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BETHANY -PENIEL

COLLEGE

Bethany, Oklaho1na ,

Mary J o vVhite

Evelyn Rousselle

Editor

Associate Editor

Buddy Farr

Mrs. Carol Lundy

Business Manager

Sponsor

dhrouqh the 1Joo rwalj to COLLEGE Ll FE

as presenteJ

'

Ln

the 1955

ARROW Life on a college campus is an intricacy of books, roommates, chapel, basketball, classes, dates, mail from home-all the experiences that, mingled together, make the average clay of the college student. The 1955 ARROW sets forth College Life as it is lived behind the portals of B-PC . As presented in this edition , college living challenges intellectual achievement, stimulates spiritual growth, advances social development, and strengthens physical fitness. Recorded here for the per足 petuation of the future is what happened m 1 9 5 5-behind th e doors of college life.

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INTELI..ECTUAL ACHIEVEMENT

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Administration Faculty Curricula Classes Who's Who

SPIRITUAL GROWTH

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116

Church Chapel Lectures Religious Organizations

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

132

School Life Organizations

PHYSICAL FITN ESS

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196

Men's Athletics Women's Athletics

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I n recognition of your diligent efforts as Dean of the College, and the achievements which you have made and are making for the benefit of our school; in appreciation of the understanding with which you view our problems and the wisdom with which you guide our decisions; in acknowledgment of our be足 lief in the worth of your character, and in the way your personal life exemplifies the fundamental prin足 ciples of Christianity; for all the things that make you the person you are, we, the 1 9 5 5 ARROW staff, dedicate our yearbook to youDr. C. Harold Ripper.

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COLLEGE CHURCH 8

LIBERAL ARTS

FINE ARTS 9

SCIENCE HALL

STUDENT

GYM

UNION

·-�

:!.11

COMMERCIAL

FANNING HALL 12

JERNIGAN HALL

BUD ROBINSON HALL l3

eoLLe9e �ife ekaLLen9e5 I NT � L L � CT U A L A C� I � V � M � NT

14

PRESIDENT Dr. Roy H. Cantrell, as president, is the central figure around which the functi ons of the college re­ volve. He heads the pl anning of the m aj or activities of the sch ool, is co-ordinator am ong all the divisions of the college, and is in ch arge of the d aily ch apel services. In addition to these duties , he spends a great p orti on of his time on the educational z one, expl aining th e college to the public, helping t o attract fin anci al and spiritual support, and prom oting the inter ests of the sch ool. The principal contact of students with the president is in ch apel. One of the m ost vivid mem ories with which one leaves the sch ool is the i m age of Dr. C antrell spe ak­ ing in ch apel, easily, freely, as if he were ch atting with one pers onally in his office. Advancements achieved during the ye ar under Dr. Cantrell's guidance h ave been the ch anging of the name of the sch ool to Beth any N azarene C ollege, the beginnings of constructi on of a men's d ormitory, and the installation of a central heating system in all d ormi­ tories.

Dr. Cantrell conducts the busy routine that characterizes his position.

Dr. Cantrell h as earned, and deserves, the respect and trust with which he is regarded by students, faculty, and constituency.

PATSY PAGAN Office Assistant

·�...

LOIS MERRIAM Secretary IRENE MEIER Office Assistant 17

BOARD OF TRUS'"rEES V. H . LEWIS, Chairman Janette Aycock Vice Chai rman

Secreta ry R. T. Williams, J r.

Dulan Clegg, Cisco Lyman Wood, Petersbu ry

LOUISIAN A DISTRICT Elbert Dodd, Pineville G. M. Akin, Minden L. H. King, Sh reveport

DALLAS DISTRICT Paul Ga rrett, Dallas Fl etcher Spruce, Texarkana Clyde Ammons, Dallas

NEBRASKA DISTRICT Whitcomb Harding, Hastings George Ronnekamp, York Blaine Proffitt, Lincoln

HOUSTON DISTRICT V. H. Lewis, Houston L. P. Durham, Houston Odell Brown, Houston

NORTH ARKANSAS DISTRICT J. W. Hend rickson, Conway Boyd Hancock, Jonesboro Paul Watson, Springdale

ABILENE DISTRICT

0. W. Jenkins, Lubbock

KANSAS DISTRICT Ray Hance, \iVichita Eu gene Verbeck, Hays E. \i\1. Snowbarger, Sylvia KANSAS CITY DISTRICT Ja nette Aycock, Kansas City A. Milton Smith, Kansas City Dean Baldwin, Springfield 18

NORTHE AST OKLAHOM A DISTRICT I. C. Mathis, Tulsa W. R. Donaldson, Muskogee Sam Nesmith, Cushing NORTHWEST OKLAHOMA DISTRICT J. T. Gassett, Ponca City E. S. Phillips, Bethany A. LeRoy Taylor, Bethany Paul Haag, Bethany

Alumni Representative Paul Macrory S AN ANTONIO DISTRICT William Davis, San Antonio Hearne Spruce, San Antonio Gene Houghtling, San Benito SOUTH ARKANSAS DISTRICT W. L. F rench, North Little Rock \i\1. R. McClung, North Little Rock Ponder Gilliland, Little Rock SOUTH E AST OKLAHOM A DISTRICT Glenn Jon t:s ; Ada B. F. Neely, Bethany \i\1. H. Deitz, Henryetta SOUTHWEST OKLAHOM A DISTRICT \i\1. T. Johnson, Duncan C. A. Dillard, Ardmore Earl Darden, Duncan

Donald R. Danskin, Dr. Wesley G. Moon, Donald S. Metz, Dr. Anne C. Greve, Dr. Roy H; Cantrell, Carol S. Lundy, Dr. C. Harold Ripper, Dean E. Boyd Shannon, Harry l. Craddock.

ADMINISTRATI VE COUNCIL DR. ROY H . CANTRELL, Chai rman President of the College DR. C. HAROLD RIPPER Dean of the College

DR. ANNE C. GREVE Chairman of the Division of Social Science

HARRY L. CRADDOCK Business Manager

DR. WESLEY G. MOON Head of the Department of Ed�cation

E. BOYD SHANNON Dean of Students

CAROL S. LUNDY Associate Professor of English

DONALD R. DANSKIN Registrar

DONALD S. METZ Associate Professor of Religion 19

BUSINESS T he financial concerns of B-PC are handled by t he Business Manager, Harry L. Craddock. Mr. Craddock supervises all matters pertaining directly to expenditures and income, controls t he large group of camp us empl�yees, regulates t he allotment payments of veterans, and takes time to listen to all the reasons why a student just can 't pay his school bill right now. Mr. Craddock not only accomplis hes t his, but does so wit h ease, good humor, and no evidence of strain and ten­ sion. His hearty laugh and c heery gr �eting, his origination and use of nicknames, and t he long strides wit h which he covers t he campus will be remembered by students as expressive of this friendly and understanding man. He will be par­ ticularly " hallowed" in the memory of students t his year for supervising the purchasing of furni­ ture for t he Student Union parlor and t he con­ struction of booths in t he Drag.

HARRY L. CRADDOCK Business Manager

Florence Lundy is t he accountant for the Col­ lege, keeping records of the business transacted and managing all t he particulars of t his exacting position. S he is always on hand to answer Mr. Craddocks call of "Dorcas, bring me t hat ac­ count!" Much of the efficiency of the business office is due to her conscientious and diligent application to doing t he job well.

RUTH NEWBERRY Secretary

IRENE lAWRENCE Assistant 20

OFFICE

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FLORENCE LUNDY Accountant

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SARAH PARKER Cashier

RAMONA SYKES Office Clerk

IRMA LEE ROSS Office Assistant 21

DEAN OF THE COLLEGE

DR. C. HAROLD RIPPER Dean of the College

As Dean of the College, Dr. C. Harold Ripper is the co-ordin ating factor between the student body and the faculty in the academic realm. He is in charge of the curricula and the educational program of the. College, works with the chairmen of the various departments, handles Selective Service Deferments, represents B-PC at regional and national conferences, and in addition is head of the department of psychology. His principal contribution to the College and the student body this year has been his untiring efforts to devise an educational program that will be acceptable to the North Central Association of Colleges. When our school achieves entrance into this dis­ tinctive o �ganization, much of the credit will be due our hard-working Dean. This year has been a momentous one in the life of Dr. Ripper. He has improved the curricu­ lum of the College, assisted in the organization of the new psychology club, was honored with the dedication of the 1 9 5 5 ARROW, and became a grandfather! Above that, he has earned a place of affection and respect in the hearts of all stu­ dents and faculty.

NADENE RIPPER Secretary

NANCY JARVIS Assistant 22

FIELD RE PRE SENTATIV E The dynamic personality who fills the strenu­ ous and demanding position of Field Represen­ tative is Rev. Curtis Smith. Students seldom see him on the campus or in his office in Breesee Hall since the responsibilities of his position keep him touring the educational zone, but the results of his work influence every student enrolled. Actually, he is the mediator between the College and the "home folk", representing the needs of the College to them, and bringing back to the a cl­ mini �tration the considerations of the constitu­ ency. He also seeks to interest high school seniors in B-PC as a perspective Alma Mater. During the past twelve months, Rev. Smith has carried on an intensive campaign for a new boys' dormitory throughout the educational zon e. His very com­ mendable efforts will soon find fruition in the construction of the new dormitory, and the sal­ vaging of the old army barracks which have stood as ugly remind�rs of the growing needs of our College. Many boys who have there lived and despaired and fervently hoped for better, will doff their caps in gratitude to Rev. Curtis Smith for what he has achieved.

NELLIE HALL Mimeograph Operator

REV. CURTIS SMITH Field Representative

SON DRA HARRIS BYNUM Secretary 23

DEAN

OF STUDENTS

E. BOYD SHANNON Dean of Students

Probably the most vers � tile man on the cam­ pus is the Dean of Students, E. Boyd Shannon. In addition to his respottsibilities as Dean, he is mayor of the city, an ordained elder in the church, a professor of chemistry, the head of the Teacher Placement Bureau, and during the past year has been writing a dissertation to complete the re­ quirements for his Doctor's degree. During the year he has also remodeled his home, doing much of the actual construction himself. Students spending this year at B -PC will re­ member Dean Shannon for his amazing ability to recall names and faces, his "little black book", his sincerity in dealing with students, his guiding hand to bewildered freshmen, and the dorm con­ ferences in which he let us express our "gripes" and "aches."

BETTY CHERRY Office Assistant

BEVERLY PARKER First Semester Secretary SUZANNE HARRIS Office Assistant 24

COUNSELOR OF WO�IEN The office of Counselor of Women was created by the administration in an effort to provide specialized counseling for the young ladies of the campus. Mrs. Roy Cantrell, wife of the president, was the natural selectee for the new position in view of her training, past experience, and status with the student body. Mrs. Cantrell's office in Breesee Hall characterizes the influence of her personality on even the dreariest of objects. A previous mimeograph room and storage space for all kinds of "odds and ends", she has reno­ vated it with paint, draperies, and wrought-iron fur­ nishings to create a homey, cheerful atmosphere that makes you want to go in and "sit a spell." Both Bud Robinson and Jernigan Halls had Mrs. Cantrell as guest speaker during the year to stimulate their residents in striving to secure for themselves the "best life." As a special feature of the fall semester she conducted an open forum on the practical application of culture, in which she answered any questions per­ plexing students, from how to eat shrimp to courtesy to others. In these ways, her quiet, gracious influence has penetrated the campus from Breesee Hall to dorm rooms, from the dining hall to Fine Arts, and has greatly improved the services of the College to its students.

MRS. ROY CANTRELL Counselor of Women

Mrs. Cantrell confers with student, Eliza­ beth Findlay, i n her office in Breesee Hall.

JUNE NEWMAN Secretary Dean of Students Second Semester 25

REGISTRAR Donald R . Danskin accepted the position of Registrar at mid-term last year, and since that time has been busy improving and adjusting the functions of that office to better serve the students and the administration. He and his office force insure the safekeeping of official records, facts, and figures and distribute grade reports at the end of each nine week period. Mr. Danskin is also head of the business department, and his training in this field is reflected in t he efficient manner in which he runs his own office. Im足 provements since becoming registrar include t he installation of a new book case in t he office which provides room for filing the catalogues of other colleges for reference use. His spare time has been occupied with completing his thesis for his doctor's degree to be conferred in July by t he University of Oklahoma. Probably the most char足 acteristic trait of the Registrar is his patient and "easy-going" attitude. He has a policy of never refusing to see anyone who desires his help, even in the mids t of registration or during the week grade reports are issued. As any member of the Business Club will tell you, "He's a swell guy!" .

DONALD R. DANSKIN Registrar

WYNONA BURKHART Secretary

DELLA INGLE Office Assistant 26

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RECORDE R Mrs. Leona McConnell has for twelve years been a part of the college force; first, working in the registrar's office, and now recording vital sta­ tistics concerning college records. The duties of this position are closely affiliated with those of the registrar's office. Her working quarters are connected with that office by a doorway, and she is as likely to be found busy in one place as in the other. She is in charge of maintaining a perman­ ent file on each individual student, recording the academic courses composing his college work, and the adeptness with which he completes the courses. It is also her duty to compile various re­ ports for the use of college administrators, such as a list of those students who are failing, or one of those who are eligible for the honor roll, and such information. To students, her official ca ­ pacity is usually regarded solely as distributor of those fateful grade reports at the end of each nine-week period. Mrs. McConnell is perhaps better known for her services to the Church as a missionary to Africa, and as the wife of our beloved "Uncle Charlie" than for her official duties behind stu­ dent transcripts. That doesn't bother Mrs. Mc­ Connell-she takes great pride in being "Mrs. Uncle Charlie."

MRS. LEONA McCONNELL Recorder

Evelyn Mil burn and Ann Dodson receive grade reports from Mrs. Burkhart. Dwight Bugh checks h is transcript with Mrs. McConnell before filing application for graduation.

27

DIVISION

WILLIS B. DOBSON, M.A. Division of Humanities

LESTER L. DUNN, M.Mus. Division of Fine Arts ANNE C. GREVE, Ph.D. Division of Social Sciences

The departments of instruction and the fac足 ulty of the College are grouped according to these five divisions for purposes of organization and integration of the curriculum. Instruction offered through these divisions is planned for the purpose of articulating the curriculum of the College to the needs of the individual student. Each division is committed to a definite set of educational objectives, and seeks to reach those objectives through general courses that cut across departmental lines, and departmental courses of足 fered by member departments. With this divi足 sional organization of instruction and faculty, the curricula of the College meets the educa足 tional needs of a student body coming from a wide geographical area, and representing widely differing backgrounds with different cultural, vocational, and professional goals.

28 I

CHAIRMEN

ROBERT G. LAWRENCE, M.A. Division of Natural Science

L. C. PHILO, B.D., M.A., D.D. Division of Philosophy and Relig ion

C. A. McCONNELL, A.B., Th.D. Dean Emeritus of Religion

29

FACULTY

Dr. Cantrell congratulates Honor Society members on their achievements.

JESS ANDERSON, B.S. Instructor-Business

DON BEAVER, Ph.D. Associate Professor-Chemistry

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NAOMI BOLERJACK Assistant Professor-Spanish

RAY BOWMAN, M.S. Assistant Professor-Art

THURMAN COBURN, M.A. Specia !-Psychology

GENE CHAMBERS, M.Mus.Ed. Instructor-Voice

DONALD DANSKIN, M.A. Associate Professor-Business 31

FACULTY

The faculty tea at Christmas-time is wel l received b y Dr. Garner and Miss Spruce.

MAURINE DICKERSON, M.A. Assistant Professor-English

ROBERT M. DillON, M.Mus.Ed. Special-Band

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NAOMI DOBSON Instructor-Voice

ROBERT EMMEL, M.A. Associate Professor-Speech

FRED FLOYD, Ph.D. Professor-His tory

RUTH FRITCH, M.S. Assistant Professor-Home Economics

JAMES GARNER, Ph.D. Professor-Political Science 33

FACULTY

Miss Huh nke displays frilly bonnet of her own creation to Miss Bolerjack and Miss Fritch.

EARL GREER, Ph.D. Professor-Mathematics

EMMETT HAMMER, M.A. Assistant Professor-Physical Science

34

CARROLL HARVILLE, B.Mus.Ed. Assistant Professor-Piano

GERALDINE HUHNKE, M.A. Assistant Professor Modern Language

W. N. KING, M.A., S.T.D. Professor-Religion

PRESCOTT JOHNSON, M.S. Associate Professor Philosophy

NOVA LEDBETTER, B.S. Instructor-Business 35

FACULTY

D r . Philo displays adeptness with the us路e of chopsticks at the Mission Band oriental din颅 ner.

CAROL LUNDY, M.A. Associate Professor-Eng I ish

DONALD METZ, B.D., M.A. Associate Professor-Religion 36

JAMES MIDDLETON, M.Mus.Ed. Special-Band

WESLEY MOON, Ed.D. Professor-Education

TRAVIS MULLINS, B.Mus.Ed. Specia l-Music Theory

HOMER PASCHALL, M.A. Instructor-Mathematics

KATHRYN PASCHALL, A.B., B.S. Instructor-Library 37

FACULTY

Professor Robinson serves dessert to Mr. D u n n at faculty dinner.

JACK RAIRDON, M.A. Assistant Professor-Social Science

HAROLD RIPPER, Ph.D. Professor-Psychology 38

KENNETH ROBINSO N, B.D., M.S. Assistant Professor-Speech

ROBERT SAWYER, B.D., Th.M. Assistant Professor-Greek and Religion

E. BOYD SHANNON, M.A. Associate Professor-Psychology

DORIS SCHUMANN, M.A. Instructor-Speech

DOROTHY SHElDON, M.A. Assistant Professor-Education 39

FACULTY

Mrs. Cantrell and Mrs. Phill ips laugh over tea cups in Bud Robinson parlor.

VERNON SNOWBARGER, Ph.D. Professor - Sociology

CONSTANCE SPRUCE, M.A. Assistant Professor Education and History 40

RUTH TAYlOR, B. Mus. Assistant Professor - Organ

DORIS VAUGHN, B. Mus. Instructor - Piano

DON WILSON, M. Ed. Assistant Professor Physical Education

ELIZABETH WILLIS, M.A. Assistant Professor - Librarian

Miss Paschall and Miss Dickerson are served by Carolyn McNabb at tea for Mrs. Harding.

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RE SIDENCE COUN SELORS

MRS. MATTIE JOBE Bud Robinson Hal l

MR. AND MRS. ROBERT PARKER Men's Hall MRS. ALICE RAY Jernigan Hal l

MR. AND MRS. FRED BURCH Fanning Hall

MR. AND MRS. C HARLES HELSEL Smith Apartments

42

CAMPU S PE RSONNEL

MR. MARVIN SIMPSON Superintendent of Grounds

MRS. KATIE DREWRY Dietitian

These are the personnel who keep B-PC runn mg from behin d the scenes. The residence counselors are in charge of the respective dormitories, and are responsible for maintai f)ing a happy, wholesome atmosphere among their dormitory students. Tlie dietitian is charged with producing three meals a day with appetite appeal and nutritional value on a comparatively low budget. The success of Mrs. Drewry's efforts is attested by the weight most stuqents begin to gain after a short time in the dining hall. The superintendent of grounds oversees the

maintenance of all college property. He employs a large staff of plumbers, carpenters, yard crews, janitors, and general repair men to assist him in the tremendous task. Health service is supplied B-PC students by the college physician, Dr. Paul Macrory and the college nurse, Mrs. Julia Wyatt. Each student is eligible for free medi cal services up to six dollars per semester, plus a physical examination at the time_ of enrolling. The college nurse is available at all times for any emergency illnesses, and will immediately contact the doctor if the extent of the illness indicates it necessary.

DR. PAUL MACRORY, M.D. School Doctor

MRS. JULIA WYATT, R.N. School Nurse

43

LI BRARY

Term papers and nine-week tests motivate students to utilize library resources.

Progress is the theme of the library. In the ten years since 1945 it has increased from 1 3,600 to 30, 1 00 volumes. New stacks have been added, rooms in Breesee Hall basement have been opened to accommodate our expansion, including storage space for seldom-used books, and a mending area provided. One room con­ tains the beginnings of an audio-visual center having a three speed RCA Victor pla yer with radio combin­ ation, and an opaque projector.

Pat Fra nklin and B i l l Gooden avail

The library contains a wide selection for all the major fields with each book catalogued according to the Dewe y Decimal classification. It has a variet y of periodicals, newspapers, pamphlets, government docu­ ments, and, for leisure time, phonograph records, maga­ zines, and an excellent art exhibit of works of nationally­ known artists.

themselves of

materials

supplied by periodical room.

Marji Greve and Melba Neal furnish student assistance in borrowing from the library.

Miss Kathryn Paschall, assistant librarian, files new additions in card catalogue.

44

CURRICULA The curriculum organization at Bet hany-Peniel Col­ lege revolves around t he stated objective of the college "to orientate students in t heir cultural and physical en­ vironment and their spiritual heritage in order to make for an integrated personality and C hristian social or­ der." All objectives of departmental curricula develop out of, and are related to, t his objective of t he college. In order to attain t his goal and meet the stated needs of the student, t he curriculum provides for both general education, which is a core of courses required for all degrees and furnis hes eac h student with a broad educational background, and special education in five divisions: Humanities, Social Science, Natural Science, Philosophy and Religion, and Fine Arts. Through these divisions, curricula are offered lead­ ing to four degrees, two certificates, and pre--profes­ sional training in various fields.

DR. C. HAROLD RIPPER Organizer of the Curricula

ART The department of art is a member of the division of Fine Arts and a part of t he general eductaion core. Courses in art fundamentals offer opportunities for the individual to cultivate an understanding of, and an appre­ ciation for, the aesthetic values to be found in art. While no departmental major is offered by

the College, advanced courses providing art exp e r i e n c e s for teachers, church workers, and ot her interested persons are avail­ able. Head of t he art department is Assistant Professor Ray Bow­ man. Ot hers assisting in the de­ partment are Dr. Anne Greve and Assistant P ro f e s s o r Rut h Fritch.

Carl Gaede sketches front o f Breesee Hall in art project.

Darleen Boldt, Beverly Clark, and Joyce Burkhart work on a sti l l life study in art funda­ mentals.

45

BIOLOGY The department of Biology has the general objective of providing the student with a better understanding of him­ self and his place in society, thus helping him to make an effective adjustment to the demands of life. It also provides training for those who wish to enter the field of education in biological sciences. Students planning a future in medi­ cine, medical technology, dentistry : and nursing may secure their pre-professional training by majoring in Biology. As­ sistant Professor Robert Lawrence is the head of the depart· ment.

Professor Lawrence carefully su per­ vises Dale Tuttle's cutting of tissue for biology s lides.

Ann Dodson examines the micro­ scopic structure of organs in his­ tology lab.

Pre-med Paul Edmonds tests the reactions and properties of various compounds.

CHE�IISTRY The chemistry department seeks to aiel students enrolled in t he department in und erstanding and ap­ preciating the part chemistry has played, and is play­ ing, in the development of our civilization and the extension of our understandin g of the physical world. The department provides thorough training for those who expect to enter such specialized fields as teaching, research, engineering, industrial chemistry, and medi ­ cine. Associate Professor Don Beaver is the head o f the department and is assisted b y Associate Professor E. B. Shannon. 46

ECON O�IICS Economics and business have been combined into a single department, and training in t he field of either may be had through the economics department. The principal objective of the department is to develop t he skills and ac­ quire the knowledge whic h will enable students to assume the responsibility for their personal, family, social and busi­ ness activities. Students wis hing to secure a degree in t he field have two possible procedures open to t hem. They may secure an A.B. degree through concentration in departmental courses or they may secure a B.S. degree t hrough inter­ departmental concentration. Associate Professor Donald Dan­ skin is the head of t he department; others teaching wit h him are Dr. Vernon Snowbarger and Instructors Nova Led ­ better and Jess Anderson.

A c lass in first year typewriting.

