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FAIRFIELD, CALIF. www.solanotempest.net

THE VOICE OF SOLANO COLLEGE

VOL. 30, NO. 4

OCT. 16 - OCT. 29, 2013

Students active in donation drives

London Rodriguez’s (left) reaction to her hair cut by Sarah Prez (right)

Andro Palting/Tempest

Annual Locks of Love drive makes the cut Rachel Sison Feature Editor rsison@solanotempest.net

On Saturday October 5, SCC’s cosmetology department held its annual Locks of Love drive. Locks of Love is a nonprofit organization that provides those under 21 who have suffered from burns,

injuries, radiation treatments, or some condition that results in permanent hair loss a custom, vacuum-fitted hairpiece made out of donated human hair. “Locks of Love is one of our passions and we try to help as best we can,” said Cheryl McDonald, a Cosmetology Instructor at Solano Community College.

Aisha B (right) and Ashley Simmons (left) prep Galen Tom for hair donation

Locks of Love began five years ago for the Cosmetology department, and was a huge success. Since then the students and staff in the department have continued the tradition. The staff mainly composed of cosmetology students, and each had their own reasons for participating in Locks 8SEE LOCKS, PAGE 4

Andro Palting/Tempest

90 students sign up for bone marrow drive John Glidden Staff Writer

Erin Marie Fritz/Tempest

The bone marrow donation booth was filled with free bracelet for the cause, Oct. 9, 2013.

shutdown could hurt SCC Vets OPINION ON 3

jglidden@solanotempest.net

Time well spent.

It only took Solano Community College cosmetology student Melissa Miller ten minutes to fill out the necessary paperwork and have the inside of her mouth swabbed four times.

Over 90 Solano Community College students participated in the two day SCC student govt. bone marrow drive held on Oct. 9 and 10 in front of the 1400 building on the main campus.

3New rugby club enters the scene SPORTS ON 7

MORE ONLINE AT WWW.SOLANOTEMPEST.NET - Check online for sports updates

In an effort to raise awareness about blood and bone cancers, the SCC student govt. worked with the Asian American Donor Program for the third time. “There is much diversity here at SCC,” Thi Li, outreach coordinator with the AADP. “It helps to get such 8SEE BONE, PAGE 5

3Solano celebrates music FEATURES ON 6 QUOTE OF THE WEEK “A true friend is someone who thinks that you are a good egg even though he knows that you are slightly cracked.” - Bernard Meltzer


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THE TEMPEST n OCT. 16 - OCT. 29, 2013

OPINION Campus Calendar Oct. 17

Oct. 25

Last day to petition for degrees/certificates for fall semester

Writing Lab 9 a.m. – 11 a.m. Noon – 3 p.m.

Oct. 18

Room 135

Typing test certification

Writing Lab

Free

Noon – 2 p.m.

Bring photo ID

Vacaville Center Room 137

2:30 p.m. Information: Pat Ceja, 707864-7258

Oct. 19

Oct. 27 Last day to drop classes with a W

Bunko Goes Pink

Oct. 28

Doors open at 1 p.m.

Writing Lab

Bunko is 2 p.m. – 6 p.m.

10 a.m. – 11 a.m.

Building 1400

Noon – 3 p.m.

Pre-sale tickets: $20, or $25 at the door

Room 135

For tickets/info: Tricia Meyer, 707-864-7197 or JJ Eaves 707-864-7000 x4400 All funds go to the National Breast Cancer Foundation

Writing Lab

Too many apples Can’t we just have one? Apple has recently released the iPhone 5s and the iPhone 5c, phones that are supposedly completely different from the other. Yet when you take a closer look the phones are identical with only a few differences.

will work continuously for 48 hours before the passcode needs to be reentered.

The first big difference is the physical aspect of both models, the 5c has a variety of colors to choose from they have the classic white and eye catching pastel colors. On the other hand, the five retains the classic choice of black and white. That isn’t a huge difference yet Apple creates the idea that having a colored version of the iPhone is something new and amazing… yeah it’s a change but it doesn’t change how the iPhone works.

An additional feature is that users can create a trusted list for their friends and families fingerprints. Both the 5c and the 5s separately have amazing features, yet Apple can’t create a phone that has the capabilities and features of both?

