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The Churches’ Magazine

O U T LO O K

The Churches of the Sodbury Vale Benefice Chipping Sodbury, Old Sodbury, Horton & Little Sodbury

April 2017 1

Jane is enrolled as a Companion of thewww.svbcofe.org.uk Society of St Francis by Brother Damian. See 1


Churchwardens

Contacts Rector

Chipping Sodbury

The Revd. Canon David Bowers 01454 313159, [Day off Monday] email rector@svbcofe.org.uk

Joy Gibson 01454 319288 Jane Jones-Williams 01454 324970

Associate Priest The Revd. Yvonne Brae 01454 325160, [Day off Monday] email yvonne@svbcofe.org.uk

Old Sodbury

Karen Hunter If you would like to know more about the 01454 319903 Christian faith or are thinking about baptism or confirmation please speak with one of the the ministerial team

Little Sodbury Brenda Cordy 01454 316447

Church Office

Open during school term time Mon - Tue - Thu mornings 9.00 - 12.00 Horton Tina Hildick-Smith Administrators: 01454 325160 01454 320380 Michelle Jenkins, Trish Gailey Richard Needs email: office@svbcofe.org.uk 01454 329890 Web Site: www.svbcofe.org.uk

Advertising: Volunteer required

This magazine is brought to you Free by the four churches of the Sodbury Vale Benefice. If you would like to make a small donation towards production costs (about 70p per magazine) that would be most welcome. Thank you.

Editor: Michael Stephenson 01454 314094 email outlook@svbcofe.org.uk

Nominated Person: Mrs Hilary Holder 01454 327118 This is the person to contact if you wish to express concern about suspected abuse of a child or vulnerable adult

May Deadline Can you have all copy to Michelle in the Church Office by Apr 12th at the latest please.

Front Cover- David with Bishop Rachel and her husband, Guy, in India 2


FROM THE RECTOR The Diocese of Gloucester has five international partnerships, covering USA, Tanzania, Sweden and two dioceses in India. A few weeks ago I was privileged to accompany Bishop Rachel and her husband, Guy, on their first visit to India to meet the people of the Dornakal and Karnataka Central Dioceses, two contrasting parts of South India: one in a very rural area in Telangana and the other based in and around the growing city of Bangalore. It was a very busy schedule, especially as so many people wanted to meet Bishop Rachel, but it was a wonderful experience and one that has strengthened our partnership with Christians in the Church of South India. One of the most memorable experiences was to share in the Ash Wednesday Service in Dornakal Cathedral, at which Bishop Rachel preached. As we began the journey of Lent with our brothers and sisters there I shall remember on Easter Day how we are united in celebrating our common faith in the resurrection of Jesus and the new life he gives. In Bangalore with Bishop PK Samuel, his wife Esther, and Revd Christy

The resurrection is the foundation of the Christian faith and the Easter experience continues to transform human lives, bringing new life, hope, joy and peace. Come and join us in our churches this Easter as celebrate and as we worship the risen Christ. Christ is risen! He is risen indeed, Alleluia! David Bowers

Prayer For The Month This month we give thanks for the Easter message of new life in the words of a prayer which reminds us of appearance of Jesus to the two disciples at Emmaus. We praise you and we bless you, our risen Lord Jesus, King of glory, for you are with us, even when our eyes are closed to your companionship. Walk this day alongside the disconsolate and despairing, open their eyes to your gentle illumination, and let their hearts burn within them at your invisible presence. To you, Lord Jesus, walking by our side, be honour and glory, now and for ever. Amen. 3


April 9th (Palm Sunday) Isaiah 50: 4 - 9a 15-17, 3: 1-7 Philippians 2: 5 - 11 Matthew 26: 14 - 27: end Psalm 31: 9 - 16

Baptisms: We welcomed into the Church: Amelia- Rose Curtis-Hedges at St John’s Chipping Sodbury on 5 February 2017 Jane Elizabeth Daniells at St James’, Horton on 19 February 2017 Ellie Samantha and Mia Victoria at St John’s Chipping Sodbury on 5 March 2017