E DUCA�riON T he education department strives to develop prospective teachers who will be prepared to accept a responsible posi­ tion in any community, possessing t he adequate techniques for t he fulfillment of t he educational aims of t he teaching profession . At the head of t he department is Dr. Wesley Moon, and assisting him are Dr. Anne Greve and Dr. C. H . Ripper, Associate Professor E . B. S hannon, and Assistant Professors Dorothy S heldon and Constance Spruce. One of t he most interesting p hases of a student's teacher education training is his experiences as "student teacher." T11is is a program developed by t he department whereby a student enrolled in teacher education is enabled to receive first hand experience t hrough observation and participation in actual classroom situations in t he public schools of Bet h� any and surrounding areas. Nora Thane demonstrates a teaching unit in elementary methods.

Mary lou Kastner, Esta C lippinger, Myrlene Pitts, Myrna Van Ostrand, and Dixie Smith present semester projects to methods class.

47

ENGLISH To meet the requirements of the general education core, every student, regardless of degree, is required to enroll in basic English courses. These are developed to insure competenc y in writing and speaking the Eng­ lish language, and to enrich and enhance the enjo y­ ment of living through an understanding and appre­ ciation of literature. Through these courses, the col­ lege hopes to develop in its students the ability to evaluate their reading in accordance with reasonable standards of taste and intelligence and thus become a more useful a nd productive citizen. The department also offers advanced work for those interested in spe­ cialized stud y in English. Professor W. B. Dobson is head of the department of English. Teaching with him are Associate Professor Carol Lundy and Assistant Professors Maurine Dickerson, Geraldine Huhnke, and Naomi Bolerjack.

Professor

Dobson

discusses

England

in

Chaucer's

time with an advanced class of English majors.

GERMAN One of the modern languages offered by the college for the enrichment of the culture of its students is German. A course of study in "Der Deutsch " includes a stud y of the native language to gain an acquaintance­ ship with the general German vocabulary, a survey of the literature and thought of the German people, and an insight into the cultural background and civiliza­ tion of German y. Teaching all German courses as well as heading the department is Assistant Professor Geral­ dine Huhnke.

Miss Huhnke confers with Ruth Unruh in second-year German project.

A group of first year students "play cafe" by conversing with the waiter in German about the menu.

48

GRE E K For the benefit of students majoring in religion, the col­ lege maintains a department of Greek. Study in this depart­ ment offers ministerial students the opportunity to study Biblical literature in the original Greek text. Attention is given to the vocabulary, grammar, and .exegesis of books of both the Old and the New T estam ents. Assistant Professor Robert Sawyer maintains the department of Greek.

Gary Hartpence translates for class Greek sentence from text.

Professor Sawyer checks transla­ tions of first year Greek students.

Dr. Floyd illustrates dust bowl area to American h istory class.

HISTORY The history department has i n recent years become increasingly important as it has accepted the responsi­ bility for giving to students an understanding of the factors involved in society's cultural, economic, social, and political problems. The basic concept of the history department is that of developing an informed and mature thinking citizenry through which we can evolve satisfactory solutions to the turbulent problems of the world. To meet this objective and to give the student a general view of the development of civilization and the history of the world, the College requires of every student nine hours of work in the history department. The department also provides advanced courses for students wishing to make this field a career or continue into graduate study. Dr. Fred Floyd heads the depart­ ment, assisted by Dr. James Garner and Assistant Pro ­ fessors Constance Spruce and Jack Rairdon. 49

HO�I E ECONOMICS

Jeanne Cypert in clothes desig ning class creates new fall outfit.

The department of home economics offers a c hance for the future "Mrs. America" to prepare for a success­ ful and enlightened career as a homemaker, or, for those interested professionally, for successful teaching in non-vocational departments. Through its courses in color, d esign, crafts, and decorations, where art prin­ ciples and t heir applications are studied, an apprecia­ tion of aesthetic and cultural values is developed to increase the enjoyment of living. Dr. Anne Greve is head of the department, and teaching with her is As­ sistant Professor Ruth Fritch.

Evelyn Milburn a nd Frances Wimberly learn the secret of cherry pie "as good as Mother makes."

MATH E MATIC� T he principal objective of t he department of mathe­ matics is to prepare students for the professional oppor­ tunities to be found in the field of mathematics. Four­ teen courses are offered to assist in t he acquisition of the mental skills, techniques, and factual knowledge necessary for a thorough and complete mastery of t he field. It also emphasizes the cultural aspects of mathe­ matics to be found in correct logical reasoning, and t he relation of mathematics to science, philosophy, and t he liberal arts. Head of t he department is Dr. Earl Greer, and teaching with him are Assistant Professor Don Beaver and Instructor Homer Paschall.

Dr. Greer ex plains the intricacies of multi­ pl ication to a group of algebra students.

50

M USI C The professional aims of the music department are to train students for positions as directors and teachers of music, and to prepare students who are especially gifted for advanced study. In addition, the department offers two courses in music fund amentals to acquaint all students with its aesthetic values. Associate Professor Lester Dunn is head of the de足 partment, which also includes Assistant Professors Carroll Harville and Ruth Ta ylor, and Instructors Gene Chambers, Naomi Dobson and Doris Vaughan.

Professor Dunn supervises private lessons of Dick Osborne and Bob Lewis.

Jacquetta Defoyd practices organ.

Madolyn Wright presents music recital .

PHILOSOPHY A department of philosophy is maintained by the Col足 lege so that students may become aware of the problems involved in existing in human society, and of the personal adjustments which these problems necessitate. Included in its departmental objectives is the desire to stimulate original and creative thinking on the part of the individual. Because B-PC is a Christian college, the basic aim of the department is to aid the student in the development of a scale of values and a sense of direction, so as to give ultimate and Christian meaning to his life. Associate Professor Prescott Johnson, head of the department, and Associate Professor L. C. Philo are the faculty philosophers. Professor Johnson lectures t o his modern philosophy class.

51

PHYSICAL E DUCATION In agreement with the ancient Sp artans' educational ideas that development of t he physical should be correlated with the development of the mental, physical education is a fundamental part of the curricula at B-PC. To ascertain that no one neglects his " healthful exercise" two semester hours are required of students, and aching muscles, peculiar limps, and loud protests at climbing stairs soon become characteristic of freshmen. Other than required courses, elective physical education courses are also provided, along with an intra-mural sports program for those desiring more vigorous athletic activity. Assistant Professor bon Wilson directs the physical education department.

In

officiating

class,

Howard

Manwarren,

Vernon Swim, and Don Dorr practice the rules.

Professor Wilson, Howard Oliver, and Joh n ny Westmorelan d demon­ strate new a r t if i c i a I respiration technique to first-aid class.

Dr. Garner lectures to government class concerning the Democratic platform.

POLITICAL SCIE NCE Courses in political science offered at B-PC have the distinct purpose of training and preparing men and women to execute the duties of responsible citizen­ ship such as voting intelligently, holding public office, and efficiently contributing to public service. The Col­ lege expects those graduating from its campus to as­ sume the obligations correspondent with democratic society, prepared to give leadership in public affairs with integrity, tolerance, and open-mindedness. Dr. James Garner is in charge of the political science de­ partment.

52

PSYCHOLOGY To help all students gain an insight into principles of behavior and the intelligent control of personal conduct, the College has provided a well-staffed department of psy­ chology. The department also seeks to lead students in ef­ fective participation and leadership in activities of the social group. Undergraduate training in psych <;>logy is provided for those interested in such spe cialized areas as teaching, ministry, counseling, and psychiatry. The faculty serving in the psychology department are Dr. Harold Ripper, head, Dr. Anne Greve, and Associate Professor Johnson.

Professor Coburn directs Betty Cherry i n manip­ ulating the strings of an apparatus that dem­ onstrates average error.

Bob

H od g s o n

is

g i v e n the

"house, person, tree" test in psy­ chological testing class.

Dr. Philo simplifies lecture with "color" illustrations in Christian Doc.

RELIGION The largest department of the College is the department of religion. The principal aim of this department is to pro­ vide ministers, missionaries, and Christian workers for the Church of the Nazarene. It also has the general aims of pro­ viding all students with a knowledge and understanding of the Bible and an outline of basic truths essential to Christian experience and living. As an instrument of the Church of the Nazarene, the College desires that religion become a vital part of each student's life. These studies provide a broad and foundational basis for a life of Christian service. Heading the department is Associate Professor L. C. Philo; other members are Dr. Fred Floyd and Dr. W. N. King, Associate Professors Don Metz and Robert Sawyer, and Assistant Professor Jack Rairdon.

53

SPANISH Spanish is the modern language offered along with Ger­ man. Objectives of the Spanish department are to develop a fluency in the skills involved in the Spanish language; to become acquainted with the important works in the liter­ ature of Spain from the "Poema del Cid" to the present; to understand the ideals and character of the Spanish people; and to attain some knowledge of the cultural background of Spanish civilization. Assistant Professor Geraldine Huhnke is the acting head of the Spanish department, and Assistant Professor Naomi Bolerjack instructs with her. Miss Huh nke explains her attractive bulletin board displays to her class of first year Spanish stude• n ts.

SPE E CH In consideration of the prerequisite of an educated per­ son to speak the mother tongue effectively, the department of speech strives to cultivate purity and power in voice pro­ duction and to develop the ability to speak with clearness and ease in life situations. In addition to these practical aims, the department maintains a close relationship with the Divi­ sion of Fine Arts in presenting recitals and programs that are both cultural and entertaining. Associate Professor Em­ mel is head of the department, and teaching with him are Assistant Professors Kenneth Robinson and Doris Schumann.

The lecture recital class presents Dale Tuttle i n program i nterpreting "Statue of Liberty."

Dramatics class watches as Margi Greve, under the direction of Mrs. Schumann, transforms Mae West into a typical shrew.

54

)

t.

-J "-a (I

0

0

(> r:r

'D ,.,.

"

Q ....

Maurice Moore Marion Snowbarger

President Vice-President

Bett y Cherry

Secretary

Jo Anne Petty

Treasurer

Dwight Bugh

Student Council Representative

Professor Robinson and Gloria Willingham g ive demonstration of spaghetti rolling at Italian dinner.

SENIORS CLA SS OF 1955 To be a Senior-sophisticated, svelte, possessor of all knowledge-is ever y college student's dream. The class of '5 5 had at last achieved this distinction, but, as is probably true of every Senior class, were surprised they felt none of these things. It wasn't much different

The customary l yceums were both dramatic pres­ entations of the speech department. The proceeds from the two affairs boosted the gift treasury, and encour­ aged the class in venturing to build a patio behind the Student Union Building. Almost completed at the end

from being a Junior-onl y a little more exciting, a little better. There was the satisfying knowledge they were the leaders of the campus-the guardians of B-PC tra­ ditions; that through hard work and perseverance the y had a t last attained the privileges and responsibilities which "senior" denotes.

of school, t he patio stood as an enchanting s ymbol of

Realizing that this w as their last year, the class re­ solved to make it their best. Professor Robinson con­ sented to take over sponsorship of the class, and his bubbling enthusiasm was contagious. Before the press of senior papers could draw the class into hibernation, an Italian dinner, complete with red-checkered table­ cloths, candle light, Italian waiters with side burns, and garlic bread, was held in t he dining hall. "The Life of Rigolache" was presented, featuring the Italian street songs of George Lackey.

the appreciation of t he class for four years at B-PC. The Junior-Senior Banquet in "Life's Elysian Gar­ den" was the beginning of the end for the Seniors. There followed in quick succession the Junior-Senior breakfast, the Senior Trip, the Facult y-Senior break­ fast, and, at last, Commencement. Here again was one of life's paradoxical quirks, for mingled wit h long awaited joy was genuine sorrow at knowing t he y were leaving forever Breesee Hall, the Drag, chapel, room­ mates, friends, Prof. Robinson's booming laugh, and that t hese must remain onl y as memories. But going forward as Alumni, each Senior was deeply grateful that his college years had been spent beneath "Beth­ any's learned tower."

57

SEN IORS PAUL ALDRICH St. Louis, Missouri; A.B., Religion.

DWIGH T BASS Dixon, Nebraska; B.S., Biology; ARROW Staff; Biology Club; Honor Society.

PAUL AMBRO St. Louis, Missouri; Th.B., Religion; Class Chaplain; Mission Band, Vice President.

CLIFFORD BEALS, Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Biology; Biology Club.

MARY BAKER Milaca, Minnesota; B.S., Home Economics.

HENRY BLANCHARD Bethany, Oklahoma; Th.B., Religion; Mission Band; Male Choir; Orchestra; I.R.C.; Prayer and Fasting.

DONALD BALDWIN Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

ROBERT BORRON, Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Biology; Biology Club, Vice President; Honor Society.

58

SE NIORS PHILLIP COURTNEY Miami, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Mission Band, Vice­ President.

VERNON BROCKMAN Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

DWIGHT BUGH, Omaha, Nebraska; A.B., Biology; "B" Club; Jamboree Team; Class Ath­ letic Director; Biology Club, President; Honor Society; Student Council; Who's Who.

CARL CRAIG Meade, Kansas; B. Mus. Ed., Music Club;· F. T. A.

BARBARA BYFIELD Enid, Oklahoma; A.B., Spanish; A Cappella; SUNFLOWER Staff; Liter­ ary Society, Secretary; Student Council, Secretary; Spanish Club, President; Bud Robinson Dorm, Presi­ dent; Jamboree Queen At­ tendant; Heart Pal Queen At­ tendant; Honor Society; F. T. A.; Music Club.

ELI CYPER T Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Business Administrator; Youth Director, First Nazarene Church.

BE TTY CHERRY Abilene, Kansas; B.S., Elementary Education; Student Council, Secretary; Class Secretary; F. T. A., Sec­ retary; College Queen; Honor Society; Who 's Who, ( two years ) ; Jerni�an Dorm Council; Music Club; Treble Choir, Secretary; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting.

JEANNE CYPERT Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Orchestra; Honor Society.

59

SE NIORS SAM EDMONDS Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Psychology; Mission Band; Prayer and Fasting; Biology Club; A Cappella; Class President; Ministerial Association; Philosophy Club; Psychology Cluo.

SANDY DAMEWOOD Coffeyville, Kansas; A.B., Speech; Literary Society, Vice-President; Orner Memorial Speech Award; Prayer and Fasting; Gospel Team.

FRANK ELLIOTT Aurora, Missouri; A.B., Philosophy; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting; Mission Band; Ministerial Association; Philosophy Club, Vice-President, President.

JOHN DAVIDSON Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

BUDDY FARR Texarkana, Texas; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A., Vice-President, President; History Club; Literary Society; ARROW Staff, Business Manager; Class Cheerleader.

JACQUE TTA DEFOYD Frederick, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Class Treasurer; Music Club; Honor Society; F.T.A.; Prayer and Fasting; Sophomore Class Scholarship; Treble Choir.

ANN DODSON Lawrenceburg, Tennessee; A.B., Biology; Biology Club, Secretary; Student Council, Secretary; Heart Pal Queen; Who's Who; ARROW Staff.

BELVA JEAN FLAUDING Independence, Kansas; A.B., Psychology; Psychology Club_; Prayer and Fasting.

60

SE NIORS CHARLES HELSEL Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Philosophy Club; History Club, Vice足 President; Prayer and Fasting.

ROY FRANKLIN Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Male Choir.

BOB HODGSON Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Psychology; Biology Club; Prayer and Fasting; Psychology C}ub; Gospel Team, President, Summer School.

BILL GOODSON Texarkana, Texas; B. Mus. Ed.; College Quartet; Music Club.

DOROTHY HOLCOMB Warner, Oklahoma; B. Mus. Ed.; Music Club, Secretary; Class Treasurer; Honor Society, Secretary; Meek Missionary Society, Sec足 retary; Prayer and Fasting; Mission Band.

PAUL HAGEMEIER Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., History.

ROBERT HALE Bethany, Oklahoma; B. Mus. Ed.; Music Club; Band, President; Prayer and Fasting; Gospel Team; A Cappella; College Quartet.

LOWELL HOLLAND Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religious Education; Honor Society.

61

SENIORS EMANUEL KEHR Ingalls, Kansas; A.B., Religion; Honor Society; Ministerial Association; Prayer and Fasting; Junior Class Scholarship.

DALE HORTON Bet hany, Okla homa; A.B., Religion.

VIRGINIA HUNTER Sloan, Iowa; B.S., Home Economics; A Cappella; Literary Society; Class Secretary; Spanis h Club; F. T. A.; Home Economics Club.

DORSEY KIRBY Kansas City, Missouri; B. S., Business; Business 路club.

DELLA INGLE Antlers, Oklahoma; B.S., Business; Honor Society; Business Club, Treasurer, Vice-President; Treble Choir.

JEAN KNU TSON Hastings, Nebraska; B.S., Elementary Education; Prayer and Fasting.

ARLENE INGRAM, Bet hany, Okla homa; B.S., Home Economics; GREENBOOK Staff; Spanish Club; Music Club; F.T.A.; Home Economics Club.

GEORGE LACKEY Pharr, Texas; B.S., Elementary Education; F. T.A., Librarian ; Biology Club; ARROV/ Staff.

62

SENIORS ROSE LAMAR Anadarko, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Honor Society.

HOWARD LEDBETTER Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Functional Major.

BOB LINDLEY Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Gospel Team; I .R.C.; Ministerial Association.

HARRY LAMB Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

MADIE LAMBERT Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Mission Band.

FAYE McCRAW Kansas City, Missouri; A.B., Music; History Club; F.T.A.; ECHO Staff; Orchestra.

JAMES LANGFORD Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Prayer and Fasting; Gospel Team .

CAROLYN McNABB Bethany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; F.T.A.; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting.

63

SEN IORS BOBBIE MOORE Lelia Lake, Texas; B.S., Elementary Education; Class Athletic Director; A Cappella; "B" Club; Jamboree Team; F.T.A.

JIM NOFFSINGER Brush, Colorado; B.S., Chemistry; Class Athletic Director; "B" Club; Biology Club; Chemistry Club; A Cappella; College Quartet; ECHO Staff, Business Manager.

MAURICE MOORE Dubuque, Iowa; A.B., History; Class Chaplain, Vice President, President; Prayer and Fasting, President; Gospel Team, Vice-President; College Quartet; A Cappella, Chaplain; Master of Cere足 monies, Junior-Senior Banquet, Jamboree, ECHO Tourna足 ment, Christmas Banquet, "B" Club Tournament; ARROW Staff; ECHO Staff; "B" Club; Who's Who.

DICK OSBORN Dallas, Texas; A.B., History; Ministerial Association, President; A Cappella, Vice-President; College Quartet; Fanning Hall Dorm President; History C i ub.

FLOYD MYERS Kalvesta, Kansas; A.B., Business Administration; Prayer and Fasting; Mission Band; Meek Missionary Society; Business Club.

NOLA JOYCE OWENS Woodward, Oklahoma; B.S., Business Education; Business Club; F.T.A.; Mission Band; Prayer and Fasting.

RICHARD PERSHALL Clovis, New Mexico; B.S ., Elementary Education.

JAMES NICHOLS Ryan, Oklahoma; A.B., History; Historical Society.

64

SENIOR-s--GEORGE PRENTICE Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

JO ANNE PETTY Clovis, New Mexico; A.B., Biology; Biology Club, Secretary; Bud Robinson Dorm Council; Class Treasurer; ECHO Queen Attendant; Class Cheerleader.

WILLIAM RIDENOUR Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

JENNIS PHILLIPS Winfield, Kansas; B .Mus. Education; A Cap足 pella; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting; Music Club; F.T.A.

DENZIL ROPER Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

UMSTED PITTS Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Class President; Prayer and Fasting, Vice-President; Mission Band, Song Leader.

CARL PRENTICE Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Prayer and Fasting; Gospel Team; Ministerial Association.

IRMA LEE ROSS Elkhart, Kansas; B.S., Business Education; F.T.A.; Business Club; Honor Society; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting.

65

SENIORS EULA MAE SCALES McLean, Texas; B.S., Elementary Education; Music Club; Gospel Team; Treble Choir; Band; Orchestra; Prayer and Fasting.

IONA S TAGGS Batesville, Arkansas; A.B., English; Literary Society; F . T.A.

MARION SNOWBARGER Sylvia, Kansas; A.B., Social Science; Class President; Class Vice足 President; Student Council President; All-Around Freshman Award; Who's Who ( two years ) ; A Cappella; Head Host; History Club; F.T.A.; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting.

JAMES S TARK Prescott, Arkansas; A.B., Mathematics.

CHARLES STUART Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting; Ministerial Association; Class Chaplain.

DARRELL SPOON Bethany, Oklahoma; Th.B., Religion; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting.

JAMES SYKES Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

lOLA STAGGS Batesville, Arkansas; A.B., English; Literary Society; F.T.A.

66

SE NIORS SHERMAN TAYLOR Hemingford, Nebraska; A.B., Religion.

MYRNA VAN OSTRAND Bet hany, Oklahoma; B.S., Elementary Education; Prayer and Fasting; Honor Society; F.T.A.

EUNICE WACHTEL Nas hville, Tennessee; B.S., Home Economics; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting; Home Economics Club; ECHO Staff.

KENNETH TERRY Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion路.

ROBERT ULRICH Bet hany, Okla homa; A.B., Psychology; Student Council; N.Y.P.S. President; Psychology Club; Gospel Team; Married Students' Club, President.

NAOMI WATSON Post, Texas; B.S., Home Economics.

MARY JO WHITE Mules hoe, Texas; A.B., Englis h; Honor Society; F.T.A.; ECHO Staff; Bud Robinson Dorm Council; Literary Society, President; Student Council; Heart Pal Banquet Toast颅 mistress; W ho's W ho; ARROW Editor.

RUTH UNRUH Nevada, Missouri; A.B., Biology; Prayer and Fasting; Honor Society; Biology Club, Treasurer; Class Athletic Director; "B" Club.

67

SEN IORS FRANCES WIMBERLEY Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; B.S., Home Economics; Gospel Team; Prayer and Fasting; F.T.A.; Home Economics, President.

DONALD WILLIAMS Centerville, Iowa; A.B., Religion; Honor Society; Prayer and Fasting.

REBECCA WILLIAMS Manning, Louisiana; B .S., Elementary Education; Prayer and Fasting; F.T.A.; Mission Band; I .R.C.

EDWIN WISSBROECKER Antigo, Wisconsin; A.B., Religion; Mission Band; Ministerial Association; Director Religious Activities, Olivet.

ALFREDA WUESTER Bethany, Oklahoma; A.B., English; Prayer and Fasting; Mission Band, Secretary; Honor Society, Secretary; Literary Society; F.T.A., Vice-President; All-School Honor Award.

GLORIA WILLINGHAM Kansas City, Missouri; A.B., Speech; I .R.C., Treasurer; Bud Robinson Dorm President; A Cappella.

0. W. WILSON Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; A.B., Religion.

ROBERT ZIMMERMAN, Bertha, Minnesota; A.B., Religion.

68

Janelle Phillips

Vice-President

Melba Lynn Neal

Treasurer

Ernie Farmer

President

Mervin Davy

Student Council Representative

Shirley Stangeland

Secretary

Professor Rairdon

Sponsor

Tom Boyd, emcee at the Junior-Senior banquet, introduc-es the speaker.

JUNIORS CLA SS OF 1956 Bouncing back to the campus as full-fledged upper­ classmen, the Juniors returned to B-PC after a sum­ mer's vacation, anxious to get back into the swing of College Life. Here were old friends, new faces, lowly freshmen, the same familiar scenes, and no study hours. At the first class meeting, Ernie Farmer was elected to lead the class during the year, and Professor Rair­ don was unanimously returned to his position as· spon­ sor. Brimming over with energy, they flew into plans for the coming year. Early in the semester they presented their tradi­ tional lyceum, featuring a duo-piano team from Okla­ homa City. That successfully out of the way, the class turned their energies to basketball, and for the third consecutive year the boys' team conquered the other classes in the REVEILLE ECHO Tournament. After the turn of the semester, the class began

preparations for the Junior-Senior banquet, and there suddenly began whispered conferences in the dark corners, mysterious noises behind closed doors, and the accumulation of all sorts of wierd-looking parapha­ nelia in a portion of the Student Union Building. A major decision of the class had been to break past precedence and have the banquet in the dining hall in order to concentrate effort ( and money ) on decorations and "atmosphere." The· theme of the banquet was "In Life's Elysian Garden" and the hard working Juniors truly created a beautiful facsimilie of the garden of paradise. At a return engagement, the Juniors were honored by the Senior class with the traditional Jun­ ior-Senior breakfast. So they completed Book Three. They had come close to their ultimate goals, and there now remained only one more year. And as they left the campus, they did so slightly sobered, realizing that it too would soon be over.

