Page 1

The Sodbury Vale Benefice Chipping Sodbury, Old Sodbury, Horton & Little Sodbury

O U T LO O K

magazine

www.svbcofe.org.uk

1 Jane is enrolled as a Companion of the Society of St Francis by Brother Damian. See 1

September 2015


Nominated Person:

Contacts Rector

Mrs Hilary Holder 01454 327118 This is the person to contact if you wish to express concern about suspected abuse of a child or vulnerable adult

VACANT

Associate Priest

Churchwardens

The Revd. Yvonne Brae, 01454 850682, Mob. 07908 513098 [Day off Monday]

Chipping Sodbury

email yvonne@svbcofe.org.uk

Joy Gibson 01454 319288 Jane Jones-Williams 01454 324970

Assistant Curate The Revd. Peter Fewings, 07795 206590, email peter@svbcofe.org.uk

Reader (Licensed Lay Minister) Mr Ian Yemm 07514 139825; 01454 318608 [Day off Saturday] email ian@svbcofe.org.uk

Old Sodbury Karen Hunter 01454 319903

If you would like to know more about the Christian faith or are thinking about baptism or confirmation please speak with the ministers

Little Sodbury Brenda Cordy 01454 316447

Director of Music VACANT

Horton

Tina Hildick-Smith 01454 320380 Richard Needs 01454 329890

Church Office Open during school term time Mon - Tue - Thu mornings 9.00 - 12.00 Administrator: 01454 325160 Michelle Jenkins - Mon, Tue & Thu AM

This magazine is brought to you Free by the four churches of the Sodbury Vale Benefice. If you would like to make a small donation towards production costs that would be most welcome. Thank you.

email: office@svbcofe.org.uk Web Site: www.svbcofe.org.uk

Oct Deadline

Advertising:

Can you have all copy to Michelle in the Church Office by Sep 11th at the latest please.

Sylvia Franklin 07788 111726

Editor: Michael Stephenson 01454 314094 email outlook@svbcofe.org.uk

Front Cover-Westonbirt Photo by Linda Hurst 2


Analysis of official aid statistics shows that four out of five countries listed on a global human rights watch list, charting attacks or official suppression against Christians, receive money from the overseas development budget or through other official agencies. David Cameron said last year that Christianity is now the “most persecuted religion around the world” and said Britain should be “unashamed” in standing up for religious freedom. Somalia, which ranks second only to North Korea on the Watch list, received £107.3 million in aid from the UK while third-placed Iraq, where the Christian population has been in freefall, received £7 million. Meanwhile Pakistan, in which blasphemy laws have been used against minority groups including Christians, received almost £34 million while just over £500,000 went to Turkmenistan where members of “unregistered” churches have complained of being subject to surveillance. Bishop Michael Nazir-Ali, the former Bishop of Rochester who is now president of Oxtrad, a charity supporting churches facing persecution, said: “Britain’s commitment to aid is praiseworthy but we must make sure that it is directed properly to the right people in the right way. “I think we have to target it very carefully and where there is real need to make sure that aid is not being used simply to support British business or other interests and certainly to make sure that it is not being used to sustain corruption.”

Baptisms: We welcomed into the Church: Talitha Hunter on 21 June at St John’s, Chipping Sodbury Rose Kinsey on 21 June at St John’s, Chipping Sodbury Willow Harrison on 28 June at St John’s, Old Sodbury Jude and Tabitha Kohn on 26 July at St John’s, Old Sodbury

Marriages: We send our congratulations to: Michael Thorn and Sophie Hewitt on 24 July at St James’, Horton Richard Pinnock and Lucy Humphris on 8 August at St John’s, Old Sodbury Stuart Sawyer and Rachel Brankin on 15 August at St John’s, Old Sodbury Richard Hawker and Kelly Stone on 15 August at St James’, Horton

Funerals:We extend our sympathy to the families and friends of:

Audrey Celia Fenn on 10 August at Westerleigh Crematorium Peter John Osborne on 23 July at Westerleigh Crematorium Wendy Harris on 24 August at St James’, Horton

Nearly 3 million of UK aid given to countries where Christians are persecuted Taxpayers in the UK donate £2.7 billion a year in aid to countries where Christians are suffering some of the most extreme religious persecution in the world, figures show. 3