Then there’s the camera capabilities, in this regard yes the 5s has the 5c beat. The camera on the 5s has better lowlight performance and has an additional amber flash that allows for more color accurate photos. Finally, the biggest difference is the M7 chip by Apple and the Touch ID Sensor. The M7 chip and the Touch ID Sensor are exclusive to the 5s model. The M7 chip can tell the difference between whether the user is walking or in a car and can tell the map app to adjust accordingly. Another feature of the M7 chip is that when the phone is not in use then the chip will make the IOS lower network activity to conserve power.

By Rachel Sison Feature editor rsison@ solanotempest.net

The fact is that Apple has the capabilities but instead of making a single amazing phone they instead create separate models to make a profit. This is something they’ve done countless times when you look back to the releases of older iPhone models the first that came out was the regular iPhone, then you get the iPhone S a few months later. This is nothing more than a ploy by a big corporation to make it seem as if you need to have the latest model. An iPhone is an iPhone no matter how pretty it is.

With the Touch ID Sensor, the user will not have to repeatedly enter their passcode; rather it lets the user use their fingerprint to unlock their phone. This application

Noon – 4 p.m. Vacaville Center Room 137

Custom Word Search Puzzle

Oct. 29

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Corrections In the Oct. 2 issue of the Tempest, photos for the story “Fairfield music scene thrives at Gordon’s Music & Sound” were taken by Dimitri Dumont. In the Oct. 2 issue of the Tempest “How do you feel about the football program coming back to SCC” Campus Conversation Dena Hudson’s name was misspelled. In the article “Top ten” of the Sept. 4 issue, Phil Hustad’s name was misspelled.

blood candy Blood Candy costumesCostumes ghost Ghost Haunted House haunted house

Party Pumpkin Scared Treat Trick

party pumpkin scared treat trick


OPINION 3

THE TEMPEST n OCT. 16 - OCT. 29, 2013

Government shutdown affecting students relying on federal benefits editorial

Financial aid for veterans will likely disappear

Editorials are the opinion of The Tempest editorial board, which is comprised of six student editors. Now that Congress has failed to pass legislation approving this year’s federal spending budget, no funding will be given to the various departments and agencies that help serve the nation. For veterans at Solano College taking

advantage of government education benefits, things are looking like business as usual. This is because the Department of Veterans affairs is using internal funding, however they admit they only have enough to continue operations until the end of October. “The current government shutdown issues will not affect the Veterans Department until Nov 1. If there is no

resolution to the issue by then the Veterans will not receive their GI bill payment. This may result in them not being able to have their tuition paid for” Said Amy Utt, coordinator for SCC’s VA office. The withholding of these benefits is likely to exacerbate the issues that a large number of American veterans have against the way they are treated and provided for by their country.

The VA has posted a “field Guide to Government Shutdown” on their webpage to help veterans who may need help keeping their financial status in order through the indefinite freeze of the federal administration. Regarding the entire community of Solano College, no one is outside the influence of this bureaucratic mess. A large portion of Solano’s enrollment is based on these education benefits, and if enrollment drops, so will everything else (except maybe the cost of tuition). That means less classes, less instructors, and less degrees.

Government shutdown makes the U.S. look amateur As you’ve probably heard, the United States federal government entered a government shutdown after Congress failed to pass a budget for the 2014 fiscal year. As a result, many nonessential government workers have been furloughed, or forced into temporary leave without pay until further notice. On top of that, a bill approving a new debt ceiling must be passed or else the US will default on its debt. It all started after republicans passed a bill to defund the new Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Ten days before the shutdown, The Washington Post quoted democrat leader Nancy Pelosi saying to the republican party, “Either you don’t know what you’re doing or this is one of the most intentional acts of brutality you’ve cooked up. “The whole idea of the government shutting down is

to the bias of different news agencies.

a stark revelation that bipartisan politics are leading our country into nothing. Congress has become a debate over who is to blame for our problems, rather than how to fix them. The political split is even beginning to reflect in our media. On October 7, Capital Public Radio’s Beth By Jason Ruyak spoke with Dr. Andy Jones Coleman of UC Davis on whether or not it is Staff Writer possible to write an objective story jcoleman@ on the government shutdown. Jones solanotempest.net called recent news coverage of the shutdown as “histrionic,” referring

On the 14th day of the shutdown, the U.S. senate and house continued to scramble to find a way to impede a possible government default if the national debt ceiling cannot be raised by October 17. The U.S. failing to fund its federal debt would cause devastating effects in our economy that would ripple out into the rest of the world. Christine Lagarde, Managing Director at the International Monetary Fund told NBC in an interview, “If there is that degree of disruption, that lack of certainty, that lack of trust in the U.S. signature, it would mean massive disruption the world over and we would be at risk of tipping yet again into recession.”

campus conversation reporting & photos: Dagmar Kuta

What do you think about the government shutdown?

