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14 2016 in review

The year that was CN looks back at the biggest stories from the UK MICE industry in 2016 1. Brexit The year will forever be remembered as the year the UK voted to leave the European Union. Ever since the EU Referendum result the UK events industry has been scrambling for answers. James Heappey, MP, and chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for UK Events has been steering the industry towards greater unity as it heads towards the uncertainty.

2. Heathrow is go Heathrow airport was given the green light to expand in October. The plan, which include the construction of a third runway, was generally welcomed by the UK events industry.

3. VisitBritain launches £4m programme In August, VisitBritain launched a £4m funding programme designed to attract more global business events to the UK. The four-year Event Support Programme offered the chance to apply for funding from a pool of £1m annually.

controversially announced that London’s QEII Centre could fill that role. It did not go down well with the events industry.

6. Grass Roots taken over 4. Leicester Business Festival This year’s Leicester Business Festival was the biggest in its history. 117 events took place during the two week event, with 12,500 visitors passing through the doors.

The UK events industry was shocked to learn that Grass Roots had entered into an agreement to be acquired by Blackhawk Network Holdings, a leading prepaid and payments global company based in California.

7. Government comits to events 5. QEII Centre to house the Lords? The need for urgent £3.9bn restoration work at the Palace of Westminster means that the House of Lords will need temporary accommodation. In September it was

The Events Industry Board and Business Visit and Events Partnership (BVEP) welcomed the government’s renewed commitment to the events industry. The new Tourism Action Plan, launched in August, reaffirmed the

10. Confex was a success! International Confex in March celebrated its evolution as the UK’s biggest events exhibition. The show, held at Olympia London, inspired more visitors in 2016 with a leading programme of speakers and first class exhibitors that underlined its ambition to be an Ideas Factory. 2017 looks to be even bigger!

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government’s commitment to helping the events industry.

8. Events are GREAT VisitBritain’s Events are GREAT Britain was launched in April as a means to act as the umbrella brand responsible for driving international business to the UK. Regardless of Brexit, the campaign seems to be going well.

9. Terror threatens Terrorism reared its ugly head once more in 2016, forcing the Joint Meetings Industry Council (JMIC) to release a statement deploring such atrocities. The reaction of meetings industry leaders to terrorism incidents and the effects to on-going event activities was one of unity. CN


Conference News online 22nd December 2016

2016: The year that was Martin Fullard

CN looks back at the biggest stories from the UK MICE industry in 2016

1. Brexit The year will forever be remembered as the year the UK voted to leave the European Union. Ever since the EU Referendum result the UK events industry has been scrambling for answers. James Heappey, MP, and chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for UK Events has been steering the industry towards greater unity as it heads towards the uncertainty. 2. Heathrow is go Heathrow airport was given the green light to expand in October. The plan, which include the construction of a third runway, was generally welcomed by the UK events industry. 3. VisitBritain launches £4m programme In August, VisitBritain launched a £4m funding programme designed to attract more global business events to the UK. The four-year Event Support Programme offered the chance to apply for funding from a pool of £1m annually. 4. Leicester Business Festival This year’s Leicester Business Festival was the biggest in its history. 117 events took place during the two week event, with 12,500 visitors passing through the doors.


5. QEII Centre to house the Lords? The need for urgent £3.9bn restoration work at the Palace of Westminster means that the House of Lords will need temporary accommodation. In September it was controversially announced that London’s QEII Centre could fill that role. It did not go down well with the events industry. 6. Grass Roots taken over The UK events industry was shocked to learn that Grass Roots had entered into an agreement to be acquired by Blackhawk Network Holdings, a leading prepaid and payments global company based in California. 7. Government comits to events The Events Industry Board and Business Visit and Events Partnership (BVEP) welcomed the government’s renewed commitment to the events industry. The new Tourism Action Plan, launched in August, reaffirmed the government’s commitment to helping the events industry. 8. Events are GREAT VisitBritain’s Events are GREAT Britain was launched in April as a means to act as the umbrella brand responsible for driving international business to the UK. Regardless of Brexit, the campaign seems to be going well. 9. Terror threatens Terrorism reared its ugly head once more in 2016, forcing the Joint Meetings Industry Council (JMIC) to release a statement deploring such atrocities. The reaction of meetings industry leaders to terrorism incidents and the effects to on-going event activities was one of unity. 10. Confex was a success! International Confex in March celebrated its evolution as the UK’s biggest events exhibition. The show, held at Olympia London, inspired more visitors in 2016 with a leading programme of speakers and first class exhibitors that underlined its ambition to be an Ideas Factory. 2017 looks to be even bigger! http://www.conference-news.co.uk/2016/12/2016-the-year-that-was/