April 13th (Maundy Thursday) Exodus 12: 1 -4, 11 - 14 1 Corinthians 11: 23 - 26 John 13: 1 - 17, 31b - 35 Psalm 116: 1, 10 - end

Marriages: We send our congratulations to:

April 14th (Good Friday) Isaiah 52: 1 - 53: end Hebrews 10: 16 - 25 John 18: 1 - 19: end Psalm 22: 1 - 11

Gary Stephen Crawford and Helen Mary Ryan at St John’s Old Sodbury on 11 March 2017

Funerals:We extend our sympathy to the families and friends of:

Ryan Michael Fews at St John’s Old Sodbury on 3 March 2017 Eric Oswald Goode at St John’s Old Sodbury on 6 March 2017 Jennifer Frances Baxendale at St John’s, Chipping Sodbury on 7 March 2017 Raymond Albert Charles Smith at St John’s, Chipping Sodbury on 10 March 2017 Mary Jean Whitehouse at St John’s, Old Sodbury on 16 March 2017

April 16th (Easter Day) Acts 10: 34 - 43 Colossians 3: 1 - 4 John 20: 1 - 18 Psalm 118: 1 - 2, 14 - 24 April 23rd (Second Sunday of Easter Acts 2: 14a - 22 - 32 1 Peter 1: 3 - 9 John 20: 19 - end Psalm 16

Principal Service readings April

April 30th (Third Sunday of Easter) Acts 2: 14a, 36 - 41 1 Peter 1: 17 - 23 Luke 24: 13 - 35 Psalm 116: 1 - 3, 10 - end

April 2nd (Fifth Sunday of Lent) Ezekiel 37: 1 - 14 Romans 8: 6 - 11 John 11: 1 - 45 Psalm 130

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Holy Week Services Palm Sunday 9 April 9.15am Procession from near Moda House, followed by Parish Communion CS 11.15am Family Communion OS 11.15am Matins Horton 6.00pm Evensong LS

Monday of Holy Week 10 April 7.30pm Compline and Meditation LS

Tuesday of Holy Week 11 April 7.30pm Compline and Meditation CS

Wednesday of Holy Week 7.30pm Compline and Meditation OS

Maundy Thursday 13 April 7.30pm

Holy Communion

F. WOODRUFF

Horton

Local Family Cremation and Funeral Directors

Good Friday 14 April 11.00am Walk of Witness – meet at Chipping Sodbury Baptist Church 2.00pm Good Friday service CS

24 Hour Service 2 High Street, Winterbourne Tel: (01454) 773776

Holy Saturday 15 April 8.00pm

Easter Vigil

LS

118-120 Station Road,Yate Tel: (01454) 320005

Easter Day 16 April 6.00am 9.30am 11.15am 11.15am 6.00pm

Dawn Service OS Parish Communion CS Holy Communion OS Holy Communion Horton Holy Communion LS

192 Badminton Road. Coalpit Heath email:info@funerals.uk.net Private Chapels of Rest at Coalpit Heath & Yate

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The next count will take place in January 2018. You will have heard that the current £1 coin is to cease to be legal tender in October 2017. Please still INCLUDE them in your box, as the bank will be honouring these coins for some time to come. It could prove a very good place to get rid of them before October !!!

received a letter of thanks for our help and support. The local organiser for the Hospice, Olly Syms and family have given us a beautiful glass globe crib, hand painted and in perfect condition, for us to keep. I shall look forward to displaying it this year. The other income raised will be put to church funds and some used for the next festival. The dates for this year will be from the Open Evening, Tuesday 28 November with the start from Wednesday 29 November to Sunday 3 December. The Victorian Committee have yet to decide when they have the Victorian Day so it could remain as the Saturday or return to the Friday. I will keep you informed as soon as I know. I send my thanks to you all for your support and look forward to working with you again. Liz

Thank you once again for your generosity.

Lent Lunch - Old Sodbury

Children’s Society Box Collection 2016 Thank you all for your most generous donations this year, and I am pleased to tell you that the box collection 2016 amounted to a magnificent £724.85. This money will be put to excellent use by the Children’s Society for children who are vulnerable and find themselves in difficult circumstances. If anyone reading this hasn't got a box and would like one please ring me and I will be pleased to deliver a box to you.