“I think the government has a job to do, and when it’s shutdown, it’s not happening. It hasn’t affected me, so I haven’t spent too much time thinking about it.” -Annie Carsen Second Semester/Undeclared

The Tempest is published by Solano College students. Opinions expressed in the paper are those of the individual writers and artists, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the college’s governing board, the administration, the faculty and staff, or the Associated Students of Solano College. Readers may take up to five copies of The Tempest free. Additional copies may be purchased for 25 cents. Member: California College Media Association • Journalism Association of Community Colleges • California Newspaper Publishers Association • Associated Collegiate Press

“I think it’s wrong, even though the police and fireman and essentials are still in service, everything else is shutdown, and it’s effecting more than just us: it’s affecting everybody.” -Christian Pitayo First semester/Biotechnology

“I think that some people in the Senate need to only stay in for one term. We need some new people in there.” -Daniel Knight First Semester/Fire Protection

“I’m concerned because I don’t know what the government is doing with all the information just sitting there, and knowing there are hackers out there makes me uncomfortable.” -Jazz Norona Third Semester/Nutrition

TEMPEST

THE

THE VOICE OF SOLANO COLLEGE

Christine Butler editor-in-chief

staff writers: Jason Coleman John Glidden Ben Gogna Dagmar Kuta Carlo Marzan Ruben Rangel copy editor: John Glidden circulation manager: Carlo Marzan

news editor: Paul Quiroga opinion editor: Mitchel Bobo sports editor: Christine Butler

staff photographers: Erin Marie Fritz Ben Gogna Andro Palting Steve Reczkowski *

*

*

features editor: Rachel Sison online editor: Deborah Graham photo editor: Dagmar Kuta

faculty adviser: Samanda Dorger

“It’s unfortunate, however, it hasn’t affected me personally. The government just needs a reboot.” -Jonathon Beserra First Semester/ Computer Science

contact us: It is Tempest policy to correct any errors in the paper. Please contact us if you spot one. To get in touch with us: phone: (707) 864-7000, ext. 4361 email: tempest@solano.edu postal address: SCC, Room 1861 4000 Suisun Valley Road, Fairfield, California 94534


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THE TEMPEST

THE TEMPEST n OCT. 16 - OCT. 29, 2013

Cosmetology cuts hair for cancer

Madison Malicki’s (right) hair cut by Samantha Cancel (left)

Andro Palting/Tempest

7 LOCKS, FROM PAGE 1

of Love. “It’s a great organization helping young people still look beautiful while they fight their battles with cancer,” said Samantha Cancel a cosmetology student at SCC and first time participant for the Locks of Love event. “I know a lot of people who have struggled with cancer. Currently my father has been diagnosed with skin cancer and I wanted to do as much support as I can. I have short hair so I can‘t donate my hair so why not help other people donate?” “I Love it, I think it’s a really great cause,” said Sarah Perez President of the Cosmetology Club. “I think the fact that so many people want to come in and do it and they

“Mainly I want to help out

“Mainly I want to help out for those who can’t grow hair, and who have lost their hair for those who can’t grow to cancer treatment” Reanne hair, and who have lost theirColado, a student at Solano who was the first to come in hair to cancer treatment” and donate her hair. “It hits home because my mom is ac-Reanne Colado tually batting cancer herself.”

just don’t have the ability to do it themselves, I mean they can come to us and we’re like the tool that gets them to help other people, so I love being a part of that.” Locks of love takes donations of 6 inches to 10 inches of hair and also accepts money donations in exchange for regular haircuts. The 6 inches cannot be used to make a wig so it is instead sold and the proceeds will go to cancer research.

“To help out somebody else; I’m always into that whether its charities or donations. I think it’s unique to donate your hair, something that’s apart of you versus just money, not that it’s a bad thing. But you’re really donating something that’s a part of you, that I’ve grown to help somebody else that’s going through a rough time,” Galen Tom staff at SCC and who has donated hair to Locks of Love several times.

from a little girl, London Rodriguez, who came in to donate her hair after her mother explained what Lock of Love does. “She has been avoiding getting a haircut but she wanted to give her hair to someone, another little girl who lost it. She has a schoolmate who just recently got cancer so they’ve been learning a lot about that,” Said Heather Rodriguez London’s Mother. “I’m so proud of her.” The cosmetology department takes donations all year round and they usually hold a large event during the second weekend of October for people of all ages.

