) consisted of the full-time equivalent (FTE) of 188 employees (2011: 124). This increase (52 %) reflects the rapid growth of the Network in 2012.*

Total Budget

solidaridad Network SAM

Andes

CAM

West Afr

Southern AfrEast&central Southeast Africa Adia China

Netherlands secretariat Income SAM

Andes ownCAM West Afr from fundraising

Total Budget RECs

SAM Personnel Southern AfrEast&central Africa Andes

CAM West Afr (in FTE)*

Southern AfrEast&central Southe Africa

Income

Personnel in F

SAM

Andes

Solidaridad South America

CAM

West Afr

Southern AfrEast&central Southeast Africa Adia China

3,207,000

13.5

Netherlands

Solidaridad Andes Solidaridad Central America Solidaridad West Africa

Personnel Solidaridad Southern Africa in FTE per REC

305,000 0 3,013,000 0

47.0 6000

Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa

956,000

Solidaridad South and South-East Asia

118,000

2000

Solidaridad the Netherlands Other Actual 2012

22.2

8000

4000

Solidaridad China

26.0

10000

0

9.0

19.0 9.0

0

19,048,000

12.0

30.7 Andes

SAM

292,000

1.6

€ 26,938,000

190.0

CAM

Budget 2012

Actual 2012

Planned 2013

Budget 2012

Actual 2012

Planned 2013

Budget 2012

Actual 2012

5000

Planned 2013

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

Budget 2012

46

Actual 2012

Planned 2013

* Total personnel (FTE, employed and freelance) 31 December 2012

West Afr


The Solidaridad network financial overview Because the Solidaridad network is not structured as a traditional group entity with a parent company and subsidiaries, it does not prepare consolidated accounts. However, the figures below, which represent investments in programmes, have been removed from the financial flows of funds between Solidaridad regional organisations. SAM Andes CAM West Afr

Southern AfrEast&cent

The four biggest of these are Solidaridad the Netherlands, Solidaridad West Africa, Solidaridad South America, and Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa. These four organisations are also the most mature ones, with a high level of internal controls in place. In 2013 the focus will shift to strengthening the other network organisations from this point of view and aligning costsfundraising ratios.

Total Bu

There is a significant difference in the ratio of HR costs to total costs among the nine organisations in the network. This is due to the way these organisations manage projects: some hire external project implementers, while others hire employees, which results in relatively high HR costs. These different approaches often depend on legal requirements and on what is common practice in a country or region.

Total actual 2012 of the CAM West Afr network per region.

SAM Andes Solidaridad

Southern AfrEast&cent

Personn

solidaridad Network Total

Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad Solidaridad 10000 South Andes Central West Africa Southern Eastern South and China the Nether- Network America America Africa and Central South-East lands secretariat 8000 Africa Asia

Fruit and vegetables

181,000

107,000 8,000 4,000

71,000 5,000

40,000

29,000

31,000

129,000

138,000

3,446,000

94,000

Gold

4000

200,000

7,000

11,000

0 181,000

5,000

59,000

130,000

1,706,000

231,000

1,214,000

32,000

24,000

138,000

1,462,000

2.086,000

5,049,000

16,914,000

Planned 2013

111,000

977,000

Budget 2012

HRM

403,000

221,000

4,475,000

542,000

2,671,000

544,000

287,000 4000

3000

Actual 2012

332,000

213,000 54,000

W

5000

353,000

Office and other costs

101,000

Actual 2012

165,000

CAM

477,000

Planned 2013

15,000

Andes

Budget 2012

19,000

2,391,000

1,898,000

35,000

Total programme 2,772,000 investments

143,000

1,107,000

Actual 2012

424,000

19,000

2,000

Planned 2013

103,000

40,000

784,000 160,000

3,625,000

Budget 2012

Livestock

20,000

106,000

Actual 2012

579,000

592,000

Planned 2013

179,000

Sugar cane

119,000

2,269,000

80,000

441,000

37,000

1,334,000

426,000

SAM

36,000

Palm oil

Other

67,000 2000

1,066,000

Textiles Soy

6000

20,000

6,000

Cotton

1,381,000

151,000

469,000

190,000

201,000

133,000

153,000 2000

125,000

94,000

47,000

156,000

78,000

86,000

51,000

41,000

3,040,000

850,000

420,000

5,100,000

810,000

2,958,000

728,000

481,000

1000

dg et 2 dg 012 e Pl t 20 an ne 12 d2 01 3

Cocoa

221,000

Bu

Tea

29,000

Bu

Coffee

2,118,000

184,000

4.146,000

1,116,000

522,000

2,316,000

8,283,000

706,000

23,376,000

0

* Solidaridad the Netherlands figures exclude contributions by the Netherlands to other Solidaridad Coffee Tea expertise Cocoacentres Fruit and

vegetables

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

47

Cot


Solidaridad South America Rural Horizons, a new solution for farmers The Rural Horizons producer support and loyalty programme is an integrated software solution that offers farmers a self-assessment tool which they can use to measure their sustainability in terms of law, certification schemes and performance. Rural Horizons also provides farmers support with certification, Central America finding a market for their produce and to minimize costs.South America Andes Regional market developments Solidaridad South America intends to use the Rio Olympic Games in 2016 to promote sustainability by linking up with the main sponsors. The focus is on sugar-cane brands. In 2012 an important step forward was the implementation of Rural Horizons with 256 producers and 17 sugar mills owned by the Cosan-Shell Joint Venture Raízen, the largest sugar consortium in the world. In 2013, another 3600 farmers will join. The provisional results were presented by Solidaridad and Raízen at the annual general meeting of Bonsucro in London.

Most work takes place through commodity Roundtables, Coffee Tea Cocoa Fruit and vegetables Cotton starting with initiatives designed to eradicate bonded labour, child labour, discrimination and illegal deforestation. The first aim of all Roundtables is to move towards legal compliance. The next step is to establish the voluntary elements of the standards, and get these certified in third-party audits. Finally, there are initiatives for moving towards integrated management, including cross-cutting tools such as REDD+ (tackling deforestation) and sustainable landscapes.

Cross-cutting theme: sustainable landscapes Concept development There are increasing numbers of requests for support with multiple commodity (sugar cane / soy, soy / cotton and beef / Rural Horizons involves a four-step approach. It supports soy) and multiple standard certification (e.g. ISCC / RTRS / farmers with self assessment – making gap analyses in relation Bonsucro / GRSB). There is considerable potential to develop to mandatory legal as well as voluntary standards. A comput‘landscapes of excellence’, including multi-commodity, multierised database will provide a rich centre of know-how and buyer, multi-tool matrix interventions. These take place in expertise. First tests are underway with cotton, livestock and selected focus regions on-farm, off-farm, and in an enabling soy. For these commodities, legal compliance is the challenge. political environment. For tea and cacao, it is more about certification and market demand. Rural Horizons can become a global tool for SoliOrganisational developments daridad. First farmers assess the sustainability of their producIn 2012, the South America team was strengthened in order tion systems. They answer questions on farm management, to manage Result-Based Management (RBM), Promis, the agricultural practices, protecting natural resources, labour regional website and support further development of the Coffee Tea and safetyCocoa Fruit and vegetables Cotton Gold Soy is used toPalm oil conditions, and the health of rural workers. These Rural HorizonsTextiles tool and database/website. RBM programmes Officeonand othersociety costs and are used to generate roadmaps and farmers measure their provide evidence ofHRM positive impacts people, performance against benchmarks as well as set priorities and the environment to five large governmental donor agencies. create actions plans.

South America Andes

Coffee Tea Cocoa Fruit and vegetables Gold Soy Palm oil Sugar cane Livestock Other Total programme investments

South America Andes

Central America West Africa SouthCentral Africa America East an South America Andes

29,000 107,000 8,000 4,000 5,000 1,334,000 179,000 579,000 103,000 424,000

Programme investments 2,772,000 HRM 143,000* Office and other costs 125,000 Actual 2012

€ 3,040,000

* M  ore costs for (freelance) personnel are included in the programme expenses. Total amounts to € 580,000.

Personnel Solidaridad South America in FTE 2010

2011

2012

4 8 13,5 Central America West Africa South Africa

€ 2,772,000

To contact Solidaridad South America go to solidaridadnetwork.org/southamerica

48

programmes Office and other costs The SolidaridadHRM 2012 annual report

Sug

East an


Solidaridad Andes Creating platforms for sustainable trade In 2012 platforms were launched for trading sustainably in coffee, bananas and flowers in Colombia and bananas in Peru. In June, Colombia’s Minister of Agriculture, the Dutch Minister for International Cooperation and the heads of the Trading & Producers Associations signed public declarations in South Andes Central America support of sustainable production and trade,America setting development targets for 2015.

Regional network Work on responsible gold with artisanal miners is new for Coffee Tea Cocoa Fruit and vegetables Cotton Textiles Gold Solidaridad. In developing fairtrade certified gold mining it’s In this region it’s all about exports. Solidaridad supports important to assemble the appropriate logistics from the multi-stakeholder platforms. In Colombia, local associamine to gold ready for export, identifying pioneers as certitions of producers help convene the main stakeholders and fied suppliers of fairtrade gold. The knowledge and experSolidaridad is in charge of the technical secretariat for each tise of local partner CSO Red Social – as well as that of more platform. This role includes using its expertise in commercial advanced miners – is fundamental here. matchmaking, developing sustainable trade in international markets and helping stakeholders to organize public-private Cross-cutting theme partnerships. After almost three years of technology adaptation and In three programmes (coffee, fruit and gold) training tools further adoption for coffee rehabilitation, the coffee and methods are being adapted and implemented through producers in San Martin, Peru have achieved significant intra-learning, for instance adapting what works among increases in yields and income. This process was facilitated coffee producers for the banana sector. E-training tools and by Solidaridad. Local coffee promoters play a similar role better printed materials are good examples of this approach. in a project in Antioquia, Colombia. A technology recipe is Organisation not generally copy-pasted from one region to another, but farmers can learn a great deal about how they can become In 2012 the former financial controller replaced the general more productive. accountant as Financial Manager. A new post has been CENBANOR, a second level association of banana producers created: Communications and Administration Manager, started the direct export of organic and fairtrade bananas who also handles PME and PROMIS. In 2012 the Programme to European markets in 2012. For a decade, Solidaridad has Manager for gold was responsible for the new agrisupported the conversion of individual banana growers into commodity programme. The new Sustainable Trade Platform organized associations capable of managing the commercial programme in Colombia will require the recruitment of five operation of getting organic and fairtrade bananas from farm full-time people in 2013. Tea Cocoa and vegetables Cotton Textiles Gold Soy Palm oil Sugar cane Livestock to port. In 2012 Solidaridad Fruit started moving to the next level: programmes Office and other costs supporting a local platform with convening banana producer HRM associations, companies, CSOs and government entities in order to remove the main barriers to sustainability.

uth America Andes

Coffee

West Africa

Central America West Africa SouthCentral Africa America East andWest central Afr South America Andes Africa

Coffee Cocoa Fruit and vegetables Gold Palm oil Other

Total programme investments

221,000 5,000 29,000 59,000 20,000 19,000

Programme investments HRM Office and other costs Actual 2012

353,000 403,000 94,000 € 850,000

€ 353,000

Personnel Solidaridad Andes in FTE 2010

uth America Andes

2011

2012

12 25 26 Central America West Africa South Africa East and central Afr

To contact Solidaridad Andes go to solidaridadnetwork.org/andes

programmesHRM

Office and other costs

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

49


Solidaridad Central America Roundtables take hold in the region

In 2012 Solidaridad moved from pilot projects in RSPO and Bonsucro certification to developing a strong regional presence as the leading organisation for implementing sustainable agriculture, environmental and social practices in the palm-oil and sugar-cane sectors. One project alone will involve over 80 % of the South Andes Central America West Africa South Africa Honduran palm-oil sectorAmerica adopting sustainable practices. Regional Network Coffee Tea Cocoa Solidaridad Central America is creating a unique sectoralwide business approach for environmental, agricultural and social sustainability that is unlike anything else in the region. Dynamic and highly participatory consortia that mirror the role and function of the Roundtables on a global scale have formed, facilitating rapid transformation, continuous dialogue and investment opportunities for long-term growth and performance. The main partners in our work include WWF for agricultural innovation, SNV for inclusive business practices and ILO / SIMAPRO Mexico for social issues.

