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A SHOWCASE OF

IN EDUCATION 2017 -18

NURSERY | PRIMARY | SECONDARY | ADDITIONAL SUPPORT NEEDS | HIGHER & FURTHER EDUCATION


WELCOME! As another school year comes to a close we are once again able to look back on some of the amazing social enterprise activity that has been happening all across Scotland from Kinlochbervie to South Lanarkshire and everywhere in between! The Social Enterprise in Education Programme raises awareness and understanding of social enterprise across Scotland and ignites the entrepreneurial talents of our young people. The Year of Young People 2018 is a chance for Young Scots to speak up about issues which affect their lives. Getting involved in social enterprise is a chance for them to identify these issues, voice them and then take action to make positive change. We are delighted to be able to share with you some of the stories of these inspiring young social entrepreneurs in this showcase and would like to take this opportunity to thank all of the schools who have contributed and worked hard to make them so successful. Social enterprises this year have ranged from running a lunchtime disco in an elderly care home, setting up a community pizza oven, tackling bullying and alcohol abuse, to making wooden crafts to fund a community defibrillator. The programme has enabled young people to get hands-on experience of running a social enterprise and given them a chance to recognise their strengths, develop skills and celebrate achievements. It is clear to see how these social enterprises are preparing young people for life, learning and the world of work and we wish them every success for the future. Kind Regards,

Emily Mnyayi Head of Social Enterprise in Education, Social Enterprise Academy

CONTAC T US

Claire Fraser (East), James Johnstone (West) 0131 243 2677

FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA >>

 @SEA_Edu  @SEAEducation

Rachel Farmer (H&I) 01463 238088

FREE RESOURCES >>for Excellence lum Download Curricu m our website fro s ce ur so re linked

We’d love to hear more about how your social enterprises are shaping up, so please do keep in touch and share your stories! You can send your news to schools@socialenterprise.academy


SHOWCASE CONTENT HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS

GLASGOW CITY

4

CROWN PRIMARY SCHOOL

8

ALEXANDRA PARADE PRIMARY

12

SHAWLANDS PRIMARY SCHOOL

5

DORNOCH ACADEMY

9

CARMUNNOCK PRIMARY SCHOOL

13

SUNNYSIDE PRIMARY SCHOOL

6

MILTON OF LEYS PRIMARY SCHOOL

10

DRUMCHAPEL HIGH SCHOOL

14

ST ALBERT’S PRIMARY SCHOOL

7

KINLOCHBERVIE HIGH SCHOOL

11

PIRIE PARK PRIMARY SCHOOL

RENFREWSHIRE

INVERCLYDE

15

ST COLUMBA’S HIGH SCHOOL

16

ST JOSEPH’S PRIMARY SCHOOL

CLACKMANNANSHIRE

19

LORNSHILL ACADEMY

EDINBURGH CITY

24

BROUGHTON HIGH SCHOOL

25

CASTLEBRAE COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL

SOUTH LANARKSHIRE

17

MARY RUSSEL SCHOOL

18

PIRIE PARK PRIMARY SCHOOL

20

DAIRSIE PRIMARY SCHOOL

22

MASTERTON PRIMARY SCHOOL

21

DULLOCH PRIMARY SCHOOL

23

TULLIALLAN PRIMARY SCHOOL

FIFE

FIND OUT MORE...

EAST LOTHIAN

26

ABERLADY PRIMARY SCHOOL

28

GLOSSARY


HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS

CROWN PRIMARY SCHOOL THE JUNIOR APPRENTICE

We are supporting Highland Hospice.

WHY? Crown Primary School chose to set up a social enterprise as it is a great way to promote creativity, problem solving and team work. As a Rights Respecting School, helping others and fundraising are a key part of our school’s visions and values. Due to the success of last years Junior Apprentice project and the school’s close relationship with the Highland Hospice, we decided to participate in the competition again. Each team designed and created their own product to sell.

WHAT? The social purpose of our social enterprise was to raise awareness and money for a local charity: the Highland Hospice. The social enterprise project gave us a better understanding of what the Highland Hospice does and why it is a good charity to support. Our school was inspired to support this cause because the Highland Hospice is a local charity and has a good relationship with the school from previous fundraisers. The Highland Hospice needs people to fundraise for it so that it can run as

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 4

it costs a lot of money to run the hospice each day. Some of our family members had also benefited from the Hospice’s services so we were very keen to help out.

