2018 ORANGE BOOK

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TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction IX

Urging Fast And Colloborative Intervention/Actions Towards Competitiveness, Resiliency And Climate Readiness Of Philippine Agriculture And Fisheries Racing Against Rice Liberalization 1 Addressing High Poverty Especially in Visayas and Mindanao 2 Ensuring Commitment to the 2018 UN Commission on Status of Women 2 Global Call for Local Climate Actions 3 Alternative Budget Proposals 3 Augmenting DAs Budget 3 Assisting Small Rice Farmers 4 Social Protection and Community Organizing 4 Promotion of System of Rice Intensification (SRI) 4 Support to Small Farm Reservoir (SFR) Development 4 Heavily-investing on Soil Fertility Measures 5 Comprehensive Resiliency Program for Poor and Vulnerable Communities 5 Set Up of Community Seed Reserves 6 NFA’s Buffer Stocking 6 Reversing the Decline in Fisheries 6 Support Development in Conservation of Fishery Management Areas (FMA) 6 Support to Village Level Fish Processing 7 Supporting Fisherfolk Cooperative Building in Areas with Community Fish Landing (CFL) Areas 7 Improving Agriculture and Fishery Governance Sustained Private Sector Led Agri-Fisheries Implementation Monitoring 7 Piloting a Coherent, Responsive, and Efficient Local and National Agriculture Planning 7 Data Trade Provision for Private Sector 7 Creation of Phil. Council for Agriculture and Fisheries Special Committee for Women 7 Farmer-led Inventory or Rice Land in Local Levels 8 Table of Alternative Budget Proposals 8

Equity Budgeting For Ensuring Quality Education

Development and Education Landscape 15 Sustainable Development Goal 4 15 Philippine Development Plan 2017 – 2022 16 Accelerating Human Capital Development 17 Strategies for Education 17 Issues and Gaps Access to Education 18 Children 5-17 Years Old Not Attending School By Age Group 18 Financing for Education 19 ABI 2018

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Basic Education Budget 19 Inequitable Basic Education Budget 20 Senior High School Voucher Program 21 Affordable Private Education Centers 21 Lack of Regulation of Public Schools 21 Summary of Findings of E-Net Case Study on Private School Regulation 22 Alternative Budget Proposals 23

A Review Of The 2018 Budget For Environment And Climate Resilienc

2018 Spending for Environment and Resilience 29 ABI Environment/Climate Change Cluster Proposals and Financing Sources 37 Light Infrastructures 38 Food and Nutrition 38 Land Degradation Neutrality 38 Coastal and Oceans Clean Up 38 CC Adaption and DRR 39 Biodiversity Conservation and Forestry 39 Ecological Solid Waste Management 39 Renewable and Sustainable Energy 40 Children in Emergencies 40 Whole Budget Approach 41

Universal Health Care Now! Abi – Health Cluster Proposal For Fy 2018/2019 Budget

ABI-Health Position Paper on UHC 43 The Health Situation: Inequities Persist 48 Challenges in the Health Sector 52 Workforce Shortage 52 Administrative Fragmentation 53 Health Policy Fragmentation 53 Health and Sustainable Development Goals 54 Whole Government Approach to Health/Health in All Policies 55 The Philippine Government Health Agenda: FOURmula One Plus 56 ABI Health Cluster Proposal: The People’s Health Agenda 57 Proposals for Key Determinants of Health 58 Water, Sanitation, Hygiene: Access to Clean Water, Sanitation Facilities 59 Water, Sanitation, Hygiene 59 Health and Nutrition 61 Road Access and Safety 63 Participation as an Underlying Determinant of Health 65 The Resources for Health 66 Alternative Health Budget Proposals 74 Health Workforce 74 Health Promotion and Integrative Health 77 Philhealth 80 Older Persons Participation in Primary Care 84 Persons with Disability 85 National Public Health Emergency and Management 86

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The HIV Epidemic in the Philippines 87 Reproductive Health 90 Strengthening Good Governance in Medicines 94 Children and Youth, including Child Protection 96 Citizens’ Participation in the Health Budget 107 Sources of Financing 108

Accessibility: Key Inclusion And Participation In Community Life: Abi Proposal For Persons With Disabilities Our Contention 119 Alternative Budget Proposals for PWDs 124