Dear Friends One of the most exhilarating passages in the Old Testament is found in Ezra 3 - verses 1-11 and I have just been reading it. It describes the huge release of joy and thanksgiving as both the temple and the altar are rebuilt. First let me tell you an ancient story. There was a man who left his 17 camels to his 3 sons. The instructions were to divide them according to age. The eldest son was to have half of the camels, the middle son a third of them, and the youngest son a ninth. This is an impossible sum. Until another man came along. He asked them what their trouble was, and they explained. Wait there, he said and soon returned with his own camel. Now there were 18 camels and the maths worked out. Half of 18 = 9. So he gave the eldest son 9 camels; a 1/3rd of 18 = 6 - he gave the middle son 6 camels; and 1/9th of 18 = 2 and he gave the youngest son 2 camels. And the man’s camel was still left at the end. The man loaned them his camel, which enabled them to do what they still needed to do, yet when that task was done, the camel that had been loaned was free to go. It was a part of the work, an important part, but not left tied up in it. It didn’t become one of the son’s camels, but without it, the sum was impossible. What seemed impossible was possible with the addition of one extra camel – and at the end that camel was still left over to be used by its own owner. A friend shared this story with a Church from which she was moving to begin her ministry elsewhere. The man’s camel in the story was valuable but wasn’t indispensable. So too separately we are valuable but not indispensable; useful but individually not the one on whom everything hangs; we are part of the church community and as the community works together so the work of God goes on. Clergy are part of the community, they facilitate and hopefully help the work of the Church but the work itself has to be owned by the Church, the people of the Church otherwise the work is not sustainable. With those thoughts in mind the story slightly changes and especially when we bring into mind the reading in Ezra. That tells us how people worked together to restore the worship at Jerusalem and laid the foundations of the temple then together they sang God is good. Paul tells us in Romans 12 that in Christ though we are many we form one body and each member belongs to the other. Let me paraphrase that slightly, together we form one body and each member belongs to the other in our individual parishes but also in our benefice as a whole. We belong to one another….. our work complements, sustains and encourages the other.

Yvonne

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Decline of C of E calls for imaginative solutions As latest figures show that the Church lost 1.7 million worshippers in 2012-14; vicars in rural parishes will need to find new ways to stay open. New figures, however, have indicated a much steeper fall in the numbers considering their views to be broadly in line with the church. According to the annual British Social Attitudes survey, in just two years between 2012 and 2014, the number of people describing their beliefs as being Church of England or Anglican fell from 21% to 17%, a loss of 1.7 million people – leading the former archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Carey, to repeat warnings that the church is “a generation away from extinction”. ‘If you were running the church nakedly as a business, it would be quite simple – you’d close down the uneconomic branches,’ says Nick Spencer, the author of a book on the future of the English parish church. ‘But the Church of England takes considerable, and I think rightful, pride in being a presence in every community in the country. That is the big challenge it faces.Nearly two-thirds of Anglican churches, 10,199, are in rural areas, but the population of rural England is just 9.3 million, or just over a sixth of the population. The challenge to those who would like to see them all remain open is obvious. One potential solution is to make the buildings themselves work harder, says Canon Dr Jill Hopkinson, the Church of England’s national rural officer. At the very least that might involve adding toilets and kitchen facilities; in some places, the church could be used as a post office or community shop, she says. “So we do need to think creatively about this. But shutting the doors should always be the last option, not the first.”

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Eclipse ‘Poor things’ the man on the tele said. ‘Centuries ago they thought the world was coming to an end. Of course they didn’t know what we know now’ he added And everyone nodded. From noon until three in the afternoon darkness came over all the land. The earth shook, the rocks split ‘It’s very eerie’ the man on the tele said ‘There was panic in the birdsong’ Facebook said. Everyone agreed. ‘It’s gone cold’ the weather woman declared I’m suddenly shivering’ she cried. And all around her nodded their heads. ‘They don’t know what we know now’ they said when the sun shone. Then the sun was darkened, and the veil of the temple was torn in two. And when Jesus had cried out with a loud voice, He said, “Father, ‘into Your hands I commit My spirit.’ And the man on the tele smiled a reassuring smile. Yvonne

DVDs of Jane’s Farewell Services

Trip to Canterbury A coach load of people set off from Gloucester to see our new b i s h o p consecrated in Canterbury Cathedral. Our benefice was represented as you can see in this picture from the diocese web site.