71

J UN I O RS

George Adkins Helen Aldrich

Ernie Farmer, Chuck Harper, Paul Edmonds, and lawrence Jantz entertain Honor Society members at their formal banquet.

Norma Jane Allen Doris Ammons i\ Iartha Anderson

Freeda Archer David Baldwin

William Bates George Biggs Gradv Bohannan \V. L. Boomer

Tom Boyd

Arlme Brown Harold BrO\m Loreta Brovles Eileen Bryan Bob Bumpus

Park Burkhart Charles Case Pauline Classen Louise Cline Esta Clippinger

72

Alice Cloud Kenneth Coker Don Conway Grace Craig Rex Crumpley

H arold Daily Barbara Davis Nancr Davis i\ lelvyn Davy

Gerald Dryden

David Elledge Darlene Farmer Drnie Farmer lvonne Finchum Alice Jean Foster

Jim Gardner Earnest Garrett Don Gassett Glen Golden Barbara Goodson

Bill Haddow William Haltom

Amos !-!ann Kenneth Herrick

Koichi Yamamoto "carves" for Bud Robinson residents at their watermelon party.

73

J UN I O RS

Phillip Hill Gerald Hogan Both lenore Sloan and the first snowfa l l add beauty and enchantment to B-PC campus.

James Hokada June Holland Bill I ngram Dolores Jantz Lawrence Jantz

lV lary Lou Kastner Doris Kehr John Kelly Allyn Kennedy Marilee Kinne

LaVerne Kinerim Althea Kohnk Alfreda Kotwitz Robert Lewis Luella McCaslin

Roger McGuire Naomi iVlcPherson Bob

ladison

Gene Mav Verna Mikkelson

74

Orville Mobley Wilma Montgomery Gene Moore Karlos Morgan Wayne M urrow

Melba Lynn Neal Diane Neely Dwight Neuenschwander Richard Newton Patsy Pagan

Janelle Phillips Myrlene Pitts Virginia Pitts Roberta Posey Lena Pulliam

John Reese Mimiam Reinhold Patsy Robinson John Rogers Lessley Roland

Evelyn Rousselle Dorothy Schauer

Grazelle Scott Mary Jo Scott

l

Jim and Ramona Sykes and Bill and Carolyn McNabb attempt to "roll" their spaghetti at the Senior Ita lian dinner.

75

J UN I O RS

Charlotte Shackelford Faith Short

Jamboree Cheerleaders Nellie Hall, John Schubert, Bill Vaughn, and Jean McElyea arouse enthusiasm for the Redskins.

Arden Sickenburger Earl Skinner Lenore Sloan Lucille Sloan Wilma Fay Smith

Carson Snow Reba Spoon Shirley Stangeland Evangeline Steele Burt Stewart

Floyd Sumner Carol Swim Richard Timmer Helen Turner Dale Tuttle

Bill Vaughn D. \V. Wesaw Madolyn Wright Leon Wyss Ellis Ziebarth

76

t;*

ďż˝

CLASS OFFI CERS Roger Riggs Chuck Harper Bob Viser Charles Strawn Eulene Akin Marian Truax Dr. Floyd

Chaplain President Student Council Representative Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Sponsor

Sophomores u n load at scene of their spring outing.

SOPHOMORE S CLASS OF 1 95 7

Gay, light- hearted, and whimsical, the Sop homore class returned-eager to display before "cowering" Fres hmen their second-year "sop histication." Here were the same scenes and faces t hat last year had loomed before t heir Fres hman eyes as strange and slightly terrifying, but w hich now signified College Life, and which t hey greeted with eager anticipation . Organizing in t he fall, t he Sop homores sanctioned the previous leaders hip of Dr. Floyd and Chuck Harper by re-electing t hem sponsor and president, respectively. Their "generous, and warm-hearted natures" (and haunting memories of t heir own initiation ) led the class to abolish the customary day of rigorous initiation for Freshmen, and treat t hem to a party instead. The two classes co-operated on material for a talent s how

held in Fine Arts, and t he Sop homores furnis hed root beer and sandwiches afterwards. Second-semester activities of t he class concerned primarily plans for the traditional Sop homore outing. Early, early in t he morning, buses were boarded for Price's Falls, and from thence until sunset restraints were abandoned, and t he Sophomores "kicked up t heir heels in the sunshine." Crowded into one clay were all the activities of a regular Senior trip : wading, hiking, volley ball, hors eback riding, swimming, and, of course, eating. T he extreme weariness wit h w hich t hey re­ turned home endorsed the success of t he day's outing. With nostalgic memories of a wonderful year, the class ended Sop homore activities, and as t hey packed t heir suitcases, were already looking a head to Junior ones.

79

SOPH OMORES

Jim Aaron Eulene Akin

Harry Pierce learns the use of chopsticks in consuming rice at the Mission Band Japanese dinner.

I Iarold Allen Robert Allen Garland Anneler Lowell Arndt Norma Atkinson

Robert Atkinson Helen Austin Bessie Babcock Pat Barham Shirley Bauder

Robbie Beavers Gorden Beckett Sam Bell Shirley Bell Eunice Bettes

Donna Bond Ruth Bond Billie Bonner Terry Brattin Troy Brooks

80

Daniel Brown Lela Brown lV!arjorie Brown Jerry Burns Ramona Campbell

Robert Campbell Thomas Cash Elmer Chandler Julia Clark Horace Classen

Frances Collins Karen Coody Maxine Coons l\ lolly Copeland

Oscar Coston

Arlis Coy lmagene Crabb Claud Cypert Mitchell Daugherty Lee Davis

Ruth Davis Jeanine Dean

Don Don

Girls from Jernigan Hall assume the role of "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" to create their prize winning Jamboree float.

81

SOPH OMORES

Jack Driscol Paul Edmonds Photographer Roy Simpson is served by t h e H o m e Economics girls after snapping the faculty tea.

Ruth Elrod LaRon Emerson Beverly Emmert Phyllis Fisher Larry Flood

Mary Foster Lou Ann Fox Harold Franklin Pat Franklin Paul Gaines

Irma Garnand Ray Gill Vonciel Gordon Marlene Graham Burton Gray

i'vlarji Greve JoAnn Hale Martin Hall Chuck Harper Billy Joe Harris

82

Harry Harris Suzanne Harris Nelva Hebard John Hendricks Robert Hendricks

Robert Herrick Robert Hess Barbara Hickman Kendall Hight Sara Frances Hilton

Ruth Hines Dean Horton David I-I uff Jerry Hull Gerald Human

Jack !mel Jerry Ingram vVal ter Isaacs Clem Jarvis Clarence Jennings

Bob Jernigan lola Johnson

Lloyd Keith

Tom Whitsett, Paul Goines, and lorry Flood go on the warpath against the Alumni preceding Jamboree.

SOPH OMORES

Reba Keys Norwood King

Sophomore Howard Oliver and Freshmen James Fox and Donald Bird unite the two classes by trumpet trio at initiation program.

Shirley King Lester Knight Melva Knippers Glynelle Lawrence Ruth Ann Lay

John Linnell Kenneth Long Graham Lukens Beverly Lundy Walter Lunsford

Kenneth Luther Berneitta McCormack Cliffie McCurley Marilyn McGuire Gail Mcintyre

Ruby McKaughan Clifton McNabb Howard Manwarren Robert Mathias Irene Meier

QA.

Ron Mercer Sue Merrill Evelyn Milburn Bobby Mitchell Charles Mitchell

Harold Moore \Vayne Mosiman Dwight Neal Wilfred 1 eel Dean Neff

Virginia Newlin Eunice Noffsinger Howard Oliver Barbara Owens Bill Oxner

Esther Ozias 1onte Page Dale Paul Bill Penquite Charles Peters

Harry Pierce Ruth Pierce

Rodney Pitts

Hickory smoke, Cokes, and sandwiches provide the proper atmosphere for A Cappella party.

85

SOPH OMO RES

Charles Pugh Arlene Reiff Snowballing supplants basketball as the favorite sport following the biggest snow of the year.

Bobby Rhodes Judy Ridley Roger Riggs Ruth Riley Frankli n Roberts

Kenneth Rogers Martha Rogers Rosalie Rose Harry Schnoehals John Schubert

Ardith Schuler Lucille Seeton Mary Lou Sells Chester Shafer Ken Sherrill

Dale Shotts Roy Simpson Bill Sipes Dorothy Sloan Frank Sloan

Dixie Smith Wilma Glee Smith Jim Snyder LaDonna Sparks Norma Stahly

George Stevenson Charles Strawn Richard Stump Vernon Swim Alice Taylor

Pauline Taylor Joyce Teas Dollie Timmer Jim Tracy Marian Truax

Forrest Tyler Elvin Vermilion Bob Viser Levoy Wallace Lavonna Ware

Harold Webster Doris West

Lyle West

The speech lecture recital class presents "The Christmas Carol" to路 those attending the anneal Christmas banquet.

87

Floe Williams

Virginia Williams Wanda Williams The campus crew give visual expression of their appreciation to Mr. Craddock and Mr. Simpson at o pa rty in the Drag.

Arless Wilson Mary Lou Wittler Clara Womack Ruth Wood I rma \Vright

Koichi Yamamoto Nana Yamamoto Glenna Yarbrough Roy Young Henry Zaleta

Dining hall routine is broken by serving hot dogs and potatoe salad in the Drag to Harry Harris, lee Davis, Gene Wright, and Wayne Murrow.

88

FRE S H MEN

Talmadge Johnson

President

Juan Casey

Treasurer Student Council Representative

Kathryn Millsap Katherine Snowbarger

Secretary

Buddy Emmert

Vice-President

Dr. Snowbarger

Sponsor

Tal madge Johnson expresses appreciation of c lass to Dr. Snow足 borger for wonderful sponsorship during the year.

FRE SHM E N CLA SS OF 1 95S The Freshman class descended on the campus in the fall-enthusiastic, eager, with soaring expectations of College Life. They greeted with naive wonder all the things that suddenly began happening to them : donn rooms, new faces, English classes, gab sessions, College Church. Life was one grand whirl, the nucleus of which was this exciting campus. Only occasionally was there time for a glance at the empty suitcases that signified home and Mom and Dad and all the others back there. As soon as they had become accustomed to class schedules, and had accepted the "doomable" fact of 7: 30 classes, the Freshmen held their first official class meeting to choose their class leaders. Dr. Snowbarger was chosen sponsor of the class, Talmadge Johnson, president, and wheels immediately began turning to grind out a successful year's activities. Initiation was supplanted with a Freshman-Sopho-

more party and talent show in the Fine Arts audi足 torium. A "sock hop" with no shoes allowed brought forth varied and interesting patterns in sock wear. Freshman prayer meetings, led by class chaplain Lyle Saxton, aided the spiritual growth of the class. Both Freshman basketball teams excelled in class athletics, and both came through season play with good records. During the REVEILLE ECHO Tournament the girls ' team C<qJtured the championship of the tourney as loyal fans jubilantly cheered from the sidelines. Then, as a fitting climax to a wonderful year; the Freshman ban足 quet transported the class to the Hawaiian Islands, and left them there for two enchanting hours midst strains of "Aloha ", diced pineapple, and waving palms. Thus the year ended. Many things had happened since the Jay stfttcases were first unloaded-a year of fun, and studies and spiritual growth. As each student left the campus, there was the anticipatory promise of足 "next year!"

91

FRE SHM E N

Yvonne Adams Dean Andrew Initiation Day is ended with the Sophomores treating the Freshmen to root beer and doughnuts.

Carroll Armstrong Carolyn Aubrey Charles Baldwin Charles Ballard Gerald Bateman

LeVeta Bee] Lowell Bell LaVeda Bernstorf James Biggs Donald Bird

Darleen Boldt Eleanor Bond Glenn Bond Billie Ann Breathwit Elain Bristlan

leta Brown Dolores Buckmaster Nancy Buckmaster Doris Bumpas Bob Burch

92

Mary Burdine Joyce Burkhart Glenn Burnett Wesley Burpo Lynn Burr

Kenneth Bynum Don Carleton Charlene Carrick Lois Carter Martha Carter

Joy Lee Cary Juan Casey David Chandler Beverly Clark Sally Clark

Carol Clegg Edwin Cloud Carna Cole Ralph Cory Earnestine Cox

Sue Cravens Genell Crawford Robert Crawford Ken Crews Forrest Cunningham

Donnie Danels Asenath Davenport Ramona Davis Wanda Dawson Delbert Dayhoff

FRE SHM E N

Doris DeVore Daney Dubose Oletha ludwig, Howard Oliver, Darlene Farmer, and Mrs. Dunn portray "The Night Before Christmas" at A Cappella Christmas party.

Phil Duff Billy Duke Gene Duncan Dorvalene Duree Gene Dybdahl

Donna Edge Howard Edgerton Doris Edmonds Hazel Edmonds Roger Egerton

Winona Ellis Buddy Emmert James Emmert Rosalie Ewell Bill Farley

Don Farmer Bill Fika Elizabeth Findlay Wilda Foote Kay Fortner

James Fox Doyle Frazier Carl Gaede Dale Gardner Marjorie Gentz

Thelma Gifford Bertha Gill J. C. Cilley Helen Goetz James Colden

John Gonzalez Bill Gooden Della Mae Goodhue Betty Gorham Gala! Cough

Dorothy Gray Duane Green Ronnie Green vVinogene Greene Gloria Hall

Nellie Hall Ann Hamiter Dan Hamiter Sondra Harris Shirley Hartman

Cary Hartpence Celia Hays Clarence Hays Pattie Headley Mary Jane Henderson

FRE S H M E N

Vera Herron Don Hess

Carl Baggett and Bob Madison threaten to kindle the Jamboree bonfire with James Goulden.

Robert Hester Janett Higdon Frankie Holland Charles Holschuh Sheilia Hopkins

Betty Howard Jerry Hutchings Myrna Jahde Dick James Mac Jantz

Talmadge Johnson John Jonte Marilyn Kauth Janice Kent Henry King

Glenn Knutson Dick Kuhns Marilyn Lake "Billy Lambert Paul Lana

QA

Martha Langley Richard Leffel Glenn Lenz Greta Lewis John Lewis

Kenneth Lewis Richie Lewis Shelda Linbocker Cora Lock Kenneth Long

Duane Lotspeich Oletha Ludwig Beth McCaleb Lee Roy McCleery Myrna McClung

Eugene McElyea Jean McElyea Jewell McGinis Martha McMinn Lima McNames

Clark McPhail Alvin Mace Glenn Mace David Mathis Maryetto Mayo

Bobbie Meador Charlotte Miley Eva Miller Delane Miller Sharon Miller

97

FRE SHM E N

Kathryn Millsap Florene Mitchell Occasional accidents prevent monotony in the kitchen far Martha Carter, Betty Gorham, Beth McCaleb, and Bertha Gill.

Delma Montgomery Deletta Mosely Duane Mosiman Jane Moore Merlin Moore

Willis Moore Carl Mullies Delores Nagel James Neuenschwander Richard Neufeld

Barbara Newman Jack Packwood Bertie Parks Jerry Parrish Barbara Payne

Jack Peard Dealine Perkins Clyde Petete Robert Phillips Doyal Pickel

98

Maralyn Posey Vera Potts Beverly Price Larry Reeves Lillie Reynolds

Joyce Ripper Sue Robinson Charles Rodgers Daniel Rogers Delta Rogers

Bill Rohlmeier Bill Rutledge Fuad Safadi Wynona Samples Hirham Sanders

Lyle Saxton Wayne Scales Darlene Scott Don Searle Danny Shaw

Wanda Shedd Jack Sheeks Raymond Shepherd Joe Shoemate Eugene Shore

Frederick Siems Dene Simpson Shirley Simpson Myrna Sipes Roy Skillern

FRE SHM E N

Alma Smith Carl Smith Lester Knight, Pat Swigart, Vera Winters, and Dick Osborne model "the colleg iate costume for a ten o'clock date in the Drag."

Ernestine Smith Ernie Smith Roberta Smith Katherine Snowbarger Helen Sooter

Charlotte Stanley Lee Stapleton Robert Stelle James Stewart Mary Helen Stewart

W. R. Stewart Vera Stone Doyle Strother Colleen Struble Vernon Sutter

Pat Swigart Shirley Tabor Janet Taylor Nadine Taylor William Thayer

1 00

Bobby Thomason Barbara Thompson Barbara Tompkins Shirley Towns Clair Uitts

Noel Vice June Vineyard Rebecca Wachtel Howard Wade Gwen Walker

Doris Ward Phillip Washburn John Westmoreland Johnny vVestmoreland Wallace White

Tom Whitsett Paul Wiggs Bonnie Williams Shirley Wilson Lois Wimberley

Vera Ruth Winter Le Roy Wire Mary Jeanne Wire Paul Wire Gerald Wisdom

Robert Womack Eugene Wright路 Mary York Albert Ray Zabel Crystal Zentz

Ruthie Bell Robert Gilpin The Dunns' living room, a festive tree, pop corn balls, and cranberry punch all add up to a gala Christmas party.

Eleanore Wagoner Henry Wagoner Delores W ellmon Lina Yakle

Campus landscaping behind Liberal Arts provides an effective setting for Sue Merrill and George Biggs.

Maurice Moore, Marion Snowberger, Charles Stuart, Bob Hodgson, and Dick Osborne give Seniors a g limpse of "Life With Luigi."

1 02

PreJenfin q

Wh o's Wh o Gfm onq S tuJe n ts at

8- P C

WHO'S WHO AMONG STUDENTS is one of the honors with which the College recognizes out­ standing service and leadership among members of the Student Body. Each year a joint committee com­ posed of the Administrative Council and Student Council select those students who best exemplify the qualifications set forth for election to the organization. These qualifications include scholarship; participation and leadership in academic and extracurricular activi­ ties; citizenship and service to the school; and prom­ ise of future usefulness. Presented on the following pages are the eleven stu­ dents who received this recognition in 1 9 5 5 .

1 04

eolle9e _gife Stimufate5 SPI RITUAL G ROWT �

1 16

Dr. and Mrs. Phillips and their three daughters, Clara, Betty Jean, and Karen, at home in the Parsonage.

COLLE GE

CHU RCH The heart of Bethany's educational experiences 1s the Christian religion. Organized and supported by the Church of the Nazarene, the college maintains those standards which are in keeping with the tenets of the Church. Religion is a vital part of the student's life during the course of his four years on the campus. A minimum of eight hours credit in religion is re­ quired to help all students formulate a Christian philos­ ophy of life and code of ethics. To instill the highest of spiritual values in all those coming under its influ­ ence, the college sets a standard of required church and chapel attendance. Also supported by the church are numerous religious organizations which are init­ iated and executed by students. Since 1 950, Dr. E. S. Phillips has furnished the leadership and guidance needed by the varied and di­ verse congregation of towns-people, students, and fac­ ulty members who make up the College Church. Be­ fore coming to Bethany First Church, he was vice­ president of Eastern Nazarene College. Dr. Phillips has achieved the respect and admiration of the stu­ dents through his intellectual and inspirational ser­ mons, his ready and whimsical humor, and his sympa­ thetic counseling and guidance. As an expression of their esteem, the college awarded Rev. Phillips in 1 9 5 3, an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree. ·

DR. E. S. PHILLIPS Pastor 1 18

CHU RCH PE RSONN E L

ROBERT GREEN Minister of Christian Education

DICK SCHUMANN Church Visitor

JEANNE AND Ell CYPERT Directors of Youth Activities

1 19

CH URCH PERSON N E L

JUNE McARTHUR Church Secretary

MINNIE BLANCHE ULRICH Office Assistant

MAURINE DICKERSON and BEVERLY LUNDY Church Librarians

1 20

SUN DA Y SCHOOL AND N. Y. P. s.

VERNON SNOWBARGER Sunday School Superintendent

DICK and DORIS SCHUMANN N. Y. P. S. Directors

SUNDAY SCHOOl TEACHERS Robert Emmel, Carol Lundy, Chuck Harper, Marion Snowbarger. (Not Shown: Tom Boyd, Dick Newton.)

121

MU SIC

LESTER DUNN Director of Music

RUTH TAYLOR Church Organist 1 22

The music of Bethany-Peniel College is ex足 pressive of the spirit and atmosphere to be found on the campus of the school. Down through the ages, music has been a medium of communicating the emotions and spirit of a people. It is only natural, then, that music should play a dominate role on the campus of a Christian college such as Bethany-Peniel. Enriching the cultural, spir足 itual, and aesthetical enjoyment of every student, church music is a vital part of all the religious services on the campus. Its influence is felt in the daily chapel programs, as the strains of the piano signify a time of quiet and restful devotion in the midst of the frantic confusion of attending classes and producing assignments. It is a herald from the church each Sunday morning as, promptly at nine-fifteen o'clock, notes from the organ peal over the campus. Special music is an integral part of N. Y. P. S., Gospel Team, and Mission Band. Standing as a personification of the motto of the College, "Character, Culture, and Christ", music is a happy and essential part of the life of every student.

CARROLL HARVILLE Church Pianist

Professor Lester D u n n and the one hu ndred and eighty-five voice choir

�IE SSIAH The last Sunday night before the C hristmas vacation, Professor Lester Dunn and a massed choir of one hundred and eighty-five voices pre­ sented Handel's Messiah in the c hurch auditor­ ium. Soloists for the traditional event were Mrs. Mabel Sonnevik, soprano; Mrs. Evelyn Robin­ son, contralto; Mr. Gene Chambers, tenor; and Mr. Robert Hale, bass. Mrs. Rut h Taylor was t he organist and Professor Carroll Harville pianist for t he presentation. Festive decorations in t he Christmas tradition t hroughout t he c hurc h en­ hanced t he beauty and spirit of the occasion. From the opening prelude of t he organ to t he concluding "Halleluja h Chorus" the presentation of the Messia h was of powerful and inspirational import. Soloists Gene Chambers, Mabel Son nevik, Evelyn Robinson, and Robert Hale.

123

CHAPE L

REV. EVERETT HOWARD Superintendent of Mexico San Antonio District

Daily chapel services are as traditional to the B-PC student as the customary "Hi," freshmen themes, or senior trip. They are provided for and required of all students, and may be attended by other persons who desire to do so. Because. they pl'ovide a time when the student may turn aside from the chaos of the average day for a short period of quiet and relaxation, the chapel services are valuable for psychological and physical reasons in addition to their spiritual and cultural values. . Most students on the campus consider the daily services as important to their college careers as getting along with their roommates. Probably remembered long after that grade in philosophy or English has been completely forgotten will be the seats occupied in chapel, the boys and girls seated next to them, stu足 dent chapel days, and Professor Dunn marching onto the stage with Hymns of the Sanctuary. To students and faculty walking through the doors of the chapel hall into an auditorium filled with or足 gan music, there to experience a time of worship and fellowship, chapel is a real privilege.

MISS LYDIA WILKIE Missionary from Cape Verde 1 24

DR. WALDO STEPHENS Government Lecturer

MISS MARY MILLER Missionary Appointee to Peru

REV. ELMER SCHMELENBACH Missionary from Africa

REV. SAMMY SPARKS Evangel ist

MISS FAIRY CHISM Missionary from Africa 125

RE VIVALS

DR. HARDY POWERS Fall Semester

DR. B. V. SEALS Spring Semester

AN D CON VE NTION S

DR. GEORGE COULTER Fall Semester 1 26

DR. V. H. LEWIS Spring Semester

AYCOCK LECTU RE S

DR. ORVIllE JENKINS

MRS. MARIDEl AYCOCK HARDING

WILLIAMS �IE MORIAL LE CTURE

DR. HARDY POWERS

.