C&IT's top 20 event industry stories of 2016 | C&IT

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C&IT's top 20 event industry stories of 2016 19 December 2016 by Susie Harwood , Be the First to Comment

From agency acquisitions and changes at Grass Roots to Brexit and Trump reactions, we reveal our 20 most popular stories of 2016.

Brexit reaction is among the top 20 event industry stories of 2016

1) State of the Industry 2016: Top 50 Agencies revealed (June) 2) C&IT A List 2016 revealed (April) 3) Rapport steals limelight at biggest ever C&IT Awards (September) 4) Brexit reaction: Event planners outline pros and cons of leave vote (June)

http://www.citmagazine.com/article/1419170/c-its-top-20-event-industry-stories-2016

10/01/2017


C&IT's top 20 event industry stories of 2016 | C&IT

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5) BCD M&E acquires Zibrant (July) 6) Blackhawk Network to acquire Grass Roots for ÂŁ90m (September) 7) Events industry reacts as Britain votes to leave EU (June) 8) Events veteran Graham Frazer passes away (January) 9) State of the Industry 2016: Brexit - the MDs lowdown (July) 10) David Taylor appointed as MD for Grass Roots Meetings & Events 11) Event industry reacts after Donald Trump wins US presidency (November) 12) Giselle Ripken and David Battley to leave Grass Roots (November) 13) President Barry Richards leaves Grass Roots Meetings & Events (April) 14) State of the Industry 2016: clients spend ÂŁ820m with top agencies (June) 15) Kurt Ekert replaces Douglas Anderson as CEO of CWT (April) 16) TFI Group pays tribute to Peter Franks (January) 17) State of the Industry 2016: Future forecast (July 18) Specsavers plans eight events at ICC Birmingham (February) 19) Cristiano Ronaldo opens new Lisbon property with Pestana (September) 20) Doug Anderson joins AMEX Global Business Travel as CEO (August)

http://www.citmagazine.com/article/1419170/c-its-top-20-event-industry-stories-2016

10/01/2017


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Contributors

Dame Kelly Holmes, athlete, public speaker and charity trustee

Mike Kelley, Cover story photographer

David Taylor, MD at Grass Roots’ M&E division

Tim Groot, CEO and co-founder of the Grip tech company

Dame Kelly Holmes has made the transition from Olympic golden girl on the track to a career in public speaking and to mobilising support for charitable projects through the Dame Kelly Holmes Trust. She speaks to CN courtesy of Kruger Cowne. P16

LA based photographer Mike Kelley, recently released a series of composite images showing the astonishing volume of air traffic at the world’s busiest airports. He has been working on the aptly-named Airportraits project, for two years. Cover/P22-23

David Taylor stepped up to lead Grass Roots’ M&E division earlier this year following the exit of Des Mclaughlin. He talks about charting a new course following the international agency’s recent acquisition by the US-based Blackhawk Network P38

We chart a Day in the Life of Tim Groot, who leads Grip, a young company specialising in AI business matchmaking apps. Based in Kensington, London, Tim is one of the exciting young entrepreneurs pushing the boundaries of event tech. P46