The recordings of both the Benefice Communion and the Songs of Praise for Jane's farewell on July 19 are now available. There are two DVDs - one for morning and one for afternoon. I would like to cover costs by suggesting a donation of £2.50 each (2 for £5) with any surplus going to St Adeline's Little Sodbury. To order you can contact me at admin@svbcofe.org.uk or ask your churchwarden. Frank Gray 6


pored over every Bible chapter, documenting the words on spreadsheets and inserting context and highlights. Week after week. Month after month. Year after year. The results give surprise insights into the lives of women ranging from Abigail to Zipporah. Eve, for example, may be the Bible’s most well-known woman, but she utters only 74 words. Yet an unnamed “Shulamite woman” in the Song of Solomon holds forth with 1,425. 93 women speak in the Bible. 49 have names. About 14,000 words were spoken by women in the Bible — at least in the English translation of the New Revised Standard Version. Judith, who kills an enemy general in the Book of Judith, gets the most ink with 2,689 words. She’s followed by the Shulamite woman in the Song of Solomon, with 1,425 words, and Esther, with 1,207 words. High-profile women don’t fare as well. Mary, the mother of Jesus, utters all of 191 words. Mary Magdalene says 61. Sarah, the wife of Abraham, gets 141. The Samaritan woman, who has the longest recorded conversation with Jesus in the Bible, speaks all of 151 words. The book the team produced, “Bible Women: All Their Words and Why They Matter.” Is designed in part to be used in Bible and women’s studies’ groups, and includes not just the number of words spoken, but the precise quotes, their context and a profile of the speaker. In the process, it shows how women in scripture dealt with issues such as poverty, faith, infertility, marriage, prayer, rape and war. “These are real people with real personalities,” said Freeman. “A lot of time, Bible studies are too complicated for people to digest. We didn’t want that.”

Principal Service readings September September 6th (Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity) Isaiah 35: 4 - 7a James 2: 1 - 10, 14 - 17 Mark 7 : 24 - end Psalm 146 September 13th (Fifteenth Sunday after Trinity) Isaiah 50: 4 - 9a James 3: 1 - 12 Mark 8 : 27 - end Psalm 116: 1 - 8 September 20th (Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity) Jeremiah 11: 18 - 20 James 3:13 - 4: 3, 7 - 8a Mark 9: 30 - 37 Psalm 54 September 27th (Seventeenth Sunday After Trinity) Numbers 11: 4 - 6, 10 - 16, 24 29 James 5: 13 - end Mark 9: 38 - end

US vicar counts words spoken by women in Bible. The Rev. Lindsay Hardin Freeman led a group that has spent 4 y e a r s cataloguing every word spoken in the Bible by women. Meeting in a church library, Freeman and an unlikely research team systematically 7


Your new bishop starts her ministry

3. The people sitting in my row didn’t seem very friendly. 4. The seats were very hard. 5. The referees made a decision I didn’t agree with. 6. I was sitting with hypocrites—they only came to see what others were wearing! 7. Some games went into overtime and I was late getting home. 8. The band played some songs I had never heard before. 9. The games are scheduled on my only day to sleep in and run errands. 10. My parents took me to too many games when I was growing up. 11. Since I read a book on sports, I feel that I know more than the coaches, anyway. 12. I don’t want to take my children because I want them to choose for themselves what sport they like best.

Our new bishop will formally begin her new role as Bishop of Gloucester on Saturday 19 September at 4.30pm. Rachel Treweek will be the first female diocesan bishop in the Church of England. During the service she will be presented with her pastoral staff and will be placed in her cathedra (or bishop’s chair) by the Archdeacon of Canterbury, the Venerable Sheila Watson, on behalf of the Archbishop of Canterbury. Rachel was consecrated as the 41st Bishop of Gloucester at Canterbury Cathedral on 22 July, but this service on 19 September will mark the formal start of Rachel’s ministry in the Diocese of Gloucester. She said: “I am delighted that my inauguration service is finally in sight and I am looking forward to it with joyful anticipation and immense excitement. It is my hope that the service will resound with thanksgiving for what has been and hopeful expectancy for what is yet to come, as we journey together into the next chapter, rooted and grounded in the love of Christ.”