127

ROW 1 : Morgan, Hokada, Gooden, Frazier, Osborn, Rohlmeier, Hendricks, Sawyer. Graham, Schoenhals, Wade.

ROW 2: Drisco, Boyd, Cloud, Shotts, Leffel,

ROW 3: Pierce, Dorr, E l liott, Bel l , Harris, Aaron, Newton, Burnett, Sickenberger, White,

ROW

4: Joh nson, Moore, Harper, Flood, Swim, Stewart, Bynum, Jennings, Strother, Packwood, Gardner.

MINIST E RIAL GROUP

The Ministerial Association devoted the year to practical aid for the ministerial student in pre足 paring for his life's work. They held meetings twice a month during the year with a special speaker dis足 cussing specific phases of the minister's work. Dur足 ing the fall term, the club sponsored an early morn足 ing breakfast for the entertainment of its members. President Vice-President Secretary Sponsor

128

Dick Osborn Dick Haltom Richard Leffel Professor Sawyer

PRAY ER AN D FASTING Prayer and Fasting had n o organized mem­ bership, but each Friday noon students wishing to replace the noon meal with an hour of devo­ tion and worship gathered in the church auditor­ ium. The services were usually the most rever­ ent of any on the campus. A hushed attitude of prayer overwhelmed the student as he walked through the doors, and continued through the program which followed. The outstanding service of the year was the Rose Service at the last meet­ mg. President Vice-President Organist Sponsor

Maurice Moore Umsted Pitts Lester Knight Dr. Garner 1 29

ROW 1 : Philo, Hendricks, Fra nklin, Gooden, Garna nd, Phil lips, Merrill, Sheldon. Knippers, Hutchins, Fox, Pitts.

ROW 2: Buckmaster, Courtney, Pugh, Sell s,

ROW 3: Biggs, Hokada, Murrow, Womack, Rogers, Pulliam,

Wallace, Saxon, Franklin, Morgan, Beals, Wellmon, Clark, Va n Ostrand, Owens. Foote, Gifford, Copeland, Hunter, Baker.

Henderson.

ROW 4: Ozias,

ROW 5: Harris, Strawn, Parks, Cravens,

ROW 6: Gardner, Taylor, Smith, Cole, McCaleb, Carter, Coons, Edmonds, Bonner,

Davis, Stangeland, Archer, Holcomb.

�IISSION BAN D

Mission Band met each Thursday evening m the basement of the church for a program of missionary emphasis. Home mission work-as well as foreign lands-was studied, and emphasis was placed on the layman's obligations toward the mission field. One of the main projects this year was the missionary play which toured the surrounding area. President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Sponsors

1 30

Charles Pugh Pat Courtney Melva Knippers Myrlene Pitts Sheldon, Philo

ROW 1 : Tompkins, Boldt, Akin, Pagan, Austin, Wil l iams, Vineyard, Hall, Stone, Mil ler. Stanley, Ridley, Owens, McNames, langley, Scott, Payne. Ell iott, Johnson, Towns. ner, Rodgers, Walker.

ROW 3 : Stewart,

Dawson,

ROW 2: Cary, Winters, Gordon,

Snowberger,

Davis,

Schuler,

Hann,

ROW 4: Aubrey, Crabb, Gentz, DuBose, Swigart, Ludwig, Montgomery, Simpson, Hann, Cloud, Sum足 ROW 5: Moore, Snowberger, Roh l meier, Joh nte, Mullies, Knierim, Bell, Cook, Byrd, Miller.

GOSPEL TE A M

From the upper church auditorium each Thursday evening flowed the inspiration of the Gospel Team services. The programs during the year were purely devotional meetings to give students a spiritual boost during the week. Services are conducted by students who are potential ministers or Christian workers. The Gospel Team Choir was organized during the year to provide music for both school services and surrounding churches. President Vice-President Secretary Sponsor

J. D. Cook Amos Hann Doris Ammons Dr. King 1 31

o{JvanceJ SOCIAL D EV E LO PME N T

1 32

.JA M BORE E CORONATION

King Gerald Dryden places robe of royalty on shoulders of Queen Wilma.

Crowned and robed, the Queen reigns over the Jamboree with simple dignity

King a nd Queen surrounded by royal court: Jim Gardner, Howard Oliver, Vernon Swim, Dean Horton, Eva ngeline Steele, Barbara Byfield, Eulene Akin, a nd Beverly Emmert.

1 34

H E A RT PAL CORONATION

Heart Pal King, Howard Oliver goes forth to claim his Queen of Valentine, Eva ngeline Steele.

Crowning Eva ngeline queen, King Howard leads her to the royal throne.

King and Queen with attendants: Tom

Boyd, Eulene Akin, Joh n ny

Dunn, Barbara Byfield, Jim Gard足 ner, and Jimmy Dunn.

1 36

'

H eart Pal Queen

RE VEILLE E CHO CORONATION

King and Queen of Tournament reign from throne at the rainbow's end.

Queen Betty bears crown sign ifying her royalty.

ROYAL COURT Jerry Hull, JoAnne Petty, Jim Gardner, Bar足 bara Byfield, Eulene Akin, John ny West足 moreland, King.

1 38

Kathryn Millsap,

Queen, a n d

BETTY CHERRY

\ '

FACULTY RECITALS

LESTER DUNN Tenor

Some o f the most enjoyable o f the cultural experiences which students at B-PC receive are the public performances given by the Fine Arts department. Throughout the year recitals are presented under its direction for the entertain­ ment of the faculty and student body. The most significant of these performances are those given by the faculty members of the de­ partment. In the fall semester, Prof. Harville and Prof. Chambers gave a joint program in which they emphasized the moods of such composers as Chopin, Debussy, and Brahms. In March, Mr. Dunn innovated an unusual program by pre­ senting a recital of nothing but sacred numbers. These numbers were recent or little known songs ranging from Handel to contemporary artists. In May the entire faculty presented a staff recital. Each member supplied two numbers on the pro­ gram, choosing and developing his selections in his own individual way. This was a delightful culminating activity of the year for the depart­ ment, and well served its purpose "to entertain." 1 40

RUTH TAYLOR Organist

GENE CHAMBERS Tenor

CARROLL HARVILLE Pianist

DORIS VAUGHAN Pianist

141

GRADUATE R E CITALS

GLORIA WILLINGHAM The Snake Pit

Graduate recitals are considered the best student presentations given at B-PC. Both the speech and music departments present major students in recitals sometime during the senior year. In order to qualify for graduation each speech major must present a public recital, and music majors have the option of presenting a recital or writing a research thesis. Outstanding among social and cultural activities were the year's three graduate recitals. During the first semester Gloria Ramquist Willingham presented a cutting of Mary Jane Ward's best seller, The Snake Pit. The dramatic presentation was the vivid portrayal of a girl who lost her mind and was confined to a men足 tal hospital. The account, from the time the girl en足 tered the hospital until she regained her sanity, was 1 42

a deeply human portrayal touching each member of the audience with its pathos and tragedy. Sandy Damewood presented Mark Twain's story of France's national heroine, Joan of Arc. She brilliantly captured the mood and tone of the novel in portraying Joan as she was called to lead the French forces as she gallantly entered the battle at the head of the troops, and finally, as she was captured by the English army and burned at the stake, triumphant even in death. This daring peasant girl was brought to life, and for almost an hour, lived and breathed upon the stage. The only music recital presented during the year was Robert Hale's spring concert featuring a repertoire of classical, modern, comic, and spiritual numbers. He was accompanied by Madalyn Douglas Wright.

SANDY DAMEWOOD Joan of Arc

ROBERT HALE Baritone

"MOONFA CE

Ruth Freda Archer as "Etta" pleads with her insane husba nd, Paul Gaines.

MUG FORD"

Wood characterizes the "interested

neighbor" who supervises the purchase of a rug by a city woman (Verna · Mikkelson).

SE NIOR FALL LY CE U M The senior class presented as their fall lyceum the annual production of the dramatics class. This year's billing consisted of three one-act plays : "The Happy Journey", "Moonface Mugford", and "Sorry, Wrong Number". "The Happy Journey" was a humorous portrayal of a typical family's trip to the home of the older daughter. Included in it were all the "homespun" elements of any family journey-and the reigning decorum of mother. Included in the cast were Jim Gard­ ner, Maurice Moore, Wilma Faye Smith, Barbara Byfield, Bill Vaughn, and Lucille Sloan. Entering the program gradually was a faintly eerie note, de­ tectable in the performance of "Moonface Mugford" -an old, insane fisherman. Moonface, portrayed by Paul Gaines, periodi­ cally banged his wife's head against the wall, but would later grind glass into his own bed to demonstrate his remorse. Eventu­ ally, he led his wife into the same murky abyss of mind until she, too, could see the dragons hiding along the seashore. Supporting Paul in his role were Freda Archer, Ruth Wood, Verna Mikkelson, and Dick Haltom. The "faintly eerie note" grew in crescendo, and reached its climax in the third play, "Sorry, Wrong Number." Here the audience watched as a helpless invalid heard a murder planned over a crossed telephone wire, and, too late, realized it was her own. In the cast, Mary Jo White played the invalid, and was supported by the entire dramatics class. ·

144

Moonface is tormented by noises his wife doesn't hear and faces she can not see.

"THE HAPPY JOURNEY"

Father (Maurice Moore) applies the brake as Beulah (lucille Sloan) rushes to the car to greet the family.

Maurice Moore, Wilma Smith, Jim Gardner, Barbara Byfield and Bill Vaughn pre足 pare for the family journey.

"SORRY, WRONG

NUM B E R "

Mary Jo White portrays an invalid listening to plans for her own murder.

145

SEN IOR SPRING . LY CE U M "LAST CURTAI N "

Park Burkhart and Norma Bumpus as Booth a nd his sweetheart vivify their mutual devotion.

Paul Edmonds a nd Jean McElyea play two perpetually quarreling actors.

On a Saturday evening late in April, the Fine Arts audi足 torium was again the scene of three one-act plays as the Seniors presented their spring lyceum. The plays, products of the directing class, were outstanding performances. The first, "Where the Cross Is Made" by Eugene O'Neill, was a mystery drama dealing with the psychological effects of a fathers insanity on his son. The father, an old sea captain, was convinced of the existence of a buried treasure "where the cross is made", and eventually the idea affected the mental equilibrium of his son. The son was played by Dale Tuttle, the father by Chuck Harper, and others in the cast were La Donna Sparks, Carl Craig, Vernon Swim, Glen Bond, and Kenneth Long. The second play was a light comedy inserted to relieve the mounting tension of the audience. The plot dealt with a young married couple, visited simultaneously by both mothers-in-law. The events which followed made a sparkling, lively play which delighted the audience. Ann Dodson played the young wife, Jack Packwood the husband, and Pat Swigart and Nita Brown the mothers-in-law. The culminating play was a historical drama l:>uilt around John Wilks Booth and his sweetheart, Jeanie, prior to the assasination of Lincoln. Minor plots dealt with the back足 stage antics of the actors playing at the theatre when, the president was killed. Booth was played by Park Burkhart, Jeanie by Norma Jane Bumpus, and supporting actors were Don Conway, Paul Edmonds, Jean McElyea, and Aulene Lamb. 1 46

Kate (Aulene lamb) instructs Peanut Joh n (Don Conway) a s to future actions.

"WHER E THE CROSS IS MADE ' '

Dale Tuttle, la

Donna Sparks, Carl

Craig, a nd

Chuck Harper enact scene presenting the death of the father.

Glen Bond, Kenneth long, a n d Vernon Swim portray three visionary sailors.

"THURSDAY E VENING " Ann Dodson as wife a nd Jack Packwood as h us颅 band exemplify typical family relations.

Pat S Wlg art 路'l?J n

N"t 'a . Ia w , d"ISCu ss th 路

m-

d

8rown ' m o th erseir pro teg es .

1 47

STUDENT COUN CIL LYCE UM

The Student Council Lyceum featured baritone singer Orcenith Smith, associate professor of music at the University of Oklahoma. The lyceum, presented first semester, was a special service of the Student Coun­ cil to aid the cultural development of students, and to provide some social activity. Dr. Smith was accom­ panied by Mr. Digby Bell, and presented such selec­ tions as "If Music Be The Food of Love," by Purcell, and "The Nightingale," by Brockway.

DR. ORCENITH SMITH MR. DIGBY BELL

JUN IOR LYCE UM The Junior Class secured for their traditional lyceum, the twin pianist team, Cockerham and Feni­ more. The class decided to "get the jump" on other activities and scheduled the lyceum as an early feature of the fall semester. The duo-pianists were local Oklahoma City talent, who conduct their musi­ cal programs as a sideline to their regular occupa­ tions. They presented their own arrangement of several musical numbers and one original compo­ sition.

MR. R. L. FENIMORE MRS. LOUISE COCKERHAM 148

J im Tracy Buddy Emmert Talmadge Johnson Leon Wyss

Glenn Knutson Gerald Human Don Farmer Chuck Rogers

QUAR'I.,ETS AND CHOIR

GOSPEL TEAM CHOIR ROW 1 : Barbara Tompkins, Mary Stewart, Ardith Schuler, Judy Rid足 ley,

B a r b a ra

Stanley,

Paine,

Imogene

Charlotte

Crabb,

Reba

Keys. ROW 2: John Joh nte, Carolyn Aub足 rey, Vera Stone, lucille Sloan, Mar足 tha langley, Charles Stuart. ROW 3: Don Bird, Bob Madison, James Stewart, Joel Miller, Frank Elliott.

1 49

QUARTETS

Robert Lewis Lester Knight Dick Osborn Robert Hale

AND

Alice Taylor Lucille Sloan I mogene Crabb

Glenn Golden Bob Viser Don Hess Sam Bell

1 50

Jess Anderson Burton Gray Paul Edmonds Dick Haltom

TRIOS

Eulene Akin Evangeline Steele Helen Aldrich

J uan Casey Genell Crawford Mary Burdine

151

IN FINE A RTS

RUTH WOODS and FREEDA ARCHER "Mooncalf Mugford" Senior Lyceum

DORIS AMMONS Fine Arts Recital

LORETA BROYLES For Heaven's Sake

Sophomore Recital 1 52

LESTER KNIGHT Sophomore Recital

EULENE AKIN Sophomore Recital GEORGE LACKEY Lecture Class Recital

BOB HODGSON Fine Arts Recital

FLOE WILLIAMS Lecture Class Recital 153

Program at Senior dinner features Bob Hale as "Luigi" and George Lackey as "Rosa." Gene and Bobbie Moore and Bill and Beverly Good足 son view h umorously bill of fare at Senior Italian dinner.

PARTIE S

Get-Acquainted party furnishes Eugene McElyea a refreshing bath.

A Cappella members take to the hills for Western party.

Bud Robinson residents picnic on Cantrells' lawn.

1 54

"Sleigh Be.lls" ca ptivate students at annual Christmas banquet. Honor Society members are entertained with "Echoes from the Tower." A mock wedding is presented at Bud Skit at Frosh-Soph initiation is given by larry Flood,

Robinson taffy-pull.

Jim Snyder, James Goulden, and Dean Horton.

C upid's arrow, su pported by h a m a nd can足 "Song of love" by Genelle Crawford, Mary Bur足 dine, Juan Casey, and Sam Bel l enhances

died yams, makes Heart Pal banquet delightful affair.

atmosphere of Heart Pal banquet.

1 55

FRE SH�IAN BANQU E T

General view of banquet reveals beautiful setting in Hawaiian Islands.

Oklahoma's Governor Gary is banq uet's principal speaker.

Banqueters enjoy food of true Hawaiian style.

Harry Pierce creates proper atmosphere with Hawaiian guitar.

1 56

Salad in Hawaiian tradition cap­ tures entire attentions of diners.

Sophomores climb weary road back to camp

After lunch, male hands rig volleyball net, divide in teams,

site after visit to Turner Falls.

a nd challenge each other to game.

SOPHOMORE OUTING

Charles Strawn a nd levoy Wallace try spring water for "the pause that refreshes."

Hikers rest from climb high above Turner Fal ls.

1 57

.JUNIOR-SE NIOR BANQU E T

A general view of the banquet as diners finish dessert and await program.

lester Knight furnishes dinner music on the organ.

The program portrays the great choices in足 volved in "life's Elysian Garden."

Seniors enjoy food comparable to that of "Elysian" fields.

1 58

Speaker at the ba nquet, Mr. Hans Sch mitt, discusses l ife's choices.

I nteresting discussions r e v o l v e around the grandiose decora足 tions created by the Juniors.

The a ntics of Professor Robinson entertained the head table.

Finishing the meal, most agreed it could be described only with super足 latives.

"-..

No ice-no stiffness-just good food and a wonderful progra m .

1 59

COMING From the opening bonfire to the final whistle of the game, from the unique and gaily decorated floats to the beauty and solemnity of the "Make Believe" world, homecoming was one long whirl of excitement.

Homecoming begins with the pre-Jam boree bonfire which boosts the Redskins and adds spirit and "spizirinktum" to fans.

Alumni began arriving the day before the game, and were on hand for the big bonfire and pep rally held to add strength and stamina to the spirits of the Redskins. Preceding the game, a parade featured varied and ingenious floats rep­ resenting both dormitories and campus organi­ zations. Jernigan Hall's "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" captured first prize as the best float entered. Following an Alumni Dinner re­ volving around "School Days", every loyal col­ legian and grad entered the land of "Make Be­ lieve" for the Jamboree Game. The gym was deco­ rated by competing organizations, chief among which was the Honor Society with "The Wizard, of Oz." Half-time festivities disclosed Wilma Montgomery as the true Cinderella of the campus and crowned her Queen of Jamboree. Despite frantic cheers and frenzied hopes, the Redskins were unable to conquer the Alumni, and in the end were forced to acknowledge them victors-and homecoming was a thing of history.

The Chemistry club reveals one of the Redskins slay­ ing the Alumni in the form of a fiery dragon.

1 60

Wilma Montgomery, Queen of Jamboree, leads the parade through the streets.

Bud Robinson Hall displays the beauty and charm of which she is rightfu lly proud.

A model construction of the future men's dormitory adds hope and prospective to the parade.

Uncle Sam in the personage of Harold Rair足 don rides atop the History club float.

The enthusiastic and exhilirating atmosphere of the Jamboree personifies the spirit of Homecoming.

161

A group of students listen to Mrs. R. C. Wel lmon's discussion of missions as a vocational possibility.

Rev. Harper Cole lectures on religious education and related vocations.

CARE E R DAY Sponsored by the Department of Personnel Services and assisted by the Student Council, Career Day on B-PC campus is a means of acquainting students with information concerning various professional areas. For those who have already chosen their main fields of work, it serves to broaden their knowledge of what can be expected from their chosen vocation; acquaints them with the preparation req1,1ired, and the possibilities of success within that particular area; and solves many problems which may be puzzling the individual. .

.

For those students yet undecided upon their vocation, Career Day supplies the opportunity to "sample" the var足 ious professional areas, and by so-doing acquire a more intel足 ligent and informed background to aiel in the selection of a life's work. Students now entering the medical profession from B-PC do so fully aware of the discouragements, diffi足 culties, and rewards waiting ahead.

Chem istry and chemical

engineering

are

considered by Consultant Edward L. Hlinak.

1 62

This year's Career Day featured twenty-three consult足 ants lecturing in as many different vocational fields. The student chairman was Tom Boyd, the student hostess Doris Ammons, and the director Dean E. B . Shannon.

C O N S U L TA N T S JEAN BADER Youthwork RICHARD CANNICOTT Clinical Psychology HARPER COLE Religious Education DOLLY CONNALLY Music Education LESTER DUNN -----------�------Church Music CLYDE L. FARRAR Electronics J. T. GASSETT Pastoral Ministry F. BERT GRUBB Law E. VI. HARPER Office Management ED\i\1ARD L. HLINAK Chemistry CARL B. JOHNSON Accounting GLADYS McDONALD Elementary Education ELEANOR MOORE Nursing CLARENCE PAINE Library Science GERALD PORTER Vocational Education BLANCHE PORTWOOD Home Economics GRACE RAMQUIST Christian Journalism DARRELL SHRIEVE Mathematics THOMAS SOREY Architecture LEE B . SPENCER History GLENN B. SNIDER Education ADOLF M. STEBLER Wild Life Conservation A. N. TAYLOR Medical Careers MRS. ROBERT C. WELLMON Missions R. T. WILLIAMS Television and Radio _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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B-PC's own Professor Dunn reviews the possibilities for careers in ch urch music.

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Dr. Glenn Snyder discusses secondary edu­ cation for the large g roup of prospective teachers. The prospects for writers in Christian journal­ ism are presented by Mrs. Grace Ramquist.

1 63

W O�I E N �S DORMS -...-.--� -�­ -

Dorm Council: Barbara Byfield, Wilma Montgomery, Eu lene Akin, Mrs. Jobe, Evangeline Steele, Delma Montgomery, Jo Anne Petty, Esta Clippinger, Eunice Wachtel.

BU D ROBINSON

Pop corn parties are u n iversal and timeless pursuits of every dorm resident since the beginning of higher education.

"Happy Birthday!" is the chorus as Delma Mont­ gomery blows out the candles to secure her wish.

1 64

Shirley Bell entertains at tea J u a n Casey, Eileen Bryan, and Genelle Crawford-a good time was had by all.

Resident students at Bethany are housed in Bud Robinson Hall, Jernigan Hall, Fanning Hall, Men's Hall, or the Bendix Annex. Here, for four years, we live, work, and play-and then, regret­ fully leave behind us the midnight "gab" sessions, the pop corn parties, and the close, affectionate companionship. The girls spending this year in Bud Robinson Hall will remember with particular nostalgia the watermelon party on Mrs. Cantrell's lawn, when even thunder and rain couldn't dampen the hil­ arious spirits; the taffy pull at the youth center; the prayer meeting with Mrs. Cantrell; and the party in cooperation with the girls from Jernigan. Highlights in Jernigan Hall were Mrs. Can­ trell's visit and stimulating talk; the pajama party; golden hours of fellowship in the parlor when girls gathered to roll hair, to study, to read, or just to talk; the constant "motherly" attentions of Mrs. Ray; the beautiful Christmas tree; the Jam­ boree float which captured first prize; and, inev­ itably, the last party of the year when seniors were bade good-bye.

"Oohs" and "aahs" from Virg inia Newlin, Mary Sells, Vera Winters, Patsy Robinson, and Doris Ammons, greet new spring fashions.

.J E R N I G A N

Oletha Ludwig, Freda Archer, Irma Ross, and Janelle Phillips prove a little snack makes studying for any test easier. Dorm Council: Betty Cherry, Ann Dodson, Evelyn Mil­ burn, Doris Ammons, Althea Konk.

165

ME N�S DOR�IITORIE S

---!

Wandering troubadour Howard Manwarren p lucks a gay aria to ease the monotony of sleep in the Her­ rick homestead.

Eleven-twenty in the Barracks, and Gene Shore, Don Farmer, Paul Edmonds, and Phil Duff sus­ tain themselves 'til morning with pop-corn and pop.

Clean-up campaign in

Barracks challenges boys to

empty waste baskets. Henry King, Doyle Frazier, a nd Carl Gaede depose theirs on head of Bob Campbell.

Gay comraderie of shower room indicated by concern of Pat Courtney a nd James Golden over loose fillings of Wesley Burpo.

1 66

Hobo-style, Tom Boyd, Bob Madison, Carl Bag­ gett, a nd Richie lewis supplement dining hall fare.

James Hokado, with upperclassman experience, aids Buddy Emmert in "weighty" Bible and life reading.

This year will always be remembered by the men students of the College as one of new hope and expectation. In recent years the steady in­ crease of enrolling males has produced a harrow­ ing problem for college administrators-that of providing suitable housing for these students. In the summer of 1 948, a group of salvage gov­ ernment units were purchased and converted into temporary living quarters to supplement the one men's dorm. Though inconvenient, and often un­ pleasant and disagreeable, these have served as home to many boys since that fall. In 1 9 54, bulg­ ing conditions again necessitated action, and the Bendix Annex was added to provide quarters for more students. But this year brought the begin­ ning of construction of a new dormitory-�he ultimate in modern design and convenience. Men leaving the campus this spring will leave forever the decrepit "barracks" and the crowded annex, to return to a renovated Fanning as well as a brand "spanking new" dormitory.