Our favourite part was the atmosphere at the finals of the competition. We were proud to have got that far.


HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS

DORNOCH ACADEMY

BRAW CHOCOLATE We want to raise money for Common Ground by producing chocolate WHY? Pupils from Dornoch Academy have set up an enterprise initiative entitled ‘Braw Chocolate’ to raise money for local charities Common Ground – a charity which gives adults with learning difficulties a chance to socialise, SOAR – who provide out of school clubs for children and TYKES – a charity who support young carers who are looking after their families and need access to social activities. WHAT? Pupils decided to sell hand crafted chocolate to the local community and have generated £16,500 turnover in the first three years. Pop up shops run in a variety of settings. Pupils experience chocolate production techniques including filling chocolate cups, capping chocolate cups and decorating chocolate bars.

WHAT SKILLS DID YOU DEVELOP? Pupils involved feel that they have become more confident managing money and people. The pupils feel that the social enterprise has enhanced their employability skills and are proud to have been part of this initiative. Several former members of the group have found local employment as a direct result of being a part of “Braw Chocolate”.

Social enterprise is an option in our school timetable and chocolate is always popular!

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HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS

MILTON OF LEYS PRIMARY SCHOOL

MOL MARKET

We are using the profit from selling sustainable products to buy a community defibrillator WHY? Our social enterprise is community focused, with profits being used for a free community bingo night and supporting the charity ‘Lucky 2 B Here’ . WHAT? Pupils at Milton of Leys raised £2,000 from their sustainable Christmas Fayre, where all products were hand crafted and materials ethically sourced, including some very popular candle holders made from up-cycled whiskey barrels. Working with their local secondary school Millburn Academy, Milton of Leys P7 made wooden reindeer complete with antlers and red nose. With the money raised the pupils hosted a free community bingo night. The school also partnered with the charity ‘Lucky 2 B Here’ to purchase a defibrillator for the local community. P7 pupils received life support first aid and defibrillator training and next years P7 will receive the same training in September.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 6

The school’s parent council have taken on the responsibility of looking after and maintaining the defibrillator for the local community. Pupils plan to host regular community coffee evenings during which life support first aid training will be offered to members of our local community.

WHAT DID YOUR GROUP LEARN? P7 have created a sustainable Christmas MOL Market using recycled materials to create their products for selling. We had the opportunity for a team of P7 pupils to go up to Millburn to use their technical workshop to help make our Christmas Reindeer. Pupils have learnt craft skills when making candle holders as well as woodworking skills from making wooden reindeer. Through organising and running the market space, skills have been developed in handling money and organising events.


HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS

KINLOCHBERVIE HIGH SCHOOL

TEAM 10

We are supporting HIghland Hospice. WHY? The Highland Hospice provides support and care for children, families and carers during their difficult times. They create an environment that is safe, comfortable and pleasant for everyone involved. Staff provide 24 hour assistance for this worthy cause. WHAT? A challenge was set by the hospice for schools in Highland Council to raise as much money as possible. This was our second year completing this challenge, our experience from the first year inspired us to participate again. We decided to plan and organise a Christmas Craft Fayre for our local community. All monies received would be donated to the Highland Hospice.

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? “Making products and Christmas decorations” - Tia

“Baking cakes for refreshments” - Caitlin “Providing music for entertainment” - Gemma “Presenting information to the judges” - Chelsea “Making posters for marketing the event” - Ellie “Organising the raffle” - Charlie “Welcoming customers to the event” - Darren “Working as part of a team” - Ross “Learning about amazing work the Hospice does” - Michelle

I enjoyed designing products to sell at our craft fayre - Katey

“Watching my class develop their professionalism in planning and organising an event” - Mrs Bain

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GLASGOW CITY

ALEXANDRA PARADE PRIMARY SCHOOL

CRUMBLE AND CRUST CAFE

We wanted to create a cafe driven by healthy choices and links across the curriculum. WHY? We wanted to create a cafe that used links in food technologies, literacy, maths and health and wellbeing across the curriculum in a meaningful, contextualised environment. We wanted to establish partnerships with community groups and local businesses and equip the children with skills for learning, life and work. WHAT? We wanted to support pupils in Ngoma Basic School in Zambia to allow them to purchase resources that would support their education and we wanted to reach out to local community groups and establish connections with our school. We did this by providing afternoon tea for residents at a local care home and a local church group in our school. Our aim is to bring the community together, support vulnerable groups and give back to others who would benefit from our funding and social interaction.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 8