Bishop of Crediton The next Bishop of Crediton will be Revd Dame Sarah Mullally. She will join the Diocese of Exeter next month before b e i n g installed in September. Dame Sarah is currently the Canon Treasurer at Salisbury Cathedral. She was made a Dame Commander of the British Empire in 2005 in recognition of her outstanding contribution to nursing and midwifery. She is the fourth female bishop to be appointed.

12 Reasons Why a Minister Stopped Attending Sporting Events 1. The coach never came to visit me. 2. Every time I went, they asked for money. 8


Desdemona the camel’s story This story, as many another, begins with once upon a time but it’s not a story told by a human it’s told by a camel, Desdemona. The day dawned bright and sunny. I had been standing in a field on the edge of town when my master came up with some very important looking men. ‘We’ll take twenty of them’ the men said and handed over a bag of money to my master. I was really happy we were all bought together, I didn’t really want to lose my friends but I was even more thankful of that later and I’ll tell you why. Some men came to us the next day ‘I’ll have that one’ said one, ‘And I’ll have that one’ said another. I was chosen by a man called Saul and so we set off on our journey. It wasn’t long before I realised this wasn’t a nice journey. The men in our group began going to villages and entering houses. They would drag out men and women, whole families and take them off to prison. Some of my friends enjoyed that but I didn’t. ‘They’re people who want to follow Jesus’ said Belzena ‘they deserve to be taken off.’ I didn’t go near Belzena from then on. But this horribleness continued village after village, town after town, we travelled such a long way. The nastiness seemed to go on for ages, people crying and screaming, it was dreadful. They even stoned a man called Stephen. I hated it. Then one day I thought it was all over but no, Saul went to all the synagogues he could find to ask if he could go to a place called Damascus and take lots of Jesus’ 9

people there. But then a strange thing happened. We were going along this road, Saul was on my back and we were coming close to Damascus. When WHAM, BANG, FLASH there was this light which seemed to come from heaven, a bit like lightening but more than that because Saul and me were surrounded by light. And I heard this voice saying ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?’ I was very scared but Saul was worse, he fell off my back screaming ‘Who are you?’ Then that voice came back ‘I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. But I want you to get up and go into the city, then you’ll be told what to do next.’ Everyone, and I mean everyone, all the men, all the camels, Belzena, everyone could hear the voice but no-one dared to say anything. I heard Saul say he couldn’t see anything, he’d been blinded. The other men just got hold of Saul and lead him into Damascus. We all stayed together for the first night, the men kept close to us camels for warmth, but then Saul stopped eating and drinking so they took him into a house. We were fastened outside and I would put my nose into the door for warmth until they closed it at night. Saul didn’t eat anything or drink anything for three days. After that time a man called Ananias came to see Saul. I could see he was frightened too, he stopped beside me and stroked me before he went into the house, I heard him speak to God asking for courage to do what God had told him to. I peaked through the window because I wanted to know what was going on. Ananias laid hands on Saul and said ‘Brother Saul, the Lord Jesus who appeared to you on the road has sent me


so that you might regain your sight and be filled with the Holy Spirit.’ It was strange because something fell from Saul’s eyes and he said ‘I can see, I can see.’ Ananias baptised him then and Saul had a big, big meal. I didn’t see Saul for quite a few months after that. Then one dark cold night, I was asleep in the field and a group of men and Saul crept up to me. Saul thanked the guys, made a joke about needing more than a basket now and said ‘Come on boy, we’ve got to get out of here quick, they’re trying to kill me now.’ I trod very carefully over the ground so no-one could hear and then ran for Jerusalem. Everyone was really frightened of Saul in Jerusalem, he was saying that he too was a follower of Jesus but no-one believed him, except for Barnabas. The next day I could hear Saul or Paul as he was known then, loudly telling people about what had happened to him and about Jesus. Lots of people listened, mind mainly from their windows and doorways. But as I said to my friend Jeana, ‘And they call us camels for getting the hump. They should listen to Saul, he’s a different man, he’s turned his life around completely and as someone who knew him before I think that’s fantastic. A great job done by Jesus and the Holy Spirit.’ Yvonne