Managing Editor: Paul Colston; Deputy Editor: Martin Fullard; Managing Director: Julian Agostini; Publishing Director: Liz Agostini; Portfolio Commercial Director: Myran Balasingham; Advertising Manager: Sam Chapman; Account Executive: Jarred Beukes, Production Manager: Simon Hadley; Senior Designer: Mana Assoudeh; Production Controller: Elizabeth Nixon; Video Production Executive: Karam Dhillon; Circulation Manager: Bret Weekes. Contact us: Subscriptions:+44(0)20 8481 1128, Editorial: +44(0)20 8481 1152, Advertising: +44(0)20 8481 1122, Production:+44(0)20 8971 1132. Conference News is published by Mash Media, Second floor, Applemarket House, 17 Union Street, Kingston Upon Thames, KT1 1RR, UK Tel: +44 (0)20 8481 1122 fax: +44 (0)20 8481 1144, Email: info@mashmedia.net Views expressed are not necessarily those of the publishers. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express written permission of the publishers. Printed by Pensord Press Ltd.

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North by North-West CN travels the Mancunian way for meetings

14 - 22

27 - 38

46 - 52

14 - That was the year that was

27 - Popping up this Xmas

46 - A Day in the Life...

CN reviews 10 big news stories from 2016

What pop-ups are around the UK this year?

CN spends a day with Grip’s Tim Groot

16 - Meeting Dame Kelly Holmes

33 - From sparring to spas

49 - Agency Eye

Transferring the golden touch

Are you looking for teambuilding ideas?

What’s the inside track on Inntel?

22 - Flying high

38 - The Big Interview

52 - Work experience

Industry reactions to Heathrow’s expansion

CN speaks to Grass Root’s David Taylor

Free labour or a rung on the career ladder?

Cover Picture: Mike Kelley/swns.com www.conference-news.co.uk


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Taylor made CN meets David Taylor who has settled into his new role leading Grass Roots’ Meetings and Events division in the UK. Words by Paul Colston

ow is the M&E business performing this year? It has been a big year for us, a year of change in terms of management and structure, and now ownership. As with the whole industry, we are facing the impacts, both real and perceived, of Brexit. What was your initial thought at the prospect of taking the reins after Des Mclaughlin? I did quip it was a bit like following Sir Alex Ferguson, which for David Moyes wasn’t exactly a success! But the reality is different. We worked together for many years and shared views on business strategy. Our styles are different but it isn’t as if I have stepped in from outside. I know the team well and understand the wider business offering. The transition has been very smooth. Was the Blackhawk acquisition of Grass Roots a surprise and what of the synergies of the link up? The synergies for M&E were not obvious at first but we are not that different in our approaches. Culturally, the fit was good. As Grass Roots was quite a diverse business, the sale process was fairly long, but it gave us the chance for a prolonged dating period. We really developed an understanding of the long-term model and how we can all work together. When I look back to our HBI days and compare that time to now, it’s fair to say that Grass Roots has been on an amazing journey and the diversity of services and the opportunities presented for the team has been fantastic. As part of Blackhawk Network we will have a more focused and simplified product and service range, which, supported by a sustained investment plan, we expect will deliver great growth potential. I envisage us continuing our primary focus in our current market, while delivering more global and regional programmes that support our clients’ requirements for a partner that works across borders, channels and technologies to deliver truly effective performance improvement solutions.

Best piece of advice to pass on to those starting out today? It is very easy to get wrapped up in the profession and world around, so I suggest people don’t take themselves too seriously. Another one for young people joining the industry is ‘not to think you are always right’. There is a chance almost every challenge has been successfully overcome by someone else out there. Do agencies in the UK need the extra critical mass of being part of a larger multinational organisation now? There is a clear trend towards clients wanting more regional and global solutions for their consolidated meetings programmes. This requires long-term investment, commitment and a geographical scale, which is difficult for privately owned companies to achieve. While Grass Roots M&E is by no means a small player, when it comes to the global needs of some of our clients it was clearly valuable that we team up with a larger organisation. There will continue to be a place for niche specialists but the days of the mid-sized agency are, in my opinion, limited. And the vision for 2017 and beyond? We are a performance improvement business that places primary importance on measurement and insight. Our clients’ world is changing and they need to be able to prove the positive effect of their meetings activity. Our services focus on this. We go beyond the simple tasks of logistics, registrations and technology, starting the process with the understanding of a client’s business and where events can work for them. Only after that has been achieved will we bring in our subject matter experts and deliver on the operational elements of an event. What trends are you observing? We have certainly seen hesitation among clients when it comes to repeating something. While they recognise the idea of not trying to fix things that aren’t broken, it is more important to