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY THE MOST? It brings the community together and it shows what skills we have. We have to work together as a team. Cole We cook, bake, think about being healthy and we do it together. Ewa It brings the whole community together, the whole school is involved and it teaches life skills which can be used at home. Reece I liked serving people. Luci You interact with people and you donate money to those who are less fortunate. Nina We can learn how to prepare food, how to run a cafe, work as a team and be a partnership. Nadine It’s fun because the whole school is involved. Trevor


GLASGOW CITY

CARMUNNOCK PRIMARY

HELPING HANDS & THE DIGITAL SCHOOL MENU We wanted to build closer bonds with the community and reduce food waste. WHY? The social purpose of our Helping Hands team is to build closer bonds with the local community, particularly older people. The Helping Hands Team was inspired by the news coverage of older people living in the community becoming isolated and by the benefits of older and younger generations meeting and socialising together. The purpose of the Digital School Menu team is to reduce food waste. Our digital School Menu was inspired by the idea that everyone in some way can help reduce global warming and become environmentally friendly

WHAT? By running a community cafe, Helping Hands share their learning with older people, such as ICT skills and the older community can share ideas with the children such as life in the past. This would develop friendships and community work

within our village and also alleviate the plight of an older generation feeling lonely or isolated. We developed an idea for Digital School Menu where lunches would be pre ordered through our school app. Therefore pupils would get their first choice of meal which would reduce food waste as they would be more likely to finish it and it would no longer be necessary for the kitchen staff to order extra meals in case they run out.

WHAT DID YOUR GROUP LEARN? Our groups learned that we can make a difference. As both our ideas are now being promoted within our school and our local community. We have learned how to create, persuade and present ideas, how to run a small business, how to interact with others outwith our own school and most importantly the value of thinking and caring for others.

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GLASGOW CITY

DRUMCHAPEL HIGH SCHOOL HOPE We wanted to help teenage depression and anxiety as well as making people more aware about it.

WHY? We have taken part in Social Enterprise for a few years and find it fits perfectly with our Wider Achievement curriculum. We wanted to help teenage depression and anxiety as well as making people more aware about it. WHAT? The group that create HOPE felt strongly about their social issue. We aim to create our club to give people a place to relax and also a place to educate others about depression and anxiety.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 10

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? I enjoyed seeing two quiet usually shy pupils go up and present strongly about a social cause they care deeply about. The pupils enjoyed going out of the comfort zone and felt fantastic after their presentation.


GLASGOW CITY

PIRIE PARK PRIMARY CODING KIDS We want to train adults and older people to be more capable using ICT whilst connecting the elderly to family and friends. WHY? The purpose of our school’s social enterprise is two-fold. First, we want to train adults and older people to be more capable using ICT, particularly computer programming. This is to improve their employability options in an age of automation. The second is to connect adults and particularly the elderly to family and friends by training them how to use social media. WHAT? We have a strong knowledge of computer programming from knowledge of programming video games. From this we considered who could we help using our ICT skills? We came to the conclusion that our parents, particularly the older ones, are

WHAT DID YOUR GROUP LEARN? From our experiences of training parents in computer coding classes, we realised that our concern about parents lack of ICT knowledge was well founded. Most parents hadn’t realised that coding is at the heart of software that they use every day. We also learned that our parents’ ability to learn coding was as good as ours. Our parents simply had not had the same learning opportunities when they were younger to learn about coding in a formal schooling environment. However, they were still able to understand the coding and join in on its creation.

without the skills which we all take for granted. They find apps and smartphones confusing even though they are increasingly important for employability and socialising.

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GLASGOW CITY

SHAWLANDS PRIMARY SHAWLANDS OUTFITTERS We sell excellent, second hand uniform to pupils, parents and carers of Shawlands Primary school. WHY? We wanted to provide pupils with cheaper school uniforms, easing the financial burden for many parents and carers by reducing the cost of school. WHAT? We sell excellent, second hand uniform to pupils, parents and carers of Shawlands Primary school. We donated 400 non branded uniform items to 2 local schools who are also in need. We are in talks with them to help them set up the same system in their schools. Shawlands Outfitters is fully self-sufficient. We get amazing donations from parents and carers and every month we sort out the lost property. We make 100% profit as all clothing items have been donations from the school community and we even managed to get temporary storage boxes for free too. The profits have helped to pay for the whole school’s access to a music program called Charanga, helped many classes go on their class trips and even helped Santa visit P1 at their Christmas parties. SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 12

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY THE MOST? Going to Dragons’ Den was a great experience of how the real business world works. It allowed the children to achieve their goal of a permanent shelving unit.