Hilary Hurley

Thank You

Local Secretary for The Children’s Society. 01454 311515'

Crib Festival December 2016 I am writing to give an update for the Crib Festival and do apologise for the delay. I am pleased to say that we did well again and have raised enough money to send a donation of £1,000 to the Children’s Hospice South West and have

Many thanks to all who made soup and cakes and all those who supported the Lent Lunch. We were few in number but had a good time of fellowship together. An amazing £110 was donated to 'Embrace' to support refugees in the Middle East. 6


woman in prison, we are paid £550 to support women in the community.” Christian Aid’s Chief Executive Loretta Minghella said: “Christian Aid was delighted to partner with Bishop Rachel and with Restored, as together we seek to mobilise the faith community to challenge and change the discriminatory beliefs that lie at the root of gender inequality. Our voices have the power to transform people’s experience of gender – especially for women and girls living in poverty – and to ensure they are shaped not by oppression, but by justice, dignity and hope.” Mandy Marshall, Co-Director of Restored said, “30% of women worldwide experience violence from their partner. Faith based organisations have great reach and influence at both national and local level in millions of communities across the globe. With the right support, we believe they have the potential to challenge the injustice of gender inequality and hasten the end of violence against women. She ended with a challenge to each of us: “How is what I am doing affecting relationships? Am I giving all of who I am to empower and build others up or am I using the power that I have to diminish and dominate?” At this time of Lent and Easter, we can all think of ways that we can promote the flourishing of others—what change will you make today?

Engagement: Living out Christ’s love and hope Being advocates for human flourishing, through initiatives which combat injustice, environmental destruction, exclusion and isolation. Bishop Rachel invited speakers to inspire and challenge MPs and guests at an event in the House of Lords to mark International Women’s Day. The event was hosted in partnership with Christian Aid, Nelson Trust and Restored, to promote gender equality. Muzoon Almellehan, an 18-yearold Syrian refuges spoke for the Malala Fund about t h e importance of prioritising girls’ education. She said: “While I was in the refugee camp in Jordan, I went from tent to tent to tell parents that [their daughters] needed teachers, not husbands.” She called on the UK government to increase support for education, especially for female refugees. Niki Gould (left) from the Nelson Trust, a Gloucestershire-based organisation that supports disadvantaged women with complex, multiple needs said: “As a consequence of women going into prison, over 17,000 children are separated from their mothers each year. Over 80% of these women have committed a nonviolent offence. It costs £45,000 to keep a

From “The Messenger” www.gloucester.anglican.org

A Friend A friend always seems to be more than a definition – a friend is someone who sees your first tear fall, catches the second – stops the third and turns the fourth into a smile. Sent in by Joyce Cairns 7


Village Burns Supper - a night to remember! (28th January 2017) The swirl of the bagpipes and the crack of the side-drum welcomed over 120 guests to our Burns Supper in the Village Hall. The tables looked resplendent with cutlery and glassware; Scottish flags and bunting decked the walls in readiness of the wonderful 3 course meal prepared by Tracy Shipp and her small team of chefs. Soon, a large Haggis was held aloft on a silver tray by William Weaver who led a procession around the room, to the accompaniment of the pipes and drum and loud applause. Dr Gregson demonstrated past surgical skills, during his faultless address to the Haggis, by stabbing the “Beastie” with his very sharp Scottish dagger. Anne Myers and John Edgar started the entertainment with an amusing poem called “Husband, Husband, cease your strife!”, followed by Richard Carter who gave a gentle, endearing speech in his toast to the Lassies. However this was firmly rebuffed by Angela Barber replying on behalf of the Lassies; then she warmly mellowed, with a twinkle in her eye, as she toasted Richard and the Laddies! Bruce Philips (a visitor to the village), gave a very entertaining outline of Burns’ colourful life and it was commented that guests had learned more about Burns in ten minutes than in all the previous suppers they had attended.