A Review Of Dswd’s 2018 National Budget – Social Protection Cluster, Alternative Budget Initiative, Social Watch Philipines 4Ps at Center Stage 128 Protective Social Welfare Programs 130 Alternative Budget Proposals 131 LIST OF TABLES: Fertilization Requirement Through the Years 5 Table of Alternative Budget Proposals for Agriculture and Fisheries 8 SDG Goal 4 15 Children 5-17 Years Old Not Attending School By Age Group 18 2018 NEP Big Ticket Items 19 Summary of Findings of E-Net Case Study on Private School Regulation 22 Details and Justification of the Proposed Budget 24 Top 3 Allocation: Agriculture, Water, ENR 31 Climate Change Expenditures by Department, 2016-2018 33 Budget for Agriculture Development 33 Environmental Protection, Tenurial Rights, Water Security 34 Energy Budget 36 Climate Change and DRR Budget 36 NDDRM Fund (GAA/NEP) 36 Top 10 Causes of Mortality, Philippines 48 The ABI-Health SWP People’s Health Agenda (2016-2030 vision) 57 Budget by Continuum of Care DOH Proposed Budget FY 2018 66 Health Sector Allocation of National Government Expenditures 67 National Health Accounts, Selected Asian Countries 71 DOH Health Promotion and Communications Services Budget 79 Specific Proposals for PITAHCs Additional Budget Particularly on Education Under the Social Advocacy Unit 80 Philhealth Members to be Covered by TseKaP 83 Tapping Older Persons as Health Human Resource 85 Psychiatric Medial Services in all Regional Hospitals and Maintenance Medicines of Children with Disabilities 86 National Public Health Emergency and Management Proposal 87 Child Protection Proposal 103 Inclusive Children’s Television Programming Proposal 106 Proposed Sources of Financing 109 ABI2018

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Proposed Amendments to UHC Bill 1896 109 ABI-PWD Cluster Budget Proposals – DPWH and DOTr 125 Comparison of 2017-2018 4Ps and KALAHI CIDS Budget 127 Investment in Well-Being of Poor Families -2017-2018 129 Protective Social Welfare Budget 130 LIST OF FIGURES: Basic Education Budget 2013 – 2018 19 Inequitable Basic Education Budget 20 Expenditures Related to Environment, Climate Change, and Disaster Risk Reduction 26 CC Tagging, by NCCAP Priorities 31 Utilization of Private and Public Health Care Facilities by Wealth Quintile 50 Prevalence of Stunting 0-5 years-olds, Philippines 50 Under-5 Mortality (by wealth quintile) 51 Assistance at Delivery (by wealth quintile) 51 Estimated UHC Total Cost 67 Total Health Expenditure as % of GDP 70 Out-of-Pocket Health Spending, 2012 72 The DOH Budget by Major Composition 73 Comparison of School Attendance Between all Household Beneficiaries vs. Household with Children with Disability Member 120 Reasons for Not Going to School (with no grade completed) 121 Average Daily Wage/Salary Workers by Educational Attainment 123 Education and Income Among Persons with Disabilities 123 Comparison of Poverty Incidence Between Households with Persons with Disability Members and the General Population 124