Eugene

McElyea

expounds

"Texas

propaganda"

glea ned from "Crockett Herald" to Gordon Beckett and Buddy Biggs.

1 67

••T W IRP�� WEEK For one week social protocol on the campus is turned upside down, and the ladies take the in­ itiative in executing those �ractices traditionally considered the male obligation, and the fellows respond with demure cooperation. "Twirp" Week receives its name from "the woman is required to pay", and during the week the girls become acquainted with the feel of reaching for the check, and the boys are made to realize the qualms of sitting home and wondering if they'll have dates.

Freeda Archer pursues Don Conway as he takes to the trees to escape "Twirp" week rulings.

According to "Twirp" rules, Myrna McClung chauffeurs Jerry Parrish (and pays the bill).

This year the Student Council came to the assistance of the frantic females and sponsored a lyceum on Tueseday night featuring the bari­ tone Orcenith Smith, and the Senior Class fur­ nished the entertainment on Friday night with their annual lyceum, the Parade of Plays. Most of the ladies returned home Friday night ex­ hausted, with empty purses, content to let it remain "a man's world."

Shirley Tabor for one week m ust open all doors for Vernon Swim, and let him enter first.

1 68

Roy Simpson drafts lenore Sloan to carry his

Martha Carter counts out "Twirp" money to

camera equipment.

louise C line to pay for George lackey's "Wing Ding."

Della Montgomery returns dishes to Drag coun足 ter after treating Jim Tracy to h a mburger.

Della Goodh ue walks on the outside of the street and carries all books for Jackie Eyestone.

1 69

oHee '" P of < ab a q,\<k g< to o< f<len d•, et the\< g\.1 alk, to me t to dy, ''" ass . �, de nt• t o before cl >0 en able 0« ln h• ot New bo

TilE

DB A G

. Fountain serv1ce furn·I S h es everyth . to Wing Dings for afte

. ���u�y�our lelsure.

170

o aspiri n for migraines

Ping-pong tables are one of the main attractions, and are generally in use. A Friday night date ends with a coke and hamburger in the Drag.

Every student before he has spent many hours on the campus becomes acquainted with the Drag. Located in the Student Union Building, it is a symbol of the social life of the campus. It is the usual place for a quick cup of coffee after chapel and between classes of a "Wing Ding" with a date on Friday night. Its easy, relaxed atmosphere makes it a popular place for casual congregating and friendly "conflabs." This year, chrome trimmed booths were installed along three walls of the Drag, replacing the old tables and chairs. Two ping-pong tabl es offer interesting possibilities for the use of spare time, and are generally in use except during meals and the chapel period. At ten o'clock each week night, when study hours cease, the Drag is filled with students seeking to relieve, with a hot dog and coke, the pangs of memorizing the parts of the ear, or studying Oedipus, the King. Occasionally in early morning classes, the instructor will allow the class to meet in the Drag and "spice" the day's lecture with a cup of coffee and a doughnut.

Dick Newton returns serve in fast game as onlookers study his technique.

In general, whether one is wanting to discuss politics or play a game of Chinese checkers, the Drag is the place to go.

Dean Simpson deliberates over move in Chinese checker game with louise Cline.

171

MOrrORCADE S

KANSAS DISTRICT

NORTHWEST OKLAHOMA DISTRICT

HOUSTON

NEBRASKA

To anyone who has ever attended B-PC, the word "Motorcade" has its own vivid connotations : sleeping on a pallet while a swarm of "highschoolers" take over the beds; valiantly struggling to play the host or hostess until three o'clock in the morning when the hilarious immigrants, enchanted with this view of dorm life, finally fall asleep; and perhaps most vivid of all, de足 vouring the super quality and quantity of food pouring from the kitchen while the visitors are here. The Motorcades are the means instigated by the administration to acquaint high school seniors and juniors interested in attending college with the many advantages of BoPC as a prospective Alma Mater. Each district of the educational zone organizes sometime during the year a motorcade to bring these prospects to the campus. Members of the student body are or足 ganized into district clubs to welcome each motorcade, plan a program of activities while it is here, and show to those attending a general view of campus life at B-PC. 1 72

NORTH ARKANSAS

Kansas District presents Dr. Cantrell a typical "Kansas check."

NORTHEAST OKLAHOMA DISTRICT

SOUTH ARKANSAS DISTRICT

SAN ANTONIO DISTRICT

SOUTHEAST OKLAHOMA DISTRICT

SOUTHWEST OKLAHOMA DISTRICT 173

MOTORCA D E S

ABILENE DISTRICT

DALLAS DISTRICT

KANSAS C ITY DISTRICT

Houston District Motorcade presents College with bona fide, genuine Texas steer.

174

ROW 1 : Tom Boyd, Kathryn Mil lsap, Mary Jo White, Ann Dodson. ROW 2: Bob Viser, Dale Tuttle, Dwight Bugh, Melvin Davy, Professor Dunn. (Not shown: Jim Gardner, Dick Newton.)

STUDE NT COUNCIL With the final tally in last spring's election and the overwhelming approval of "Boyd for President," the Council began to vibrate with new life, and reach out for new academic, social, and recreational goals. Repre­ sentatives returned this fall eager and willing to do all within their power in improving campus activities. To start the ball rolling the Council sponsored an All School Party, and followed through with the other traditional events, such as Jamboree, Heart Pal Week, Career Day, etc. In addition to these, the group pro­ moted special projects including magazine subscrip­ tions for the parlor; a bulletin board for Fine Arts programs; a record player to be installed in the lounge; two lyceums; and installation of new student body officers. The major achievement of the Council was the development and decisive planning for a program of societies among the student body.

TOM BOYD President 1 76

The Council is composed of the student body offi­ c�rs, the director of religious activities, the two editors of student publications, and one representative from each class. It serves as a sounding board for student opinion, and acts as coordinator between the student body and the administration.

J IM GARDNER Vice-President ANN DODSON Secretary

DICK NEWTON Director Religious Activities

PROFESSOR LESTER DUNN Sponsor

1 77

ROW 1 : Darlene Boldt, Melvin Davy, Shirley Bell, Eddie Cloud, Beth McCaleb, Joyce Burkhart, Charles Strawn. ROW 2: Gary HQrtpence, John Jonte, lillie Reynolds, Janelle Phillips, Lester Knight.

RE VE ILLE E CHO The REVEILLE ECHO began a prmmsmg year with Editor Tuttle writing the banner heads for all campus occuuences-presenting new faculty members, covering the Holiness Convention, announcing Who's Who selectees, warning graduation aspirants as to Senior Paper deadlines, and in general publishing all the news pertaining to the school. Lucille Sloan's new column, "Caddying the Clubs," carried informal com足 ments on the activities of all campus organizations. The personal columns of Tom Boyd and Dick Newton provided serious discussion of everything from the elements of a complete sentence to the tragedy of reality. The third page, devoted exclusively to sports, lamented the loss of the Jamboree to the Alumni, and predicted Kansas would win the State League basket足 ball trophy. Its coverage of school events throughout the year proved things were happening in places other than Korea and Yalta, and that the REVEILLE ECHO was usually there.

DALE TUTTLE Editor 1 78

JIM NOFFSINGER Business Manager

SUE MERRILL Associate Editor

DENE SIMPSON Photographer

MISS MAURINE DICKERSON Sponsor

1 79

Freeda Archer, Diane Neely, Richard Stump, Janelle Phillips, George Biggs, Beth McCaleb, Pat Swigart, George lackey, Katherine Snowberger, Roberta Posey.

THE ARROW

MARY JO WHITE Editor 1 80

The ARROW Staff rallied at the first of the ye<�r to the task of producing an "All American" yearbook. With the previous year's first class winner as a guide, the en­ thusiastic staff was sure it could be done. Early in the fall a basic theme was chosen around which to build the plan of the whole book. It was decided to picture life on a co11ege campus, as it is lived day by day by the aver­ age student. From here the staff went to work-and there followed long hours of planni n g, picture trimming, writ­ ing, pasting, measuring, and drawing; lost week-ends in the dark room; days when it seemed as if nothing could emerge from this maze of layout paper, dummy sheets, razor blades, rubber cement, undeveloped film, and ad­ vertising forms. But always uppermost in the minds of the staff, even above the press of approaching deadlines, was the goal of creating a good yearbook. Here are the results-you can judge how we11 they succeeded. In the opinion of a prejudiced editor they produced "one of the best."

BUDDY FARR Business Manager

EVELYN ROUSSELLE Associate Editor

ROY SIMPSON Photographer

MRS. CAROL LUNDY Sponsor

181

ROW 1 : Akin, Scott, Bumpus, Winters, Ripper, ludwig, Ammons, K. Snowbarger, Phil lips, Byfield. Taylor, D. Montgomery, Steele, -Swigart, W. Montgomery, Millsap, Edge, Fox, Neely, Casey. Osborn, M. Snowbarger, Neff, Farmer, Dorr, Noffsinger.

ROW 2: Professor Dunn,

ROW 3 : Allen, lmel, Isaacs,

ROW 4: Knight, Harper, Viser, Oliver, Wilson, Sanders, Carleton,

Moore, Gardner.

A CAPPELLA A Cappella performances this year included church services in the Greater Oklahoma City area, Dallas, and Norman, and a tour of churches in Kansas and Ne足 braska. In addition to these appearances they pre足 sented a program in chapel and an Alumni concert, and participated in Music Emphasis Week. Social activities for the members of the choir during the year were a western party at the lake, a white elephant Christmas party, and open house at the home of the Dunns. President Vice-President Secretary Librarians Chaplain

1 82

Howard Oliver Dick Osborne Wilma Montgomery Bob Viser, Walter Isaacs Maurice Moore

Social Chairman

Doris Ammons

Sponsor

Professor Dunn

ROW 1 : Diane Neely, Eulene Akin, Patsy Robinson, Jacquetta Defoyd, Mary Sells, Irma Garnand. Myrna Van Ostrand, Roberta Posey, Rose Lamar, Patsy Pagan, Madolyn Wright. Cherry, Beverly Lundy, Shirley Stangeland, Dolores Jantz, Paul Edmonds.

ROW 2: Wilma Smith,

ROW 3: Robert Herrick, Tom Boyd, Betty

ROW 4: Jim Gardner, Ernie Farmer, Chuck Har足

per, Clifton McNabb, Dick Newton, Lawrence Jantz, Dale Tuttle, Robert Lewis.

HONOR SOCIETY Honor Society made two significant achieve足 ments during the year-they concocted the best Jamboree gymnasium decoration and they enter足 tained members with one of the most successful of the year's social occurrences, the "Echoes from the Tower" formal banquet. Other activities in足 cluded a chapel program for the presentation of membership pins and monthly luncheons in the Student Union Building. President Vice-President Secretary Sponsor

Paul Edmonds Clifton McNabb Alfreda W uester Professor Emmel

183

ROW 1 : Dr. Moon, Professor Sheldon. Miller, Smith, Mcintyre, Garnand. Taylor, Hays, Neely, Crabb.

ROW 2: Rogers, Foster, M. Pitts, Sta ngeland, Smith, V. Pitts, lawrence, Owens, Bauder,

ROW 3 : Kinne, Byfield, Kni ppers, Phill ips, Hilton, Cherry, Montgomery, Wuester, Towns,

ROW 4: White, VanOstrand, McN abb, Robinson, Posey, lona Staggs, lola Staggs, King, Rouselle,

Gill, Hu nter, lucille Sloan, lenore Sloan, Pulliam, Farr.

ROW 5: Copeland, Schuler, Greve, McNa mes, Owens, Biggs,

Snowberger, Oliver, Davy, Craig, Duff, Clippinger, Brya n.

F. T. A . Future Teachers rightfully boasted the best advertising department of any campus organi足 zation. Their unique and clever posters kept stu足 dents well informed on coming attractions. Throughout the year, the chapter presented var足 ied programs emphasizing the different aspects of public education and the teacher's duties. These included films, slides, and special speakers. President . . Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Sponsors 1 84

. . Buddy Farr Alfreda Wuester . Betty Cherry . Wilma Glee Smith . . . Moon, Sheldon, Spruce

ROW 1 : Petty, Dodson, Dean, Phill ips, Burkhart, Boldt, Devore. ROW 2: Simpson, Jahde, Unruh, McCaleb, Wittler, Bonner, Sloan, Wil liams. ROW 3 : Washburn, Zable, Mitchell, Foote, Carter, Price, Bass, Herrick, Borron. ROW 4: Tuttle, Paschall, Carlton, Paul, Bugh, lackey, lawrence, Rutledge.

BIOLOGY CLU B An overnight field trip, a dog operation, work on the department's bird cages, and further specimens I for the ornithology museum composed the activities of the Biol ogy Club during the year. One of the largest and most active groups on the campus, it is known for its annual Jamboree decoration, and for its yearly project providing some addition to departmental facilities. President . . Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Publicity Sponsor .

.

Dwight Bugh . Bob Barron JoAnne Petty Ruth Unruh Dale Tuttle .

.

.

.

.

Professor Lawrence 185

ROW 1 : Wanda Williams, Della I ngle, Vera Stone, Ruth Lay. Barbara Hickman.

ROW 2: Marilee Kin ne, Pat Barham, Helen Turner, Nel lie Hall,

ROW 3 : Floyd Myers, Nola Owens, Phyllis Fisher, Mary Wire, George Biggs, Professor Anderson.

ROW 4:

Professor Danskin, Ellis Ziebarth, Robert Allen, Bill Ingram, LeRoy Wire, Eli Cypert.

BU SIN E SS CLUB

B usiness Club centered their activities around practical aid for those entering the business world. Attention was given telephones, insurance, secre足 tarial practices, and salesmanship through films and special speakers. Social life of the Club was enliv足 ened by an informal party at the Danskins and a picnic at Will Rogers park. President Vice-President Secretary Treasurer Representative Sponsor 1 86

Ellis Ziebarth Della Ingle Marilee Kinne Helen Turner Nola Owens Professor Danskin

ROW 1 : Barbara Byfield, Eulene Akin, Wilma Montgomery, Dorothy Holcomb,

Patsy Pagan.

ROW 2 : Glenna

Yarbrough,

lester Knight, James Golden, John Jonte, Robert lewis, Billie Breathwit. ROW 3: Karlos Morgan, Sam Bel l , Walter Isaacs, Melvyn Davy, Professor Harvil le. ROW 4: Jerry Parrish, Robert Franklin, Howard Oliver, Don Bird, James Fox.

MUSIC CLUB

The Music Club's activities during the year in足 cluded a special Music Week emphasis program, a band concert, and various programs centering around different composers, artists, and musical pro足 ductions. Through these activities, Music Club sought to advance "musicianship" and appreciation for music among the student body. President Vice-President Secretary Sponsor

Melvyn Davy Lester Knight Dorothy Holcomb Professor Harville

1 87

ROW 1 : Diane Neely, Eunice Bettes, Professor Bolerjack, lona Staggs, Ruby Taylor. ROW 2: lola Staggs, Beverly Lundy, Al足 fredo Wuester, Roberta Posey, Mary Jo White. ROW 3 : Professor Emel, Buddy Farr, Professor Dobson, Jack Sheeks.

LITERARY SOCIETY

The Literary Society became officially organized this year and adopted the Greek letter name of Pi Tau, signifying the five arts which they embrace. This organization is unique in that it allows both faculty and students full participation in the dub. Special activities of the year were slides of the Shakespeare country, a film of "Tale of Two Cities", and recorded sessions of "Macbeth."

1 88

President . . Vice-President Secretary

Beverly Lundy Eunice Bettes . . Ruby Taylor

Sponsor

Professor Dobson

ROW 1 : Darlene Helsel, Charles Helsel, Dr. Floyd, Burton Gray, Grazelle Scott. ROW 2: Carl Mullies, Ja mes Nichols, laverne Knierim, Eugene McElyea, Bill Rohlmeier. ROW 3: Edwin Cloud, Dr. Garner, Marion Snowberger.

HISTORY CLUB

The principal project of History Club was the publication of the B-PC H ISTORIAN, containing articles of students, and financed by the Alumni group. Other activities included discussions on such pertinent topics as elections, segregation, and Russia, and films on interesting historical subjects. President Vice-President Secretary Editor of HISTORIAN Sponsor . .

Grazelle Scott Burton Gray Charles Helsel Marion Snowbarger Dr. Floyd

1 89

ROW 1 : Phillip Hill, Professor Joh nson. ROW 2: Don Conway, Jim Gardner, Tom Boyd. tom, Frank E l liott. ROW 4: Gary Hartpence, larry Flood, Cha rles Strawn, leon Pelley.

ROW 3: Dick Newton, Dick Hal足

PHILOSOPHY CLU B One of the main tenets of the Philosophy Club IS to give opportunities for free expression to stu足 dents with philosophical yearnings. They met once a month in an informal discussion group to read and discuss papers dealing with philosophical con足 cerns, and to give free vent to any ideas of their own. The club also attempted to provide social and cultural development for its membership by spon足 soring a spring banquet. President . . Vice-President Secretary Sponsor 1 90

Frank Elliott Dick Haltom Don Conway Professor Johnson

ROW 1 : Earl Skinner, Henry Zaleta, Elvin Vermillion. Kelly, Jim Noffsinger, Paul Edmonds.

ROW 2: Phillip Washburn, Kenneth Herrick, Gene May.

ROW 4: Professor Beaver, C l ifton McNabb, Forrest Cunningham.

ROW 3: John

CHE �IISTRY CLUB The Chemistry Club was organized on the cam­ pus this year. I t is affiliated with the Chemistry Associates of B-PC, and is governed by the same constitution. Membership is based on major interest in chemistry or chemical engineering. Projects for the year included a spring banquet, "construction of a Jamboree float, and a bulletin board for the Science Hall. President Vice-President Secretary Sponsor

Gene May Paul Edmonds Jim Noffsinger Dr. Beaver 191

ROW 2: Evelyn Mil burn, Beverly Emmert, Daney DuBose, ROW 1 : Eunice Wachtel, Nelva Hebard, Ruby McKaughan. ROW 3: Virginia Hu nter, Dr. Greve, lola Johnson.

HOME E CONOMICS The Home Economics Club lent an air of cul足 ture and refinement to the campus with emphasis upon "better living." Programs savoring of typical feminine interests were filmed demonstrations and a discussion by Dr. Greve, sponsor, enhancing the art of cooking, and a spring fashion show elaborat足 ing dressing neatly, simply, and in style. Home Eco足 nomics Club is open to all interested in the promo足 tion of practical culture and etiquette. President Vice-President Secretary Sponsor 1 92

Frances Wimberley Evelyn Milburn Beverly Emmert Dr. Greve

ROW 1 : Jerry H u l l, Tom Boyd.

ROW 2: Jim Gardner, Jack I mel, Jim Noffsinger.

Howard Manwarren.

ROW 3: Billy Joe Harris, Ernie Farmer,

ROW 4: Maurice Moore, Dwight Bugh, Howard Ol iver.

B CLUB Any man who has won the "B" through varsity activities is eligible for membership in the B Club. To win the "B" letter award, the student must participate in all campus sports; and excel in one of them. The B Club's major activity was the B Club Tournament, climax足 ing state basketball. They also served as the nominating committee for new lettermen. President Vice-President Secretary

Howard Oliver Howard Manwarren Bob Bumpus

193

Ruby Taylor, Charlene Carrick, Vonciel Gordon, Beverly Emmert, Nelva Hebard.

WOM E N�s B CLUB

The Women's B Club is the female counter­ part of the Men's B Club, carries the same stipu­ lations as to membership and organization, and functions under the same officers. The two groups jointly maintained the concession stand at the season basketball games and used the proceeds for a special club project. Immediate plans for the project are a trophy case to be installed in the Student Union Building parlor, and to be used to display the annual awards presented in the various activities.

Coach Don Wilson sponsors the B Clubs and is co-ordinator between the two groups.

1 94

The annual Alumni Association banq uet features the theme "School Days."

. .

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

B-PC grads are promptly indoctrinated i n the Alumni Association at a banq�1et immediately pre­ ceding commencement each year. At the same time recipients of the Alumni "B" awards are honored for outstanding achievements in the field of Chris­ tian service. The Association held its annual meet­ ing at Jamboree time featuring a banquet built around "School Days" in the Student Union Build­ ing, which was a recent Alumni project. Rev. J. T. Gassett is the president of the Asso­ ciation. Mr. Travis Mul lins, an a lumnus of B-PC, was master of ceremonies at the annual banquet.

195

eoLLe9e £ife StrenqtkenJ P � YS I CA L FITN �SS

1 96

From the first clash on the gridiron to the last hurdle on track day, athletics are a part of college living. Disliked by some-ignored by others-they still provide a unifying core around which school spirit is built. To the average student, whether he participates on the field or from the sidelines, sup­ porting his team and celebrating its victory is as much a part of school life as 7 : 30 classes. Intramural sports, along with classes in the physical edu­ cation department, compose the athletic program, This en­ compasses football, basketball, tepnis, softball and track. Par­ ticipation in the intramural program is based on two factors : statehood and classification . The student body is divided into five teams, Border States, Kansas, Off-zone, Oklahoma and Texas, and membership in a team is determined by the location one claims as home. In addition to the state program, basketball is also played among the four classes. Professor Don Wilson is head of the athletic department, and supervises the sports program. He is assisted by a school athletic director, and two athletic directors from each class.

DON WILSON Head of the Athletic Department

ATHLETICS AT B-PC

� ..

1 98

J )

�·

ATHLETIC DIRECTORS

ERNIE FARMER All-School Director

J IM NOFFSINGER Senior Director

HOWARD OLIVER Junior Director

200

BOB BUMPUS Sophomore Director

JOHNNY WESTMORELAND Freshman Director

Boyd eludes Horton for Texas first down.

Tracy finds no hole in Oklahoma's defenses.

FOOT BALL The fall of the year, back at 'ole B-PC, and of course, Football and Windy Stadium! The season began to roll early in October as students lined the field to see what the new Freshman class had brought in the way of quar足 terbacks, and to anxiously predict if the Border States could do it again and outpass Texas! The initial games were exciting and hard fought as boys, rested from vacation holidays, struggled to bring their teams to victory. With only four games in which to prove themselves, each team was determined to make every game count toward capping the team championship. As the season advanced, the initial contest again centered between Texas and the Border States, and the question became, "Who really has the better team?" But as the pigskin continued to be battled back and forth the Okla足 homa Chiefs asserted their primitive natures and came into their own. The Kansas Jayhawks and the Off-zone Hornets were unable to endure the onslaught of thest teams, and the three were left to battle furiously among themselves for the championship. The first defeat came when the Border States downed the Texas Longhorns; but this only drove the Texans to wreck vengeance on Oklahoma by soundly defeating them. Then to really throw every足 thing topsy-turvy, the Oklahoma boys trumped the Bor足 der State Trojans by one touchdown. Thus the season ended with three champions, all with three wins and one loss, and everyone still unsatisfied as to who really had the better team.

Hight attempts aerial for Trojans' gain.

201

TEA�I COMPETITION BORDER STATES TROJANS ROW 1 : Wiggs, Mullies, Hight, Pitts, Wyss. ROW 2: Tracy, G. Prentice, C. Prentice, Pierce, Rohlmeier.

TEXAS LONGHORNS ROW 1 : Neff, long, Green. ROW 2: Boyd, Harris, Moore.

OKLAHOMA C HI E FS ROW 1 : Human, Westmoreland, Miller. ROW 2: Joh nson, Whitsett, Rodgers.

202

OFF-ZONE HORNETS ROW 1 : Kelly, Skinner, Sherrill.

ROW 2 :

Noffsinger, Madison, Stewart, Daugherty.

KANSAS JAYHA WKS ROW 1 : Anneler, Kuhns, Gough, Shore, Stapleton.

ROW

2: Gardner, Swim, Oliver, C rews, Gaede, Perkins.