Andes Cocoa

Market Development The Program of Sustainable Quality (PROCASO) matured in 2012 from a donor-supported technical assistance branch of Solidaridad, into a fee-for-service organisation that works directly with coffee exporters in the certification and professionalization of their supply chains. With demand for diversification and adaptation increasing regionally, PROCASO is expected to diversify their portfolio to include cocoa in 2013, and other commodities as opportunities arise. Solidaridad’s visibility in Central America has increased significantly through participation in industry events and the involvement of multi-nationals in national commodity- focused consortia.

cane sectors, amid ongoing efforts in Smart and Sustainable Fruit and vegetables Cotton Textiles Gold Soy Land Use. The devastating coffee leaf rust outbreak in the region is creating opportunities for crop diversification and adaptation related to Climate Smart Agriculture, as well as a renewed focus on food security for vulnerable families who are struggling to stay on their farms as coffee productivity drops.

P

Organisation Under new leadership, Solidaridad Central America has installed internal management and communication systems that are harmonized with the entire Solidaridad Network. Long-term partnerships that have been strengthened as well as new ones are making Solidaridad a cutting-edge organisation for transformation in the region.

Central America West Africa Africa America East andWest central AfricaSouth EastAfrica South South America AndesSouthCentral Africa Fruit and vegetables Cotton

Textiles

Gold

Soy

Palm oil

Sugar cane Livestock

Aquaculture Not c

programmesHRM Office and other costs Cross-cutting themes In 2012 the seeds were planted for future efforts in relation to child labour and worker’s rights in both the palm-oil and sugar-

Coffee Cocoa Total programme investments

181,000 40,000

Programme investments HRM Office and other costs

€ 221,000

Actual 2012

221,000 151,000 47,000 € 420,000

Personnel Solidaridad Central America in FTE 2010

Andes

Central America West Africa South Africa

2012

19,2 19,2 East and central Africa East South

To contact Solidaridad Central America go to solidaridadnetwork.org/centralamerica

Office50 and other costs The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

2011


Solidaridad West Africa Smallholder palm oil for local markets Solidaridad West Africa has strengthened relationships with private sector partners, government agencies and producer groups across the region in oil palm, cocoa, cotton and gold. A € 12 million grant from the Dutch Embassy will fund a large-scale palm-oil programme for the next four years.

South America Andes

Central America West Africa South Africa

East and c

Regional network tion with a consortium in Ghana on rural service centres will Tea Cocoa Fruit and vegetables Cotton Textiles Gold Soy Palm oil start in 2013. Via these centres farmers will be able to double The network includes companies, knowledge partners, productivity through access to improved planting material governments and CSOs. Partnerships were built with trading and fertilizers and rehabilitation services such as grafting. companies in cocoa such as Cargill, ECOM, Touton and Noble Within annual crop programmes there is training on conserResources and in palm oil with Unilever and Wilmar. Knowlvation farming and demonstration farms have been estabedge partners include the International Plant Nutrition Instilished. This will improve yields, mitigate the risk of draught tute in Kenya, which is developing protocols for best manageand erosion while maximising organic matter in the soil. ment practices for the palm-oil programme, and universities such as Wageningen on mapping the oil palm sector and Organisation Erasmus on baseline and impact assessments for gold, in collaboration with the University of Cape Coast in Ghana. The In 2012 Solidaridad West Africa doubled its turnover. With ministries of agriculture in Nigeria, Ivory Coast and Ghana are four-year funding from the Dutch Embassy in Ghana, a also involved. Key CSO partners are WWF, Conservation Alliregional sustainable oil-palm programme started, focusing ance and GIZ. on improving the productivity of small and medium-sized farmers and mills. The funding base has been diversified Market development with support from new companies, WCF and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The office has recruited experts Solidaridad engages with Unilever in a partnership to inteon commodity programme management and a communigrate smallholders in their palm oil supply chain for West cation & knowledge manager is developing a virtual knowlAfrica by guiding them to produce more sustainably. Unilever edge centre for sustainable palm-oil production and writing will provide support by integrating traceable smallholder brochures. New programmes for which proposals were palm oil from a sustainable source into their supply chain developed in 2012 include maize and soy bean for Ghana as through RSPO certification. The oil will be processed in local well as cotton programmes in Mali and Senegal. and regional factories.

Coffee

Sugar c

entral America West Africa Africa America East andWest central AfricaSouth EastAfrica South and South South America AndesSouthCentral Africa East and cE

uit and vegetables Cotton Textiles themes Gold Cross-cutting

Soy

Palm oil

Cocoa Fruit and vegetables Cotton Gold Palm oil Other

Total programme investments

3,446,000 6,000 94,000 130,000 784,000 15,000

Aquaculture Not commodity specific

Programme investments 4,475,000 HRM 469,000 Office and other costs 156,000 Actual 2012

€ 5,100,000

€ 4,475,000

Personnel Solidaridad West Africa in FTE 2010

entral America West Africa South Africa

sts

Sugar cane Livestock

programmes HRM land use Office and other costs Smart and sustainable is addressed in all programmes. In oil palm best management practice plots showcase the potential of small-scale approaches. In cocoa collabora-

2011

2012

22 32 46 East and central Africa East South and South E

To contact Solidaridad West Africa go to solidaridadnetwork.org/westafrica

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

51 51


Solidaridad Southern Africa Forming partnerships across the region

America Tea

Many key partnerships were formed in 2012 — with the private sector, other international CSOs, local CSOs, governments, universities and funding agencies. Over one hundred of these partners attended a conference in May in Pretoria exploring regional aspects of the Solidaridad theme: Making markets work Andes East and central Africa for the poor. Central America West Africa South Africa Regional network Cocoa Fruit and vegetables Cotton Textiles Solidaridad Southern Africa focuses on sugar, soy, livestock, cotton, biomass and tea. In South Africa the most important projects are in sugar, livestock, cotton and rooibos. In Mozambique, the emphasis is on cotton, soy, black tea and agroforestry, in Zambia on cotton, and in Malawi it’s on sugar, soy and black tea. Food security is a theme that cuts across all cash-crop programmes; this involves the production of staple crops such as maize and cassava, along with beans, groundnuts and soy (as a food crop). Solidaridad cooperates with a number of companies, notably with Olam and JFS (cotton and food crops), Mondelez (former Kraft) and Illovo (sugar), as well as various government entities and embassies. The regional office is expanding cooperation with regionallybased offices of international organisations such as Concern Universal, TechnoServe, WWF, and the Southern African Trust. It has partnered with local producer organisations such as NASFAM in Malawi, CAZ in Zambia and Fonpa in Mozambique and local CSOs such as Abiodes in Mozambique and Lima and the Cane Growers Association in South Africa.

creating a local-to-local market for charcoal and energy from Soy Palm oil Sugar cane Livestock biomass. The aim is to improve yields, strengthen livelihoods for smallholders and introduce improved sustainability methodologies.

Gold

E

Aqu

Cross-cutting themes Alongside initiatives to improve food security, the regional office is developing user-friendly information management and self-assessment tools. These currently focus on the sugar sector, but plans are also being made to expand this programme to cotton, soy and biomass. This work involves inter-regional cooperation with the South American office. The system is an e-tool that will improve the ability of producer associations and smallholders to implement sustainable management systems, access certification and verification schemes and thus improve market access. Organisation The Southern African regional office moved from Botswana to Pretoria in South Africa at the beginning of 2012. There are now six full-time and three part-time staff in Johannesburg and one employee in Mozambique since a sub-office was opened in Maputo. It is expected that regional capacity will expand in 2013-14 as new programmes come on line.

West Africa Africa America East andWest central AfricaSouth EastAfrica South and South East Asia America AndesSouthCentral Africa East and central AfricaChE Market development Textiles

mmesHRM

The region is involved in developing a sustainable cotton supply chain, for example by working closely with two Goldcommodity Soy Palm (Olam oil and Sugar large supply companies JSF) cane and by Livestock Office producer and otherassociations costs involving and the textile and retail sector further up the value chain. Farmers in Mozambique also receive support in producing sustainable biomass and

Tea Cotton Sugar cane Other

Total programme investments

71,000 200,000 160,000 111,000

Aquaculture Not commodity specific

Programme investments HRM Office and other costs Actual 2012

542,000 190,000 78,000 € 810,000

€ 542,000

Personnel Solidaridad Southern Africa in FTE 2010

West Africa South Africa

2012

2 9 East and central Africa East South and South East Asia

To contact Solidaridad Southern Africa go to solidaridadnetwork.org/southernafrica

52 52

2011

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

Ch


Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa from subsistence to commercial farming

des

Cocoa

A key development in 2012 was approval of funding by the Netherlands Embassy in Kenya for a Horticulture and Food Security programme in which Solidaridad is the leading organisation as part of a consortium involving Hivos and SNV. The programme takes smallholders from subsistence to commercial Central East and central Africa East South an farming.America West Africa South Africa Regional network

Fruit and vegetables Cotton Textiles Gold Soy Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa works with producer organisations, governments, civil society organisations and companies. There is collaboration with Armanjaro, Volcafe, Sucafina, ECOM, DEG and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation on coffee projects in the region. There is also collaboration with the Ethical Tea Partnership (ETP), Rainforest Alliance, the Kenya Tea Development Agency, East Africa Tea Trade Association and a partnership with Fairtrade Foundation and the Alliance for Responsible Mining on gold projects. Key success factors include contract agreements and Memorandums of Understanding at the start of projects, so that the roles and responsibilities of each partner are clear. Having a leading organisation such as Solidaridad and establishing steering committees composed of members from all partners is vital. There are regular conferences to maximise the involvement of partners and beneficiaries and the participation in regional, national and international forums. Market development