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INTRODUCTION More than two years into the Duterte Presidency, we are still facing issues, the old and the new, as we aspire for a universal, equitable, and people-centered development. This aspiration becomes even more daunting with the grand plan of achieving sustainable development in 2030. 2018 is the year of impending major reforms in the country. President Duterte’s pronouncements on rice liberalization speak of its forthcoming passage. On the other hand, there has been a growing support among advocates, public, and government agencies alike for the Universal Health Care Bill. Assessing how the country will realize the spirit of these laws is another point for discussion; to be followed by series of our collective actions. Persistent issues in key development areas such as education, climate resiliency, equality, and social protection hound our sustainable development agenda. Despite few safety nets in place (e.g. 4Ps, Free Tertiary Education) are we really on the right track of not leaving anyone behind? The Filipino farmers’ welfare, and by extension, our nation’s food security, yet again hangs by a thread. President Duterte’s pronouncement supporting the lifting of import limits, countered by criticisms from several sectors proves once again that we are facing a new age of uncertainty for the long barren agriculture sector. As such, our alternative budget proposals on this sector is one that seeks to ease the suffering of those left behind in what was once known as the rice granary of Asia. Sad to say, we have a blurred vision of a robust agricultural and fisheries sector for the years to come. Accelerating human capital through education is haunted by accessibility, financing, and growing unhealthy presence of the private sector. With the first batch of Senior High School entering tertiary education, have we truly prepared them for what lies outside their classrooms? This, complemented by the Free Tertiary Education, begs the question – what more can be offered to envigorate our lagging education systems? As it should be, global awareness on climate change has been steadily growing for the recent years. Left with less than 12 years to prevent irreparable damage to the Earth, it is imperative for the international community to raise the level of discourse and actions towards our common protection. It should raise our alarms, as Filipinos, that we are located in a position waiting to be engulfed by the effects of global warming. However, we are left with a passive, gradual to say the least, development in disaster risk reduction as reflected in the government’s actions. Our climate resiliency lags way behind our romanticized, often overused, Filipino resiliency attitude. It is high time to have climate resiliency in all sectors reflected in the government’s agenda – particularly the budget. Universal Health Care (UHC), which our Health Cluster fought for valiantly for so long, is envisioned to reap benefits across all sectors – persons with disabilities, children, women, to name a few. A colossal policy reform such as this would require major governance and fiscal reforms. Then again, this is another battle for us advocates. The Health Cluster’s tag line, “Kahit sino ka man, kahit saan ka man, kailan pa man, may de-kalidad na serbisyo pangkalusugan para sa lahat tungo sa buhay na may dignidad!” sums up our aspirations – indeed an assuring call for all our stakeholders. This is invigorated with the on-going campaign for higher sin taxes on tobacco expected to cover billions worth of funding for UHC. Will our development be spurred to those who need it more? Equitable development and inclusion of the marginalized, particularly of persons with disabilities, is long overdue. Their inclusion speaks so much of how we value our people as a society. It will be a most welcome site to see roads, conveyances, infrastructures, and other social systems cater to all. To this end, our Persons with Disabilities Cluster offers alternative budget for the Department of Transportation and Department of Public Works and Highways. There have been wider social protection measures through the Pantawid Pamilya. With a 6.2% growth ABI2018

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in 2018, will the growing numbers reflect the actual living conditions of the poor? With no clear major development that will be felt by Filipinos across development areas in the near future, is the flag ship social protection program of the government for two administrations reaping the gains of the multi-billion cash allowance? The unfair share of wealth and development of Filipinos across economic classes is a gross indicator of our progress as a nation. When the numbers do not trickle down to the majority of the population, it is warranted that we take positive reformative actions on how the people’s purse is used by the government. After all, the public coffers should only be opened to serve the public. With righteous indignation, we ask our government - “What reforms? What transformations?”

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Urging Fast and Collaborative Interventions/Actions Towards Competitiveness, Resiliency and Climate Readiness of Philippine Agriculture and Fisheries

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EQUITY BUDGETING FOR ENSURING QUALITY EDUCATION

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1Philippine

Statistics Authority. 2014 Yearbook of Labor Statistics (YLS)–Chapter 6– Working Children. http://labstat.psa.gov.ph/ARCHIVES/YLS/2014%20YLS/STATISTICAL%20TABLES/PDF/CHAPTER%206/Tab6.2.pdf

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2018 NEP Big Ticket Items In Thousand Pesos

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The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank. (2011). Philippines Private Provision, Public Purpose. A review of the Government’s Education Service Contracting Program. Executive Summary. pp. 3. http://wwwwds.worldbank.org/external/default/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2011/04/20/000333037_20110420020321/Rende red/PDF/611540WP0P10651e0Govt1s0ESC0Program.pdf 2

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A Review of the 2018 Budget for Environment and Climate Resilience1

Written by Isagani R Serrano for the SWP-ABI Environment and Climate Change Cluster being chaired by PRRM, with research and technical assistance by Alce Quitalig of the SWP-ABI secretariat.

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Universal Health Care Now!