We have developed many business skills such as advertising, accounts, stock management. These are life skills which cannot be achieved in a typical classroom environment.


GLASGOW CITY

SUNNYSIDE PRIMARY SCHOOL #NAESTRAWATAW We are encouraging local shops and restaurants to reduce the amount of single use plastic straws

WHY? Through working with the fantastic MCSUK, we adopted a beach a couple of years ago. Doing beach cleans, and auditing what was found, we have seen the impact of plastic first hand. WHAT? We thought that by creating a grass roots campaign where children can take responsibility for reducing the amount of single use plastic being used in our own town/area, we could make a significant impact in a fairly short space of time. Having first focused on the bottle deposit scheme

WHAT SKILLS DID YOU DEVELOP? From organising trips, campaign posters, websites, using social media, we have gained confidence and experience in public speaking, persuasive techniques and the science skills and knowledge gained through research has been invaluable to being able to back up our claims and hopes.

last session, the school established a link with British Divers Marine Life Rescue (BDMLR) by raising money for much needed dolphin pontoons in the Wester Ross area. This led to a link with Living Seas (an element of the Scottish Wildlife Trust) and a join project was created to ask businesses to replace single use plastic straws with alternatives.

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GLASGOW CITY

ST ALBERT’S PRIMARY SCHOOL SOCIAL ENTERPRISE ULTRA We are supporting multiple local social enterprises and vulnerable groups in our city. WHY? We decided to embed a whole school approach to Social Enterprise so that we were not specifically focusing on one cause or one organisation. We believe that SE links should be purposeful and sustainable, so that it serves the common good. WHAT? Our established Social Enterprise projects are relevant to each class in our school, based on interests and current issues in our local area. Therefore, we were inspired by asking ourselves, our parents, teachers and community members; ‘How could we improve our local area?’, ‘Which groups require our support?’, ‘Which services can we provide?’.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 14

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? We have and will continue to enjoy and experience many challenges and successes due to the sustainable nature of our idea. We believe in adopting a resilient attitude towards each obstacle we face, and developing a social conscience. We further developed our skills in creativity, communication, digital literacy, budgeting and marketing. We enjoyed working in partnership with already established social enterprises and learning from them how a social enterprise can serve a community and make a profit at the same time.


INVERCLYDE

SAINT COLUMBA’S HIGH SCHOOL CUP EXPRESS We are creating ‘back home boxes’ for people in our community returning home after hospital. WHY?

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY THE MOST?

We are studying National 5 Health Sector Skills and the idea to help Compassionate Inverclyde with the back home boxes fitted into the course well. Whilst we were learning about health sector jobs, we were keen to go into the hospital and help people. We had heard about the back home boxes and thought it would be good to get involved in it.

Gaining confidence and taking on responsibilities. Some of us were embarrassed to speak in front of others and now can talk confidently to a panel of adults about their project.

WHAT? To provide supplies for the ‘back home boxes’, these are a box of provisions for people being discharged from hospital who do not have someone at home to look after them. We came up with ideas to raise money for this, and the winning idea was to make tea for teachers. They noticed there was a hole in the market and that teachers are busy and do not have a lot of time at interval, so this social enterprise actually helped in two ways.

WHAT SKILLS DID YOU DEVELOP? The group learnt the basics of running a business. We had to come up with a money making idea, source and organise supplies, handle money, communicate with suppliers and organise their time so the teachers had a hot drink in their interval. Our confidence in speaking to others has massively increased as we have been interviewed by the local paper and taken part in a Dragons’ Den style event.

15 SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE


INVERCLYDE

ST JOSEPH’S PRIMARY SCHOOL

INTERGENERATIONAL LEARNING Our generation is often misrepresented. We wanted to show the elderly that we’re good young people. WHY? As part of our raising attainment in literacy we wanted to apply our communication and writing skills in a real life context. We chose to set up a Social Enterprise project as it provided us with the opportunity to apply our skills to fundraising which would in turn provide the necessary funding for the social aspect of our project. With 78% of our pupils with EAL it was apparent from class discussions that most of our pupils do not get to see their grandparents very often as many of them live far away. We recognise that the older generation have a wealth of knowledge and experiences that we can learn from

WHAT? Our team felt that working with the elderly would be an excellent way to share their learning and their visits would give the elderly something nice to look forward to. We learned some of the

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 16

old, forgotten crafts such as knitting and sewing so they could help and encourage their elderly friends to have a go at trying them out again and perhaps pass on any tips to improve their work. Our class hoped that together we would be able to share their experiences of life in Glasgow in the past and present.