Tracy takes lateral for more yardage toward TD.

McPhail skirts Trojan defenses to pick u p yardage for Oklahoma.

203

Horton grabs loose ball during Oklahoma's victory over Texas Longhorns.

BASK ET BALL Basketball season officially got underway with the Jamboree game between the Alumni and the Redskins. This was one of the major social events of the year and was accompanied by fanfare and pomp comparable to a Junior-Senior banquet. Following the Jamboree, the state competition briskly began. The Kansas Jayhawks had been pre­ dicted to finish the season first over last year's cham­ pions, the Oklahoma Chiefs, but the Chiefs were de­ termined to prove the prediction unreliable. Both teams were still undefea ted near the close of the state · season, when the Border States Trojans pulled the gre�t upset of th,e season and defeated the mighty Chiefs. Oklahoma s only hopes were to tie the cham­ pions� ip by defeating Kansas. Kansas, however, clung ferociOusly to her undefeated title, and in the contest

204

for the championship of the State League outdid Okla­ homa 78-4 3. However, in the B-Club Tournament the Chiefs regained their lost glory and came out victors. Follow­ ing the tourney, basketball was organized into class teams. In class competition, the Freshmen boys' and girls' teams strode through the season with little difficulty, and �ame out undefeated and champions of class play. But m the ECHO Tournament, their winning streak was stopped when they were defeated by the Junior boys. The Freshmen girls were able to hold to their un­ ?efeated title, and won the championship of girls' play m the tournament. And so, the season ended.

JAM BORE E ALUM N I 60

R E D SK INS 63

Gardner sinks basket for Redskins.

Noffsinger outleaps Alumni g uard (Al­ derson) to pass to teammate.

Farmer and Dryden clear the board for the Redskins.

The Jamboree was excitement, frenzy, elation, and dis­ appointment all rolled together into one big game. Pre-game sentiment had been in favor of a difficult, but sure, victory over Alumni members, but faith wavered as the team stormed back to- the campus, and the roster was re­ vealed : Frank Hagin, Art Kastner, Bill Draper, Dick Alder­ son, Gordon Stangeland, Jerry Yoesel, and Bill Burch. The starting line-up for the Redskins was Howard Oliver, Bob Bryan, Ernie Farmer, Al Kennedy, and Jim Gardner. The game began slowly, with little action on either side, but speedily gained momentum as the game progressed. The Redskins seemed to have a slight edge over the "grads" dur­ ing the first half of the game, and the half-time score in their favor read 3 1 -28. But after this the Alumni began a steady drive to decrease the score, and by the fourth quar­ ter had gained control. The Redskins tried a desperate last quarter surge to even the score, but were unable to conquer the Alumni. Defeated and chagrined, the Redskins could only promise, "next year!"

205

JAMBOREE C H EERLEADERS Nel l ie Hall, Jean McElyea, Florene Mitchell, John Sch ubert, Kay Fortner, Bil l Vaughn.

ALU MNI PRE VAIL

Bill Re ds kin stru ggles With A Ium nus

206

Draper

accepts

for

Alumni

championship trophy presented by for reb o u n d.

Queen Montgomery.

Horton sinks 路 basket to decrease Alumni lead.

Draper and Horton grapple for possession of ball.

Alumni secure rebound in third quarter play.

Rebounding ball provokes long stretch from Kennedy and Yoesel .

207

Jim Tracy and Carl Gaede fight for the rebound.

For two days the ball was dribbled down the court midst toe balancing, high leaps, and furious arm wav­ ing, as each state team strove to trim the seasonal champs, the Kansas Jayhawks. The tourney was an innovation in the sports program, culminating the play among the state teams.

The tournament was � single elimination affair that provided playoffs for both tournament champs and con-

Ja yh a wks ma ke try fo r b a s ket in prelim in ar pla y y to to ur n am e nt

B-CLUB TOU RNAM E NT

OKLAHOMA CHIEFS ROW 1 : Burpo, Dryden, Horton, Farmer. ROW 2: Zabel, Cory, Baldwin, H u man, Westmoreland.

208

solation champs. The Oklahoma Chiefs and the Border States Trojans clashed in the opening game. The Kansas Jayhawks then defeated the Off-zone Hornets, and threw the Hornets into the first consola­ tion game against the Border States. The Hornets were again defeated and stepped gracefully from the competition. The Oklahoma Chiefs then took over and out­ scored the Texas Longhorns, which left Kansas and Oklahoma to battle for the championship. The Longhorns went to grips with the Trojans for the consola­ tion prize, but were unable to match their scoring, and left the Trojans con­ solation champs. T h e championship battle got underway, and much to every­ one's surprise, the Chiefs literally ran off and left the Kansans. The final score was 78-4 3 as the Chiefs earned their title and were announced "chiefs" of the tourna­ ment.

KANSAS JAYHAWKS ROW 1 : Gardner, Manwarren, Anneler, Hull, leffel. ROW 2: Gaede, Swim, Oliver,

Bird,

Shore.

O FF-ZO NE HO RNETS RO W 1 .., / y' a · . fl.ef '9g s' Sk · Ro w 2: Mad"IS t n ner O n' S te wart' He ss. •

Human grapples with Jayhawk in championship

Horton sneaks pass i n spite of desperate

battle of tournament.

efforts of Oliver.

209

TEXAS lONGHORNS ROW 1 : Boyd, long, Moore, Siems. ROW 2 : McNabb, Cypert, Harris, Neff, Reeves.

Wilson blocks shot o f Bird

Bird, Madison, and Biggs fight for tie ball

Trojan makes ready to sink basket.

210

CHIEFS CA PTURE TOURNEY

BORDER STATES TROJANS ROW 1 : Vice, Pierce, Roh l meier. ROW 2 : Bass, Kennedy, Bugh, Harper.

211

Coach Snowberger encourages Fresh men to rouse from first half lethargy during called time of Sophomore-Freshman battle.

Swim sinks basket for Sophomores, Gaede guards for Freshmen in third quarter of tourney opener.

E CHO TOURNA�IENT

J UN IORS ROW 1 : Dryden, Hess, I ngram, Gardner. ROW 2: Farmer, Kennedy, Madison, H altom.

SOPHOMORES ROW 1 : Hendricks, warren.

Human,

H u l l,

Anneler, Man­

ROW 2: Swim, Flood, Ol iver, Horton, Harper.

FRESHMEN ROW 1 : Vice, Roh l meier, Westmoreland, Leffel, Farmer. ROW 2: Burpo, Gaede, Stewart, Shore, Perkins.

The REVEILLE ECHO Tournament was · the grand finale of the basketball season, completing play between the classes and opening the way for baseball and track. The tourney was spiked with jubilant enthusiasm from each class as each felt this might be their year! ' The Freshman team had come through season play un­ defeated, and were convinced they could wrap up the tournament in the same way. The Juniors had won the championship the two past years, and were determined to be third-time winners. The Seniors were aware of their disadvantages as "Old Men of the Court," but had given the nimble Freshmen a run for their money in the previous game, and were anxious to try it again. The Sophomores had vowed through sheer willpower to "bring home the bacon." The bonfire and pep rally preceding the game gave vent to team spirit and zest as each class danced around the bonfire to the tune of B-E-A-T-Beat Urn!, and the Seniors snake danced through Breesee Hall, Jerni­ gan, and Bud, urging their team to victory. During the elimination games of the two-day fracas, the Sophomores surprisingly defeated the Freshman team, and the Juniors overpowered the Seniors in spite of desperate cheering from the sidelines. This left the Sophomores and Juniors to battle for the trophy in the final session of the tourney. The Sophomores showed amazing fight and "spiz" in comparison with their season play, but were unable to stave off the vic­ tory-minded Juniors who, with the enthusiastic backing of their coach, Professor Rairdon, shot their way to their third consecutive victory. During the half-time rest, the REVEILLE ECHO king and queen were crowned, and the Most Valuable Player Award was presented to co-holders, Ernie Farm­ er and Howard Oliver.

Flo o d' H en dricks, for reb . a n d Ste wart grab ou nd m Fre sh ma n- Soph o­ m ore o pen e r.

213

JUNIOR CHEERLEADERS Kenneth Herrick, Mary Jo Scott, Martha Anderson, George Biggs. Bonfire arouses class spirit a n d fires teams with determination to win.

SOPHOMORE CHEERLEADERS Glenna Yarbrough, Ramona Campbell, JoAnn Hale, Doris Bumpas.

SENIOR CHEERLEADERS JoAnne Petty, Buddy Farr, Mary Jo White.

FRESHMAN CHEERLEADERS Beverly Clark, Myrna Jahde, Nel lie Hall.

214

SENIORS Kennedy

guards,

Noffsinger

attempts

ROW 1: Noffsinger, Burch, Bass. ROW 2: Bryan, Bugh, Snowberger, Moore.

basket in Ju nior-Senior geme.

Fresh men and Sophomores fight for rebound in

Senior M o ore trie s uns uc c es sfull y to sto J un ior ln p s h ot g ra m. of

tourney opener.

215

Fresh men and Sophomores take to air in struggle for rebound.

JUNIORS TRIUMPH T HI R D TIME

Juniors and Sophomores wage cham pionship battle. In last minutes of championship game Oliver

Kennedy strides for goal to swell J u nior

scores with jump shot.

score closer to victory.

216

Jack Packwood crosses line to take 50 yard

Bill Haddow breaks long standing mile record to finish in time of 4:54.

dash a nd tie record.

TRACK As spring weather approached and new leaves and green grass finally appeared, B-PC athletes began to eye Windy Stadium once again-and interest in indoor basketball quickly vanished. May 2 was marked on the calendar as the big day of track events, and preliminary play began to whip the teams into shape. Daily, boys could be seen circling the field, practicing the pole vault, or behind the shot-put, straining with all their strength. Three meets were held prior to Track Day to pit the teams in state competition and give opportunity to try each other for strength. The Oklahoma Chiefs managed to gain the most points in the first two meets, but in the last one, the Kansas Jayhawks began flexing their muscles and breezed through to first place. In these preliminaries participants really hit their stride and four standing records were broken­ the high jump, broad jump, discus, and 50 yard dash. Track Day arrived and the weatherman was kind enough to withhold the rain. Activities got underway early in the morning, and immediately the mile run record, standing since 1 947, was shattered as Bill Haddow paced the distance in the time of 4 : 54. Later in the morning, Jack Packwood tied the old record of 5 .4 in the 50 yard dash. The afternoon events gained no new records, but allowed the Oklahoma team to chalk up a total of 541/2 points to finish first. The other teams finished in the following order : Kansas, 43y2 points; Off-zone, 34% points; Texas, 32V2 points. The Border States team did not enter the meet due to ineligibility of members.

Jim Noffsinger breaks high-j u m p record by clearing 5' l OW' i n prelimin ďż˝ ry meet.

217

OKLAHOMA CHIEFS ROW 1 :

Human, Westmoreland, Coy.

ROW 2:

McPhail, Pack�ood, Flood, Whitsett.

At crack of g u n participants take off in

440 yard dash.

Maurice Moore places second i n high jump to gain score for Off-zone.

218

KAN SAS JA YHA WKS ROW 1 : I mel, Bond, Perkins, Farmer.

ROW 2: Leffel ,

Crews, Oliver, Swim, Gaede, Shore, Burr. Packwood carries baton for Oklahoma to come in first in 880 yard relay.

STATISTICS

Broad Jump-Packwood Mile Run-Haddow 1 20

______________

_____________________

Yd. High Hurdles-Flood

Shot Put-Harris

____________________

Yd. Low Hurdles-Westmoreland

440

Yd. Dash-Harris

l OW'

_ _ __ _

27.9

_ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

________________________

1 00

Yd. Dash-Packwood

880

Yd. Run-McNabb

High Jump-Noffsinger 220

42'

1 7.

----------------路-----58.

Yd. Dash-Packwood

Discus-Imel

4 : 54

______________

220

50

1 9' 7114"

Pole Vault-Noffsinger

1 1 6' 5"

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _

________________

________________

Yd. Dash-Packwood

1 0. 5

2 : 1 7.9

5' 7W'

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

24.6

___________________

440

Yd. Relay-Oklahoma

880

Yd. Relay-Texas

5 .4

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

__________________

1 0'

5 1 .4

} : 5 1 .3

Noffsinger clears bar at 1 0' to win first in pole vault.

219

OFF-ZONE HORNETS ROW 1 : Daugherty, Skinner, Cloud, Sherrill.

ROW 2:

Noffsinger, Moore, Stewart, Madison, Kelly.

McNabb crosses finish i n 2: 1 7.9 to win first in 880 yard run.

220

880 yard relay brings all teams into action with

Noff�inger takes 220 yard low hurdles in

Texas finish ing first in 1 :5 1 .3.

stride and finishes third.

TEXA S LONGHORNS ROW 1 : long, Moore, Jarrell.

ROW 2: McNabb,

Bird, Boyd, Neff, Huff.

lmel puts the shot greatest distance i n preliminaries.

Whitsett takes third place in 880 yard

Packwood broadjumps 1 9' 1 7'!.4" to win event.

run for Oklahoma Chiefs.

221

lmel throws discus 1 1 6'5" to win first for Kansas.

Noffsinger strains i n broadjump but fails to equal Packwood's record.

222

Farmer's effort i n discus throw nets him second

Stewart a n d long receive handoffs from Skinner

place for Kansas Jayhawks.

a n d Jarrell in 440 yard relay.

ATHLETIC DIRE CTORS

RUTH UNRUH Senior Director

LOUISE CLINE J unior Director

JEAN McELYEA Freshman Director 224

NELVA HEBARD Sophomore Director

Seniors huddle with coach at half-time of game climaxing season play.

Rousselle guards McElyea as Freshmen lead Seniors by two points.

BA SK ET BALL Girls' basketball this year embraced only class com­ petition, and did not begin its season until after the B-Club Tournament. The Freshmen and Seniors both possessed strong and well co-ordinated teams, and be­ gan practice in earnest early in the season. The Sopho-

Freshmen and Seniors engage in tussle for ball in last quarter of game.

mores and Juniors had good team spirit, but were forced to draw on volunteers from the other two classes for sufficient "woman power" to complete a lineup. The Freshmen and Seniors had little difficulty roll­ ing over the other two classes with clean slates, and the big game of the season came when the two faced each other on the floor. Predictions were 50-50 as to the outcome, and enthusiasm vibrated from the rafters as the two teams struggled neck to neck on the score board. The Seniors were holding the edge, with def­ inite hopes of victory, when depleted ranks left them with only four playing members. The Freshmen quickly pressed their advantage, shot ahead, and finished the game with a slight margin. This left them with an undefeated title as they went into the ECHO tour­ ney competition. Here they continued their battle with the Senior girls, and once again came across in the final quarter with a victorious lead. The basketball season ended for the girls in this order : Freshmen heading the list, Seniors close behind and still unsat­ isfied, Sophomores with a slight edge over the Juniors, and trailing in the cellar, the Juniors.

225

Moore dribbles toward goal during championship play-offs between Seniors and Freshmen.

Juniors and Freshmen meet in open­ ing game of tourney.

ECHO TOU RNA�IENT

FRESHMEN ROW 1 : Moseley, McElyea, Hutch ins, Herron. ROW 2 : Towns, Burdine, Sta nley, Foote, McNames.

226

SENIORS ROW 1 : lola Staggs, Cherry, Rousselle, Van Os­ trand. ROW 2: Moore, Taylor.

lona

Staggs,

Unruh,

Owens,

SOPHOMORES ROW 1 : Womack, Clark, Hebard, Milburn. ROW 2: Smith, West, Gordon, Johnson, Car­ rick.

The ECHO Tournament proved to be a replica of sea­ son play, with the contest centering between Freshmen and Senior teams, almost evenly matched in skill and teamwork. Earlier in the afternoon the Seniors had upset the Sopho­ more girls, and the Freshmen had strode over a newly re­ cruited Junior team. The Freshmen and Seniors then con­ tinued their season battle, each team striving to prove de­ cisively, to the satisfaction of all, it was really the better of the two. The Seniors managed to keep a slight edge during most of the game, but late in the fourth quarter the Fresh­ men rallied to sink four baskets from the field. Then in the final seconds, they gained a one-point margin, and left the Seniors trailing 2 3-22. Saturday night, midst the cheers and huzzas of their loyal supporters, the Freshman team re­ ceived the championship award. At the same time, Nelva Hebard was presented the Most Valuable Player Award.

Heb ard r a ces f r g o a/ W ith closely gu Sta g gs ard"mg 10 . se m o rg am e. Soph om ore

227

JUNIORS ROW 1 : Posey, King, Pagan. ROW 2: Sloan, Cline, Konk, Sta ngeland.

Moore goes into action for rebound as Burdine guards in finals.

I n Freshman-J unior struggle Sloan thwarts Foote's attempts at basket.

Womack catches rebounding ball in Sophomore足 Senior preliminary.

228

Lenore Sloan hands-off to lola Joh nson in 220 yard relay.

TRACK

Herrin carries baton to finish 220 yard relay.

STATISTICS

Basketball Throw-McElyea Softball Throw-Stanley 50

Yard Dash-Herrin

1 00 75

78'91/2"

______

_

1 66'8"

____________

Yard Dash-Herrin

Yard Dash-Herrin

___

_______ ___

________

___

7.5 1 4. 5 11.

Herrin crosses l i ne first to finish 75 yard dash in 1 1 seconds.

229

Kauth and Sloan lead off in 220 yard relay.

Burkhart throws basketball for Chieftains.

McElyea takes basketball throw event with 78'9%''.

Cline takes turn at basketball throw.

230

Herrin, McElyea, Kauff finish 50 yard dash for respective teams.

Gill's effort at basketball throw nets third place.

Gill takes second place in softbal l throw.

Towns throws softball to win fourth for Kansas.

231

Stanley's basketba l l throw nets Kansas second place.

Cline utilizes overhead throw in softball event.

Bond hands-off to Millsap for Oklahoma team in 220 yard relay.

232

O fF IC E I

WH 9fb66

A

A DVE RTISING INDEX CHURCH ADS Abilene District Abilene First Ada Arlington Ada First Augusta, Kansas

____________________

241

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

254

______________________

282

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

268

____________________

246

COMMERC IAL ADS

Kansas City First 257 Kansas City St. Paul's 244 Killeen, Texas -- - - - -- ---- �- - -- - --- - - 2 5 4 -� - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - � - �

_______ __________

- - - - - - - - - - �--- -- - - �

______________

270 277

_____ ________

__ __ _ ___ ___ __ _ ____ ___ _

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- �

Carthage, Mo. ----- - - - - - - - - - - - - -- -- 2 5 8 College Church -- - -- -- - -- - - - - - - -- -- 276 Corpus Christi First 2 56 County Line Church 266 _________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______

_ _ _ _

---·-------------

___________________

Lincoln, Nebr. --�------2 36 Little Rock First � - - - - - - - - - - 263 Louisiana District - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 5 8 Lubbock First 2 36 269 Lufkin, Texas -------�

Bethany Eastside Bethany-Peniel College

2 84 Alumni -Association Anthony Department Store ( C . R . ) 2 86 Bethany Flower Shop 296 Bethany Laundry 305 Bethany Medical Center - - - - - - - - - - - - � 290 Bethany-Peniel College 307 Bethany Tribune - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 29 1 Boyers Motel - Cafe 293 Brown-McClure Lbr. Company � - - - - - - - 2 9 1 Burch, Freel - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - -- - 302 Bynum Electric 306 Carnation Ice Cream Company 297 Carters Flowers 299 Chamber of Commerce, Bethany 287 City Cafe - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 30 5 College Cleaners 291 College Shoe Shop 300 Colonial Bread - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3 0 I Community Loan Company 304 Drag, The 298 Eagan Plumbing and Heating 297 El Taos Motel 303 First Nat'l Bank, Bethany 294 First Nat'! Bank, Yukon 286 Graham's Appliance 303 Greyhound B u s Company 301 Hal Owen Photographers 288 Hansen-Atlee Dairy 309 Herman's Eat Shoppe 299 Humpty-Dumpty Stores 301 J & M Cleaners - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3 00 Kiwanis International - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 309 Kraker's - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3 0 0 Munn Radio 289 Nazarene Publishing House 295 Oklahoma Natural Gas - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 306 O'Mealey's Cafeteria 309 Paul Hoag Agency 285 Peck Grocery 297 Philbrick Clinics 2 89 Posey Auto Supply 292 Powell Rexall Drug 303 Shadid Dental Clinic 297 Southwestern Sta. and Bank Supply 308 Stub and Sue Zesto 302 Student Council 307 T. G. & Y. 2 89 Up-to-Date Cleaners - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3 0 5 Wehrenberg Drug 284 Western Auto 299 Western Motel 304 Yukon Mill and Grain 289

_______

______________

________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

Muleshoe, Texas Meridian Park, Oklahoma City Muskogee First ______ _____

. _ _ __ __ __

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

----- �--------------

282 2 50 2 50

________________

_______

_______

� - - -- - -- - - - - -

______

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Dallas Central - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 6 0 Dallas District - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 5 2 Dallas First 255 Denison, Texas 246 Dodge City, Kansas 2 38 Duncan Oak Avenue 278 Durant -- --- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 7 5 ----�

___________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

Nebraska District Newton, Kansas - - - - - - - North Arkansas District Northeast Oklahoma District Northwest Oklahoma District --------�

-

-

__ _ _ __

--

_ ___

235

-------- 2 5 4

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

259

__________

245

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

272

_________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

E l Reno Enid F�rt

__________________________

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

238 240

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Oklahoma City First

_ __ __ _ _ __ _ __ _ __ _

247

_________________

-

-

--

-

268

Pennsylvania Avenue, Oklahoma City Perryton, Texas Petersberg, Texas Pine Bluff, Arkansas Ponca City, Oklahoma

__

267

- ---------�

266

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

24 2

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -�

279

__ _ __ __ _ _

_ _ _ _

-

- 279 - 244

267

San Antonio District 251 San Antonio Hatfield 242 San Benito, Texas 240 Sapulpa First - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 3 7 Shields Blvd., Oklahoma City 279 South Arkansas District 261 Southeast Oklahoma District � - - - - - - -- - 2 6 2 Southwest Oklahoma District 24 3 Student Religious Organization 281 _ _ __ _ _ __ __ ___ _

-

-

-

_____

-

_________

Hamlin, Texas - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 279 Henryetta, Okla. 244 Hooker, Okla. - - -- - - - - - - - -- - -- -- - -- 2 56 Hot Springs, Ark. 275 Hutchinson, Bethany 279 Hutchinson, First Church - - - - - - - - - - - � 269 Hutchinson, Peniel 279 Houston District 2 39 Houston Oakwood 262 -

-

-

--

-

____________________

___________________

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

--------�

________

----------------�

___________ _______

_________________

____________

____ __ _ ______

_________________

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

___ ____________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____

________________

____ ______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _______ __ _ _______

__________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

___________________

____________

_______________

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

_____________ ___

--

_ _ __ __ _ _ _

______________

--- --- -- - ---- - - ·

Great Bend, Kansas Guthrie, Okla. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Guymon, Okla. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

__ _ _ _ _ __ __

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ _ __ __ _

_____ _

Fort Worth North Side 279 Freeport, Texas - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 5 8

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

Texarkana, First 264 Texarkana, North - - - - -- - -- - -- - - - - 268 Topeka, Kansas -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 246 Trinity, Oklahoma City 270 ___________________

-

-

--

-

-

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _

_________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

____

__________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Inclepenclenc� Kansas Kansas District Kansas City Central Kansas City District

___ _ ___ ___ _____

_____________________

2 34

260

271

__ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ __ _ _ _

280

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

274

Wellington, Texas Wichita Falls First Church Wichita, Kansas Williams MemoriaL Bethany ·williams Memorial, Lubbock

__ _ ___ __ ___ __ __ _ __

280

__________

242

____________________

________ __________

248

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

268

_________

282

_____________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

CONGR A T ULA TIO NS . . .