www.conference-news.co.uk


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David Taylor Having studied Hotel Management at Huddersfield Polytechnic, Taylor worked in F&B and then sales and marketing for the Hotel Management Today magazine, where he met Des Mclaughlin. After some ‘long lunches’ the idea of the agency Hotel Brokers International was born in 1991. That subsequently became HBI and was sold to Grass Roots in 2008.

answer a simple corporate mantra – where’s the value? Holding a great event is no longer enough, instead we need to work with them to deliver solutions that improve performance.

invest in our systems. An expensive decision, it ensures we can balance control with flexibility and individuality, all of which are points of difference in a sector where clients continue to desire specific and tailored solutions.

Agencies are continually frustrated by time wasted on RFPs and briefs that they have no chance of landing. How do you deal with this? We have a simple solution. We believe in the need to build partnerships with our clients based on strong relationships. We do not take on speculative work and are not in the business of writing proposals.

Which sectors are your targeting in particular for new M&E business? Those sectors where we have historically seen growth and success including: banking, professional services, automotive, retail and tech.

What role is technology now playing in the business? While many agencies have thrown away their own technologies in favour of third party providers we continue to

There will continue to be a place for niche specialists, but the days of the mid-sized agency are limited

What are the biggest challenges of the UK meetings industry? Challenges crop up in all the time, some driven by economics, some by politics and some by completely unforeseen sources such as terrorism or the power of nature. At the moment – more value required for less budget; uncertainty in the market causing delays in decisionmaking, short lead times, and Brexit. The solution is simple – we need to work more closely with our clients. What is your attitude to the ramifications of Brexit? No one can know exactly what impact Brexit will have on the market, so

www.conference-news.co.uk

sticking close to clients is vital. Through our Dusseldorf office we have already seen some automotive clients consolidate their European event procurement decision-making in Germany. That trend may continue. The most important thing to do is consider all the possible outcomes, ensure contingency plans are in place and continue to converse with clients. What do you think of recruitment and what initiatives are you taking? Grass Roots looks to recruit from the graduate market and we started an apprenticeship scheme in 2015. Flexible working and opportunities for international secondments are becoming almost prerequisites in our sector, so we have started to introduce initiatives to attract talent. What trends should we be looking for in 2017 and beyond? There may be fewer long-term contracts. We also might see a greater trend to more tailored solutions. And, most pertinently, we might see clients wanting to use more ‘big data’ solutions for evaluation and delegate engagement pre, during and post-event activation.


Conference News online 29th December 2016

The Big Interview: David Taylor Martin Fullard

david-taylor-0782

CN met David Taylor who has settled into his new role leading Grass Roots’ Meetings and Events division in the UK.

How is the M&E business performing this year? It has been a big year for us, a year of change in terms of management and structure, and now ownership. As with the whole industry, we are facing the impacts, both real and perceived, of Brexit. What was your initial thought at the prospect of taking the reins after Des Mclaughlin? I did quip it was a bit like following Sir Alex Ferguson, which for David Moyes wasn’t exactly a success! But the reality is different. We worked together for many years and shared views on business strategy. Our styles are different but it isn’t as if I have stepped in from outside. I know the team well and understand the wider business offering. The transition has been very smooth. Was the Blackhawk acquisition of Grass Roots a surprise and what of the synergies of the link up?