WHAT SKILLS DID YOU DEVELOP? Many of us are enjoying the craft work with the elderly. Isobel age 73 said, “I really enjoyed making that fish, I didn’t think I could do it.” Amelia age 9 said, “I enjoyed sitting, chatting away to Jean while we were both knitting away.”


RENFREWSHIRE

MARY RUSSELL SCHOOL

RUSSELL RECORD BREAKFAST CLUB Our purpose is to provide the most deprived with a better start to their day WHY? Our school magazine (the Russell Record) has been making a profit since it started and because of this, the profits were spent on making the magazine. However, we thought the money would be better spent on buying breakfast goods for deprived pupils within the school.

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? We have enjoyed learning numerous curricular skills as well as skills for life and work. It had also been rewarding to see many deprived pupils having a better start to their day because of our Breakfast Club.

WHAT? Our purpose is to provide the most deprived with a better start to their day. We started by trialling this across the whole school to ensure everyone understood our purpose and to help remove any poverty-related stigma that could become attached to the Breakfast Club. This has been successful as all pupils from all backgrounds now join and enjoy the Breakfast Club.

17 SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE


SOUTH LANARKSHIRE

CROSSHOUSE PRIMARY SCHOOL

CROSSHOUSE CARES The aim of Crosshouse Cares is to enhance our awareness of the elderly and give back to our local community. WHY? We chose to set up the enterprise after the children in Primary 2 were due visit the local care home to sing at Christmas. Unfortunately, due to the weather the children could not attend. The children then came up with the idea of visiting the residents at other times of the year and from there it all began.

WHAT? The social purpose is to enhance the childrens’ awareness of the elderly in their community and the work of the care home. It is to provide opportunities for the children to communicate with other members of the local community and to give back to them.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 18

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? I enjoyed making the residents happy and seeing them smile. Ava Hendry P2 I liked reading my book and showing them the pictures Alice Boyle P2

I enjoyed singing some songs and then the elderly people joined in. Roxanne Gray P2


CLACKMANNANSHIRE

LORNSHILL ACADEMY

CITIZENSHIP CAFE The aim of the Citizenship Cafe is to support Strathcarron Hospice

WHY? Pupils independently researched different charities and after a vote, selected Strathcarron Hospice. They felt it was important to chose a local

WHICH SKILLS DID YOU DEVELOP? We have really enjoyed the opportunity to work with staff and pupils from other year groups. Providing

charity given our commitment towards citizenship in the “Citizenship Cafe”, and this is one that is close to the hearts of many of our wider school community.

work experience for younger pupils and running the café like a real business has really developed our communication skills, which will help us in the future. What we have most enjoyed is the sense of ownership and responsibility we have been given. We organise the café finance, staff rotas, orders, cleaning and promotion through social media to create an area for both staff and pupils to enjoy. Doing this has really developed our confidence and we are proud of what we have achieved.

WHAT? It is a coffee shop run by students with the aim of developing skills for work, as well as opportunities to engage in enterprising activities and with the wider community. Supervisors and baristas carry out the running and maintenance, creating an inspiring area where pupils and staff interact daily.

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FIFE

DAIRSIE PRIMARY SCHOOL

A BLETHER, A BREW AND A BONNIE WEE VIEW - DAISIE’S COMMUNITY CAFE We want to connect with elderly people through gardening

WHY? We have recently converted a disused piece of land into a community garden. We harvested the produce and sold some vegetables in soup bags. Some of the money would be spent on seeds and plants but we also wanted to do some good with the money. From helping an elderly gentleman, who suffered with dementia, we formed a partnership with the local residential care home. We found that many of its residents would benefit from spending time with our young people. We noticed a difference in our happiness as well as the elderly people at the care home and decided to link the community garden and with North Eden House.