The most amazing donation came

ASSC discovers fake Solano college website Student government may seek legal action Paul Quiroga News Editor

tion of Solano’s name and confidential images according to Baig.

pquiroga@solanotempest.net

The Solano College student government stumbled upon a webpage three weeks ago that may be promoting fictitious student discounts and displaying an unauthorized image of a student ID, according to Jose Ballesteros. Studentdiscountprogram.com was discovered by SCC student govt. Governing Board Representative Naser Baig who brought it to the attention of the student govt. The website lists false information, unauthorized promo-

After discussion, the student senate determined to take action toward the owners of the website. During the Oct. 8 meeting of the student govt., ASSC advisor Jose Ballesteros said he had contacted the owners of the site, Jenkins Interactive Advertising, and asked them to cease the illegal postings, which Jenkins Interactive agreed to. But the website is still active, and has yet to comply with the wishes of the student government.

The student government discussed that If Jenkins Interactive does not take initiative to resolve the issue Solano College will be inclined to take legal action against them, and possibly seek reimbursement for any advertising profits reaped by the advertising firm. During discussion of this webpage, Ballesteros admitted Solano College could use more promotion of student discounts and suggested seeking the same format as Jenkins Interactive. Current valid student ID discounts include local museums, aquariums, theme parks, and select movie theaters.


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THE TEMPEST

THE TEMPEST n OCT. 16 - OCT. 29, 2013

SCC raises blood and bone cancer awareness

Erin Marie Fritz/ Tempest

Nick Cunze wipes the inside of his mouth with a cotton swab for sample during the bone marrow screening on campus outside the 1400 building. Oct. 9, 2013 7 BONE, FROM PAGE 1

samples from diverse ethnicities and races.” In the previous two bone marrow drives, over 200 SCC students signed up with two being possible donors, Li said. “Thi (Li) approached us (SCC student govt.) about helping SCC student Kyle Lu who was battling with leukemia,” Naser Baig, ASSC student govt. governing board representative said. A bone marrow match for Lu was not found during the inaugural bone marrow drive held in November 2012. Lu died in January of this year. A picture of Lu was placed on the outreach table, serving as a reminder of why the AADP was on campus.

For Miller the decision to participate in the bone marrow drive was easy. “It was really easy,” Miller said on the first day of the drive. “Just a little paperwork and the swabs.” Miller also said that the decision to participate in the drive was due to her military background, which she signed up for to help people. Both Baig and Li hope that the SCC student govt. will host another bone marrow drive next semester. “I hope the ASSC (student govt.) makes it a tradition,” Baig said. “There is a great legacy of helping at Solano,” Li said.

Project rebound:SCC considers educational rehabilitation for ex-cons Deborah Graham Online Editor

“We are here to support all members

pquiroga@solanotempest.net

of our community. What better way to

James Garner never believed he would become a college graduate. He has survived 10 gunshot attempts and struggled for years with alcohol and drug abuse. He attended Solano Community College in the early 80’s. He started hanging out with the wrong crowd and found himself doing 10 years in state prison for felony drug charges.

help integrate people who have come out

“When I got out of prison in 1995, I didn’t realize how hard it was to get back in society,” Garner said. “I moved to New York and felt I had better opportunities there, but I couldn’t find a job or get into any colleges because of my background.” Garner’s story is just one of many who find themselves after leaving the penal system with no type of support or dreams of total rehabilitation. In 1967 John Keith Irwin (an ex-convict) founded Project Rebound at San Francisco State University. The rebound program supports former prisoners on their journey to successful integration in a college setting. President, Jowel Laguerre, in a recent newsletter indicated interest in having similar programs at SCC. “I had a good visit with Dr. Kenya Williams, associate superintendent of the state prisons. We discussed ways Solano Community College could provide educational opportunities for prisoners,” Laguerre’s newsletter said.

of the penal institutions then to begin them with a successful academic life?” -Quentin Carter Quentin Carter, a user services librarian at Solano Community College says he would also like to see similar programs at SCC. “We are a community college,” Carter said. “We are here to support all members of our community. What better way to help integrate people who have come out of the penal institutions then to begin them with a successful academic life?” Carter said. San Francisco State University is currently the only college in the country to successfully integrate prisoners on their journey through college settings through their “Project Rebound Program.” The program uses a multitude of vocational resources to help prisoners assimilate back into their communities and academic success. Garner, who recently moved back to the San Francisco Bay area, says he has completed all his requirements to enter into SFSU and will attend spring of next year.