The synergies for M&E were not obvious at first but we are not that different in our approaches. Culturally, the fit was good. As Grass Roots was quite a diverse business, the sale process was fairly long, but it gave us the chance for a prolonged dating period. We really developed an understanding of the longterm model and how we can all work together. When I look back to our HBI days and compare that time to now, it’s fair to say that Grass Roots has been on an amazing journey and the diversity of services and the opportunities presented for the team has been fantastic. As part of Blackhawk Network we will have a more focused and simplified product and service range, which, supported by a sustained investment plan, we expect will deliver great growth potential. I envisage us continuing our primary focus in our current market, while delivering more global and regional programmes that support our clients’ requirements for a partner that works across borders, channels and technologies to deliver truly effective performance improvement solutions. Best piece of advice to pass on to those starting out today? It is very easy to get wrapped up in the profession and world around, so I suggest people don’t take themselves too seriously. Another one for young people joining the industry is ‘not to think you are always right’. There is a chance almost every challenge has been successfully overcome by someone else out there. Do agencies in the UK need the extra critical mass of being part of a larger multinational organisation now? There is a clear trend towards clients wanting more regional and global solutions for their consolidated meetings programmes. This requires long-term investment, commitment and a geographical scale, which is difficult for privately owned companies to achieve. While Grass Roots M&E is by no means a small player, when it comes to the global needs of some of our clients it was clearly valuable that we team up with a larger organisation. There will continue to be a place for niche specialists but the days of the mid-sized agency are, in my opinion, limited. And the vision for 2017 and beyond? We are a performance improvement business that places primary importance on measurement and insight. Our clients’ world is changing and they need to be able to prove the positive effect of their meetings activity. Our services focus on this.


We go beyond the simple tasks of logistics, registrations and technology, starting the process with the understanding of a client’s business and where events can work for them. Only after that has been achieved will we bring in our subject matter experts and deliver on the operational elements of an event. What trends are you observing? We have certainly seen hesitation among clients when it comes to repeating something. While they recognise the idea of not trying to fix things that aren’t broken, it is more important to answer a simple corporate mantra – where’s the value? Holding a great event is no longer enough, instead we need to work with them to deliver solutions that improve performance. Agencies are continually frustrated by time wasted on RFPs and briefs that they have no chance of landing. How do you deal with this? We have a simple solution. We believe in the need to build partnerships with our clients based on strong relationships. We do not take on speculative work and are not in the business of writing proposals. What role is technology now playing in the business? While many agencies have thrown away their own technologies in favour of third party providers we continue to invest in our systems. An expensive decision, it ensures we can balance control with flexibility and individuality, all of which are points of difference in a sector where clients continue to desire specific and tailored solutions. Which sectors are your targeting in particular for new M&E business? Those sectors where we have historically seen growth and success including: banking, professional services, automotive, retail and tech. What are the biggest challenges of the UK meetings industry? Challenges crop up in all the time, some driven by economics, some by politics and some by completely unforeseen sources such as terrorism or the power of nature. At the moment – more value required for less budget; uncertainty in the market causing delays in decision- making, short lead times, and Brexit. The solution is simple – we need to work more closely with our clients. What is your attitude to the ramifications of Brexit? No one can know exactly what impact Brexit will have on the market, so sticking close to clients is vital. Through our Dusseldorf office we have already seen some automotive clients


consolidate their European event procurement decision-making in Germany. That trend may continue. The most important thing to do is consider all the possible outcomes, ensure contingency plans are in place and continue to converse with clients. What do you think of recruitment and what initiatives are you taking? Grass Roots looks to recruit from the graduate market and we started an apprenticeship scheme in 2015. Flexible working and opportunities for international secondments are becoming almost prerequisites in our sector, so we have started to introduce initiatives to attract talent. What trends should we be looking for in 2017 and beyond? There may be fewer long-term contracts. We also might see a greater trend to more tailored solutions. And, most pertinently, we might see clients wanting to use more ‘big data’ solutions for evaluation and delegate engagement pre, during and post-event activation. http://www.conference-news.co.uk/2016/12/the-big-interview-david-taylor/


Charities Management | Subscribers | No. 111 Late Autumn 2016

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Subscribers | Charities Management magazine | No. 111 Late Autumn 2016 |

The magazine for charity managers and trustees

Contents for subscribers This material is for paid subscribers and for recipients of one-off promotional mailings. Only paid subscribers will see the full magazine every issue, receiving it by email. When a full magazine is emailed to you it will include the "Contents for all" material, most of which will disappear from the website permanently after the next issue. If you have received a promotional copy, there is a subscription form accessible below.