WHAT? Our main aim is to provide a safe and homely environment where all members of the community can come together to grow, learn, share and enjoy each others company and wisdom. SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 20

We noticed a generational gap in gardening, as many of us no longer have grandparents to pass on their knowledge and skills. With this in mind and a shared awareness of loneliness amongst the elderly, our community cafe aims to befriend vulnerable members of the community. We hope that through our relationship with the local care home, we raise an awareness of dementia.

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? We enjoyed making friends and bonding our community through our enterprise. It has been enjoyable to work together to benefit the community and in turn learn a lot from them. “Making soup with vegetables that we had spent so long growing. It was well worth the wait” “Having a friend who is more than seven times my age!...and being able to have a laugh with them”


FIFE

DULOCH PRIMARY SCHOOL TOAST BUSTERS We are providing families with a convenient way of enjoying breakfast together. WHY? We explored the needs of our community and potential customers. From this, a number of businesses grew and were given the opportunity to run. There is a large number of working parents in our immediate community and we discovered that breakfast can sometimes be a rush or more of a necessity than a meal to be enjoyed. WHAT? Toast Busters provides families with a convenient and sociable way to enjoy breakfast together without the same time pressures. Busy family life affects a number of our local families and pupils within our learning community. We have also been looking at the health benefits of a balanced diet and the importance that breakfast has on our readiness to

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? Seeing Toast busters being so successful with a constant queue of customers has been very enjoyable. We have also enjoyed being able to involve the whole school by a different class taking responsibility each week, with the toast busters support. We enjoyed having responsibility for doing the shopping each week, to ensure we have what we need for the next toast busting session.

learn. Pupils felt this was something that they would like to try to improve. We have, therefore, found it to be a successful and sustainable small business.

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FIFE

MASTERTON PRIMARY SCHOOL QUILTMANIA We are supporting Project Linus UK by making quilts with upcycled materials. WHY? We have a sewing group in school who have been making quilts for Project Linus using recycled materials. The children had been learning to sew and this seemed like a good way to develop those skills in a meaningful way. It also enabled us to discuss reusing and recycling.

WHAT? We enjoyed learning to sew. Inspired by the school sewing group, we collected bedding and fleece to get started sewing quilt squares. To buy fabric to finish the quilts, we made and then sold crafts to the rest of the school. WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? “I enjoyed learning new skills because I can now teach others to sew.” “I liked learning about sewing - it reminded me of my granny.” “I can help my dad sew and fix things in the house.” SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 22

“The best bit was working as a team and visiting the sewing shop.” “Sewing is something you can do forever.” “I like designing our own quilt squares because we got to be creative.” “If you sew in school you might grow up and work in a sewing shop.”

I feel happy that I can help people by sewing one tiny little square.


FIFE

TULLIALLAN PRIMARY

TULLIALLAN’S TASTY TREATS We are supporting our school Lunch Club. We want as many children as possible to enjoy a healthy lunch. WHY? We wanted to ensure as many children as possible were learning good food practices . Also, we wanted to equip children with a variety of skills to make healthy choices with food. We have really benefited from the lunch club sessions and have had the opportunity to sit at a table and chat in a small group setting. WHAT? Tasty Treats is a baking business that sells products made by pupils to the wider school community. We are keen to show the importance of healthy eating and profits are used to deliver Lunch Club workshops where we prepare , cook and eat delicious homemade food. The cooking facilities in our school are open and we really enjoy using the area. We wanted to highlight the importance of healthy meals so we started the lunch club. Children in Primary 5 have been baking treats for break one day a week to raise funds for our business.

WHICH SKILLS DID YOU DEVELOP? We have had the opportunity to work together as a team. We have learned so much about running a business and this has helped us in other areas across the curriculum. We have been visiting the local food store, they have been helping us find bargains and work out the best deals.

We have built strong relationships and we can quickly sort problems.

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CITY OF EDINBURGH

OUR VISION BRO Enterprise is a social enterprise which aims to tackle social isolation and loneliness in the community. Our vision is to create a safe and welcoming space with a café providing low cost, healthy food and intergenerational workshops where everyone feels included and valued. Our students are developing creativity skills and confidence. They lead the workshops, create the activities and resources, and manage the running of the café . Working closely with local residents and community users is building a stronger and more caring society

BROUGHTON HIGH SCHOOL BRO ENTERPRISE We aim to tackle social isolation and loneliness by Community café, workshops and providing a welcoming and events run by students of inclusive social cafe where Broughton High School 1.00-3.00pm all are Fridays welcome.