Africa. In Kenya, groups of smallholder horticulturalists now Palm oil Sugar cane Livestock Aquaculture Not comm have two new market outlets. Solidaridad helped them grow better products – and sell them in supermarkets – and has linked them to exporters, who sell their fresh produce to EU markets, especially the Netherlands. Cross-cutting themes Gender is integrated in all programmes, including training workshops for the management and staff of partners in coffee, tea and horticulture and there are projects designed to involve the younger generation in coffee production in Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. To promote climate change adaptation and mitigation there is a partnership with ETP on developing training materials for field staff and training of trainers and tea extension services assistants. A climate change symposium featured a Solidaridad study using the Cool Farm Tool to measure carbon footprint on Utz certified coffee farms and thus address adaptation and mitigation. Organisation

Africa East central East South and South East Asia China Nether A tea factory calledand Iria-iniWest in Kenya wasAfrica supported with Africa The Solidaridad Africa was established and South desSouthCentral America Africa South East andFoundation central Africa East an capacity building and branding. As a result, the factory has Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa was certified for ISO

been able to introduce a successful new product in the local 9001:2008. The co-director left and a new one was appointed. market. In coffee there was collaboration with Savannah Three new programme managers were engaged (for horticulSoy Commodities Palm oil Sugar cane Livestockconsumption Aquaculture ture, Not commodity specific Ltd in Uganda, which stimulates gold, cotton and sugar cane) and an office manager was ffice and other costs of local coffee and in South Africa with a local roaster – Bean employed. A continental board was set up. There – to promote Utz Certified coffee, which is purchased in East Africa and sold to over 30 supermarkets in South

Coffee Tea Fruit and vegetables Cotton Gold Sugar cane Other

Total programme investments

1,381,000 129,000 1,066,000 7,000 37,000 19,000 32,000 € 2,671,000

Programme investments 2,671,000 HRM 201,000 Office and other costs 86,000 Actual 2012

Personnel Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa in FTE 2010

South Africa

€ 2,958,000

2011

2012

10 9 12 East and central Africa East South and South East Asia China Nether

To contact Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa go to solidaridadnetwork.org/eastcentralafrica

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

53 53


Solidaridad South and South-East Asia Food security programme in Bangladesh

In November 2012, a grant of € 12 million was received from the Dutch Embassy in Bangladesh for the Sustainable Agriculture Food security and Linkages programme (SAFaL). This will help 200,000 smallholders in Southwest Bangladesh adopt sustainable practices in dairy farming, horticulture and Americaaquaculture, West Africa South Africa while improving food security. East and central Africa East South and South East A

vegetables Cotton

Strengthening the regional network Cross-cutting themes Textiles Gold Soy Palm oil Sugar cane Livestock Aquaculture Not commodity specific Solidaridad South and South-East Asia (SSEA) views partClassic Solidaridad themes such as smart sustainable land nerships as critical for addressing the difficult problems of use, gender and farmer training are an integral part of all poverty, environmental degradation and weak governance in programmes. Measures are being undertaken to ensure that the region. Partnerships based on equity, transparency and women are equal partners in SSEA programmes and many mutual benefit have been established in a range of agriculsmallholders across the region are women. Given the Indian tural commodities. These include a Memorandum of Undergovernment’s requirement for 5 % ethanol to be blended with standing with Hindustan Unilever Limited and IDH on creating petrol from June 2013 (requiring 1,000 million litres), making an Indian sustainable tea code and supporting 540,000 bio-based energy available is an important component of the workers and smallholders in India with sustainable farming sustainable sugar-cane programme. practices from 2012-16. There was underspending in the tea Organisational developments programme in 2012 due to delays in transferring resources and getting approval from industry stakeholders. The past year has seen rapid growth. Starting with a single Another important partnership involving International office in Delhi, eight offices are now being set up across the Finance Corporation (IFC) is helping 200,000 small-scale region. The current staff of 8 FTEs is expected to grow to 60 farmers and 14 sugar mills across India to create a sustainable FTEs by the end of 2013. To manage this evolution, a regional sugar-cane supply chain. This major programme, with $ 5.5 management committee is being set up, a new HR system, million in funding, runs from 2012 until 2016. smarter software, and PME are being introduced, and the Promis project management system is being integrated into New-market development: a shift of focus programme management. Changes are underway, driven by market players and market forces. Whereas in the past the focus was on sourcing in developing countries for markets in OECD countries, now Asia itself is the main market for most agro-commodities. Sugar cane SSEA Livestock Not commodity Solidaridad is working Aquaculture with global businesses to sustain- specific ably transform the markets for tea, cotton and garments in India as well as those for tea, cocoa and palm oil in Indonesia.

East andWest central AfricaSouth East Africa South and South East Asia Netherlands America Africa East and central AfricaChina East South and South East A

alm oil

Coffee Tea Cocoa Cotton Textiles Soy Sugar cane Other

Total programme investments

31,000 138,000 20,000 11,000 36,000 119,000 165,000 24,000 € 544,000

Programme investments HRM Office and other costs Actual 2012

2010

2011

2012

9 11 19 China Netherlands

To contact Solidaridad South and South-East Asia go to solidaridadnetwork.org/ssea

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

€ 728,000

Personnel Solidaridad South and Southeast Asia in FTE

East and central Africa East South and South East Asia

54 54

544,000 133,000 51,000


Solidaridad China Intervention starts with farmers’ ambition Solidaridad China’s approach is to convince producers to invest in sustainability by first listening to their ambition for quality improvement and market access. Such an approach meets both international requirements and farmers’ needs.

West Africa South Africa

tiles

Gold

East and central Africa East South and South East Asia

Regional network and market development Soy Palm oil Sugar cane Livestock Over the past few years, Solidaridad has set the stage for the Better Cotton (BCI) launch in China in 2012, which will lead to more large-scale BCI projects as well as spin-offs for Solidaridad. H&M is closely involved with Solidaridad’s cleaner textile production programme, which resulted in around two million metric tons of water being saved and re-used. H&M and Solidaridad are now working on targeting a further 75 factories. Solidaridad China is also building a joint task force with the Market Transformation Initiative team of WWF China to strengthen demand and mobilise support for sustainably produced products such as certified soybean, palm oil and sugar cane. In collaboration with the Chinese Tea Marketing Association, Solidaridad has been promoting the concept of responsible consumption among consumers in China. It is also working with China’s biggest online store (Alibaba) to create online sales space for sustainable products. More importantly, Solidaridad is helping WWF China to build a responsible procurement forum among China’s top ten retailers, which will not only manage supply chain risks, but also promote sustainable consumption among Chinese consumers.

efforts. Besides working with industry associations, there is a Aquaculture Not commodity specific new strategy to build partnerships with Chinese government departments with the aim of generating extra funds for innovation and technical improvements. In 2012, Solidaridad’s intervention resulted in tangible, measurable benefits for over 10,000 farmers, including tea farmers from Myanmar, who crossed the border to attend an in-depth programme in Yunnan province. Cross-cutting theme Solidaridad takes an in-depth approach to addressing farmers’ needs, while helping them meet international requirements. This approach has proven effective in winning trust from producers and is crucial to maintaining their commitment to moving towards sustainable production when there are still insufficient incentives from the market. Organisation In 2012 Solidaridad China doubled in size to eight FTEs, restructured its management system and created an independent financial management system. By the end of the year a stable management structure was in place, including the recruitment of an FSP liaison, a financial controller and a specialist in creating decent working conditions in agriculture.

central AfricaSouth EastAfrica South and South East Asia Netherlands West Africa East and central AfricaChina East South and South East Asia Partnerships

ane Livestock DueAquaculture Notscale commodity specific and market to the enormous of both production

China

China

in China, to promote sustainability in an effective way, Solidaridad mainly relies on stakeholder platforms (some of which it helped create) to build alliances and make joint

Tea Cotton Soy Total programme investments

67,000 181,000 40,000

Programme investments HRM Office and other costs Actual 2012

€ 287,000

287,000 153,000 41,000 € 481,000

Personnel Solidaridad China in FTE 2010

central Africa East South and South East Asia

2011

4 9 China Netherlands

2012

9

To contact Solidaridad China go to solidaridadnetwork.org/china

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

55 55


Solidaridad the Netherlands Campaigns raise Solidaridad’s profile

Three eye-catching campaigns have raised Solidaridad’s public profile in the Netherlands: ‘Why poverty,’ in collaboration with public broadcasting; ‘For the love of chocolate,’ with Mars; and the market launch of ‘good gold,’ in collaboration with twelve goldsmiths and jewellers. Solidaridad’s higher profile has led more uth Africaand more Eastpeople, and government central Africa East South and South EastitsAsia bodies, foundations and companies to support work. China Netherlands

Fundraising is mined and to the alternative developed by Solidaridad Sugar cane Livestock Aquaculture Not commodity specific and its partners. ‘Fairtrade and Fairmined’ (FT&FM) gold is The Solidaridad team in Utrecht shares the responsibility for now available at a growing number of retail outlets in the sourcing the funds needed for the programmes and projects Netherlands. of our partners in developing countries. In 2012, Solidaridad in the Netherlands received € 19.1 million, 26 % more than Influencing policy-makers expected. As more and more government bodies, endowments and Solidaridad advises companies on how to change their policompanies across Europe are providing support, we expect cies and make the economy more sustainable. Solidaridad strong growth in the years ahead. doesn’t act as a consultant in this respect, but as a ‘corporate challenger’. We challenge companies to be more ambitious Sustainable market development and to initiate real change. The idea is that companies become active participants and share in the costs. Solidaridad also has Solidaridad Nederland works with many companies in Europe a voice in the debate about the future of the Dutch governto make their production chains more sustainable. The ment’s development cooperation policies. In our view, aid collaboration focuses on advising producers in developing and trade are perfectly compatible, as long as the focus is on countries, on certifying products and on developing markets sustainable economic development. and consumer demand. More and more programmes are co-financed by the companies concerned, whether through organisation a direct financial contribution to Solidaridad (€ 2.9 million in 2012), or more often through direct co-financing of the In 2012, Solidaridad in the Netherlands put a lot of effort into producers’ development programmes (€ 3.3 million in 2012). improving quality management systems. The Promis management information system and the Results-Based MeasureThe Campaigns ment System have been rolled out. This has greatly increased our capacity to manage, steer, make corrections and learn. In 2012, Solidaridad conducted three campaigns in the Netherlands: the ‘Why poverty?’ and ‘For the love of chocodity specific late’ campaigns, which took our message to a total of 16 million people and the campaign for ‘Good Gold,’ which was supported by the National Postcode Lottery. This drew attention to the miserable circumstances in which gold