I had no hope. I think every college and university should have something in place for people who have made mistakes in life but have paid their debt to society,” Garner said. Earl Taylor, the president of the African-American Male Scholars club at SCC, also knows the struggles that Garner refers to, as he also spent some time behind bars. Taylor says he is grateful there are programs like Project Rebound at SF State, where he hopes to transfer after getting his degree at SCC. “I truly embrace the theme ‘Education not incarceration,’” Taylor said. “After going through the prison system, education has helped reinvent my life. Prison is no place to be,” Taylor said. For more information on Project Rebound you can contact director Jason Bell at 415-4050594 or jbell@asi.sfsu.edu

“This program has been the ultimate blessing for me. My family abandoned me and I felt

New recycling program reinvigorates campus efforts to go green Ruben Rangel Staff Writer rrangel@solanotempest.net

After three years of effort, Solano Community College is finally getting indoor recycling bins. Thanks to a grant from Coca Cola, SCC is gaining momentum in its current attempt to ensure the campus is maximizing recycling and minimizing waste. The grant, entitled The Pilot Program by those involved, consists of 100 recycling bins which cost $50 each. “There is currently a 50 to 1 ratio of trash cans to recycling bins on campus,” said

Sandra Diehl, a horticulture professor and chairwoman of the college’s Sustainability Advisory Committee. “The state says we have to reduce our trash and increase our recycling by 50 to 70 percent by 2020.” “The Pilot Program intends to get recycling bins into classrooms and to reduce trash cans on campus,” said SCC Recycling Club president and student Jenny McCarthy. “Its main focus is promoting recycling on campus.” The objective of creating an environment friendly campus solidified once SCC president Jowel Laguerre committed the college to a nationwide effort to address climate disruption.“Which means, as an education-

al institution, SCC is going to do our best to reduce waste and energy,” Diehl said. Although the two committees are signs of a concentrated effort by school staff and management, both Diehl and McCarthy agree that those who have the greatest impact and responsibility on campus are the students. “It needs to be more student-led as opposed to administration-led,” Diehl said. “The more student-led, the greater force we can be.” “I personally make an effort to recycle but only became aware of the recycling club through a teacher,” said Jared Shibuya, a

biotechnology major, “but it seems many students on campus are unaware- I’ve even seen students throw trash in recycling bins. The more bins on campus the better, it’ll help people recycle more often.” The student-led and organized Recycling Club, however, is currently suffering from a lack of members that McCarthy says is a result of students on campus being unaware of the club’s goals and only aware of the work that is involved in providing a cleaner, greener campus. For more information on how to help SCC in its efforts to go green contact the Recycling Club at SCC_Recycle@gmail. com


6

THE TEMPEST n OCT. 16 - OCT. 29, 2013

FEATURES SCC music department celebrates culture in first fall concert Carlo Marzan Staff Writer cmarzan@solanotempest.net

Solano Community College music department performed its first concert of the fall semester Wednesday, Oct. 9 entitled “Folksongs from Near and Far.” Directed and conducted by Kristy Juliano, the concert consisted of various folk songs, both of American and other cultural traditions. The likes of Jamaican, Serbian, Canadian, Aruban, Native American and Haitian traditional songs were on display along with a wide range of the concert members wearing their own culture’s traditional clothing. “It was definitely marvelous to see with the mixture of a lot of cultures, both Americans and abroad,” said SCC Superintendent/ President Jowel Laguerre.“To see the students singing in different languages was also something beautiful because sometimes we tend to think that Americans don’t enjoy other languages and this is one example where language is important and also beautiful.” The American folk songs consisted of “Fiddle-I-Fee,” an extension of the song “Old McDonald had a Farm,” and “When I’m Gone” by Anna Kendrick from the movie “Pitch Perfect,” all of which gave both the choir and the audience a fun and amusing time both listening and singing them. “I was so impressed with their spirit about it because this is really early in the