To finish a great evening, John Lee (piano) and Highland Johnny (Myers) led the singing of well known Scottish songs including “Donald where’s your troosers” and of course “Auld Lang Syne”. This hugely successful evening will remain a warm memory for many years to come, as one of excellent food, great company and wonderful village fun! Our thanks go to everyone who helped and supported this event. The Friends of Old Sodbury Church. JOIN US AT OUR NEXT EVENT: Pudding Evening Friday 19th May in the Village Hall

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underworld of their sleep, out into the middle of March. To Easter the earth with their heads flapped and flayed by the wind. Broken yolks splashing the air all that we hoped for and answer to prayer. Sent in by Joyce Cairns

Easter This Easter I’d like to share these memorable words with you. Reflect on them as you celebrate the gift of fresh life and new life ‘Twas Easter Sunday. The dull blossomed trees filled all the air with fragrance and with joy’ ‘The story of Easter is the story of God’s wonderful window of divine surprise’ ‘On Easter Day the veil between time and eternity thins to Gossamer’

Thought for the Month "How would your life be different if… You stopped making negative judgmental assumptions about people you encounter? Let today be the day…You look for the good in everyone you meet and respect their journey."

We forget all about them in the years, darkness, in the long winter. Without a sound they are there one morning. A kind of sunlight grown from the ground. As if some call had woken them from the 9


all. There are about 60,000 members there in a population of over 177 million so here God’s work is being done. In Burundi in 2015 the M.U. Launched a parenting skills programme to encourage parents to teach their children skills that will create a safe place for stable family life and empower parents, especially the mothers to support the education of their children. Work here is growing and there are 17,000 members with a population of over 10 million Here in Gloucestershire we still support the Foodbank and homeless and work in Eastwood Park woman’s prison. Our next meeting will be Jacky Fredrickson telling us how Love, Courage and Faith helped her and her family live with tragedy. Please join us if you can, you don’t have to be a member, married or even a woman, just come and hear how the Mothers’ Union can help lives We meet in the Church Centre Wickwar Road at

Holy Land Pilgrimage

We are organising a pilgrimage to the Holy Land from October 9th – 18th 2018 and leaflets and booking forms are now available, either from the churches or from the Vicarage. The cost is £2025 and includes all travel, meals, entrance fees and gratuities. We stay in very good hotels in Jerusalem (6 nights) and Tiberius (3 nights) and the flights are with El Al from Heathrow. If you would like further information please see David Bowers.

7:45pm on Monday 10th April

Chipping Sodbury Mothers’ Union

Pied Beauty

I have been reminded that no M.U. News has been noted in the Outlook for several months so I will put this to rights. The Mothers’ Union is a worldwide organisation of over 4 million members with branches all over the world. The work we do varies from area to area and all the money sent for causes goes directly to the branch workers who need it. In Nigeria it is not just spiritual support through daily prayer, but with practical help with basic healthcare using doctors and nurses who are members of the M.U. And church brings hope and a future to

Glory be to God for dappled things For skies of couple-colour as a brindled cow; For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim; Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches’ wings; Landscape plotted and pieced – fold, fallow, and plough; And all trades, their gear and tackle and trim. All things counter, original, spare, strange; Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?) With swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim; He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change Praise him

Gerald Manley Hopkins 10


Geriatric Trekking - Part 2 ‘Kilimanjaro; ‘the highest freestanding mountain in the world’ We had conquered Mount Meru and we were now ready for our 6 day climb of Mount Kilimanjaro. At 0930 fifteen of us set off for the Kenya side of Kilimanjaro in a Toyota 7 seater, reminiscent of a Nairobi matatu (taxi). Like “sardines in a can” we bumped slowly along very poor roads in deep choking dust for over 3.5hrs.