Soy

Palm oil

d South East East Asia andChina uth Africa central Netherlands Africa East South and South East Asia

d South East Asia

56 56

Coffee Tea Cocoa Fruit and vegetables Cotton Textiles Gold Soy Palm oil Sugar cane Livestock Other

2,152,000 576,000 1,276,000 2,000 2,871,000 1,047,000 479,000 1,401,000 1,312,000 1,351,000 900,000 2,646,000

Total programme China Netherlands investments € 16,013,000

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

China Netherlands

Programme investments 16,013,000 HRM 2,118,000 Office and other costs 1,116,000 Actual 2012

€ 19,247,000

Personnel Solidaridad the Netherlands in FTE 2010

2011

2012

20,3 27,1 30,7

To contact Solidaridad the Netherlands go to solidaridadnetwork.org/netherlands


Solidaridad North America New regional office in San Francisco As major importers of agricultural products, including significant volumes of Solidaridad’s core commodities, the US and Canadian markets are vital to achieving Solidaridad’s mission. In 2012 alone, US imports of coffee amounted to $ 8.9 billion, cocoa $ 4.1 billion, vegetable oil $ 6.4 billion, fruit $ 12.5 billion, and sugar and sugar-based products were worth $ 4.8 billion. The opportunity A rapidly growing number of North American companies are committing to sustainable supply chains. For example, Mars is committed to sourcing 100 % of its cocoa from sustainable sources by 2020, Starbucks has announced its aim to source 100 % of coffee by 2015 and Dunkin’ Donuts recently announced a commitment to buy only sustainable palm oil. An increasing number of platforms such as the Consumer Goods Forum and The Sustainability Consortium are helping to secure similar commitments from even more companies across the region. The Solidaridad Network is poised to build on this momentum. By bringing its unique international experience in developing standards, building producers’ capacity to improve their livelihoods and linking them to end markets, Solidaridad can help North American companies meet their commitments and encourage others to follow suit. It can also create new market linkages for producers across its international network. To achieve their goals, North American donors are keen to use their funds to leverage private sector finance. Solidaridad’s track record of developing public-private partnerships, through, for example, the Farmer Support Programme, can make a valuable contribution. Lastly, there is growing interest in the social entrepreneurship model in North America. Solidaridad has been at the forefront of helping farmers become better entrepreneurs and creating companies to fill gaps in sustainable value chains.

Approach The establishment of the North America office will allow Solidaridad to engage strategically with key market players across the region. In the short term, the office will focus its efforts on fundraising and identifying opportunities for market development. In the medium term, it plans to expand its aims to influence policy and raise consumer awareness with regard to sustainable consumption of Solidaridad’s ‘core’ commodities. The North America office will also support network-wide activities designed to promote sustainable land use, reduce emissions from agriculture and adapt to climate change. Organisation In the second half of 2012, the North America office appointed three board members and started supporting fundraising and market development efforts for the network. In December, Solidaridad North America became a legal entity in the US. The San Francisco-based office currently comprises one staff member, with two additional hires planned for 2013, one of whom will be located on the East Coast.

The

establishment of the North America office will allow Solidaridad to engage strategically with key market players across the region.

To contact Solidaridad North America go to solidaridadnetwork.org/northamerica

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

57 57


58

Photo: Fred Ernst The Solidaridad 2012 annual report


Governance, supervision and finance

Communication

Solidaridad reaches a broader public

Supervision, management and organisation

Full supervisory structure nearly in place Financial report Auditor’s report

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

59


Communication Solidaridad reaches a broader public Solidaridad conducts campaigns and communicates in a wider sense about sustainable economic development, in order to stimulate companies to act, to influence the public agenda and to win support from private donors.

Market development With the European markets as its home base, the Dutch regional expertise centre (REC NL) builds alliances with companies to ensure the link from supply to demand. Together with these business partners, Solidaridad cooperates on marketing and communication in order to create consumer awareness and to increase demand for sustainable products. By developing direct linkages between buyers and producers, market transformations towards sustainable change are shaped and improved. In 2012 Solidaridad initiated the GfK sustainable consumer scan to encourage our business partners to integrate sustainability in their marketing strategies. This consumer research shows that the consumer awareness of sustainable products is growing in the Netherlands. It also shows that consumers expect companies to take responsibility and communicate about the sustainability of their products in a comprehensive and credible way. Most companies find it difficult to reach consumers in this area and feel the limitations associated with a label or certification. The For the love of chocolate campaign in 2012, conducted with Mars, shows that Solidaridad can be an interesting partner for companies that wish to fulfil consumer expectations about them, becoming more transparent about their commitment to sustainable products.

Campaigns For the love of chocolate

Solidaridad and the chocolate manufacturer Mars again conducted the For the love of chocolate campaign in 2012, its third year now. Its goal is to alert a broad public in the Netherlands to the threatening scarcity of cocoa, to present sustainable cocoa farming as the only solution and to highlight the importance of the cocoa farmer in this solution. Following the design of a new web site, the campaign was relaunched in June in the Leidseplein in Amsterdam, by the well-known Dutch actress Katja Schuurman. She spoke of her love of chocolate and her worries about the possible cocoa shortage. Her words prepared the ground for activities later in the year. In October, Mars and Solidaridad opened the Netherlands’ first chocolate jewellery shop. For one day, showcases that normally display very rare and expensive jewellery were filled with chocolate jewellery. The message

60

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

was: if chocolate production does not become more sustainable, chocolate will be a precious commodity and chocolate jewellery shops will appear! Both the launch in June and the chocolate jewellery shop in October were well covered by radio, TV, newspapers, journals and the online media. In the autumn, a camera team from the National Geographic Channel, followed by a group of journalists, travelled through Ghana and made a 50-minute documentary, entitled For the love of chocolate. Katja Schuurman called on the cocoa farmers and spoke about making cocoa growing more sustainable. The documentary was first shown in the Netherlands on Sunday 2 December 2012. In the week before it was shown, all the television guides carried reports on the trip and the documentary. In these two weeks, the campaign reached 67 % of the Dutch public. Items of the For the love of chocolate campaign were shown on national radio and television programmes eight times, including Eénvandaag on 28 November (more than 1 million viewers). It was covered in about 70 articles in newspapers and journals, including the two largest Dutch newspapers, the Telegraaf and Volkskrant and all the television guides. More than 150 reports were included in online media, and the campaign was prominently featured on the largest Dutch news site, www.nu.nl. In total, the campaign, which reached 15.7 million users in the 13+ target group, had an estimated media value of more than € 1.2 million. A qualitative study of the effect of the campaign showed that people who had heard about the campaign more frequently also knew more about the threatening scarcity of cocoa. In view of Solidaridad’s limited resources, campaigns that extend over several years are necessary in order to create sufficient awareness among the Dutch public. This is a prerequisite for long-term changes in the knowledge and attitudes of the sector and the general public with regard to sustainable chocolate. Towards Good Gold In May 2012, Solidaridad launched Fairtrade&Fairmined gold in the Netherlands. At the media event, the columnist and television anchorman Jort Kelder presented the first gold jewellery with the Fairtrade & Fairmined (FT&FM) hallmark to international guests from the jewellery and gold mining sector. This is the world’s first system in the jewellery sector to certify that gold has been extracted in a fair, safe and environmentally friendly way. A Peruvian miner presented actress and television personality Katja Schuurman with the first


‘Good Gold’ bracelet with a Fairtrade hallmark. The FT&FM standard will improve the working conditions in the world’s small-scale gold mines, which employ 20 million people. Solidaridad is also working to make large-scale gold mining more sustainable. The PR value of the event to launch the FT&FM hallmark was € 2.3 million. Other smaller initiatives, with a light touch, have been taken to raise the Dutch public’s awareness of issues in the gold mining sector. These include social media activities connecting to the gold medals awarded at the Olympic Games, the Golden Calf award at the Netherlands Film Festival, and the golden Loeki award for television advertisements.

Corporate communication Why poverty?

From 25 November to 2 December 2012, the Dutch public broadcasting network (NPO) organised an anti-poverty week under the name, Hoezo Armoede (Why poverty)? It showed real initiatives that have already been taken to combat poverty and the activities of companies, governments and NGOs in Asia, Africa and South America. The Why poverty? week focused on people’s ability to lift themselves out of poverty. Solidaridad was an active participant at the launch, because we believe that a fair and sustainable economy can put an end to poverty. With just a little support, farmers who live below the poverty line can often achieve higher yields and thus increase their income. At the launch, Solidaridad gave

a presentation about the future of cane sugar, participated in a debate with other NGOs, academics and the business community, and gave the public a taste of a sustainable chocolate fountain. During the Why poverty? week, Solidaridad presented a strong profile on radio and television and in many magazines, including a two-page interview with our director Nico Roozen in all the main television guides. Web sites In 2012 Solidaridad developed a central content management system for its web sites. This simplifies the management of solidaridad.nl, opwegnaargoedgoud.nl, fortheloveofchocolate.nl and the international web site solidaridadnetwork.org. New web sites, for example for particular campaigns, can now be made and maintained more cheaply. The reach of solidaridad.nl in 2012 was stable at about 5000 unique visitors per month. During the Why poverty? week in early December it peaked at 8000 visitors in one week. Our international web site, solidaridadnetwork.org is the fastest growing site. In 2012 it received over 52,000 visitors, 81 % more than in 2011. This site is mainly intended for Solidaridad’s current and potential partners and commercial visitors. The growth in visitor numbers is partly due to the greater number of publications about our work and the use of social media. Social media Social media again grew in importance in 2012. These media are used mainly to monitor discussions in the various sectors in which Solidaridad is active, and to hear what is being said

The PR value of the launch of Fairtrade & Fairmined gold was €2.3 million.

Photo: Keke Keukelaar

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

61


Fund-raising from private donors

about Solidaridad. A growing number of fans and followers actively share Solidaridad’s postings. Twitter and Facebook are effective in motivating a broad public for campaigns and LinkedIn is becoming increasingly important as a way of contacting the donors and companies Solidaridad works with – or would like to work with.

The goal of our fund-raising is to obtain financial resources for Solidaridad’s work, in an efficient way, from a growing group of private donors in the Netherlands. Integrated multi-media PR campaigns – intended not only for fundraising but also for market development and public education – produce the best results. They contribute to awareness among donors, the business community and consumers regarding the origin of our products and how they are produced, and they publicize the work Solidaridad does with its partners.

Annual report and pamphlet The 2011 annual report was the first to cover the entire Solidaridad network. New formats, a new working method and the contributions of dozens of people from all around the world made its production a complex challenge. Nevertheless, the report scored just as well in the transparency competition as the previous report. The publication of the Solidaridad network report at the end of May was on schedule, but the Dutch version, which was published at the end of June, was clearly late. Over the year the annual report was distributed online and on paper to several thousand Solidaridad partners around the world. The corporate pamphlet developed in 2011 – with inserts for the various commodity programmes – was used in 2012 mainly at conferences and other meetings, to introduce Solidaridad to potential new partners.