Our second Benefice Retreat. We had a full-house from the Benefice for our now biennial retreat in July at Llangasty Retreat House in Wales. The house enjoys spectacular views across Llangorse Lake towards the western fringe of the black mountains. It really is the most beautiful spot and we were blessed again with some glorious weather. The word ‘retreat’ seems to deter some people, which is funny when so much of 10

the word is ‘treat’! And it was a particular treat to welcome Canon Jeremy Davies to be our inspiration for the weekend. He entitled his sessions “Something understood” a reflection on prayer and imagination. He guided us through poetry, through music, through art and finally through silence as tools to deepen our prayer life and encounter with God. He also led us in prayer throughout each day and presided and preached very powerfully for us at the Eucharist on Sunday. Many of the group took the opportunity to meet with Jeremy one-toone too. It is a particular gift to be able to step into a group of strangers and know when to be gentle and when to be courageous. He was at all times generous and even sent on his notes to those who wanted them when we returned home. We were encouraged to preserve an atmosphere of quiet inside the house but we were free to talk at meal times and outside on the terrace. There was also time for a good walk or drive out on Saturday afternoon (or a snooze!). It was lovely to be welcomed back to Llangasty as old friends and again the food was good. As Jane Kenchington was with us and clearly preparing to move on from her ministry in the Benefice, there were some very poignant and grateful moments too. Most of all it was great to share this special time together and the company of friends on the journey there and back again. Could it be for you in 2017? Ian Yemm For more information see www.llangasty.com or search Llangorse Lake to see the views!


A Quiz for the Knowledgeable

HOLIDAY HOME

There are only nine questions. This is a quiz for people who know everything! These are not trick questions. 1. Name the one sport in which neither the spectators nor the participants know the score or the leader until the contest ends. 2. What famous North American landmark is constantly moving backward? 3. Of all vegetables, only two can live to produce on their own for several growing seasons. All other vegetables must be replanted every year. What are the only two perennial vegetables? 4. What fruit has its seeds on the outside? 5. In many stores, you can buy pear brandy with a real pear inside the bottle. The pear is whole and ripe, and the bottle is genuine; it hasn't been cut in any way. How did the pear get inside the bottle? 6. Only three words in standard English begin with the letters ' dw' and they are all common words. Name two of them. 7. There are 14 punctuation marks in English grammar. Can you name at least half of them? 8. Name the only vegetable or fruit that is never sold frozen, canned, processed, cooked, or in any other form except fresh. 9. Name 6 or more things that you can wear on your feet beginning with the letter 'S.' [I May be persuaded, for a large consideration J, to publish the answers in a future issue - Editor]

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Self Catering Pet Friendly Open All Year Wonderful Sea Views Parking for 2 cars Sleeps 6-10 people 3 Bedrooms, 2 Futons

Call Bob Alcock

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With arms wide open Walking into somewhere new can sometimes feel overwhelming. Surrounded by lots of strange faces looking towards you, it can take a lot of courage to step into the unknown. But a warm welcome can make all the difference. As the academic year begins again in September, hundreds of children are bracing themselves to start a new school. It can be a daunting time, and it is important that the teachers and pupils take on the responsibility to welcome them to their classes and to make sure that no one feels left out and no one is forgotten. What a huge task to give to our children, but it is one which is central to our faith. Once Jesus’ disciples were arguing about who was the most important. Stopping the argument, Jesus took a child in his arms and said: “Whoever welcomes one of these little children in my name, welcomes me.” It is important to remember that we should be welcoming everyone equally – from the grandest king to the smallest child. Because when we welcome them, we are welcoming God into our lives too. So when we see someone entering a new place – whether it is our classroom, office or neighbourhood, let us remember to welcome them with open arms.

ethical business is the norm – pursuing outcomes other than profit. All Ecotricity customers are on the latest, best and same price, no matter when they joined or how they pay. Switching to Ecotricity is one of the single biggest things you can do to cut your carbon emissions. Its only electricity tariff is 100 per cent green and it also offers one single green gas tariff. What’s more, there are no exit fees or penalties for leaving. Switch to Ecotricity and get a voucher worth up to £25 to spend at Waitrose or John Lewis. Plus for every household, vicarage or church that switches, Ecotricity will donate £25 to the Diocese of Gloucester into a special fund that will support new, local environmental projects.