People’s Declaration of Principles for the Universal Health Care for All

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The Health Situation: Inequities persist

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AXIS TITLE

Figure 1. Utilization of private and public healthcare facilities by wealth quintile (%) 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Public Facility

PrivateFacility

83.3

13.6

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23.9

Middle

64.2

33.7

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53.4

Richest

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Poorest Poor

Figure 2. Prevalence of stunting 0-5 year-olds, Philippines (by wealth quintile)

AXIS TITLE

50 40 30 20 10 0

Poorest

Poor

Middle

Rich

Richest

Urban

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Figure 3. Under-5 Mortality (by wealth quintile) 45 40 35 AXIS TITLE

30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Under -5 Mortality (%)

Poorest

Poor

Middle

Rich

Richest

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Figure 4. Assistance at delivery (by wealth quintile) 120

100 AXIS TITLE

80 60 40 20

0 Skilled assistance at delivery (%)

Poorest

Poor

Middle

Rich

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Challenges in the Health Sector

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Health and the Sustainable Development Goals

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Whole Government Approach to Health/Health in All Policies

1 Social determinants of

health are the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, {learn}, work, {worship} and age. These circumstances are shaped by the distribution of money, power and resources at global, national and local levels which are themselves influenced by policy choices. Accessed from the World Health Organization Website: http://www.who.int/hrh/resources/Ebook1st_meeting_report2015.pdf?ua=1 on 26 August 2015.

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The Philippine Government Health Agenda: FOURmula One Plus

ABI Health Cluster Proposal: The People’s Health Agenda

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Not to be confused with the Philippine Health Agenda (PHA) of the Philippine Government Consolidated draft by Steering Committee Member, Maria Fatima Villena

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Proposals for key determinants of health DETERMINANTS OF HEALTH PROPOSAL CONTENTS [1] Water, Sanitation, Hygiene: access to clean water, sanitation facilities [2] Health and Nutrition [3] Road Access and Safety

4 Water coming from community water system piped into dwelling, yard or plot, public tap, and protected well. 5 Unprotected well, spring, river, pond, lake, rainwater, and tanker truck or peddler 6 The National Anti-poverty Commission defines “waterless areas� as municipalities outside Metro Manila or Barangays inside Metro Manila wherein less than 50% of the total household population are connected to any water supply system.

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7 Costing estimates may change as the period gets adjusted

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Participation as an underlying determinant of health

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The Resources for Health

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Figure 5. Estimated UHC Total Cost (following a 10-year reform phase), in billion pesos Estimated Cost (w/ LGU budget)

273.15 257.54

Year 1 (2019)

291.81 271.02

Year 2 (2020)

312.41 286.33

Year 3 (2021)

333.92 302.43

Year 4 (2022)

356.43 319.38

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380.04 337.28

Year 6 (2024)

402.96 354.32

Year 7 (2025)

428.76 374.04

Year 8 (2026)

451.3 390.31

Year 9 (2027)

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Figure 6. Total Health Expenditure (THE) as % of GDP, Philippine National Health Accounts (2005-2016) 5

4.5 4 3.5

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4 2006

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3.9 2008

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8http://www.jointlearningnetwork.org/uploads/files/resources/WHO_Exploring_the_thresholds_of_health_expendit ure_Background_paper.pdf on October 8, 2015. The data presented here suggests that 15-20% of OOP as a share of total health expenditure and 5-6% of government expenditure on health as a share of GDP could considerably reduce the incidence financial catastrophe in a country. However, as we find in this study, the reality is almost all countries that have reached these levels are high and upper-middle income countries. 9 WHO "recommendation" that countries should spend 5 percent of GDP on health, a recommendation which was never formally approved

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Figure 7. Out-of-pocket health spending, 2012, Philippines 120% 100% Axis Title

80% 60% 40%

20% 0% Total

Quintile 1

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Quintile 3

Quintile 4

Quintile 5

Inpatient services

26%

14%

22%

21%

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29%

Outpatient medical and paramedical services in cash

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12%

Other medical goods and supplies in cash

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Drugs and medicines in cash

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. The Department of Health Budget by major composition (in Billion Pesos)* 180

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10 0 Health Facilities Subsidy for National Health Insurance Health Promotion

20 200 200 200 200 200 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 201 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0.043 1.65 2.07 3.2517.143 5.07 10.77 9.27 13.2726.8724.1930.26 3.5 12.02812.61 35.3 37.0643.8353.22 63.8 0.3160.316 0.44 0.4830.843 0.99 2.46 1.87 1.95 2.54 3.336 3.99 7.1 7.4