Direct Mail Sending a letter with a giro payment slip is still the most efficient way for Solidaridad to obtain donations. More donors are now using online banking to contribute, but the giro payment slip is still required, to remind them to do so. In 2012, Solidaridad sent out five mailings with the following subjects and results: Subject

Publicity Solidaridad received a good amount of publicity in 2012. There were more offline publications and online publications. The latter can be expected to play an ever more important role in the media and in Solidaridad’s strategy. Many of the professional journals read by our stakeholders publish prompt online reports on developments in the market.

The bars show the number of offline publications from 2008-2012. 114 in 2012, 72 in 2011.

DM 2 Annual report

35,478

8 %

€ 83,065

DM 3 Cocoa

30,846

13 %

€ 109,295

DM 4 Sugar cane

8,635

35 %

€ 117,971

DM 5 Sugar cane

8,636

11 %

€ 25,218

€ 110,142

Number of online publications in 2012 (in weeks).

Fairtrade & Fairmined gold launch

72

114 72

2010

141

National Geographic documentary ‘For the love of chocolate’ and Why poverty week

78

30

1919

17

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

1

8 -4

-5 12

5 -4 12

2

7 2

20

-3

6 -3

3

-4 12 20

12 20

12

9

1 0 0 1 0

0

10

5 4

5 5

20

0

-3 12 20

7

-3

-2

4

3

1 1 0

12

12 20

-2

1

3

20

4

1 0

12

1

4

20

8

-2

-1

1

12

-1

2

20

12

5

1 1 0 0

20

2

5

12

-1 12

9

1

3

20

5 5

20

6 -0

-0 12

3

6 1

20

12 20

-0 12

-5 11 20

62

20

2

0 0 1 0

3

13

12

10 3 4

19

20

68

12

2009 2008

18 %

20

2011

22,059

About half of the donations from individual donors can be directly attributed to the mailings. The other half, of a total of € 937,596 in donations, came from online transfers and cannot with certainty be attributed to the mailings. Solidaridad’s working method makes the response rate very much dependent on the number of appeals posted. The higher the number, the lower the response rate is, because we post less often to incidental donors. Nevertheless, a negative trend can be seen in the response rates over the course of 2012, due in part to more difficult economic conditions. In recent years, many development organisations have found struggled to

Solidaridad’s activities in relation to fashion, soya beans and sugar cane are also receiving more attention. The media and a broad public are interested in these product groups. The focus for publicity in 2013 will be mainly on the Good Gold campaign, and the start of a new campaign on sugar cane. The Solidaridad Network’s new mission statement and vision will also be presented.

2012

Number sent Response rate Result

DM 1 Textiles

0 0


Lauren Verster opened the first ‘chocolate jewellery shop’ in the Netherlands. For one day it showed what will happen if cocoa becomes a scarce product.

Photo: Diederik van der Laan

keep their income from private donors at the same level. Unfortunately, that includes Solidaridad. Because Solidaridad has not been on the offertory schedule of the Roman Catholic Church since 2010, income from this source is declining. Yet, since many parishes continue to pass the plate for Solidaridad’s work, revenues have fallen less than was anticipated in the budget. In 2012, substantially more was received in donations from companies and organisations than in 2011, and more than was budgeted. These are mainly donations from companies and organisations that support the development of sustainable chains of production (see also the section on Supervision, management and finance). Large donations If Solidaridad receives a donation of € 300 or more, a member of Solidaridad’s staff thanks the donor personally. Solidaridad offers to send them more information or a small gift such as the Good Gold bracelet or a photo book. Responses to this personal show of gratitude have been very positive. Complaints Every complaint that Solidaridad receives is answered personally by a staff member. Depending on the subject, the response may come from someone in the secretariat, a programme officer or a communication officer. In 2012, Solidaridad received two substantive complaints as a result of the direct mail campaigns. All complaints are processed and answered in accordance with a fixed procedure. The national Postcode Lottery Since 2009, the national Postcode Lottery has made an important contribution to Solidaridad’s work every year. The Postcode Lottery also mentions our projects in its television

programmes and in national newspapers. In 2012 the Postcode Lottery increased its contributions to good causes. Solidaridad received € 1,350,000. The national Postcode Lottery provides a considerable proportion of our private income, enabling us to fund a significant number of projects. The Postcode Lottery also made an extra donation of € 1.7 million from its lottery income, enabling Solidaridad to expand its support for gold miners in Latin America to include miners in Ghana. This is an important step for the gold programme. The funding is intended for the project ‘The face of Ghana’s gold’ – a three-year programme that includes training miners in safe and efficient mining techniques and arranging certification in accordance with the Fairtrade & Fairmined standard. The Postcode Lottery and Solidaridad will highlight the project for the general public by substantially reinforcing the Towards Good Gold campaign in the years ahead. ASN Bank In 2012, the ASN Bank’s support has helped Solidaridad to initiate and continue projects in India, China and Bangladesh that contribute efficiently and effectively to better conditions in the textile and clothing industry. The aim is both better working conditions and reduced environmental impact. The relevance of these themes is clear from recent reports in the media about abuses in clothing factories. AIR MILES Solidaridad is part of the Air Miles saving programme. Supporters can choose to donate Air Miles once or structurally save Air Miles for Solidaridad. For each thousand Air Miles donated, five Euros are remitted to Solidaridad.

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63


Supervision, management and organisation Full supervisory structure nearly in place The Solidaridad Network seeks to be an effective, influential, innovative learning organisation, which can consider itself to be among the best in the field of international development cooperation. This requires checks and balances throughout the organisation. A fully operational network supervisory structure, which has been developed in recent years, will be completed by the end of 2013. delegate one member to the International Supervisory Board, which will be established in 2013. Until then, the members of the Supervisory Board of Solidaridad the Netherlands also comprise the International Supervisory Board.

Network structure Supervision

The new supervisory structure is intended to ensure that the Network is seen as a credible organisation with a transparent, responsible, cost-effective system of supervision, and one that affirms Solidaridadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vision, programme and working methods. Its fundamental principles are to ensure a high degree of autonomy for the regional expertise centres, fostering solidarity by means of world-wide strategies for each commodity sector, a professional approach to maximise the programmesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; impact, and a shared vision and mission. The International Supervisory Board (ISB) is the highest (international) level. The ISB monitors policies, the quality of programmes, financial control and the performance of the Executive Board of Directors. The ISB is guided in the performance of its task by the interests of the Solidaridad Network. Four continental supervisory boards monitor the regional programmes, the last of which, the African Supervisory Board, was set up in 2012. The continental Supervisory Boards each

Management The global executive level is formed by the meeting of the directors of the nine Solidaridad organisations that constitutes the decision-making Executive Board of Directors (EBoD). The EBoD is the policy-making body, providing policy coherence, consistency and relevance and it is also responsible for implementing policy. The chair of the EBoD is the International Executive Director. Regional execution The nine Solidaridad organisations are responsible for coordinated global programmes. Regional management is the responsibility of the individual directors, who lead their regional office and respective staff. The regional Solidaridad organisations, which are responsible for programme development, are legally clustered at the continental level, producing

Solidaridad Network Supervision

Management

International Supervisory Board

Continental Supervisory Board Solidaridad network Latin America (FSLA)

Continental Supervisory Board Solidaridad network Africa

Continental Supervisory Board Solidaridad network Asia

Executive Board Solidaridad network Executive director: Nico Roozen

Supervisory Board Solidaridad network The Netherlands

Solidaridad Network Secretariat

LATIN AMERICA

64

AFRICA

ASIA

EUROPE

Solidaridad South America

Solidaridad Andes

Solidaridad Central America

Solidaridad West Africa

Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa

Solidaridad Southern Africa

Solidaridad South and South East Asia

Solidaridad China

Solidaridad the Netherlands

Jeroen Douglas

Gonzalo la Cruz

Michaelyn Baur

Isaac Gyamfi

Karugu Macharia

Annie Sugrue

Shatadru Chattopadhayay

Martin Ma

Nico Roozen

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report


consolidated policy development and financial statements within one legal entity per continent. The continental legal entities are affiliated to the Network. This allows joint policy development and hiring and firing of directors and ensures that operations are financially autonomous. The regional Solidaridad organisations are legal branches of the continental entities, thus avoiding national board structures.

Supervision he composition of the Supervisory Board At the end of 2012, the Supervisory Board of Solidaridad the Netherlands consisted of Saskia Borgers, Ton Geurts (chairperson from July 2012), Maarten van der Graaf, Gerrit Meester, Theo Jan Simons, Marieke de Wal and Albert Jan Zonnevylle. In 2012 we said farewell to Roelf Haan, who was chairperson until July 2012, and Jan van Hoof. To guarantee the separation of functions and to prevent conflicts of interest, no close family or comparable relationships are permitted within and between the members of the Supervisory Board and the Management. The members of the Supervisory Board may not be Solidaridad employees or a board member, founder, shareholder, supervisor or employee of any organisation with which Solidaridad, in the normal course of its work, conducts any transactions that can be valued in monetary terms.

The Supervisory Board met four times in 2012. The most important topics discussed were: −− Strategy: developing a network organisation, evaluating the meetings of the Board of Directors in April and October and deciding on the annual plan for 2013. −− Finance: finalising the annual report for 2011, discussing interim figures for 2012 and setting the budget for 2013. −− Management: introducing the new Supervisory Board and exploring the possible expansion of the Supervisory Board. −− Evaluation: annual report for 2011 and discussions on the sectoral programmes for cotton, textiles, sugar and soy. The audit committee advised the Supervisory Board on the annual accounts for 2011, the budget for 2013 and investment regulations. Remuneration of the Supervisory Board In accordance with Solidaridad’s statutes, the members of the Supervisory Board of Solidaridad receive no remuneration of any kind.