From “The Messenger” www.gloucester.anglican.org

Bills into mills Did you know that the Diocese of Gloucester has a partnership with Stroudbased green energy company Ecotricity? The company puts its profits back into building windmills, with its ‘bills into mills’ model. Ecotricity does this in pursuit of a vision for a Green Britain – a place in which we all live more sustainable lives and where 12

From “The Messenger” www.gloucester.anglican.org

Crib Festival The final details for the festival leaflets are almost ready and we hope to have them printed very soon. We would like to ask everyone in the Benefice to support us again this year, please. We are really appreciative of all you have done in the past and hope you will wish to be part of the event this year. We seem to have generated a great deal of interest both locally and further afield. The number of visitors we have is very encouraging. We are trying to fine the best way to organise the rotas between us all to make the best use of the time people give and avoid duplication. Please, if you have any ideas we should be grateful to hear from you. Tel. 01454 318883, or email at woodchip@waitrose.com or via the church centre. With many thanks, in advance! Liz Gregson


Goodbye again.

until

we

meet

On July 6th last year I arrived at the Horton Flower Festival service hotfoot from my ordination in the Cathedral with Lin. It all seems quite a long time ago and I know how green behind the ears I must have seemed, but barely 15 months later I am moving on to Wickwar and its surrounding parishes of Hillesley, Rangeworthy, Charfield and Kingswood. Lin and I have enjoyed our time in the Sodbury Vale Benefice immensely. Highlights for me have been the people I have met and been able to serve and get to know, though I must admit it took me a few months before I felt I could confidently give a name to most people. The highlights for me were visiting people in their homes and getting to pray with them, leading St John’s Praise, sharing Christian values and the Bible with those who courageously came to our nurture group. We gelled quickly as a group and always looked forward to our weekly Tuesday meetings. As a deacon I was able to share a part of the spiritual journey of those in our benefice who were bereaved or bringing their children to baptism. Also of note was the amazing crib festival and special services around Christmas and Easter. So many people seemed to be involved in the crib festival and each seemed to know exactly what they had to do. I on the other hand operated on the basis that if I turned up every day then there would be someone to talk to and welcome and of course I enjoyed the hourly prayer slots. The hospitality of opening the church for 5 days to anyone in the community was amazing. So why are these things so significant? You will notice that many of them are about successfully reaching out to people

around us – in the church and outside so that they will feel encouraged and welcomed. It is not just about getting people to come to church more often or about Sunday services, but it is about successfully sharing the heart of the gospel of Jesus Christ. He didn’t ask people to come to His house church, but He met them where they were and ministered to their need. He was concerned for their whole lives, physical and spiritual and He made Himself available. For all of the experiences I have had I am most grateful and thank you for your love and care from the bottom of my heart. I shall miss you and keep you all in my prayers. I hope that as the church goes into a vacancy there will be a real sense of what God is calling you to do now – individually and as a church. This is a challenge and a learning opportunity for you as well as me as I move on. God’s love and blessing on each Peter

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Sodbury Vale Benefice Regular Weekly Events Monday

8.45am

Morning Prayer

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

7.30pm

Bell Ringers’ Practice CS

Church Tower, Chipping Sodbury

Tuesday

8.45am

Morning Prayer

Church Centre, Upper Room,Chipping Sodbury

Tuesday

9.15pm

Stor'k'ies

St John's Church, Chipping Sodbury

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

8.30am

Morning Prayer

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

730pm

Bell Ringer’s Practice Horton

St James’, Horton

8.45am

Morning Prayer

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

7.00pm

Benefice Choir Practice

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

7.00pm

Youth Club (age 11-18)

Baptist Church Centre

Note: No Morning Prayers on Bank Holidays

Sodbury Vale Benefice Forthcoming Events Wed

9th

Sat

26th Sep

Benefice Baptism Fun Afternoon

St John’s, CS

Sun

27th Sep

Harvest Communion

St John’s, CS

Sun

4th

Oct

St John’s Praise for Harvest

St John’s, CS

Sun

4th

Oct

Harvest Family Communion

St John’s, OS

Mon

5th

Oct

Old Sodbury’s Harvest Supper

Village Hall, OS

Sun

18

Oct

Little Sodbury Harvest Festival

St Adeline’s LS

Sun

1st

Nov

2nd - 6th

Sep

Nov

7.30pm Jane’s institution as Rector of Solihull

4.00pm All Souls’ service Nativity Crib Festival

St Alphege’s Solihull

St John’s, CS St John’s, CS

If you don’t see your event in the list above please let me know, once it is on this calendar other people can put it on theirs! All times are subject to change look out for further details closer to the date. Michelle 01454 325160 office@svbcofe.org.uk