semester and it’s hard to get a new choir, a new group of people to come together as a bonded unit,” Juliano said. “It was playful; they got to wear cultural, folky, ethnic clothes that kind of brought the spirit about it, too, which made it interesting for the audience and themselves as well,” Juliano said. The Jazz choir (Jazz on the Vox) consisted of Sarina Caragan, Melissa Cancio, Micalia Moten, Kevin Redrico, Andrew Kahrimanian and Michael Stone; all of which are graduating students from St. Patrick St. Vincent High School, the same high school Juliano had previously taught at. “I trained them, so it’s great having them come back,” Juliano said. “All of them are such good musicians and they know what I expect. I’m proud and impressed by them always.” “I felt exhilarating and amazingly titillating,” said bass singer Stone after the performance. “Ms. Juliano is a great teacher for Solano Community College,” Redrico said. “Every year her concerts just get better and better and we all look forward to being in her groups in the future.” The next concert featuring Chamber Choir, Collegiate Chorale, and Jazz on the Vox will be Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m. at the SCC theatre entitled “Songs of Winter.”

USF, JUST CLOSER.

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Album review

“AHJ” adds nothing new Mitchel Bobo Opinion Editor

• Small Classes • Outstanding faculty with academic and real-world expertise • Degree options in Communication, Psychology, and Management

mbobo@solanotempest.net

Albert Hammond Jr.’s new EP, “AHJ,” is an exercise in the familiar. While the featured tracks’ stripped down production bares a resemblance to the songwriter’s first two solo albums, it simultaneously is akin to his work with The Strokes. Their most recent LP “Comedown Machine,” seems to have influenced these recordings as well. The album finds the guitarist turned songsmith achieving new heights in the vocal department yet the lyrics seem thrown together and forgettable hindering some of the well-constructed melodies. Highlights include the guitarists angular riffing and penchant for pretty melodies, but the songs crave the emphatic hooks which have made The Strokes’ records tick. Hammond has undoubtedly been influenced by his bandmates, especially Julian Casablancas.

SAME

• Financial aid and scholarships available • Classes start in January and August

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Source: Cult Records.com

AHJ lacks bite.

Hammond recorded the album in Casablancas’ Cult Records studio in New York, and at times it seems he is attempting to impersonate his bandmate. Carnal Cruise –the album’s third track, sounds like a song that would have been featured on Casablancas’ 2009 solo effort, Phrazes For The Young.

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SPORTS 7

THE TEMPEST n OCT 16 - OCT 30, 2011

Intense playing yields tie for women’s soccer Dagmar Kuta Staff writer/photographer

and a free kick being given to the Falcons.

dkuta@solanotempest.net

Despite a disappointing start to the game, the Falcons soccer team came back from behind and tied up the game on Oct. 10, which ended in a 1-1 score against the Mendocino Eagles.

After a foul, arguably of yellowcard nature, was dismissed by the referee, rowdy spectators hollered at the official, asking if he even knew the game.

Facing the sun, the Falcons started with the ball, with forward Harmonie Carranza crossing the ball to forward Angie Dooley.

Immediately after, Eagles player Maci Feliz took a long, powerful shot towards the top of the goal, which goalkeeper Danelle Hendershot reached for and tipped into the goal.

In a game littered with minor fouls, the first was in the Falcons favor, with midfielder Tia Rowley being knocked to the ground,

In the 28 minute of the first half, the Falcons gained a shot on goal, when forward Crystal Thompson Andreas crossed the

ball to forward Megan Welsh, who took a quick shot, only to be nudged out of the goal’s path by defensive players on Mendocino’s team. A nervous crowd later watched as the Falcons relinquished a free kick near the goal box to the Eagles, who were blocked by heavy defensive strategies. No goal was made. In the 29 minute of the game, forward Welsh knocked the ball into the net from a corner kick placed by defender Bryce Branagan-Franco , an act met with uproarious cheers by the sidelines.

Several injuries were sustained by both teams, the majority of which occurred in the final minutes of the first half, when tensions were running high due to the tied score. The second half of the game consisted of several shots on goal by both teams, with none being turned into points. On a breakaway run, forward Dooley used stealthy tricks to fool the opposing defense, and subsequently took a shot from right field across towards the goal, which passed directly over the left upper corner of the goal.

Falcons’ goalkeeper Hendershot took a direct shot close to the ground, punching it out of harm’s way to defender Branagan-Franco, who cleared the ball further. In the final minutes of the game, forward Dooley fouled forward Adriana Borjon on the opposing team, and received a yellow card from the officials. Cheers were heard by neither team as the exhausted players retreated from the field, as an additional tied score was marked down on each record.