BRO Café

Our café is open on Friday afternoons from 1.00pm-3.00pm. Serving homemade soups, baking, breads and salads, we aim to provide healthy food at low cost. We have joined the Fareshare movement with the Cyrenians and this is helps us offer great food at friendly prices. Our partnership with Chartwells Catering enables a small team of S4 students to work in the kitchen preparing the soups which are made from fresh ingredients.

Workshops 1.30-2.30pm Together good things happen

WHY? Students were inspired when Josh Littlejohn, from Social Bite, came into a senior assembly to speak to students about his work to eradicate homelessness. We took part in the SITP event in Princes Street gardens, but we wanted to do much more. There were concerns around social isolation and loneliness in the community, and we were keen to respond to this social problem by creating a cafe and workshop where all are welcome and feel included. We thought this was an excellent opportunity to develop skills for work in our young people, including enterprise and creativity.

WHAT? We wanted to tackle social isolation and loneliness by providing a welcoming and inclusive social cafe where all are welcome.

WHAT SKILLS DID YOU DEVELOP? The group has learned that setting up a sustainable SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 24

Workshops

Each week we provide workshops for people of all ages. These focus on interactive literacy and crafts. We might have an eighty year old making playdough with an eight year old, or a whole room reading together with props and mimes. The emphasis is on being together, and having fun. We regularly have performances from students from City of Edinburgh music school who play in the café after their school rehearsals. It’s a lovely way to relax into the weekend

business is hard work but very rewarding! We have learned to be organised, responsible, and have shown real commitment. Confidence and self esteem has really developed across the whole team. There are so many skills that we are learning every week: planning, problem-solving, creativity and enterprise, team-working and communication, safe food handling, customer service and developing positive “can do” attitudes.

We enjoyed being part of an extended and socially inclusive team that works well together and is striving to achieve a shared vision for the community


CITY OF EDINBURGH

CASTLEBRAE COMMUNITY HIGH SCHOOL

CASTLE KITCHEN Our aim is to have and run a successful restaurant that offers young people work skills WHY? Castlebrae think it’s important to equip our young people with skills for work and enterprise. Keeping this in mind, we looked at what courses were offered in the department and wanted to make changes to offer students exciting and enjoyable SFW and enterprise courses. We decided to undertake N4 SFW Hospitality. This meant we would need to have experience working in a professional kitchen and serving the public, so we decided to set up our own business Castle Kitchen but as a social enterprise as the school is linked to many charities. Our aim is to provide quality healthy food at a cost effective price to our learning community and beyond and the

WHAT? Our objectives are: To have and run a successful restaurant that offers young people work skills. To use profits made from our business towards YPI projects and assist in the local community. To increase and improve our young peoples’ skills for work, life skills and qualification. WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? Making mistakes and learning from them! We learned how to cope with conflicts within the team and working effectively as a diverse team with ranging strengths and weaknesses but in the end delivering amazing lunches and events.

profits we raise can help with local charities such as Thistle, HOTS and our chosen charity Street Work.

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EAST LOTHIAN

ABERLADY PRIMARY

A BITE AND A BLETHER We are supporting the senior citizens of Aberlady. We want to give back to those who helped the pupils feel safe and secure WHY? We are supporting the senior citizens of Aberlady. The senior pupils realised that within the context of Aberlady ‘it takes a village (community)

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST? We enjoyed emphasising that it takes a community to raise a child and that a children do give back to their

to raise a child’ and they wanted to give something back to those who help to make them safe and secure when growing and discovering new things in the area where they live.

community, showing that young and old can work together, building positive relationships and learning from one another. Of course we also enjoyed making and eating the pizzas!

WHAT? Enterprise is embedded in the learning experiences offered at Aberlady Primary. The pupils ran a silent auction selling their art work that featured key locations associated with their local context. They used the profit to reinvest in UNNI ovens (a successful social enterprise adventure)- for community and pupil use. The pupils made pizzas and sold them to raise funds to buy resources for ‘A Bite And A Blether’.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 26


WELL DONE TO ALL SCHOOLS FOR BEING

CHANGE MAKERS!


Well done to all the schools across Scotland! While all this activity is happening, there are also some really exciting social enterprises happening across the world. Here are some fantastic examples of social enterprises in Australian Schools. We started with running a cafĂŠ selling hot drinks, cakes and sandwiches. We noticed that sometimes our customers had to wait for their sandwiches, so we set up the car wash to make the most of this time. Our biggest challenges have been getting the cars washed on time so no one is waiting around after they have had their food and making sure we get a steady run of cars, when it rains we get fewer customers.