After lunch, we set off on the Rongai route up the mountain to Sikimba camp, a 4hr trek, mentally preparing ourselves for the challenges ahead. It was the first time we had camped in a long time and we were to share a tiny tent with mess facilities, appropriately named, in the porter’s tent and what was euphemistically described as ‘long drop toilets’; it was all very cosy. An early morning breakfast prepared us for a 6hr trek to our second camp at Kikelewa Caves and the quality track continued until about halfway, when the going became much rougher, with a steady ascent. Spectacular views of Kilimanjaro and a snow-capped Mount Mawenzi came into view and the trip was worth it for that alone. We arrived at the Camp at 1530, time for a ritual foot-wash and clean up before preparing our kit for

the next day. By 1900 we were tucked up and ready to sleep, interrupted by a late night ‘dawn porter chorus’! Despite little sleep we were on our way to Mawenzi Tarn Camp by 0845. This was a 4hr steeper trek over rough terrain with splendid views over the Kenya plains and glimpses of Kibo Hut, the last camp before the final ascent, a long way ahead. Our Meru climb was paying off as we felt fit and strong and by now we were at an altitude of 4,300m. After lunch and a rest Thaddeus led us a short way up Mawenzi for further acclimatisation. We could see the Camp way below us until the mist came swirling in and obliterated the view. It was a lot colder and we took to sleeping in our base layers despite the high tog ratings of our sleeping bags. Our selfinflating mattresses also needing additional help at this altitude. We were not looking forward to the next day’s trek which consisted of a steep climb followed by an interminable trudge across the Saddle to Kibo Hut at 4,700m and part way up the dome of Kilimanjaro. The terrain was more like a moonscape with at times a strong cold wind and we were thankful to reach the Hut 4hrs later. What a dump! It was crowded with tents awaiting the return of climbers from the summit whilst others were either eating or sleeping before continuing down the mountain to Horombo Hut. The Huts was poorly maintained with banging doors and cold winds howling straight through. We were thankful that we would be camping but until the present incumbents had

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departed there was no space left to pitch our tents. The organisation seemed chaotic and the latrines were in the worst state we had ever seen! However, by 1500 a semblance of order was restored, new tents erected and optimistic climbers milled around. Already a few were suffering from acute mountain sickness (AMS) with nausea and headaches. Fortunately, we had both been spared the worst of those symptoms up to then. After a brief rest, we climbed 200m up the mountain to acclimatise in readiness for the final ascent and returned for the ‘last supper’! By 1830 we were ready for our sleeping bags, now with silk liners and most of our clothes on to keep out the cold. Sleep was virtually impossible; noisy porters nearby and a windstorm and sleet kept us awake. We rose at 2330 and an hour later we were ready, dressed in five layers of clothing, balaclavas, two pairs of woollen gloves and mitts. A long dusty climb along a zig-zag scree path gave way to a steep rocky slope. We were walking at a snail’s pace, drinking regularly. It was very cold and 2hrs later, just above Hans Meyer Caves at 5,150m, the temperature dropped to below freezing and the water in the supply pipe from our camel-backs froze. We resorted to our spare bottles that had to be shaken vigorously to break up the icebergs! The climb became tortuous but a full moon had risen and turned off our head-torches. The last 200m up to Gilman’s Point at 5,680m and the accepted summit of Kilimanjaro, was a particularly tough scramble. It was minus 12 degrees and

our fingers were beginning to freeze. By the top of this section I had became extremely unsteady on my feet, my speech had begun to slur and I was having mild hallucinations. Despite what we understood later was the second stage of AMS and after a brief discussion, I decided to attempt to reach Uhuru Peak. After only about 50m I realised and I was going to be a danger to us all so we returned to Gilman’s Point. There it was agreed that I would return with Thaddeus and that Barry would attempt Uhuru Peak, the highest point on the mountain at 5,895m with Heaven, our assistant guide; an appropriate name in the circumstances! Dawn was breaking as Barry started on the 2hour trek to Uhuru. It was a slog but views of the crater, glaciers and ice cliffs were stunning and kept him going. At last Uhuru Point appeared with a board claiming that this was the top of Africa and Kilimanjaro the highest freestanding mountain in the world! After pictures were taken and congratulations given, the return trek to Gilman’s Point was a bit of an anti-climax. The descent from Gilman’s for both of us was very different and after the initial scramble, consisted of scree running and jumping armed with our walking poles. It was exhilarating but quite tiring given the rapid descent of 1000m. Barry made it back to the camp at 10.40am where he found me resting and took a well-earned rest himself. The combination of poor sleep over the previous nights and intense physical effort had taken its toll but half an hour later we both felt refreshed. After a meal, we started our tedious 3hr trek back