SPORTS CALENDAR Fri. Oct. 18, 2013 3:30 p.m. Women’s Soccer vs Contra Costa College 6 p.m. Volleyball vs Mendocino College

Falcon forward/midfielder Megan Welsh goes head to head against Mendocino’s goalkeeper and misses her chance at scoring, Oct. 11, 2013. Friday’s home game ended in a tie 1-1.

Tues. Oct. 22, 2013 3:30 p.m. Women’s Soccer @ Napa Valley College

Steve Reczkowski/Tempest

Solano tackles rugby with new club Carlo Marzan Staff writer

continue their education at Solano Community College.

cmarzan@solanotempest.net

Rugby is a tough and intense sport that some people may be scared to partake in, but Solano Community College isn’t. A new rugby team is in the works at Solano Community College. Founding board member and Coach Rick Flyn, advisor Alison Aubart, and Solano Rugby President Wolfy Riedel are working with Dixon rugby coach Rob Salaber to bring this sport to Solano. We’ve planned on starting this about two months ago” Riedel said. Both Flyn and Aubart feel this new sports club gives great opportunity to many students to pursue something new while continuing their education here at SCC. With a lack of a football team, the new rugby team can be seen as an alternative sport for former football players looking to stay in shape and can very well be a new source of school spirit for the Solano Falcon’s. With the sport of rugby’s growing popularity worldwide, Flyn wants to put an emphasis on recruiting members to teach them about this complex sport. “You need no experience to play, in fact we encourage all former athletes -football players, lacrosse players, soccer players- anybody who has ability or interest in playing the game” said Flyn. Alongside giving athletes the opportunity to continue in sports, Aubart said it also gives them the equal opportunity to

“Dixon won the national championship in high school rugby two years ago” said Aubart. “so you had all these kids that were nationally ranked kids going off graduating and Salaber couldn’t really offer them anything” “Now what he is doing is he’s going to send these kids to Solano to continue their rugby as well as be able to get their education, so it’s kind of a win-win.” Members of the rugby sports club must be enrolled in at least one class at Solano Community College. The first meeting will be Oct. 23 at 8 p.m. at SCC’s Vacaville campus. Flyn said this first year they plan on being a provisional team for division two rugby, meaning there won’t be any kind of conference games in terms of wins or loses, but rather games Flyn liked to call “friendly’s” with other community colleges. will begin in with a mini camp in November and December in conjunction with Dixon’s rugby team. If the team is viable and has a sustainable number of members its first provisional year, Flyn said they will apply for membership for division two rugby for the next year. For more information to join, contact Flyn at ricker1512@yahoo.com, Aubart at Alison.aubart@solano.edu, Riedel at wolf.riedel@gmail.com, or Mike Dazo at M.Dazo@yahoo.com.

Wed. Oct. 23, 2013 6 p.m. Volleyball @ College of Marin

Fri. Oct. 25, 2013 3:30 p.m. Women’s Soccer vs College of Marin 6 p.m. Volleyball @ Napa Valley College Tues. Oct. 29, 2013 3:30 p.m. Women’s Soccer vs College of Marin


8

THE TEMPEST n OCT. 16 - OCT. 29, 2013

SPORTS

Crystal Thompson Andreas decided to tryout at the last minute Ben Gogna Staff writer/photographer

bgogna@solanotempest.net

Crystal Thompson Andreas currently plays for the Solano Falcons under head-coach, Jeff Cardinal and assistant coach, Joe Coller. She attended Vintage High School in Napa, California, graduating in 2012, and although she initially wasn’t going to try out for the high school girls’ soccer team, she had played soccer since she was six years old. “I’ve been playing soccer since I was six (years old),” Andreas said. Andreas is a center-midfielder/ forward for the Solano Falcons. She previously played for Huntington University, Indiana in the fall, 2012. When Andreas was in middle school and played soccer, she reached a period of time where she didn’t want to play for her coach. “I played basketball in high school, because basketball was something I really loved to do ever since I was a kid,” Andreas said. “A few of my teammates and a lot of my friends, from high school, knew I played soccer in the past and tried to get me to play for high school, but it wasn’t something I wanted to do.” Ben Gogna/Tempest

Andreas said in a last minute Crystal Thompson Andreas is a center-midfielder/forward for decision, after basketball was over, the Solano Falcons women’s soccer team. she decided to step on the field and tryout.