Management Director Nico Roozen is the statutory Director of Solidaridad the Netherlands and Executive Director of the Solidaridad Network. He is also a member of the Supervisory Board of Utz Certified, a member of the stakeholders’ platform of the Business Social Compliance Initiative (BSCI), a member of the Taskforce on Biodiversity and Natural Resources, and he serves on the panel of the United Nations Forum on Sustainable

Members of the Supervisory Board for Solidaridad the Netherlands Saskia Borgers Member Term ends December 2014 – Environmental sociology, environmental expert – Haarlem municipality, Secretary/General Director – Chairperson of Surplus (linking primary schools in North Holland) – Member of the Arbitration Board of Bureau Integriteit Nederlandse Gemeenten Ton Geurts Chairperson Term ends December 2014 – Master of (Dutch) Law – Chief Procurement Officer for AkzoNobel Maarten van der Graaf Member Term ends December 2014 – Master of (Dutch) Law – Barrister and partner at Stek Advocaten Gerrit Meester Member Term ends December 2014 – Doctor of Agricultural Economics – Retired advisor on questions of agricultural policy to the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality – Member of the Council for the Environment and Infrastructure – Member of the Committee on Genetic Modification – Member of the Board, Centre for World Food Studies (SOW-VU) Theo Jan Simons Member Term ends December 2015 – MSc in Chemical Engineering – McKinsey Marieke de Wal Member Term ends December 2014 – MA in Philosophy – Organisational researcher and consultant – Network coordinator for the Partnerships Resource Centre / Rotterdam School of Management / Erasmus University – Senior researcher at the Netherlands School Public Administration – Member of the Supervisory Board of IKV Pax Christi Albert Jan Zonnevylle Member Term ends December 2015 – Master of (Dutch) Law – Rabobank International

Standards in Geneva. Since May 2012 he has been a member of the Supervisory Board of ASN Investment Funds N.V. and a member of the Supervisory Board of ASN Groenprojectenfonds. Until September 20, 2012, he chaired the Supervisory Board of Kuyichi International B.V. Remuneration of the Director The Supervisory Board updates it salaries policy from time to time. The most recent evaluation was in October 2012. The Dutch Wijffels Code and the VFI’s Adviesregeling Beloning Directeuren van Goede Doelen (Guidelines for the remuneration of Directors in philanthropic organisations) were taken as

The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

65


guidelines in the evaluation. The latter proposes a maximum norm for the annual income, based on certain criteria. The Supervisory Board found the Director’s position had a ‘BSD’ score of 460 points, for which the full-time maximum annual income is € 124,233. The actual annual income of the Director for 2012, before this evaluation using the VFI maximum, was € 96,459 (25 % below the maximum). The level and composition of this salary is explained below.

Remuneration of the   Director: Nico Roozen Employment contract

2012

Indefinite period Indefinite period

Hours

36

36

100

100

All of 2012

All of 2011

Percentage of full time Period

2011

Remuneration (in euros) Gross salary

82,469

80,712

End of year bonus

6,845

6,699

Holiday pay

7,145

6,993

96,459

94,404

8,216

6,934

-

-

Employer social security contribution Taxable allowances Employer pension contribution

21,408

20,211

Other benefits

-

-

Payments at termination

-

-

126,083

121,549

Total

Solidaridad provided no loans, advances or guarantees to the Director. Two thirds of this amount (€ 84,055) is borne by Solidaridad the Netherlands and one third (€ 42,028) by the Solidaridad Network.

Organisation Annual and long term planning

Solidaridad produces a long term Strategic Plan, which shows how it translates its primary goal, mission and vision into operational objectives. This plan is drawn up by the management and approved by the Supervisory Board. The annual plans are a translation of the long-term strategic plan into more specific objectives, desired results, activities and budgets. Solidaridad makes its objectives measurable using indicators, which are formulated using the SMART approach (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant and Time-bound). A context analysis and evaluation of the previous annual plan serve as guidelines in preparing the next annual plan. The heads of departments write annual reports in February. These show whether the objectives and expected results have been achieved. These reports are evaluated by the Director. Reports on fund-raising and management and the plans for these activities are also evaluated every year and approved by

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The Solidaridad 2012 annual report

the Director. Solidaridad goal is that the costs of private fundraising should be stable at 10 to 15 % of the revenues from such fund-raising. Exceptions may be made if it can be demonstrated that an investment in fundraising will be cost-effective in the long term. Solidaridad not only finances projects in developing countries – it invests in making Western markets more sustainable by influencing policy-makers and through research. Solidaridad strives to maintain a healthy relationship between its operational costs and its total costs. It has decided internally that the operational costs should not exceed 25 % of total costs. This limit has been set by analogy to the limit that the CBF applies to the costs of an organisation’s own fund-raising. Within these operating costs, Solidaridad seeks to keep the costs of management and administration as low as possible without endangering the quality of its operations. A percentage of between one per cent and two per cent of all costs is considered to be a healthy proportion. Quality management policy Solidaridad seeks to achieve a high quality on all fronts. External auditors give independent evaluations of the quality of each aspect of its operations. Solidaridad is certified under the ISO 9001:2008 norm. Internal audits and an external certificate issuing body regularly examine whether the quality management system meets requirements and whether any progress has been made. The Central Bureau on Fundraising (CBF) monitors all philanthropic bodies in the Netherlands and evaluates their management and policy, in order to increase the transparency of the charitable organisations sector. Solidaridad is entitled to use the CBF quality mark and complies with its requirements. The accountability statement presented below shows that Solidaridad upholds the principles of the CBF quality mark. The Dutch Association of Fundraising Organisations (VFI) is the umbrella organisation for philanthropic organisations that raise funds across the Netherlands. Its goal is to increase public confidence in fundraising institutions. Solidaridad upholds the principles of the VFI in relation to respect, reliability, openness and quality. Solidaridad is recognised by the Taxation Department as an institution serving the common weal, which means that donations and bequests to Solidaridad are not taxed. Donors can obtain income tax deductions for their contributions to Solidaridad. Audit of annual report and accounts External reporting takes place through the annual report and accounts. These are verified by an auditor and accompanied by an auditor’s opinion. The Supervisory Board has appointed Ernst & Young as its external auditors. This appointment is reviewed and renewed annually. The appointment covers the audit of the annual accounts and the accounts for various projects. Ernst & Young do not provide any non-auditing services. The auditor discusses his findings with the Director and Financial Controller and may also call the attention of the Supervisory Board to any points that must be addressed, or where improvements could be made.


Organisation development in progress The nine Solidaridad organisations that form the global network develop according a patern. This model of organisation development defines three stages: initial, intermediate and mature. Each organisation is scored against several indicators of progress. Most of the Solidaridad organisations now score intermediate or mature on most of the indicators. The original plan was that in 2015 all organisations would achieve the mature phase. Progress is promising and, as a result, the goal may be achieved one to two years earlier.

Solidaridad network organisation development Legally established

Governance through supervisory board

Financial ISO Management 9001:2008 certified

ROMIS Results-Based HRM quality Management Management systems Information

Fundraising capacity

Solidaridad South America Solidaridad Andes Solidaridad Central America Solidaridad West Africa Solidaridad Southern Africa Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa Solidaridad South and South-East Asia Solidaridad China Solidaridad The Netherlands Solidaridad North America Start up

Intermediate

Mature

Evaluations Employee evaluations

Once a year each employee’s direct manager invites him or her for an appraisal and performance evaluation interview. The outcome of that interview includes areas in which improvements could be made, for the employee and for the manager. The focus is on the employee’s development and ‘growth’, but it also covers the development of the position he or she occupies, and work motivation. The heads of department discuss the results of these interviews with the Director during their own appraisal and performance evaluations. The Director has an appraisal and performance evaluation interview with the Supervisory Board – or with some of its members – every six months. Evaluation of the operational structure The Management evaluates the working of the entire quality management system, including the policies and objectives, every year. In 2012 the conclusion was that the quality

Established

management policy and system are suitable and effective. The most important points that need to be addressed in the coming year are the introduction and improvement of the project management system and harmonising processes and systems in the fields of planning, monitoring and evaluation. Evaluation of the Supervisory Board The Supervisory Board is relatively new; five of the seven members were appointed in 2011 and two in 2012. During its meetings in 2012, the Supervisory Board regularly reviewed its own functioning. An evaluation is planned early in 2013. Staff and wages In 2012, Solidaridad had an average of 28.9 employees, when translated into the equivalent number of full time staff (FTEs). This figure in 2011 was 23.7. At the end of 2012, Solidaridad had 35 employees. The average gross annual salary per FTE in 2012 was € 61,700 (2011: € 63,600). The total personnel costs per FTE in 2012 were € 77,200 (2011: € 77,400). Solidaridad has its own salary structure document, which describes all staff functions and the tasks and responsibilities

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that go with them. The functions are also weighted on the basis of the following four characteristics: −− ­ knowledge and experience −− ­ independence −− ­ social skills and −− ­ risks, responsibility and influence. Solidaridad’s wages policy follows that of the Dutch government. Where necessary, management may award a labour market premium. The Director is paid according to scale 16, two staff are on scale 13, four on scale 12, eighteen on scale 11, four on scale 10, four on scale 9 and two on scale 7. The other conditions of employment are based on the Status of Employees Regulations, but legal provision always prevails over the Status of Employees Regulations.

should reflect the Dutch population in so far as this is possible. Solidaridad has 23 female and 12 male employees. Their average age is 40 years. Three employees left in 2012, and ten new employees were welcomed. The rate of absence due to sickness is low, at 0.7 % in 2012 (in 2011: 1.7 %).

Personnel policy Solidaridad is a knowledge-intensive organisation that depends on well-qualified staff. Its staff must be involved, motivated, innovative and customer-oriented. This is why Solidaridad devotes a lot of attention to recruitment and why there is ample opportunity and a budget for career development. Education and career development are discussed at every performance evaluation interview. Employees can apply to further their education, and internal courses are organised. Solidaridad also has a training plan that covers the entire organisation, which is evaluated every year. The goal of the diversity policy is that Solidaridad’s staff

Accountability statement Solidaridad presents an accountability statement, showing how it gives effect to the following principles of the CBF quality mark: 1. separation of functions between supervision, management and implementation 2. optimising effectiveness and efficiency of spending and 3. optimising relationships with interested organisations.

Environment Solidaridad minimises the impact of its work on the environment as far as possible, by reusing items, by purchasing sustainable products (office items with a green label, energy efficient equipment, green energy, organic lunches and sustainably produced coffee and tea), by separating its waste paper for recycling, and by making double-sided printing and copying the norm.

The accountability statement, which was approved by the Director and the chair of the Supervisory Board on is presented below.

The full statement can be ordered from the secretariat

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Financial report Balance sheet on 31 December 2012 (in euros and after allocation of surpluses) The complete annual accounts are available on request from the secretariat.

ASSETS

2012

Tangible fixed assets

45,327

Financial fixed assets

562,868

2011 59,195 567,525 608,195

Receivables, prepayments and accrued income Stocks and shares Cash and bank balances

1,320,485

626,720 866,925

517,544

471,843

13,616,219

9,184,323

Total assets

15,454,248

10,523,091

16,062,443

11,149,811

LIABILITIES Reserves and funds Reserves – Continuity reserve – Reserves for financing operational assets – Reserves for financing assets to meet our objectives

4,178,434

4,234,852

45,327

59,195

562,868

– 4,786,629

4,294,047

Designated funds – Designated fund for participating interests – Designated fund for Haiti

Long-term debts

567,525

682,826

720,501 682,826

1,288,026

5,469,455

5,582,073

Short-term debts

10,592,988

5,567,738

Total liabilities

16,062,443

11,149,811

General notes to the accounts

Guidelines for annual reporting The annual accounts have been drawn up in accordance with the Guideline for Fundraising Institutions (Richtlijn Fondsenwervende instellingen: Richtlijn 650), which is part of the accounting standards produced by the Dutch Accounting Standards Board (Raad voor de Jaarverslaggeving). Foreign currencies Assets and liabilities in foreign currency have been converted at the exchange rates on the balance sheet date. Items in the statement of income and expenditure have been converted to euros using the exchange rate at the time of the transaction.