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across the Saddle to Horombo Hut. We had been on my feet for the best part of 15hours and miraculously with no blisters to show for it! On arrival, we had a couple of celebratory high cost beers with the team, a meal and went to bed. The tent flapped continuously as high winds blew across the camp and we had another night with minimal sleep! We said goodbye to our porters and then trekked 12k down the mountain expecting to be met by our transport, only to find that we had to walk a further 8k through the forest to Marangu Gate. Fitness paid off and we were thankful to arrive and collect our respective certificates. We were informed that annually 40,000 persons climb Kilimanjaro of whom 12,000 get to the Peak and 4,000 make it to Gilman’s Point. It was late afternoon when we arrived back at the Keys Hotel and we both desperately needed a shower to remove 6 days of dust and grime. Both Barry and I felt that the trip had been well worthwhile and felt Two Wolves proud of our personal achievements in A Cherokee legend conquering both mountains “back to An old Cherokee is back”, particularly as we were no longer teaching his grandson spring chickens. As I remarked to Barry about life. “A fight is ‘we must now both be as fit as a butcher’s going on inside me,” he dog’! Richard Needs said to the boy. It is a terrible fight and it is between two wolves. One is evil – he is anger, envy, sorrow, regret, greed, arrogance, self-pity, guilt, resentment, inferiority, lies, false pride, superiority and ego. “ He continued, ”The other is good – he is joy, peace, love, hope, serenity, humility, kindness, benevolence, empathy, generosity, truth, compassion and faith. The same fight is going on inside you and inside every other person too” The grandson thought about it for a minute and then asked his grandfather, “Which wolf will win?” The old Cherokee replied, “The one you feed.” We Made it! 13


Sodbury Vale Benefice Regular Weekly Events Monday

7.30pm

Bell Ringers’ Practice CS

Church Tower, Chipping Sodbury

Tuesday

8.30am

Morning Prayer

Church Centre, Upper Room,Chipping Sodbury

9.15pm

Stor'k'ies

St John's Church, Chipping Sodbury

8.30am

Morning Prayer

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

730pm

Bell Ringer’s Practice Horton

St James’, Horton

8.30am

Morning Prayer

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

7.00pm

Benefice Choir Practice

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

8.30am

Morning Prayer

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

7.00pm

Youth Club (age 11-18)

Baptist Church Centre

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Note: No Morning Prayers on Bank Holidays

Sodbury Vale Benefice Forthcoming Events 11th June

9.30am

Chipping Sodbury Festival Service

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

18th June

10.30am

Communion with Bishop Robert

St John’s Chipping Sodbury

30th

10.30am

Benefice Communion

St Adeline’s Little Sodbury

7.00pm

Crib Festival opening night

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

Crib Festival

St John’s, Chipping Sodbury

July

28th Nov

29th Nov - 3rd Dec

If you don’t see your event in the list above please let me know, once it is on this calendar other people can put it on theirs! All times are subject to change look out for further details closer to the date. Michelle 01454 325160 office@svbcofe.org.uk

Magazine Advertising Organiser Wanted Sylvia Franklin is standing down from the role and we thank her for the great work she has done over the years. As a result the editorial team needs a volunteer who will look after the advertising for the Outlook magazine. The job entails keeping in contact with the advertisers, persuading them to renew their adverts when the time comes and looking for new advertisers in the local community. If you are able to help please initially contact Michelle in the Church Office 01454 325160 or by email at office@svbcofe.org.uk