“I did good, I had the stomach flu so I didn’t tryout for varsity, but the coach moved me up,” Andreas said. “As a freshman, I was playing on varsity.”

In Andreas’s senior year, she led the team to the school’s first Monticello Empire League championship game in 2012, playing soccer for Vintage. The team went 14-3-2 overall, 11-2-2 MEL. “That’s kind of making me see whether or not I would like to have a career geared towards that kind of thing,” Andreas said when she talked about her political science course. “Right now I am majoring in Kinesiology and I am taking organic chemistry. “I really like English II,” said Andreas.

need to work on, technical stuff, everything else will just fall into place.” “Both of my parents are from Africa. My dad is from Ethiopia, which is in East Africa and my mom is from Ghana, which is in West Africa, said Andreas,” said Andreas. Andreas was born in San Francisco, which is where her parents met. “My teammates are pretty cool, they like soccer,” Andreas said. “We’ve had two bonding’s in the past, but it’s been a while. I think it’s time for another one.” Andreas said that if the team continues to listen to Joe, she thinks they’ll succeed.

“My goal is to get my four-year by the time I am 21,” Andreas said, followed by, “I know I will be going to school after that, I know that for a fact; my parents will push me. Honestly, it all depends on what I make out of it this year, my future is in my hands, as well as gods because; he determines my destiny,” Andreas said. “I do believe, wherever I end up, god has a plan for me. I don’t have a legit plan cause, anything can happen.”

“The team’s goal is to go to the playoffs. There is only so much a coach can do, that is up to the players,” said Andreas. “Joe tries to help us day in and day out.”

“I actually like playing for Jeff Cardinal,” Andreas said. “He has opened my mind to some new strategies, along with Joe. Joe helps us with our formations and drills and technical everything.” Andreas said, “That’s what we

Andreas is #10 for the Falcons. The team will be playing at home on October 18th, Oct. 29th and November 1st, before the playoffs start. Go check her out along with the rest of the lady falcons volleyball team.

Andreas has a religious background. “God is something that is really important in my life,” Andreas said. “That’s why I wanted to go to a private school.” “It was very helpful in that, it helped me see things differently through a religious point of view.”

Solano’s women’s volleyball thinks pink Carlo Marzan Staff writer cmarzan@solanotempest.net

In the spirit of Breast Cancer Awareness month, the Solano Falcons women’s volleyball team wore a uniform in support of Breast Cancer Awareness, rocking pink t-shirts and pink socks against Los Medanos College on Wednesday, Oct. 9. Solano won the match against the Los Medanos Mustangs, winning the sets 3-0; 25-13, 25-10, and 25-14. Both teams had a tough time getting over the net, mostly on the serves, with Los Medanos giving up a majority of their points due to this. As soon as Solano got their groove going, they were able to get plays into action. Where the Mustangs lacked in commu-

nication, the Falcons excelled, executing their game plan and getting the victory over Los Medanos. Gabrielle Silva totaled nine kills; Keanna Layug had 12 digs, Selina Castro with 14 assists and implementation of tip balls from Danielle Thelen helped pushed their victory. “I’m not a very tall hitter, so I do what I can to help the team,” Thelen said. “Moving the ball around definitely helped because our other hitters were just pounding the ball, so it was good to mix it up with a tip,” Thelen said. “Sometimes I didn’t even think I could get them,” said Castro in response to the Mustangs’ hard hitters. “I think getting it up, just a little, my team was able to get

there and get the points,” Castro said. “I feel we played consistent and solid from the beginning to end and that’s kind of been one of our goals,” said coach Darla Williams. “We haven’t quite been challenged yet; we’ve only played three games [in a match], and no one has pushed us to four or five yet,” said Williams. Solano women’s volleyball will have their next home game on Friday Oct. 18 against Mendocino College. Their game in support for Breast Cancer Awareness, Dig for Pink, is Oct. 30 against Yuba College where the money made from the entry or any other donations on that day will go towards Breast Cancer Awareness.

Erin Marie Fritz/Tempest

Alexis Myers practicing bumps before Wednesday’s home game with team member Brittany Smith behind her. The Falcons are wearing “Dig for the Cure” shirts supporting Breast Cancer Awareness Month throughout October, Oct. 9.


Solano Tempest  

Oct. 16, 2013 - Oct. 29 2013

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