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Statement of income and expenditure for 2012

(in euros) INCOME Income from own fundraising Income from the activities of third parties Government subsidies Interest and income from investments Other income Total income

Actual 2012

Budget 2012

4,144,817

3,135,000

Actual 2011 4,734,759

1,894,905

920,000

929,143

12,607,803

10,935,000

8,850,674

486,800

150,000

382,655

208,186

19,134,325

15,140,000

15,105,417

EXPENDITURE Expenditure on achieving our objectives Awareness raising Structural aid

646,116

316,000

341,336

17,885,868

14,466,600

14,018,860

18,531,984

14,782,600

14,360,196

391,425

398,000

347,391

16,835

9,400

176,216

204,000

164,752

Income generation Costs of own fundraising Costs of third-party activities Costs of obtaining government subsidies Investment costs

584,476

611,400

512,143

Management and administration Costs of management and administration

130,483

146,000

124,730

19,246,943

15,540,000

14,997,069

– 112,618

– 400,000

108,348

Continuity reserve

– 56,418

79,874

Reserves for financing operational assets

– 13,868

– 20,553

– 4,657

147,175

– 37,675

– 98,148

– 112,618

108,348

Total expenditure RESULT Allocation of surpluses

Reserves for financing assets to meet our objectives Designated fund for Haiti Result

Accounting policies for valuation and determination of the result

Tangible fixed assets The operating assets are valued at purchase price less annual straight-line depreciation based on the expected useful economic life. Purchases made in the reporting year are depreciated from the date of purchase. Financial fixed assets Advance payments and loans are valued at their nominal value, taking into account any risk that they may not be collectible. Participations that do not enable Solidaridad to exercise a significant influence on commercial and financial policies are valued at purchase price after deducting exceptional depreciations where applicable. Non-consolidated participations over which significant influence can be exercised are valued at their share in the net equity value according to the accounting policies for these annual accounts. Receivables Receivables are valued at their nominal value, taking into account any risk that they may not be collectible. Stocks and shares Investments listed on the stock exchange and other investments are valued at their market value. Realized and unrealized price gains and losses are entered into the statement of income and expenditure.

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Other assets and liabilities All other items in the balance sheet are valued at their nominal value. Income and expenditure Income is accounted for in the year to which it relates. Expenditure is determined with due regard to the accounting policies for valuation described above and is allocated to the accounting year to which it relates. Losses are accounted for in the year in which they can be anticipated. Income from inheritances is accounted for in the first year in which the size of the inheritance can be reliably established.

Analysis of the results for 2012 in comparison to 2011 and the budget for 2012

Solidaridad’s financial results for 2012 indicate a successful year. Total income was € 19,134,325 – the highest ever. Income from our own fundraising declined by € 590,000 compared to last year’s result, but was € 1,010,000 higher than budgeted, chiefly because of the increase in donations from companies and other organisations. Income from subsidies increased by € 3,757,000, as compared to 2011 and was € 1,673,000 higher than budget because of new subsidies approved in 2012. Total income in 2012 was € 4,029,000 higher than in 2011. Spending in 2012 was € 4,250,000 higher than in 2011. € 4,172,000 of this was direct spending on our objectives. All of these fluctuations led to a shortfall of € 112,618 in the statement of income and expenditure in 2012 (2011: € 108,348). € 13,868 has been drawn from reserves for financing operational assets, € 4,657 from reserves for financing assets to meet our objectives, and € 37,675 from the designated fund for Haiti. The balance to be drawn from the continuity reserves in 2012 is € 56,418. This is less than the budgeted shortfall of € 400,000. Historical summary The table below shows the financial results for the past five years (in euros). INCOME Income from own fundraising

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

4,144,817

4,734,759

4,057,959

3,734,673

4,350,492

Other income

14,989,508

10,370,658

14,782,563

11,086,303

8,261,818

Total income

19,134,325

15,105,417

18,840,522

14,820,976

12,612,310

EXPENDITURE Awareness raising

646,116

341,336

323,009

360,716

647,733

Structural aid

17,885,868

14,018,860

17,278,214

13,305,948

10,385,654

Total expenditure on objectives

18,531,984

14,360,196

17,601,223

13,666,664

11,033,387

Total costs of income generation

584,476

512,143

600,963

515,072

512,762

Management and administrative costs

130,483

124,730

164,465

149,832

145,956

19,246,943

14,997,069

18,366,651

14,331,568

11,692,105

– 112,618

108,348

473,871

489,408

920,205

Total expenditure Surplus

Policy on assets and investments Solidaridad spends € 18.5 million on financing projects. These funds come from many different sources, including government contributions as well as donations from individuals, companies and institutions. Solidaridad has an asset buffer of € 4,178,434 to cover any unexpected large fall in income. If funding is received and cannot immediately be usefully deployed in support of our objectives – since it takes time to prepare and implement projects – these funds are temporarily invested. Solidaridad’s partners, suppliers and staff need to be sure that Solidaridad will always be able to meet its liabilities and donors and other funding bodies must be confident that the money they donate to Solidaridad is in safe hands. It is therefore extremely important that Solidaridad’s assets are managed responsibly. Investment rules have been drawn up to ensure that this is the case. These rules also stipulate that Solidaridad will comply with the Guidelines on Charity Reserves prepared by the Dutch Association of Fundraising Organisations (VFI). In view of the limited volume and complexity of the portfolio, Solidaridad has decided to manage its assets internally to reduce costs. By far most of the asset buffer is invested in savings deposits with socially responsible banks, such as ASN Bank and Triodos Bank. In line with Solidaridad’s objectives, about € 0.5 million of the asset buffer is invested in funds managed by banks committed to promoting a more sustainable society. These investment funds are managed by the banks to ensure an optimum spread of risk. The historical summary on the next page shows the changes in the capital value of these investments.

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Value on January 1 Purchases Reinvested dividend Price gain/loss Value on December 31 Cash dividend received Investment costs

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

455,433

476,208

436,373

382,120

490,112

3,473

3,289

5,128

5,164

3,961

42,128

– 24,064

34,707

49,089

– 111,953

501,034

455,433

476,208

436,373

382,120

6,564

8,759

13,462

14,928

13,845

The most recent purchases were made in 2001 and no sales have been made during the past five years. Partly as a consequence of the credit crisis in the Netherlands, the fund lost nearly a quarter of its value by year-end 2008, but recovered to a certain extent in 2009 and 2010. This recovery did not continue in 2011, but resumed in 2012. The average return on investment over the past five years is about 2.8 % per year. Solidaridad’s working capital is held in savings accounts with socially responsible banks, such as ASN Bank and Triodos Bank. By designating funds as reserves, the Supervisory Board indicates how they intend to employ the resources available to them. Solidaridad has designated a continuity reserve, a reserve for financing operational assets and a reserve for financing assets to meet our objectives. The continuity reserve is intended to cover short-term risks and to ensure that Solidaridad can continue to meet its moral and other obligations. Solidaridad bases itself on the concept of sustainable relationships with its partners and with its staff. The size of the continuity reserve is determined as a trade-off between the desirability of deploying as much as possible of our resources for our objectives and the need to maintain a healthy financial basis for the future. We are guided in this decision by the Guidelines on Charity Reserves prepared by the Dutch Association of Fundraising Organisations (VFI), the association of national fundraising charities in the Netherlands. The Guidelines on Charity Reserves state that: −− a reservation of resources is desirable for the continuity of the support given to the charity’s goals; −− the continuity reserve should be no more than 1.5 times the annual costs of maintaining the operational structure. The costs for maintaining Solidaridad’s operational structure in 2012 were € 2,572,057 (2011: € 2,194,454). At the end of 2012, the continuity reserve amounted to € 4,178,434, i.e. 1.6 times the annual costs of maintaining the operational structure (2011: 1.9). In the 2013 budget approved by the Supervisory Board, these costs are € 2,795,000 and a shortfall of € 1,000,000 is therefore forecast. This shortfall will be covered from the continuity reserve, which is expected to reduce the ratio to 1.1 times the annual costs of maintaining the operational structure at the end of 2013. In view of this expected shortfall, and the expected growth of Solidaridad’s operational structure in 2013, Solidaridad considers it prudent that the continuity reserve at the end of 2012 was more than 1.5 times these costs, as recommended by the Central Bureau on Fundraising (CBF). Key figures The Dutch Central Bureau on Fundraising (CBF) considers the costs of the organisation’s own fundraising – as a percentage of the income from its own fundraising – to be an important way to evaluate whether a fundraising institution is worthy of support. This indicator shows the proportion of the proceeds from fundraising that are used to generate these funds. Solidaridad aims for a (reasonably) stable proportion of between ten and fifteen per cent, unless it can be demonstrated that an investment in fundraising will generate sufficient additional income in the future. The table below shows the income and costs and the relevant percentages for the past five years. In all cases the percentage is well below the maximum of 25 per cent set by the CBF.

Income from own fundraising Costs of own fundraising Costs as a percentage of income from own fundraising

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

4,144,817

4,734,759

4,057,959

3,734,673

4,350,492

391,425

347,391

367,001

357,039

405,930

9.4 %

7.3 %

9.0 %

9.6 %

9.3 %

The CBF recommends calculating two ratios related to spending: the ratio of spending on the organisation’s objectives to its total income, and the ratio of its spending to its total expenditure. Solidaridad strives to achieve the highest possible spending ratio without endangering the quality of implementation of the projects. The CBF has not set a minimum ratio, because this percentage depends to a great extent on the type of organisation. The table below shows the amounts Solidaridad spent on its objectives, and the resulting spending ratios, for the past five years.

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2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Amount spent directly on objectives

16,455,773

12,609,873

15,575,753

11,392,908

9,408,612

Total income

19,134,325

15,105,417

18,840,522

14,820,976

11,688,710

86.0 %

83.5 %

82.7 %

76.9 %

80.5 %

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Amount spent directly on objectives

16,455,773

12,609,873

15,575,753

11,392,908

9,408,612

Total expenditure

19,246,943

14,997,069

18,366,651

14,331,568

11,692,105

85.5 %

84.1 %

84.8 %

79.5 %

80.5 %

Spending ratio (income)

Spending ratio (expenditure)

Budget for 2013 and for future years The budget for 2013 has been drawn up in the light of the objectives and priorities set out in the Strategic Plan for 2011-2015 (and detailed in the annual plan for 2013) and the long-term budget for 2013-2017 has been modified accordingly. The 2013 budget was adopted in the meeting of the Supervisory Board held on 11 December 2012. The income and expenditure statement for this budget is summarised below (in euros). INCOME Income from own fundraising Income from third-party activities

Budget 2013

Budget 2012

2,622,000

3,135,000

1,897,000

920,000

11,328,000

10,935,000

250,000

150,000

16,097,000

15,140,000

367,000

316,000

15,938,000

14,466,600

16,305,000

14,782,600

442,000

398,000

18,000

9,400

198,000

204,000

658,000

611,400

134,000

146,000

Total expenditure

17,097,000

15,540,000

Result

– 1,000,000

– 400,000

Government subsidies Interest and income from investments Total income EXPENDITURE Expenditure on achieving our objectives Awareness raising Structural aid Costs of acquiring income Costs of own fundraising Costs of third-party activities Costs of obtaining government subsidies Costs of investments Management and administration Management and administration costs

The amounts shown in this budget for contributions from governments, companies, other organisations and charitable foundations – as well as the income from third-party activities – are based on signed donor contracts. The risk that this budget will not be achieved is limited to the extent to which these parties may not meet their contractual obligations. It is expected that supplementary commitments will be made during 2013 and that the budget will therefore be exceeded. The revenues from church collections, mailings, deceased estates and interest received are budgeted on the basis of historic values, taking current developments and trends into account. These sources of income are monitored on a monthly basis so that adjustments can be made if necessary. The expected expenditures include all expenditure relating to committed programme funding and an estimate of incidental costs. It is important that we maintain our present staff levels in the Netherlands and overseas, so that we are able to implement our innovative programme in the best way possible and make the most of the many potential sources in funding. Solidaridad has sufficient uncommitted reserves to cover the shortage budgeted for 2013.