11

A

iming

in

th

e

R

ight

D ir e ct i on"

RU STY HARD I N G

NEBRASKA D I S TRI CT

WHITCOMB HARD ING

D I STRICT S U P E R I NTE N D E NT

235

Compliments of

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE 33rd and "C" Streets LINCOLN, NEBRASKA

Congratulations to the

Class of 1 955

J. H. WHITE, Pastor ROY STANSBURG, S. S. Supt. LLOYDE GRAMER, N.Y.P.S. Pres. MRS. KATHERINE HARDMAN, N.F.M.S. Pres.

J. H. White, Pastor

. FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE

L U BBOCK, TEXAS _

IJ�

236

t:J!?)T

IJ/J ZARENE

Cl/1//?01

MILTON POOLE, Pastor

Church Building - Park at Lincoln

SAPULPA CHURCH of the NAZARENE

O K L A H O M路 A B OB DONALDSON S. S. Supt.

G. W. ABLA Minister "Backing the whole program of tbe District and General Churcb"

Interior of Sanctuary 237

El R e n o Oklahoma Church · Rev. Carl Prentice Pastor

STEWARDS

TRUSTEES

Mrs. Hannah Yount Mr. M. Taylor H . M. Bright Steve Wilds, Jr. Mrs. J. Eichholz Rev. Birt Moore

R. H. Stroud D. M. Clawson C. C. Matthews Carl Odom E. l. Kisner Ivan Armstrong C. M. Clason

Sunday School Supt. - Bailey Ca ntrell, Jr. N.Y.P.S. President - Paul Stroud N.F.M.S. President - Mrs. Carl Prentice, Sr.

500 South Rock Island

FIRST C HUR C H O F THE NAZARENE D O D G E CITY, KAN S A S

Avenue "A" At Cedar

",t/ e� 'k/iih ,tl VUioH. Jn ,tl

e�

2 38

Rev. Milo L. Arnold

With ,t� dJ�"

C r u s a d i n g fo r C h r i s t ------

on

-------�

. A m e r i c a's I n d u s t r i a l f r o n t i e r

DR. V. H. lEWIS Dis!. Supt.

ODELL BROWN C h u rch

School

Chairman

MRS.

V.

H.

LEWIS

N.F.M.S. President

DWIGHT BOLTON

VAN TURMAN

J u nior Supervisor

N.Y.P.S. President

s T 2 39

13est Ot'iskes Cfa55 of 1955 FROM

FIRST UHURUH of the NAZARENE

San Benito, Texas I N TH E RIO GRAN DE VALLEY

E. FLEMING PARMER Pastor

6niJ

CHURCH of the NAZARENE Enid, Oklahoma

Sanctuary

Enid Students 240

L. H. CLEGG Pastor

�\stt\ct

GH OROU nt P r eside

M D W ILLI A N .Y .P .S . istrict

D

DD lZE D . M. irn1an d . C\1a l1ool B c S . b t C D istric

MRS .

Distric

t

IZ1N S W . 1 EN nt . P reside N .F .M .S

O.

5 JEt-�Ki t-1 RV IllE REV . o d e nt n te n ri e Sup Oistri cl

241

;JeatpJd

WI CHIT A

FALLS

CHUR CH of ilie N A ZA RENE 5t h & Burnett

CHURCH

BOOST I N G BETHANY

AT

4 1 5 S. Flores St. IN

San Antonio

BUFORD BURGNER, Pastor

REV. H EARNE SPRUCE Pastor

Church

of the

Naza rene

Petersburg, Texas

TH E F I RST C H U RCH O N TH E COLLEGE ZON E TO S ET AS I D E 5 % O F ITS I NCOME TO ASS I S T STU D E NTS I N B ETHANY- P E N I E L COLLEGE.

LYMAN P. WOOD, Pastor

Representatives of our investment in 1 953, 1 954 D E A N ANDREW

242

RUTH WOOD

LARRY REEVES

SOUTHWEST OKLAHOMA .W. T. JOHNSON Dist. Supt.

DISTRICT

MRS. W. T. JOHNSON N.F.M.S.

for BETHANY-PENIEL CoLLEGE N.Y.P.S. Camp and I nstitute Juue 2 7 - July 1 , 1 9 5 5 District Campmeeting August 5-14, 1 9 5 5 KENNETH RICE Church Schools

H . C . EMMERT N.Y.P.S. 243

St. PauL's

CONGRATU LATIONS足

CHURCH of the NAZARENE 2908 Indiana KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

BETHANY- PE N I E L COLLEGE C LASS OF 1 955

CH URCH of the NAZARENE Guymon, Oklahoma

REV. J A C K H . lEE Pastor

STU DENTS: Robert Bryan Melvin Davy Eileen . Bryan

POTENTIAl STUDENTS OF B. P. C. PRESENT STUDENTS DICK N EWTON

lEON WYSS

ROY SIMPSON DENE SIMPSON

JIMMY TRACY CARl MUlliES JOHN GONZALEZ

RUTH ANN HESTER Student

-

1 97 1

JAMES C. H ESTER Pastor

Congratulations to the Class of '55

FIRST CHURCII of the NAZAR EN E Corner 8th & T r udgeon HENRYETTA, OKLA.

OUR STU DENTS Jack Packwood W. R. Stewart, Jr. Doyal Picke Ernie Smith

W. H .

244

D E I TZ, Minister

Dr. I. C. Mathis Dist. Supt.

!fn L{niteJ Support of J3etkanlj- Penief College

NORTHEAST O KLA. D I S T R I C T

Albert Neuschwanger Church School Board Chm.

Robert Weathers N.Y.P.S. Pres.

Mrs. I. C . Mathis N.F.M.S. Pres.

Mrs. Ester Hendrix District Jr. Director 245

First Church Of The

Nazarene

TOPEKA, KANSAS "A Church Ot In,spiration"

Tenth and Buchanan Sts.

NAZARENES FROM THE CAPITOL CITY OF KANSAS EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO THE S T U D E N T S AND FACULTY OF A STRONG SPIRITUAL INSTI足 TUTION.

WE MAKE YOU F E E L WELCOME

Forrest W. Nash Minister

Congratu lations

.

.

.

Bethany-Pen i el C o l lege

We Are With You 100%

AUGUSTA, KANS. Rev. and Mrs. H .

F.

Crews

Church of the Nazarene 1 0 1 0 OSAGE

Com p l i ments of the

CHURCH of the NAZARENE 23 1 West Texas St. D E N I SON, TEXAS

246

CHARLES M. SPICER Pastor

CCke Sinqinq Church"

ff

at work in 3ÂŁome _A1tssion5

LAKE VIEW CHAPEL N .W. 50th and Goff Streets

LAKE VIEW PARK CHAPEL built

Property on N.E. 44th Street has been purchased for building the SPRINGLAKE CHAPEL in the near future. Area-1 308' x 300'.

101 .11. W. l. St.

Oklakoma

in 1 954- 1 955 at a cost of $25,000. Property 1 37' x 250' is surrounded by several new home developments in northwest Oklahoma City.

eulj M I N I S T E R S

R. T. Wil liams Pastor

Kenneth S. Rice Education

Harper L. Cole Administration

Robert Sawyer Music 247

H C R U H C T S R FI

4

WICHITA

r G . A . G O U G H , Pasto rd R. W. BAB CO CK, Cha irm an of the Boa nt FO RREST NEWL IN, N .Y.P .S. Pre side 248

EST HER BUN DY, ELF RIEDA SHE LLEN BH

E N E R A Z A f the N KANSAS

, Associate KEN S . ARM S T R ON G r of Music Aissionary President

erin ten den t CLA RK FRA ZIE R, Sun day Sch ool Sup retary NA DA U ND ERW OO D, C hur ch Sec

249

MUSKOGEE FIRST SUPPORTS BETHANY- 路 PENIEL COLLEGE BY STUDE NTS MONEY

REV. AND MRS. W. R. DONALDSON

P RAYE RS

M E R I D I A N PA R K C H U R C H of t h e N A ZA R E N E Congratulations Seniors

N O R TH WEST 44th & MERIDIAN

O K LAHOMA C I T Y , O K LAHOMA 250

NOBLE HATHAWAY Minister

San flnton.i o (District

OUR STUDENTS Norma Jane Allen Terry Brattin Marilee Kinne George Lackey Martha Moore Patsy Robinson Alma Louise Smith George Stevenson Marian Truax REV.

W.

H . DAVIS

District Superintendent

251

Dr. Paul H. Garrett District Supt.

"

Mrs. Paul H. Garrett N.F.M.S. President 2 5- 2

ADVISORY BOARD

Rev. Clyde Ammons Secretary

Rev. R. B. Gilmore

Mr. Ned Thompson

Mr. W. L. Crawford

CHURCH SCHOOL BOARD

Rev. H. F. Crews Chairman

Rev. Fletcher Spruce

Rev. Lawrence Gholson President

Rev. Robert Nielson Vice President

Rev. Fred Fike

Rev. E. B. Matthews

Mr. Ned Thompson

Rev. John Ellis

N.Y.P.S. OFFICERS

Rev. M . A. Wagstaff Sec.-Treasurer

Rev. Leon Martin High School Supt.

Miss Karen 'Vatson Teen-age Rep.

Mr. D. Davenport Teen-age Rep.

N.F.M.S. OFFICERS

l\ Irs.

Clvde E. Ammons Vice Pres.

Mrs. John Parmer Corresponding Sec.

Mrs. H . B. Brooks Recording Sec.

Mrs. L. Crawford Treasurer

Mrs. Fletcher Spruce Supt. of Publicity

Mrs. H. F. Crews Supt. of Study 253

CON GRAT U LAT I O N S

.

.

Abilene, Texas

.

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZAR E N E C hestn ut a n d Eighth

R. B. KELLY, Pastor

Through the years First Church has

CHURCH of the NAZ ARENE

supported our fine college and has

KILLEEN, TEXAS

sent students that proved a blessing to our church. We believe in Christian education for our youth.

REV. IVY BOHANNAN, Pastor

@on gratulations to the 1955 :A1RJROW Staff WE SALUTE OUR STUDENTS: Joyce Burkhart Carl Gaede Howard Oliver Delores Jantz Lawrence Jantz Darlene Scott

1

ne New Sanctuary

Built by Paul Madden- Construction Co., Hutchi nson, Kansas

First Church of the Nazarene Newton, Kansas CLIFTON NORELL, Minister 2 54

D A L LAS F I RST

Tenth and Beckley

Robert Pastor

G. Nielson

255

r�he r;!riendflj Gkurch with a Ofarm Ofefcome'' Ala meda at Booty

Corpus Christi First Church REV. T. A. BURTON, Pastor

ERNIE ZANDT, N.Y.P.S. Pres.

W. E. NOBLES, Sunday School Supt.

MRS. ED BENNETT, W.F.M.S. Pres.

BROADWAY & IMO

CHURCH of the NAZARENE H O O KER, O KLAH O M A REV. FRANK J. KEMENDO Pastor 2 56

Vera Ruth Winter, Al bert Zabel and Delores Nagel

rJint Gkurck of tke cA!.azarene

:J(ansas Gib;, _Mo.

HARRISON AT FORTY-FIRST

S UPPORTING O UR C OLLE GE YEAR BY YEAR Music Di rector-Ray Moore Orga nist-Mi ldred Edwa rds Su nday Schoo l Su pt.-Vernon L u n n N . F.M.S. Pres.-Mrs. A. Mi lton Sm ith N .Y. P.S. Pres.-Robert Mi lburn

Dr. A. Milton Smith Pastor

Di rector of Visitation-Ed Murphy Youth Director-Bi l l Prince 2 57

FREEPORT

CHURCH of the NAZARENE will \Velcome you to 'the land of opportunity, the center of the fabulous Gulf Coast area

located at

F R E E P O R T, T EX A S C . R . Watson Pastor R. E. Gilbert S. S. Supt.

THE e

V. J. Christenson

N.Y.P.S. Pres. Mrs. John Gardner N.F.M.S. Pres.

LOUISIANA DISTRICT

STANDS FOR THE PROGRAM O F THE C H U RC H

MRS. ELBERT DODD-N.F.M.S. Pres. B. M. LOFTIN-N.Y.P.S. Pres. PAUL E. PITTS-S.S. Board Chm. R . A. McCORMICK-Treasurer

ELBERT DODD-D.S. 1 6 1 1 Henry Street Pineville, Louisiana 258

N O R T I-I ARKA N SAS D I S T. Enthusiastic Beleivers in Ch ristian Education

Rev. J. W. Hendrickson

Rev. J. L. Emmert

District Superintendent

N . Y.P.S. President

MRS. J. W. HENDRICKSON N .F.M.S. PRESIDENT ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERS REV. PAUL WATSON Rev. Boyd Hancock District S. S. Chairman

REV. A. G. JOHNSON CARL VINSON BERT TRUMBLE 2 59

CHURCH

OF

THE

N � � � �!h�t E S t J a Independence, Kansas

Broadcasting the "Nazarene Hour" 7:30-8:30 P. M. Sundays on K I N D FM, direct from the Church and by tape delay on K I N D AM, 1 2:00 noon to 1 :00 P. M.

OUR STUDENTS Belva Flauding, Sally C lark and C lair U itts M. D. Smith S. S. Supt. Mil l ie Bacon N . F.M.S. Pres. Wesley Helm N .Y.P.S. Pres. H . Wayne Van Dyne Choir Director Board of StewardsMerle A. Hudson, Chmn. Harold Taylor Hester Van Dyne Bob Ra ndels Ethel Yates W. J. McDaniels L. R. Price

Board of Trustees­ Basil Metcalf, Chmn. Paul Uitts H. Wayne Van Dyne 0. S. Palmel' W. E. Cutsinger

TREA S U R E R

S T A N L E Y B E N N ETT 6229 BELGRADE

N . F. M. GLENA

S.

S.

M C C U L LO U G H

S.

SUP'T.

J. J . CH I S U M

t 3 t 8 H A R L. A N O A L. E

6 7 2 4 PETA I N

O F F I C E 4105 Victor St. Phone TR-4293

Paul M. Sodowsky, Th.M. Pastor

N.

Y.

J A M ES

SECRETARY

P. 5 .

HAGAR

BURL

1 06 1 9 COT I L L I O N

CLYDE E. AMMONs,

BRANTLY. J R .

!5808 WOFFORD

Pasto!

5726 Morningside

Phone TE-6881

NAZARE NE ISAIAH 4 8 : 1 4

DALLAS, TEXAS

VICTOR AT HASKELL

STU D ENTS

Richard Osborn Doris Ammons Bobby Viser

Dan Hamiter Ann Hamiter James Fox

CONGRATULATIONS TO GRADUATES - BEST WISHES TO FACULTY AND STUDENTS 260

C O N GR A T ULA TI O NS

Class of '5 5

REV. W. L. F R E N C H , Dist. Supt.

MR. I. l. STIVERS N.Y.P.S. Pres.

MRS. W. l. FRENCH

REV. J. F. HAMM

N.F.M.S. Pres.

Church School Chm. 261

SOUTHEAST 0I(LAHOMA DISTRICT District Superintendent GLEN J O N E S

"EDUCAT I O N A N D CH R I ST I A N I TY B R I NG S UCC ESS I N L I F E"

W. H. Dietz Dist. Chairman of Church Sch. Bd. Bill Butcher Dist. N. Y. P. S. President Mrs. l. A. Richardson District N. F. M. S. President Harold C. Harcourt District Secretary Orville E. Williams District Treasurer DISTRICT PARSONAGE ADA, OKLAHOMA

O a kwo o d C o n gr a tu l a t e s You Our School For another Good Year For the Church For God. Our Students,

54-'55

'

Donald Conway Marjorie Gentz James Golden Dick James John Schubert Granville S . Rogers, Pastor Oakwood Church of the Nazarene Houston, Texas 262

L I TT L E R O C K FI RST CH U RC H

PONDER W. GILLILAND Pastor J. OTT IS SAYES Associate BERTHA SPRENGER Assistant PROFESSOR AND MRS. DAVID KLINE Music and Youth

263

Parsonage -

FL

264

ETCHER SPRUCE Pastor

1 61 9

W. 8th Street

T�XARKAN A Fl RST

:uary and Educational Unit - 8th at Brown Street 265

co u n ty l i n e ch u rch

REV. S. J . K I N G, Pastor

Rota n, Texas

MRS. J . F. C LEGG, S . S. Su pt.

PERRYTON TEXAS

5th and Amherst

CONGRA T ULA TIONS

S EN I O R S 266

J . REYNDAL RUSSELL Minister

COMPLIMENTS of

FIRST CHURCH of the

NAZARENE 7 1 8 S. 4th ST.

Vonca C9ity O K L A H O M A

Our Students Wesley Burpo and Ruth Pierce

L. J . M I NKLER, Pastor

The P ennsg lvania Av enue

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE

C . R. THRASHER Pastor M. L. STONE S. S. Supt.

P e n n A v e . a t W e s t P a rk O kl a h o m a City

MRS. M . L. WYCOFF N.F.M.S. Pres. RAY MURRAY N.Y.P.S. Pres. 267

ADA FIRST CHURCH

CHURCH of the NAZARENE Great Bend, Kansas

North Oak Ave. At Ninth

REV. R. S. BALL Minister MRS. IMA McANALLY N.Y.P.S. President JIMMIE HALEY S. S. Supt. DOROTHY BURNS N.F.M.S. Pres.

NORTH TEX A R KANA CHURCH

of the

NAZARENE

1 2th and Stone

H E BERT MERRITT, Pastor HARRY SMITH, S.S. Supt. JOANN BABCOCK, N .Y.P.S. MRS. MERLE GATES, N. F.M.S.

WI LLIAMS M EMORIA L 82 5 N. Beaver Street

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

The New Ch urch Parsonage

"TH E F R I E N D LY CHU RCH"

Frank McConnell-Pastor J. C. Fechner-Educational Director Clint Coats-Sunday School Supt. Dorthy Luginbyhl-Pianist and .F.M.S. Pres. Vestal Nichols-Chorister

LAWRENCE ABLA, Minister

THE GROWING CHURCH \VHERE EVERYBODY IS HAPPY A D EVERYBODY LIKES TO SI G.

370.5 Main Street

Texarkana, U. S. A.

268

L UFKIN TEXA S .

Church of the N azarene The New Church -

1 08

Moody Street

\VE HEARTI LY SU PPORT BETHANY-PENIEL COLLEGE \VITH OUR PRAYERS, vVITH OUR YOUNG PEOPLE, AND vVITH OUR MONEY. S. S. Supt-Rex Weisinger .F.M .S. Pres.-Crace Weisinger N.Y.P.S. Pres.-A. D. Courtney Music Director-Mollie Massingill Pianist-Barbara Pletcher Organist-Kathy Boyd

Mrs. Emma Irick Pastor

3futckinson

211

EAST FOURTH AVE .

F I RS T C H U RCH OF THE

n

Wilson R. Lanpher Minister

A Z A R EN E Vernon Sv.路im, Shirley Tabor and Dealine Perkins

"Breaking The Bread of Life in The Heart of The Nation" 269

TRINIT Y CH URCH JOE L. BEA Minister RA Y ADUDDELL S. S. Supt. MRS. M . V. LISTER N.F.M.S. Pres. JAMES R. CLAY N.Y.P.S. Pres. J. RAYMOND PARKER Organist

S . W. 2 9 t h a t I n d i a n a

O k la homa Ci ty, O k la h o m a

.,__

.

• •

..:

I

to

.;.

.,...-.r: :'! ' •

l\ lAIN i\ T l li\ l\- 1 !\ IOND

EASTS I DE

C H U RC H

B ET H ANY, O K LAH O M A

" A FRIENDLY CH URCH NEAR THE CAMPUS" 270

DARREL L. SLACK Minister

0 I s T R I c T

Mrs. Ray H ance N.F.M.S. Pres.

C. E. Rowland Cl1 111 . Church Schools

MiltOI1 H uxman N.Y.P.S. Pres. 271

Dr. E .S. Phillips Advisory Board Sec.

Frank J. Kemendo Advisory Board

Harry L. Craddock Advisory Board

W. J. Bryan Advisory Board

D. R. Danskin Treasurer

Dr. Fred Floyd Secretary

N O RTHWE S T O KI 67

J. T. Gassett Superintendent

4594

C H U RC H

MEMBERS

8495

S U N DAY

SCHOOL

5 904

S U N DAY

SCHOOL

1 858

N.F.M.S.

MEMBERS

1 272

N .Y.P.S.

M E M B E RS

535

Darrell L. Slack Church School Board Chairman

LeRoy Taylor Ch. Sch. Bel.

272

Frank McConnell Ch. Sch. Bd. Treas.

C H U RC H ES

J U N IOR

SOCI ETY

E N RO LLME N T A T路T E N D A N C E

MEMBERS

'' B o o s t i n g T h e C o l l e g e W i t h S t 1 Elmer Stahly Ch. Sch. Bd.

Roy McCaleb C .S.T. Director

Mrs. Chas. Roberts Junior Director

M. L. Riddle Ch. Sch. Bd. .Y.P.S. Vice路Pres.

Mrs. J. T. Gassett Corresponding Sec.

Mrs. Roy H. Cantrell N.F.M.S. Vice-Pres.

Mrs. Earl Harris N.F.M.S. Treas.

Mrs. D. R. Pierce Recording Sec.

Mrs. D. R. Danskin Supt. of Study

Mrs. E . S. Phillips Supt. of Publicity

�HOMA DISTRICT JUNE

J U LY

2 0-J U LY

1 1

-

& GIRLS' CAMPS

1 - BOYS'

1 5 - N.Y.P.S.

CAMP

F E LLOWS H I P

J U LY

BETHANY

26-30 - C H U RC H

C A MP

(Near

26-29 - CONVENTIONS AT

SEPT.

AT

AND

F I RST

SCHOO L

AT B E T H A NY

Wichita,

AND

Mrs. Elmer Stahly .F.M.S. President

Ka nsa s)

ASS E M B LY C H U RC H

WORKS H O PS WOO DWAR D

e n ts , P r aye r s a n d F i n a n c e s ." Mrs. M. L. Riddle N.Y.P.S. Sec.

J. C. Fechner N.Y.P.S. Treas.

Mrs. Paul Temple Teen-Age Worker

Mrs. Bob Fetters Children's Worker

James Hester N.Y.P.S. Pres. & Ch. Sch. Board

Ruth Rawlings Teen-Age Rep.

David Philo Teen-Age Rep.

27 3

:J{anJaJ rito/f {jj)iJfiid Dr. J arr.ette Aycock 路

Superintendent

No t l a r g e ,

bu t g rowing

IN 195 4 Six

New

3 1 6 Net Gain 829 Net Gain 255 Net Gain 1 53 Net Gain 21 1 Net Gain 98 Net Gain

$87

C h u rches

i n C h u r c h M e m bers h i p i n S u n d a y S c h oo l rn N. F. M. S. in N. Y. P. S. in D. V. B. S. r n J u n i o r S o c iety

Thousand Dollars Gain in Finances

N OW e

e

e

274

1 00 C hurches 99 Own Their

P roperty

Over Six Thousand

M e m b ers

3fot Sprinqs FIRST CHURCH SOUTH AND THIRD STREETS

3fot Sprin9s cNat'l Park, 0/rkamas SARA FRANCES HILTON B-P.C. Student

r-------ďż˝

REV. J. F. HAMM Pastor

I. L. STIVER S. S. Supt. RALPH PARKER N.Y.P.S. Pres.

MRS. ESTER TEAL N .F.M.S. Pres.

In O u r 49th Year of Service

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE

D u r a n t, O k l a h o m a

The Class and Arrow Staff of 1 9 5 5 Supporting B.N.C. By regular budget payments In expansion plans \iVith interest and prayer Harold C. Harcourt Pastor Jess Robinson S.S. Supt.

Elsie Cobb N.F.M.S. Pres.

Leman Miller N.Y.P.S. Pres. 275

The College Church

r

Pastor Robert Green Min. of Christian Ed. Eli Cypert Youth Director

I

Lester Dunn Minister of Music

Dick Schumann

I

The Church Board

1

..------'-c

James Gilbert N.Y.P.S. Pres.