Family Health and Responsible Parenthood

0.06 0.06 0.1923.019 1.23 1.43 0.731 2.28 2.54 2.54 3.27 2.27 4.27 3.6

Total DOH Budget*

0

0.0410.0370.1330.1670.1720.1550.1530.1620.1650.1670.2020.1210.322

Expanded Program on Immunization

Health Human Resource Development

Total DOH budget

Allocation for Major Programs

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0.0190.0810.1240.192 0.29 0.2321.905 2.95 3.04 4.32 7.12 7.11 9.6 9.73 9.97 11.5818.9123.6624.6531.8342.0853.2383.7286.97122.63148.49169.8

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Alternative Health Budget Proposals1 SUB-CLUSTER PROPOSAL CONTENTS [1] Health workforce [2] Health Promotion and Integrative Health [3] PhilHealth [4] Older Persons Participation in Primary Care [5] Persons with Disability [6] National Public Health Emergency and Management [7] The HIV Epidemic in the Philippines [8] Reproductive Health [9] Strengthening Good Governance in Medicines [10] Children and Youth, including Child Protection [11] A Better Democracy, A Better Health for All; Citizens’ Participation in the Health Budget

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The ending balance of the PhilHealth reserve fund was PhP 120 billion in 2014.

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There is an ongoing debate on whether the PCB should be providing general health checks for all members, both healthy and sick, as it is currently designed, or providing primary care for those who are sick. Studies have shown that general health checks are very costly to provide but are not beneficial in reducing morbidity and mortality. 14 Currently, only government facilities can be accredited as a PCB provider since it is still uncertain if private facilities will be willing to provide primary care to indigents at the current PhP 1,800 per family budget. 15 For example, the current prescribed fix allocation of the per family payment rate (PFPR) is restricting local public health providers from using the capitation to subsidize the transportation cost of patients that need to be referred to other facilities. Other local governments may also find that the prescribed 15% of PFPR is insufficient to compensate health workers.

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Portions fully drawn from Investment Options for Ending AIDS in the Philippines by 2022: Modeling different HIV Investment Scenarios in the Philippines from 2015 to 2030. A paper commissioned by UNAIDS Philippines. January 2015. 17 Philippines 2012 Global AIDS Response Progress Report, PNAC 18 Philippine HIV Situation 2014 Update (presentation), UNAIDS Philippines 19 2005-2013 IHBSS, DOH-NEC

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20 According to the 2013 IHBSS, only 30.7% of PWID used Sterile equipment the last time they injected, suggested that 70% of PWID are using needle/syringes that are contaminated—this may be due to sharing with friends, using discarded need needed, being injected by professional injectors.

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The CIP is a multi-year actionable roadmap designed to help governments achieve family planning goals. It is focused on three components: (1) supportive environment through Contraceptive security through provision of FP supplies and services, FP grants for demand generation and service delivery, deployment of one RPRH officer per municipality under the nurse deployment program, purple ribbon award and PhilHealth services, an (2) social marketing, and (3) leadership and management.

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A Better Democracy, A Better “Health for All”: Citizen’s Participation in the Health Budget

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Sources of financing

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Accessibility: Key to Inclusion and Participation in Community Life

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A Review of DSWD’s 2018 National Budget

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In P’000

2017 GAA

Increase 2018 GAA (Decrease)

4Ps

78,186,55 1

89,408,30 3

14.4%

Sustainable Livelihood Program

9,112,556

5,060,000

(44.5%)

KALAHI-CIDSS

10,229,16 0

5,425,085

(47.0%)

97,528,26 7

99,893,38 8

2.4%

TOTAL WZ(}uMWZv(}u}vM

Page 1 of 6

127


https://psa.gov.ph/poverty-press-releases/data. Last accessed 7 July 2018. Commission on Audit, Performance Audit Report (PAO-2017-01), 12 3 DSWD 2018 National Expenditure Program, 141 4 https://www.teacherph.com/deped-public-schools-enrolment-sy-2015-2016/. Last accessed 7 July 2018. 5 Presentation given by DepEd on 22 September 2016 during a forum of E-Net Philippines at Ateneo de Manila University. 6 Department of Social Welfare and Development, Keeping Children Healthy and In School: Evaluating the Pantawid Pamilya Using Regression Discontinuity Design Second Wave Impact Evaluation Results, 2014, 20. 7 DSWD, Keeping Children Healthy, 28 1 2

128

Page 2 of 6

ABI 2018


2017 GAA

In P’000

2018 GAA

Increase (Decrease )