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The current growth in income is expected to continue. Increases are expected from various sources. The additional income will be spent almost entirely on meeting our objectives. The long-term budget below shows the consequences of these expectations. INCOME Income from own fundraising

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2,622,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,500,000

Other income

13,475,000

14,000,000

15,000,000

16,000,000

16,500,000

Total income

16,097,000

17,000,000

18,000,000

19,000,000

20,000,000

367,000

370,000

375,000

400,000

450,000

Structural aid

15,938,000

15,835,000

16,820,000

17,770,000

18,695,000

Total expenditure on objectives

16,305,000

16,205,000

17,195,000

18,170,000

19,145,000

658,000

660,000

665,000

680,000

700,000

EXPENDITURE Awareness raising

Total costs of income generation Management and administration costs

134,000

135,000

140,000

150,000

155,000

Total expenditure

17,097,000

17,000,000

18,000,000

19,000,000

20,000,000

Result

– 1,000,000

Cash flow statement for 2012 (in euros) 2012

2011

Cash flow from operational activities Surplus from the statement of income and expenditure Depreciation

– 112,618

108,348

31,184

30,792

Changes in working capital: – short-term receivables

– 453,560

957,408

– short-term debts

5,025,250

– 53,362 4,490,256

1,043,186

Cash flow from investment activities Investments in tangible fixed assets Changes in financial fixed assets Changes in stocks and shares

– 17,316

– 10,239

4,657

– 147,175

– 45,701

20,575 – 58,360

– 136,839

– 45,378

4,431,896

860,969

Cash flow from financing activities Changes in long-term debts Changes in cash and bank balances Cash and bank balances Balance on 1 January Balance on 31 December Changes in cash and bank balances

9,184,323

8,323,354

13,616,219

9,184,323

4,431,896

860,969

The cash flow statement has been drawn up using the indirect method. The cash and bank balances at the end of 2012 were € 4.4 million higher than at the end of 2011. The most important change is that € 6.9 million in funding for use in 2013 was received during 2012. This is € 3.8 million more than in 2011. It is reported under short-term debts. Short-term debts also include € 1.2 million more than in 2011 to cover the final payments on contracts with our partners. Short-term receivables include € 1.0 million in the outstanding final tranche of funding for projects. This is € 350,000 more than in 2011.

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Specification and breakdown of costs by categories

The table below shows the level and composition of the costs. Objectives Expenditure Contributions to projects Communication

Structural aid

Income generation

Awareness raising

Fundraising

Third-party activities

16,012,650

Subsidies –

Investments –

Management and administration –

Total 2012

16,012,650

Budget 2012

12,435,000

Total 2011

12,439,299

443,123

219,113

662,236

370,000

363,316

1,542,728

167,178

141,911

13,865

145,127

107,462

2,118,271

2,215,000

1,738,063

105,165

11,396

9,674

945

9,893

7,326

144,399

150,000

126,591

Premises

95,271

10,325

8,764

856

8,962

6,636

130,814

162,500

166,573

Office and general

107,343

11,632

9,874

965

10,098

7,477

147,389

172,500

132,435

Staff Travel and accommodation

Depreciation

22,711

2,462

2,089

204

2,136

1,582

31,184

35,000

30,792

17,885,868

646,116

391,425

16,835

176,216

130,483

19,246,943

15,540,000

14,997,069

Explanation of cost allocation Operating costs are allocated to the various cost categories. The calculation method for 2012 is the same as that used in 2011. The job descriptions for each member of staff are used to determine which parts of their work relate to the various categories. The general overheads are then allocated using the same percentage distribution as for the staff costs. Management and administration As in 2011, the management and administration costs include the following personnel costs: Director, 0.2 FTE; secretariat, 0.25 FTE; Controller, 0.33 FTE (including the Personnel Department and internal affairs); Administrator 0.4 FTE; and the Planning, Monitoring, Evaluation officer, 0.1 FTE. Solidaridad strives to achieve the lowest possible percentage of management and administrative costs without endangering the quality of its operations. A percentage of between one and two per cent of total costs is considered to be a healthy proportion. Number of staff members During the 2012 fiscal year, the average number of staff members employed by Solidaridad – expressed as full-time equivalents (FTEs) – was 28.9 (2011: 23.7).

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Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s report

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solidaridad network We operate as a global network of regional expertise centres

Solidaridad Network International Secretariat ’t Goylaan 15 ,3525 AA Utrecht, the Netherlands Tel +31(0)30 275 94 50 info@solidaridadnetwork.org Solidaridad continental foundations Solidaridad Network Asia Hong Kong Contact via Solidaridad South and Southeast Asia Solidaridad Network Latin America (Fundación Solidaridad Latino America) Panama City, Panama Contact via Solidaridad South America Solidaridad Network Africa Nairobi, Kenya Contact via Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa

Solidaridad regional expertise centres Solidaridad South America Federico Lacroze 1820, 1er Piso Depto A y B, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, CP: 1426, Argentina Tel +54 11 47750741 Country office: • Brazil, São Paulo Contact via Solidaridad South America Solidaridad Andes Av. Roosevelt Nº 5866, Miraflores Lima 18, Perú Tel +51 1 4454242 Solidaridad Central America 15 Avenida 13-45, Zona 10, Oakland Guatemala Ciudad, Guatemala Tel +502 2366-5856 (ext. 115) Solidaridad West Africa Hse No. 40 Sir Arku Korsah Road, Airport West, Accra, Ghana Tel +233 (0)302 733129

Country offices: • Ivory Coast, Abidjan • Cameroun, Yaounde • Nigeria, Akure Contact via Solidaridad West Africa Solidaridad Southern Africa 105 Oxford Road, Saxonwold PO Box 87286, Houghton 2041 Johannesburg, South Africa Tel +27-11-7887952 Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa Kilimani Business Centre, Kirichwa Road, off Argwings Kodhek Road P.O. Box 675-0618, Ruaraka, Nairobi, Kenya Tel +254 (0) 716 666 862 Solidaridad South and SouthEast Asia 1st Floor, A-5, Shankar Garden Main Najafgarh Road, Vikas Puri New Delhi – 110018, India Tel +91 (11) 2551 5122 / 3

Country offices: • Bangladesh, Dhaka • Indonesia (in formation; foreseen for May 2013, West Java) Contact via Solidaridad South and South-East Asia Solidaridad China Room 1407, Building A, New World Plaza, Chongwen District Beijing 100062, China Tel +86 10 6708 9110 Solidaridad the Netherlands ’t Goylaan 15, 3525 AA Utrecht, the Netherlands Tel +31 (0)30 2720313 Solidaridad North America (in formation) 3180 18th Street, Suite 205 San Francisco, CA 94110, USA Tel +1 415 449 9906 Mobile +1 415-812-8012

Solidaridad China Beijing, China

Solidaridad the Netherlands Utrecht, the Netherlands Solidaridad North America San Francisco, US

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Solidaridad South and South-East Asia New Delhi, India Solidaridad Central America Guatemala Ciudad, Guatemala

Solidaridad West Africa Accra, Ghana Solidaridad Eastern and Central Africa Nairobi, Kenya

Solidaridad Andes Lima, Peru Solidaridad Southern Africa Johannesburg, South Africa Solidaridad South America Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina


Glossary

Agency NL BCI Bonsucro BSCI CIDIN CSO DEG ETP ECOM FTFM GRSB Hivos IDH OECD PROCASO REDD+ RJC RSPO RTRS SNV Utz WWF

Dutch GO working on sustainability, innovation and international business Better Cotton Initiative Global sugar-cane Roundtable Business Social Compliance Initiative Centre for International Development Issues Nijmegen Civil Society Organisation Deutsche Investitions und Entwicklungsgesellschaft Ethical Tea Partnership A global trading/processing company specialising in coffee, cotton, and cocoa Fairtrade and Fairmined gold Global Roundtable Sustainable Beef A Dutch NGO engaged in sustainability, social innovation and knowledge sharing International Sustainable Trade Initiative Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Program of Sustainable Quality (Honduras) Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation Responsible Jewellery Council gold Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil Round Table on Responsible Soy Association International NGO with an emphasis on reducing poverty From Utz Kapeh, meaning â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Good Coffeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in the Mayan language Quiche World Wildlife Fund


Photo: Piet den Blanken

Sugar-cane cutter in Nicaragua Cane cutting provides millions of people with an income. It is one of the most demanding jobs there is. Cane cutters work from dusk to dawn in air that is thick with ashes from pre-harvest burning, working in temperatures up to 40 degrees C. It is also dangerous work, and many cane cutters are trapped in a cycle of poverty and health problems for generations. People like this sugar-cane cutter form the basis of the growing global business in sugar and ethanol, a business that is diversifying into automotive fuels and plastics, as sugar cane is increasingly used to replace oil. Yet, in many countries, the valuable contribution of sugar-cane cutters is not reflected in decent working conditions and an income that can help them break the cycle of poverty. Solidaridad is working throughout South America, Africa and Asia to improve the position of sugar-cane cutters, by making them aware of their rights, building up their skills, working with their employers and governments to secure compliance with labour laws. We cooperate with well-known brands and Bonsucro, the global sugar-cane roundtable, to source responsibly. In 2013 Solidaridad will launch an international campaign to engage consumers and companies alike, encouraging them to make their contribution to changing the world of sugar cane.

You can support our work with a donation: Solidaridad â&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Goylaan 15 3525 AA Utrecht The Netherlands IBAN: NL45 RABO 0129 9111 51 BIC/SWIFT: RABONL2U

Change that matters www.solidaridadnetwork.org www.solidaridad.nl

Solidaridad the Netherlands 2012 Annual Report  

The global Solidaridad network is growing fast. More farmers, workers and miners are being supported in sustainable production, programme in...

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