Sodbury Vale Benefice Calendar April 2017 Sun 2nd Fifth Sunday of Lent

Tue

4th

Thurs

5th

Sun 9th Palm Sunday

8.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

9.30am

St John’s Praise

St John’s, C/S

11.15am

Mattins

St James’, Horton

11.15am

Family Communion

St John’s O/S

6.00pm

Evensong

St Adeline’s L/S

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, C/S

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

11.00am

Lent Course

9.30am

Parish Communion

St John’s C/S

11.15am

Holy Communion {BCP}

St James’, Horton

11.15am

Family Service

St John’s O/S

6.00pm

Evensong {BCP}

St Adeline’s L/S

Mon

10th

7.30pm

Prayers for Holy Week

St Adeline’s L/S

Tues

11th

3.00pm

Meditation Meeting

Ring 327118 for venue

7.30pm

Prayers for Holy Week

St John’s C/S

Wed

12th

7.30pm

Prayers for Holy Week

St John’s O/S

Thurs

13th

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

7.30pm

Maundy Thursday Service

St James’, Horton

Fri

14th

2.00pm

Good Friday Service

St John’s C/S

Sat

15th

8.00pm

Easter Vigil

St Adeline’s L/S

6.00am

Dawn Service

St John’s O/S

9.30am

Parish Communion

St John’s C/S

11.15am

Holy Communion

St James’, Horton

11.15am

Holy Communion {BCP}

St John’s O/S

6.00pm

Evensong {BCP}

St Adeline’s L/S

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

7.30pm

Crib Fest meeting

Church Centre C/S

9.30am

Parish Communion

St John’s C/S

11.15am

Holy Communion {CW}

St James’ Horton

11.15am

Morning Praise {CW}

St John’s O/S

6.00pm

Holy Communion {BCP}

St Adeline’s L/S

9.15am

Storkies

St John’s, C/S

2.00pm

Tea and Chat

Church Centre C/S

3.00pm

Meditation Meeting

Ring 327118 for venue

10.00am

Holy Communion

St John’s C/S

10.45am

Coffee Shop

Church Centre C/S

10:30am

Benefice Service

St John’s C/S

Sun 16th Easter Sunday

Thurs

20th

23th

Sun Second Sunday of Easter Tue

Thurs

25th

27th

Sun 30th Third Sunday of Easter

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plan. What’s more, our instant news culture tempts us to make snap judgments and to search for someone, anyone, to blame. We aim for the most prominent lightning rod available: the police, the social worker, the asylum seeker…

To Blame The Government, Press '1'

A blame culture seeps into our workplace when we try to keep our own slate clean whilst getting others’ dirty. People waste copious amounts of time and effort avoiding blame rather than resolving the issue. It quickly becomes toxic: damaging individual well-being, A US President blames fake media for undermining collaboration and fake news. Political pundits blame a innovation, and creating a fear of party leader for a poor by-election speaking out. result. And social media was rife with discussion about who was to blame for But we can challenge blame culture in the extraordinary ‘envelope our workplaces. This happens firstly malfunction’ at the Oscars. There when we avoid rushing to judgment, seems to be a lot of blame being thrown aware that a complex web of personal around, but it was ever thus. As far decisions and organisational pressures back as Genesis 3, Adam deftly lie behind most ‘failures’. Secondly, sidesteps his own culpability for when we spend more time celebrating disobeying God by blaming Eve for the successes of others than dissecting giving him the forbidden fruit, and even their weak spots. Thirdly, when we blaming God for putting Eve there encourage mutual accountability and beside him in the first place. shared responsibility within our teams, Being held responsible for our decisions and actions is an inescapable part of our existence as moral agents. When sales targets aren’t met, or when our football team plummets from being last season’s Champions to this season’s Relegation Battlers, we can rightly expect fingers to be pointed.

so that we stand, or fall, together. And if (or when) things don’t work out, we focus on fixing the issue rather than pointing the finger.

Blame can be a potent weapon, but it’s one that Jesus never used to get his way. His weapons, and ours, are humility, service, encouragement and forgiveness. Our desire is not to tear Blame can, however, quickly become others down, but to see them succeed. insidious and destructive. Similar to In the end, there are no winners in the Adam, blaming others can become our blame game. way of side-stepping our responsibilities when things don’t go to Nick Tatchell Nick is an HR Consultant Source - London Institute for Contemporary Christianity www.licc.org.uk.

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April Outlook 2017  
April Outlook 2017  

The monthly magazine of the Sodbury Vale Benefice of churches

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