WHITFIELD DISTRICT PRIMARY

WHITTY WORKERS CAFE & CARWASH We are supporting the Halo trust.

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE SHOWCASE 28

We are supporting the Halo trust, this is a charity that clears landmines from areas affected by war and we decided to support this cause as a whole class. We have really enjoyed setting up our social enterprise and would recommend it to other schools.

Most of the skills I have noticed being developed are teamwork, using our initiative and problem solving


AUSTRALIA

BORINYA WANGARATTA COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIP

We are supporting NESAY by making and selling hexagonal shelves.

WHY? NESAY stands for North East Support and Action for Youth, and this is what they do: support and act for young people in our community. They provide youth and family welfare services to address issues of adolescence family life and youth homelessness. NESAY is a huge support to so many students at Borinya and we thought it is about time we gave back.

WHAT? Mullinmur is a very special word to Borinya. It is a Pangerang word for platypus, it is also the name of the billabong behind our school. Borinya students are involved in a sustainability project to restore and improve this billabong. Borinya is also a Pangerang word, meaning billabong. Borinya is a school that helps at risk kids with their education. Just like the anabranch in its logo, kids who come to our school, leave the mainstream school to join a smaller setting where they have a second chance at their education, reconnect with the community and then return to mainstream school, further education or the workplace. Students make and sell hexagonal shelves, lovingly handcrafted from Tasmanian Oak floorboards, with profits going to support NESAY.

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GLOSSARY

Here is an explanation of some terms you may not be familiar with...

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

COMPANY LIMITED BY GUARANTEE

This is a way of doing business that makes positive social and/ or environmental changes. Social enterprises believe there are other things as important as making profit. These may include working with homeless people, or young people who have problems, or helping the world’s poorest people get out of poverty. There may also be an environmental element to it, such as encouraging people to recycle. ‘Social enterprise’ is a general term which covers lots of types of business, or ways of working, which include:

These are businesses where the board of directors (the people who run the company) are interested in community activities. Profit is put back into the company or given to the community that they work with. The Social Enterprise Academy is a company limited by guarantee.

CO-OPERATIVE A co-operative is a business which is owned and controlled by its members – these could be the people who make the products or provide the services, or who buy or benefit from them. There are lots of legal forms for co-operatives but all of them share the basic idea that only those directly involved in the running of the business should benefit from it. Media Co-op is a co-operative business.

COMMUNITY INTEREST COMPANIES (CIC) This is another type of business run specially for community benefit. It is a new way for organisations to legally define themselves as social enterprises and is important because it clearly shows that the business only uses its profits for a social purpose. Bookdonors is set up as a CIC.

DEVELOPMENT TRUST Development trusts run buildings that provide services to the community. These may be anything from a local shop to a doctor’s surgery or a wind farm. They work in specific places and are owned by the local community. Fintry Development Trust is an example of this.


FAIRTRADE An alternative approach to international (and often unfair) trade. Fairtrade pays workers and farmers a fair price and helps to improve living conditions in developing countries. Divine Chocolate and CafĂŠdirect are Fairtrade organisations.

LIMITED LIABILIT Y PARTNERSHIPS (LLP) This is a form of partnership for community organisations. The partners in an LLP do not keep the profits for themselves and because of this they are not financially responsible for any losses the company might make.

INTERMEDIATE LABO MARKET (ILM) UR An ILM aims to help those who find it difficult to find a job or get back to work by offering training and new skills. Fifteen, the restaurant group founded by Jamie Oliver, is an ILM.

SOCIAL FIRM These are businesses that create jobs for people who can’t get them because they have a mental or physical disability. Haven Products is a social firm.

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Above all else we really enjoyed working together on something we feel passionate about and helping those in need

CONTACT US Claire Fraser (East), James Johnstone (West) 0131 243 2677 Rachel Farmer (H&I) 01463 238088 Delivered by

Social Enterprise Academy is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. 272855 and a Scottish Charity SC035936

ď‚ @SEA_Edu

ď‚‚ SEAEducation

Social Enterprise in Schools is funded by

Social Enterprise in Education is supported by

SEE Showcase 2017 2018  
SEE Showcase 2017 2018  
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