Social pension for indigent senior citizens

17,940,25 19,282,85 8 8

7.5%

Protective program for individuals & families in esp. difficult circumstances

2,136,526 5,708,078

167.2%

Disaster response & rehabilitation program

2,197,755 4,899,866

122.9%

Services for residential & center-based clients

1,416,408 3,854,808

172.2%

Supplementary feeding program

4,427,077 3,428,462

(22.6%)

Technical assistance & resource augmentation program for LGUs Social welfare for distressed overseas Filipinos & trafficked persons Tax reform cash transfer project

9

929,862

17.6%

24,827

167,601

575.1%

1,184,705

BangUN project to reduce child hunger & malnutrition in ARMM 8

791,011

156,011

Keeping Children Healthy, 22 Philippines Statistics Authority, Philippines in Figures 2017, 36.

WZ(}uMWZv(}u}vM

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129


NEP

In ‘000

GAA

Protective program for individuals & families in esp. difficult circumstances

3,455,344

5,708,078

Disaster response & rehabilitation program

3,647,866

4,899,866

Services for residential & center-based clients

1,554,808

3,854,808

130

Page 4 of 6

ABI 2018


WZ(}uMWZv(}u}vM

Page 5 of 6

131


132

Page 6 of 6

ABI 2018



ABI MEMBERS LIST Access Health International ACHIEVE INC. Action for Economic Reforms (AER) Active Youth Movement (AYM) AKBAYAN Aksyon Klima Plipinas Alliance of Progressive Labor (APL) ALMANA Alternative Health Foundation (Alt*Health) Alyansa Agrikultura Alyansa ng May Kapansanang Pinoy Alyansa Tigil Mina ANAK Youth of KABATAAN Ang Kapakanan ng Kabataan ating Protektahan (AKKAP) Ang NARS Partylist Association of Major Religious Superiors of the Philippines – Justice Ateneo School of Government (ASOG) Autism Society Philippines Ayos na Gamot sa Abot Kayang Presyo (AGAP) Babae Plus Bagong Silangan Youth Federation (BSYF) Ban Toxics Brilliance Homeowners Association Bulig Kami Parents Association of Samar Call Foundation for the Blind Catholics for Reproductive Health (C4RH) CBR Smile, Inc. Center for Emergency Aid & Rehabilitation Inc. (CONCERN) Center for Empowerment and Development of Elderly and Seniors (CEDES)/PAMANA Center for Empowerment and Resource Development (CERD) Child Protection Unit Network (CPU-NET) ChildFund Philippines Childhope Asia Children and Youth Organization (CYO) Children Talk to Children (C2C) Children’s Legal Rights and Development Center (CLRDC) Christian Aid in the Philippines Civil Society Network for Education Reforms (E-Net Philippines) Coalition for Health Advocacy and Transparency (CHAT) Coalition of Services of the Elderly, Inc. (COSE) Community Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Facilitators Confederation of Older Persons Associations Philippines (COPAP) CORRINAI Housing Cooperative Damayan ng Maralitang Pilipinong Api, (DAMPA) Inc. Dario River Alliance Housing Cooperative (DRAHC) Deafblind Support Philippines Dream House Ville Home Owners Association Earth Day Network Philippines (EDNP), Inc. Earth Savers Movement Eco Waste Coalition EDUCO - Fundación Educación y Cooperación Philippines ERDA Foundation Family Planning Organization of the Philippines (FPOP) FCTC Alliance Philippines (FCAP) Filtao MPC First Philippine Conservation Incorporated (FPCI) Forum for the Family Planning and Development Foundation for the Philippine Environment Freedom from Debt Coalition-KUMPAS Gintong Silangan Philippines Golden Agers Good Neighbors International Government Union for the Integration of Differently Abled Employees Green Research Gumamela Neighborhood Association Haribon Foundation Health Integrated Development and Services (HIDS) Healthcare Without Harm HealthJustice