Sodbury Vale Benefice Calendar September 2015 Tue

1st

3.00pm

Meditation Meeting

Ring 312228 for venue

Thurs

3rd

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s, C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre, C/S

2.00pm

Mothers’ Union Wave of Prayer

Lady Chapel, St John’s, CS

8.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s, C/S

9.30am

St John’s Praise

St John’s, C/S

11.15am

Mattins {BCP}

St James’, Horton

11.15am

Family Communion

St John’s, O/S

4th

Fri

Sun 6th Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity

6.00pm

Evensong {BCP}

St Adeline’s, L/S

Tue

8th

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, C/S

Wed

9th

7.30pm

Jane’s Institution as Rector at Solihull

Solihull

Thurs

10th

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s, C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre, C/S

7.30pm

Crib Festival Meeting

Church Centre, C/S

Parish Communion

St John’s, C/S

Holy Communion {BCP}

St James’, Horton

Family Service

St John’s, O/S

6.00pm

Evensong {BCP}

St Adeline’s, L/S

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, CS

3.00pm

Meditation Meeting

Ring 312228 for venue

7.30pm

Horton PCC

tbc

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

7.30pm

OS PCC meeting

Village Hall, O/S

10.30am

Mothers’ Union Coffee Morning

St John’s, C/S

9.30am

Family Communion

St John’s, C/S

11.15am

Morning Prayer {CW}

St James’, Horton

11.15am

Holy Communion {BCP}

St John’s, O/S

6.00pm

Evensong {BCP}

St Adeline’s, L/S

9.30am Sun 13th Fifteenth Sunday 11.15am after Trinity 11.15am Tue

Thurs

Sat

15th

17th

19th

Sun 20th Sixteenth Sunday after Trinity Mon

21st

7.45pm

Mothers’ Union Annual Service

St John’s, C/S

Tue

22nd

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, CS

2.00pm

Tea and Chat Afternoon

Church Centre, CS

Wed

23rd

7.30pm

Little Sodbury PCC

TBC

Thur

24th

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

7.30pm

CS PCC

Church Centre C/S

2.00pm

Baptismal Fun Afternoon

Church and Centre, C/S

9.30am

Parish Communion for Harvest

St John’s C/S

11.15am

Holy Communion {CW}

St James’ Horton

11.15am

Morning Praise {CW}

St John’s O/S

6.00pm

Holy Communion {BCP}

St Adeline’s L/S

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, CS

Sat

26th

Sun 27th Seventeenth Sunday after Trinity Tue

29th

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Computer Clinic By the time you read this we shall have had our first Computer Clinic (August 20 and 28) at the Church Centre. We plan to have these quarterly - so the next will be in November. Each session will start with a short update on using the website, then it will be thrown open to addressing the problems you are facing. We suggest that you bring with you your laptop computer, tablet or smartphone to use during the session. Our aim is to provide a place where you can get help with your computing issues and for you to know that you have somewhere to turn without being made to feel 'dumb'! Our secondary aim is to help you become conversant with using our SVB website (at http:// svbcofe.org.uk) so that ultimately you will be able to start contributing to its content. Maybe you are interested in writing - or can provide pictures - old and new - that we could use. You can also learn how to use SVB Mail (mailing list) as well as Facebook and Twitter. We now have people taking responsibility for the websites for Horton, Little Sodbury and Old Sodbury. Be encouraged that some good progress is being made. With Windows 10 now available for free it is possible that you may be asking questions about the free upgrade and if it is worth it. What are the risks? - and what are the benefits? If you are interested in coming do feel free to bring a friend. This could be a useful service to our community. Do feel free to contact me at <admin@svbcofe.org.uk> if you have any questions or suggestions on how we can make Computer Clinic more useful within our churches. See you at our next Clinic!

Solutions for those who tried these picture puzzles here are the locations of the items you were looking for

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Sept Outlook 2015  

News, articles and pictures from the four parishes of the Sodbury Vale Benefice

Sept Outlook 2015  

News, articles and pictures from the four parishes of the Sodbury Vale Benefice

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