Richard Tinham charities should understand the OJEU procurement rules.

Please refer to our terms of use accessible via the bottom of the screen. All articles are of general application. In relation to financial articles in particular, no personal or individual advice is given. Regarding investment articles' main text and charts, past performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance.

Contents - No. 111 Late Autumn 2016 Page 1 - Reviewing charity trustee effectiveness Peter Swabey on trustee board effectiveness.

Charlotte Baldwin school fundraising can be both fun and hasslefree.

Page 2 - Taking corporate governance into charity governance Simon Walker on emphasising charity governance.

Page 3 - Charities working with the public procurement process Richard Tinham on approaching the public procurement process.

Page 4 - Seasonal and ongoing fundraising for schools Charlotte Baldwin on opportunities for school fundraising activities.

Max du Bois - charities are missing a golden opportunity for engagement.

Page 5 - Creating compelling emotional engagement Max du Bois on charities highlighting differentiating values.

Page 6 - Helping charity retail work better with IT Robert Finley on adopting electronic point of sale capabilities.

Page 7 - Focusing on charity event security David Taylor on safeguarding charity event data.

Robert Finley - admin is one of the biggest cost centres for a charity.

Page 8 - Safeguard your charity with background checks Rachel Bedgood on the need for background screening.

PLEASE ALSO SEE THE "CONTENTS FOR ALL" PAGES.

No. 111 Late Autumn 2016 Publisher and Editor Richard Blausten Charities Management magazine appears six times a year. © Richard Blausten 2016. All rights reserved. It is not a time sensitive publication. Articles are published in good faith without responsibility on the part of publishers or authors for loss occasioned to any person acting or refraining from action as a result of any views expressed therein. Opinions expressed in this issue are of a general nature and should not be regarded as the official view of the editor except where stated. There can be no copying of any kind or any reproduction without permission of the publisher. Unauthorised copying or reproduction is a breach of copyright. This does not apply to search engines when material appears on the web. Charities Management is published under licence from Richard Blausten by Mitre House Publishing Ltd. (which should be the recipient of copyright fees), PO Box 29, South Petherton TA13 5WE. Investment, financial and legal articles do not convey particular advice for specific circumstances. The material in this magazine is aimed at UK readers.

Annual subscription £48 for registered UK charities and £56 for UK non-charities. For those who wish to phone in their subscriptions, please call 01460 241106 ISSN 0964-9093.

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15/12/2016


Focusing on charity event data security

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Subscribers | Charities Management magazine | No. 111 Late Autumn 2016 | Page 7

The magazine for charity managers and trustees

Focusing on charity event data security DAVID TAYLOR of meetings and events management company GRASS ROOTS warns that charities should be aware of a responsibility to safeguard event data. Security in the modern age is of the upmost importance. Whether it is protecting data or creating a safe environment for people – security is now high on the agenda for us all, and this should include charities, although this article deals with security in a very specific situation, namely protecting data when organising an event. Terror attacks over the last year in Belgium and France have only served to highlight the fact that security can no longer be treated as a secondary issue. It is now high on the priority list of things that must be covered off when organising an event. These attacks happen without warning and the threat is not going to pass any time soon. And the threat to security isn’t just to people. Data security needs to be taken as a high priority too. As we have seen through the Russian cyber hackers Fancy Bear, who have been leaking confidential athlete data from WADA’s AntiDoping Administration and Management System (ADAMS), there are an increasing number of personal data leaks including recent personal data breaches concerning the Duchess of Cambridge’s sister. Whatever sector you operate in, those involved in the organisation of events across the globe must be prepared to tackle ever-changing threats whether they are physical or digital.