Hope for the Youth Foundation, Inc. Inclusive Mobility Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities Kaakbay Kababaihan Pilipinas Kagduma Hu mga Higaonon (KHI) Inc KAIBHAN INC. Kaisahang Buhay Foundation Kalipunan ng mga Sektor sa Caloocan (KASECA) / LGU Caloocan Kalusugan ng Mag-ina, Inc. KAMAO Kampanya Para sa Makataong Pamumuhay Kasama Ka Organik Kooperatib Kasarian-Kalayaan, Inc. (SARILAYA) Katalingban para sa Kalabuan Katipunan ng Bagong Pilipina (KABAPA) Katipunan ng mga Mamamayan ng Bagong Pilipinas Inc. (KMBPI) Katipunan ng mga May Kapansanan sa Pilipinas Katungod Han Samareña Federation Kilos Damit Kilusan ng Mamamayan sa Bagong Milenyo (KMBM) Kilusan Para sa Makatarungang Lipunan at Gobyerno Labor Education and Research Network (LEARN) Las Piñas Persons with Disabilities Federation Leonard Chesire Disability Philippines Life Haven, Inc. Lilak (Purple Action for Women) Lunduyan Center MAKALAYA Malabon City Brgy. Health Workers Federation and Malabon Integrated Entrepreneur, Inc. (MINE) Mga Gawa My Refuge National Anti-Poverty Commission (Women, Children, Urban Poor, and Youth and Students Basic Sector) National Council for Social Development (NCSD) National Organization of Visually Impaired Empowered Ladies New Tribes Mission New Vois Association NGOs for Fisheries Reform (NFR) No Burn Coalition Norfil Foundation, Inc. Nova Foundation One Organic Movement Open Heart Foundation PAMANA Pambansang Koalisyon ng Kababaihan sa Kanayunan (PKKK) Parents Association of Visually Impaired Children Partido Luntian Partido Manggagawa Partnership for Clean Air, Inc. Peace, Integrity of Creation Commission (AMRSP-JPICC) Peer Counselling Foundation Peer Educators Movement for Empowerment of Pasay, Manila, Caloocan, and Quezon City (Peer Ed PMACQ) Philippine Alliance of Persons with Chronic Illness Philippine Association for Citizens with Developmental and Learning Disabilities Philippine Business for Education (PBED) Philippine Center for Population and Development Philippine Chamber of Massage Industry for Visually Impaired Philippine Coalition on the U.N. Convention On The Rights of Persons with Disabilities \ Philippine Deaf Resource Center Philippine Federation for Environmental Concern (PFEC) Philippine Federation for Natural Family Planning (PFNFP-FILTAO) Philippine Federation of the Deaf Philippine Legislators’ Committee on Population and Development (PLCPD) Philippine Movement for Climate Justice (PMCJ) Philippine Partnership on Children with Disability

Philippine Rural Reconstruction Movement (PRRM) Philippine Society of General Internal Medicine (PSGIM) Philippine Society of Sexual & Reproductive Health Nurses (PSORHN) Piglas Kababaihan Plan International Psoriasis Philippines Public Services Labor Independent Confederation (PSLINK) PUNLAKA Putting Baston Advocacy Quezon City Federation of Persons with Disabilities Resilience: Nurturing Disaster-Ready Cities and Communities Rice Watch and Action Network Saganang Buhay sa Liga ng Bayan Foundation (SBSB) Sagip Sierra Madre Environment Society, Inc. Samahan ng mga Mamamayan ng Zone One Tondo Organization (SM-ZOTO) Save the Children SCOPE Sentro ng Progresibong Manggagawa Sibol ng Agham at Teknolohiya (SIBAT) Socialista Southeast Asia Regional Initiatives for Community Empowerment (SEARICE) Stakeholder Partnerships for Education and Lifelong Learn¬ing (SPELL) Tahanang Walang Hagdanan Tambuyog Development Center Tanggol Kalikasan Teachers, Inc. Teachers’ Dignity Coalition (TDC) TLF Sexuality, Health and Rights Educators Collective Inc. (TLF SHARE) Trinitarian Center for Development, Trinity University of Asia Unang Hakbang Foundation Unified Filipinos Service Workers (UFSW)-National Federation of Labor United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Universal Health Care Study Group UP Diliman Gender Office Upholding Life and Nature (ULAN) Visayas Health Ministry of United Methodist Church Visually Impaired’s Brotherhood for Excellent Services WomanHealth Philippines Women with Disabilities Leap to Social and Economic Progress Women’s Legal and Human Rights Bureau Women’s Education, Development, Productivity and Research Organization, Inc. (WEDPRO) World Vision Development Foundation, Inc. Young People’s Action for Change (YPAC) Youth Leader’s Club of Antipolo Youth Meets the Children Organization (YMETCO)

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