Lacking key skills Whilst most charity event organisers in the UK do view threats to security seriously they unfortunately lack key skills to be able to tackle them effectively on their own. Firstly, they are often unaware of the specific risks and challenges to the charity but as infrequent event organisers they also often don’t have the right processes in place.

Grass Roots' David Taylor - delegate management at charity events includes the retention of personal information, and it is an imperative that the processes around data and its security are as meticulous as possible.

Perhaps therefore event professionals should work more closely with the charity sector to achieve best practice for all involved. Earlier in the year I read of a security warning in Australia following the leak of personal data for thousands of conference delegates after a breach. A hacker accessed a server which contained details including names, addresses, emails and passwords of all the delegates attending the company’s recent conferences and events. It’s a serious breach and one they have now hopefully learnt from. Delegate management includes the retention of personal information and it is an imperative that the processes around data and its security are as meticulous as possible. All too often one hears of situations where data and personal details are “just the administration” or indeed the boring part of event management. This is a grave error as it creates a significant risk when the securing of data should be considered as having the upmost importance by anyone in charities, including those of people working in events. It is also important that charities realise that in 2018, a new EU data framework will come into force - the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which will apply to the UK. It remains to be seen when and how Brexit will affect its operation . But it’s something everybody in the organisation of charity events needs to think about because it focuses so tightly on improved understanding of data, its use and security.

"Data management and security should be of the highest priority when it comes to charity event data, no matter whether it is a conference, fundraiser or even a trustee meeting."

One frequent issue for events is that by their very nature they tend to be temporary, which in some instances leads to complacency around the care of event related information and occasionally the attitude that the data itself is temporary and therefore less important. This can be even more true when the people involved are volunteers and therefore considered stakeholders rather than third party clients.

Passport and payment details This is, however, clearly not the case when you consider that personal information around an event can include names, addresses, passport details and payment methods. It’s important data that can be dangerous if it falls into the wrong hands. Even more important can be an individual’s itinerary, which tends to be a part of an event’s data. It might not sound much but whether it is a junior or a high ranking CEO, a VIP or even a celebrity helping with fundraising a leak of their whereabouts could have significant ramifications. Data management and security should be of the highest priority when it comes to charity event data, no matter whether it is a conference, fundraiser or trustee meeting. Such technology needs to be upgraded frequently, and in a fast paced world, upgrades to existing technology are always on the horizon. While it might seem a significant investment, the positives will always outweigh the negatives. On top of this your teams managing data should undergo regular training and assessment. This approach, which should include monitoring and vigilance against attacks, will go a long way to deliver excellence in all areas of security and should always be reviewed and improved on. So how can you ensure data security at all levels for your charity events? Investing in a system and support to improve both physical and virtual security is essential. Expertise and compliance in this area can ensure security is tight from the very start of planning for the event. Week in and week out, one is besieged by news stories about celebrities having pictures leaked or delegate details being sold across the internet following a major leak – there is no shame in asking for help and support to ensure your business does not suffer a similar fate. The charity sector in particular needs to take a collective approach to ensure delegate data is secure. You’d be surprised at the number of professionals within the industry who don’t even have a secure password attached to some of their most important accounts. Or they use the same one for multiple accounts making it easy for them to be accessed. Perhaps it is time that focused more closely to ensure data security is at the forefront of the sector’s priorities.

Beyond tech based security In fact, the situation goes beyond just tech based security. On-site staff need training and it’s often the simple things which need attending to and which can make a significant remedial impact - such as not leaving operational files lying around after an event; and ensuring clear disposal and shredding is carried out so that files are not simply thrown in a bin where they can easily be taken away. In an age where technology is quite literally taking over – can charities really afford to gamble with their delegate security? END OF ARTICLE Return to top of page

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15/12/2016



Grass Roots - Cuttings Dec 2016