I

l

Harry Craddock s. s s"pt. N.Y.P.S. Council

.F.M.S. Council

Church School Board

276

Servinq J3o tk Goffeqe anJ Gommunillj

B E T H A N Y- P E N I E L COLLEGE DR. ROY H. CANTRELL President

BOYS' NEW DORMITORY NOW UNDER CONSTRUCTION

BETHANY-PENIEL COLLEGE IS THE ANSWER TO YOUR PROBLEM•

The Problem of the Parent : Where shall I send m y son or daughter to college?

The Problem of Youth : Where can I receive a Christian education?

The Problem of the Steward : Where can I invest my money that I may receive eternal dividends? 277

--

-- ---

1 70 1 Oak Avenue

OA K AV E N U E Gkurck of lke cNazarene 1Juncan, Ok fakoma

Supporting the Whole Church e

â&#x20AC;˘ e

EARL C. DARDEN Minister

\Vorld Evangelism Christian Education

D. WAYNE SLEDGE S. S. Supt.

"Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore, get wis­ dom : and with all thy gettings get understanding." (Prov. 4 : 7 ) 278

Holiness Evangelism

Students : Lou Ann Fox and Talmadge Johnson

from Poplar at Campbell

PENIEL CHURCH H UTC H I N SON KANSAS CLAUDE G. WHITE Minister

PAT FRANKLIN B路P.C. Student

FT. WORTH, TEXAS

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA

NORTHSIDE C H U RC H of the NAZARENE

SH IElDS C H U RC H of the NAZARENE

N. W. 2 1 st & Roosevelt Sts.

4408 S. Shields Blvd.

H. B. Dean, Pastor

Willie W. Voigt, Pastor

"North Ft. Worth's Evangelistic Center"

"A Good Place to Worship"

GUTHRIE, OKLAHOMA

PINE BLUFF, ARKANSAS

CHURCH of the NAZARENE

C H U RCH of the NAZARENE

Second and Noble

8th and State Streets

E. l. Looman, Pastor

Agnes W. Diffee, Pastor

"We Will Be Evangelistic in Purpose"

"Preparing for Eternity"

HAMLIN, TEXAS

HUTCHINSON, KANSAS

CHURC H of the NAZARENE

BETHANY C H U RCH of the NAZARENE

S. W. Ave. C at First St.

4 Miles East on Hwy. 50 S.

Wm. C. Emberton, Pastor

Milton Huxman, Pastor

"Supporting B-P .C. with prayers and money"

"The friendly church where you are always welcome"

279

Wellington Texas

SANCTUARY

CHURCH of the NAZARENE JOHN FERGUSON,

Roberta Posey, Grazelle Scott, Glena Yar足 brough, Ruthie McCaskill, Mrs. Ferguson, Jim Posey, Harold Moore, Rev. John Fer足 guson.

Minister

Tenth & Pacific

KANSAS CITY CENTRAL CHURCH

of

the

NAZARENE

ALLEN B. MILLER, Pastor

J EAN C H U RC H , N .Y . P . S . Pres.

E. H . GOODMAN, S. S. Supt.

MA RION SNYDER, N . F.M.S. Pres.

Congratulations to Graduates of '55 and The A R R O 'V S taff. 280

DICK NEWTON Director Religious Activities

S tu Jen t 1t efir; iou5 Orr;an izationJ J. D. COOK Gospel Team

CHUCK PUGH Mission Band

A ll out for God and Souls.

MAURICE MOORE Prayer and Fasting

DICK OSBORN Ministerial Assoc.

281

A da A rlington Church

WILLIAMS

Is

MEMORIAL .

Boosting

Lubbock

BETHANY PE N I E L

Texas

COLLEGE

ORVILLE WILLIAMS Minister

5th at Franc!ts

Ada, Oklahoma

271 6 Duke Street

JIM HOLMAN, Minister

MULESHOE TEXAS CHURCH of the NAZARENE J. E . PERRYMAN, SR., Minister

282

COMM E RCIAL

283

B e t h a ny's M o s t M o d er n D rug S to r e

We

Give S&H Green Stamps

WE � R E N B E RG

DRUG

Phone WH 9-5636

dke G'{fumni GfJJociation

284

DR. VERNON SNOWBARGER Vice-President

REV. J. T. GASSETT President

DR. PAUL MACRORY Board of Trustees

CAROL LUNDY Secretary

FLORENCE LUNDY Treasurer

CONSTANCE SPRUCE Historian

M ERLINE

FRED

l\1ARTIN

VA UGHN, Jr. Mrs. Mary Martin Mrs. Perry Neel

fJJaul :ffoar1 Jlfle;;to/1 fiJellta,ny_, @ldaltoNta

INSURANCE Auto life Bonds Fire

REAL ESTATE Rental Sales

• • e

ST

e

RECORDS

sure you are properly i nsured that po licies won't lapse

e "LEGWORK" - - - - Wi l l i n g n ess to run erra nds in the i nterest

of the best protection for our c lients.

WH - 9 - 5602 1 06 S. College Street 285

f¥1AM Jllalional flJanlc ofWukm

(jj)ejtenda�le f!/Jan� /7ince

�892

Dep artment Store Serving the College and the Community BETHANY, OKLAHOl\IA 286

HANY LOOKS TO THE FUTURE AND

---�--U I L DS

N EW C I TY PAV I N G

N EW P U BLIC SCHOOL B U I LDI NGS

dhe 3teart o{ Oklahoma" - lf!Jn

M U N I C I PAL WATER IMP ROVEMENTS

($200,000) N EW W I D E R 4-LAN E H IGHWAY NEW B U S I N ESSES

N EW H O U S I N G

N EW COLLEGE DORMITORY

GREE TINGS from

Hal Owen Letha Saunders

Bessie Farley

Margaret Bishop

288

Hal Owen

Studio

Mary McGuire

Thelma Ames

Hazel Hill

Pearl McHaney

COMPLIMENTS OF

M U N N RA D I O AND

TE LEVI S I O N

HEADQUARTERS FOR

C9ompliments of Your Friendly T. G. &

Y.

STO R E

B ETHANY

1 06 S. W. 1 ST

M 0 T 0 R 0 LA •

HOUSE RADIOS

CAR RADIOS

TELEVISION

B ETHA NY Phone WH 9·2698

Headquarters for Col l ege Students

Compliments of

PHILBRICK CLINIC

YUKONS BEST FL0UR

AS K

YOUR

GRO C E R

Yukon Mill & Grain Co. Y U KON, OKLAH OMA

2 1 2 S.

College

BETHANY WH 9-2284

289

Comp liments of

-

BETHANY MEDICAL CENTER DR. LEON G I LB ERT

DR. PAU L MACRORY

DR. ERIC MOTLEY 290

T h e B ROW N - M c C L U R E L U M B E R C O M PA N Y from "A Home-Town Concern" 309 East Ma i n Street

*

WH 9-5608

P hones WH 9-5607

WH 9-5609

BETHANY, O K LAHOMA

"Striving daily to build a bigger and better Bethany"

Roy Brown

COLLE G E C LE A NE R S

TRIBUNE PUBLISHING COMPAN Y

"For those who wish promptness

"Might As Well Have The Best " Mr. a n d Mrs. N . A. Little

as weii as neatness"

316

E. Main

Tel. WH 9-342 5 291

P OS EY

AUlOMOl\'4t 2 lQlt10Q ��QlS

Wellington, Texas 292

H O TE L

C O UR T

and

R E S TA UR A .N T

One of Ok Lahoma's gines l Every Room

Free Television Tile Bath Telephone Refrig. Air Cond itioned Beautifu lly Decorated

BOYER HOTEL COURT & RESTAURANT

5 1 20 N .W. 39th Street - Near Bethany-Peniel Col lege

293

FIRST N AT I O N A L BANK

OF BETHANY

F I RST I N NAM E - F I RST I N S E RV I C E

WE

S E RVE

OUR

COMM U N I TY

OUR

DEPOS ITORS

OUR

B O R R OW E R S

MEMBE R OF

294

F . D . I .C .

e 2923 TROOST AVENUE, BOX 527 KANSAS CITY 4 I. MISSOURI e PASADENA BRANCH:

Washington at Bresee, Pasadena 7, California e TORONTO BRANCH: 1592 Bloor St., W., Toronto 9, Ontario e BETHANY STORE: 200 West Main, Bethany, Oklahoma

29 5

One B lock East of the C a m p u s

T h e LORETTS a n d T h e H I LLS

296

Co mpl imen ts

E A G A N PLUMB I NG

and

of DR. RAlPH S H A D I D

H EAT I NG D R . E DWARD S H A D I D

ROY E . EAGAN

D R . WALTE R THOMPSON

1 1 1 S. W. 1 st Street

BETHANY

BETHANY

WH 9-2778

Compliments of

C A R N A T I O N lue

P E C K 'S

FOOD

STORE

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

Cream

Company 0

f "For Friendly Service and Quality Food

O K L A H O M A

I t's PECK'S"

297

THE DRAG MRS. KATIE DREWRY Manager

298

�at

SPECIALIZ I NG IN­ HOME COOKED FOODS

1 07 S. COLLEGE BETHANY, O KLA.

Western Auto Asso c i a t e

C a r t e r 's

Flowers and Gifts

2600 N. MacArthur

1 23 S. College

Bethany, Okla.

Free Delivery

WI 3-33 1 4 299

Congratulations

KRAKER' S

LADIES AND MEN ' s \VEAR

Sportswear for College Joe and Jane Use Our Convenient Lay-Away Plan

1 22 S . W. Main

Phone WH 9-3440

COLLEGE SHOE SHOP

BETHANY

1 05 South Co l lege

ONE AND TWO DAY SERVICE

Bethany's finest and most modern Dry C lea ners

"A lways Boosting B-P C" ELMER MANN and JAY R. JACOBS, Owners

1 1 5 S. COLLEGE 300

Phone WH 9-3332

Colonial

. . first choice

.

at

.

ou r house!

Co m p l i m e nts o f

F�iendly Standard Humpty-Dumpty Store Bethany

F. W. Walker, Mgr.

Call your local Greyhound Agent for complete information. 30 1

B ROT H E R H O O D M U T U A L Ll FE I N S U RA N C E CO M PAN Y

11�Jk me ab-out -my b-eroeneJJ.

��

utlncfe �ed

FRED

,r]J{u6

BURCH

and fPue Z B S T 0 Rootbeer Stand & Golf Course ( Completely recarpeted for your pleasure )

39th & MacArthur 302

G RA H A M'S APPLIANCES

e

FURNITURE

(Formerly Buford I ngram Applia nce)

E L TA O S COU RTS

1 1 0 W. Main Street

H IGHWAY 66 P H O N E WH 9-9540

General Electric and RCA Appliances Phone WH 9-3894

BETHAIY

BETHANY

POWELL REXALL DRUG

"We Are Here t o Serve You"

DRUGS SUNDRI E S PRE S C RI PTI ONS - Carefully Compounded -

1 26 S. \V. MAI N

PHONE \VH 9- 5656 303

' •

f'

-

..

_,

• .

-- - -_,r� . -

" ..,

c "'

-

-

-

. �.-

. .

·-

-

<

-

"On Hiway 66 e

-

One Mile West of B-P.C."

Air Conditioned e

T.V. In Rooms e Central Heating e

Private Baths Owned and Operated by Nazarenes

MR. AND MRS. JOHN D I FFEE

Community Loan & Investment Com pany WH 9-4 1 88

1 05 S. Col lege

BET HANY,

Box 85

OK LAH OM A

6 % PAI D O N I NVESTMENTS LOANS - F I NANCI NG CARS F U R N ITURE SEE JACK ABOUT YOUR F I NA N C IAL PRO BLEMS Charlsta Curry

Jack Davidson

"We Are Helping to B uild a Better Bethany!"

304

UP-T O - D AT E C LE ANE R S

"Come in for the best in Dry Cleaning, Pressing and La undry Service . " Phone WH 9-240 1

1 1 6 S . W. Main

Bethany Laundry

"Large Enough to Serve You Small Enough to Know You H umble Enough to Appre足 ciate Your Business."

Special Services to Students

1 1 8 S. W. Main

WH 9-4063

1 1 2 S. W. l st BETHANY

J. L. HULL

MARIE HULL 305

lh/s GAS' Rome work BEmR thon .runshine

This tiny GAS flame in your Automatic GAS Clothes Dryer actually dries clothes better than sunshine. It saves money, too. Costs so very little to use, saves clothes from wind and dust, saves #me and trouble of taking clothes to and from a clothes line. Try a new Automatic GAS Clothes Dryer, and you'll never be without one another week.

See your GAS appliance

dealer for a demonstration.

O H LR H O m R n RTU R R L (/aD ďż˝

1 28 West Main BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

'

j

HOWARD BYNUM Owner

306

"You r H eadquarters For A l l Appliances"

THE STUDENT COUNCIL of Bethany-Peniel College Congratulates

DALE TUTTLE ECHO Editor MARY JO WHITE ARROW Editor

Religious Activities

Secretary

JIM GARDNER Vice President

TOM BOYD President

Freshman Rep.

BOB VISOR Sophomore Rep.

the ' 55

ARRQ V\1

MELVYN DAVY Junior Rep.

S ta ff

DWIGHT BUGH Senior Rep. 307

a n

d

L I T H O G R A P H I N G •

Produced i n a modern ly equi pped p la nt.

• Where machines cast n ew type for every job,

which mea n s that every letter produces a c lea n, c lear, sh arp i m p ression. • Where the best of camera and

p late making

eq u i pment is operated by ca refu l ly tra in ed men who take pride i n their a bi lity to do better litho­ g ra p h i n g . • Where every order that comes t o the p lant is

looked upon by the craftsmen as an opportun ity to disp lay their ski l l. • Where

Q UALITY

p r i nting

and

lithographing

sta ndards are m a i ntained.

S T A T I O N E R Y & B A N K S U P P LY •

LAWTON

PONCA C ITY

AMARi llO

AND THE PRINTING DIVISION IN OKLAHOMA CITY The Arrow Annual Was Produced in This Plant 308

Good Food and Friendly Service 3 1 9 N. W. 2 3RD - JA 8-2942

HANSEN & ATLEE DAIRY IN C .

3 1 ST & MAY - \VI 3-04 30

B ET H ANY K I WA N I S

CLUB Serving the Church School Community

1 60 1 Exch a n ge Ave. 309

STU DENT INDEX 80, 1 28 AAR01 , JIMMIE 1 04 Main, Duncan, Okla. ADAMS, YVON E ------------------- 92 Rt. 1 , Anderson, Mo. ADKI S, GEORGE ------------------ 72 Box 541, Bethany, Okla. 78, 80, 1 02, 1 3 1 , 1 34, AKIN, EULENE 1 36, 1 38, 1 5 1 , 1 64, 1 82, 1 83, 1 8 7 304 Oleander, Grand Saline, Texas 72, 1 5 1 ALDRICH, HELEN 2 5 3 3 Verona, St. Louis, Mo. ALDRICH, PAUL -------------------- 58 2 5 3 3 Verona, St. Louis 1 4, Mo. ALLEN, HAROLD -------------------- 80 3 3 1 7 26th St., Lubbock, Texas 72, 87, 1 82 ALLE , NORMA JANE Box 883, Terminal, Texas 80, 1 86 ALLE , ROBERT 5 502 N. West Ave., Bethany, Okla. AMBRO, PAUL ---------------------- 5 8 9449 Midland, Overland, Mo. 72, 1 3 1, 1 6 5 , 1 8 2 AMMONS, DORIS 5726 Morning Side, Dallas, Texas 72, 2 1 4 A TDERSON, MARTHA 1 609 N.E. 1 5th, Okla. City, Okla. A DREW, DEAN ---- ---------------- 92 4720 S.E. 26th St., Okla. City, Okla. 80, 203, 209, 2 1 3 ANNELER, GARLAND Rt. 2, Sylvia, Kans. 72, 1 30, 1 44, 1 6 5, ARCHER, FREEDA 1 68, 1 80 1 504 . 2nd, Sayre, Okla. ARMSTRONG, CARROL -------------- 92 10 N. Little, Ft. Scott, Kans. ARNDT, LOWELL ------------------ 80 307% W. Main, Bethany, Okla. ATKINSO , NORMA ---------------- 80 1 06 % S.E. Main, Bethany, Okla. ATKINSON, ROBERT ---------------- 80 106% S.E. Main, Bethany, Okla. 92, 1 3 1 , 1 49 AUBREY, CAROLYN 300 Park Ave., Kansas City 1 7, Mo. 80, 1 3 1 AUSTIN, HELE 3 1 1 North Sheridan, Minneapolis, Kans. _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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BATES, WILLIAM ------------------- 72 201 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. 80, I 8f BAUDER, SHIRLEY Box 2 I 8, Scotts Bluff, Nebr. 58 BEALS, CLIFFORD Box 7 I 3, Bethany, Okla. BEAVERS, ROBBIE ------------------ 80 Center, Texas 80, I67 BECKETT, GORDON 2217 W. Washington St., Charleston, W . Va. 92, 1 30 BEEL, LEVETA Johnstown, Nebr. BELL, LOWELL --------------------- 92 Rt. l, Lubbock, Texas 102 BELL, RUTHIE Rt. 1 , Lubbock, Texas 80, 1 28, 1 3 1, 1 50, I 5 5, I 87 BELL, SAM 1 1 0 5 W. Cave Springs, El Dorado, Kans. 80, 1 64, 1 78 BELL, SHIRLEY 681 5 Joyce St., Austin, Texas 73, 92 BERNSTORF, LAVEDA Lewis, Kans. 80, 1 88 BETTES, EUNICE 1 2 30 N. Peters, Norman, Okla . 72, 96, 1 02, 1 80, 1 84, BIGGS, GEORGE 1 86, 2 1 4 Box 84, Wayside, Kans. 92, 1 02, 1 30, I 67, 209 BIGGS, JAMES 3 1 4 E. Rador St., Nashville, Tenn. BIRD, DONALD 84, 92, 1 3 I , I 49, I 87, 209 Sublette, Kans. BLANCHARD, HENRY --------------- 58 Box 628, Bethany, Okla. BOHAN AN, GRADY ---------------- 72 Box 4 I 3, Bethany, Okla. 4 5, 92, 1 3 1, I 78, 1 8 5 BOLDT, DARLEEN Chase, Kans. BOND, DONNA -------------------- 80 Ingalls, Kans. BOND, ELEA OR ------------------- 92 Ingalls, Kans. 92 BOND, GLEN Ingalls, Kans. BOND, RUTH ----------------------- 80 Ingalls, Kans. 80, 1 30, 1 8 5 BONNER, BILLIE Tichner, Ark. BOOMER, W. L. -------------------- 72 Okarche, Okla. 58, 1 8 5 BORRO , ROBERT 2 0 5 N.W. Maine, Bethany, Okla. 72, 1 1 1 , 1 28, 1 36, 1 67, 1 76, BOYD, TOM 1 8 3 , 190, 1 9 3, 2 0 1 , 202, 2 1 0 1 208 Idylwood, Lufkin, Texas· 80 BRATTI , TERRY McAllen, Texas 92, I 8 7 BREATHWIT, BILLIE ANN Box 1 1 3, Boswell, Okla. BRISTLA , ELAIN ------------------- 92 Box 92, Hewitt, Minn. BROCKMAN, VERNO -------------- 59 1 1 5 N.W. l st, Bethany, Okla. 80 BROOKS, TROY E., JR. 1 926 W. Elm, Springfield, Mo. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

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BABCOCK, BESSIE ------------------ 80 909 \Vashington, Great Bend, Kan . 58, 1 30 BAKER, MARY Rt. 3, Milaca, Minn. 92, 268 BALDWIN, CHARLES E. 723 W. Washington, McAlester, Okla. BALDWIN, DAVID ------------------ 72 407 N.E. l st, Bethany, Okla. BALDWI 1, DONALD 58 407 N.E. l st, Bethany, Okla. 92 BALLARD, CHARLES Rt. 6, Center, Texas BARHAM, PAT ---------------------- 80 Rt. l, Cabot, Ark. 58, 1 8 5, 2 1 1 , 2 1 5 BASS, DWIGHT Dixon, Nebr. 92 BATEMAN, GERALD 71 3 Sante Fe, Coffeyville, Kans. __________________

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310

BROWN, ARLYNE ------------------- 72 Swan, Mo. BROWN, DANIEL ------------------- 81 302 ?. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. BROWN, HAROLD ------------------ 72 2480 N.W. 39th, Oklahoma City, Okla. BROW , LELA ---------------------- 81 703 E . Symmes, Norman, Okla. BROWN, MARJORIE ---------------- 81 302 S. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. BROWN, NETA ------ --------------- 92 201 E. Marshall, Midwest City, Okla. BROYLES, LORETA ----------------- 72 Rt. 3, Alma, Ark. 72, 7 3, 1 64, 1 84 BRYAN, EILEEN Box 224, Guymon, Okla. 92, 1 30 BUCKMASTER, DOLORES 1 3 1 8 Bluff St., Delta, Colo. ANCY ------ ------- 92 BUCKMASTER, Rt. I I , Box 29 I , Tulsa, Okla. 27, 59, I 06, 1 76, I 85, BUGH, DWIGHT 193, 2 1 1 , 2 1 5 2 4 37 . 45th Ave., Omaha, Nebr. BUMPUS, DORIS 8 1 , 85, 92, 1 82, 1 83, 214 2 5 27 Bush Blvd., Birmingham, Ala. 92, I 9 3, 200 BUMPUS, ROBERT 2 527 Bush Blvd., Birmingham, Ala. BURCH, BOB ----------------------- 92 Gen. Del., Bethany, Okla. 93, I 5 I , 1 5 5, 164, BURDINE, MARY 226, 228 344 E. Park, Orange, Texas 45, 93, 1 78, I 8 5 BURKHART, JOYCE 2 I 5 E . l Oth St., Newton, Kans. BURKHART, PARK D. -------------72, 87 2 1 5 W. 1 Oth St., Newton, Kans. 93, 128 BURNETT, GLE N 2 8 1 6 S. Jewett, Wichita, Kans. BURNS, JERRY ---------------------- 8I Cimarron, Kans. 93, I 66, I 99, 208, 2 1 3 BURPO, WESLEY 9 1 6 S. 8th St., Ponca City, Okla. BURR, LYN. ------------------------ 93 Box 1 77, Sublette, Kans. 59, 73, I 02, 1 34, 1 36, BYFIELD, BARBARA 1 38, I 45, 1 64, I 84, I 82, I 87 6 2 3 W. Cherokee, Enid, Okla. 93, I 28 BYNUM, KENNETH Rt. 2, Pittsburgh, Texas •

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81, 214 CAMPBELL, RAMONA 7 5 1 Leath St., Memphis, Tenn. 8 I , I66 CAMPBELL, ROBERT B. 1 3 36 S. 6th, Abilene, Texas 93, I 82, 1 8 5 CARLETO , DON 7 1 7 Iowa Ave., Chandler, Okla. 93, I94, 227 CARRICK, CHARLENE Rt. 2, Gould, Okla. CARTER, LOIS ------------------ ---- 93 3808 Park, Greenville, Texas 93, 98, I 69, I 8 5 CARTER, MARTHA 3 2 1 West State, Enid, Okla. CARY, JOY LEE --------------- --93, l 3 l 905 Cherry, Duncan, Okla. ___________

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CASE, CHARLES -------------------- 72 1 00 5 Graymont Ave West, Birmingham, Ala. CASEY, JUAN 90, 93, 1 5 1 , 1 5 5, 1 64, 1 8 2 1 80 3 . E . Madison, Okla. City, Okla. CASH, THOMAS --------------------- 8 1 6 1 9 Mineral, Fort Scott, Kans. CHANDLER, DAVID ----------------- 9 3 520 N. College, Bethany, Okla. CHANDLER, ELMER 81 520 N. College, Bethany, Okla. CHERRY, BETTY 24, 5 3, 59, 106, 1 38, 1 39, 1 6 5, 1 8 3, 1 84, 227 206 E. l st, Abilene Kans. CLARK, BEVERLY 45, 93, 2 1 4 5 1 4 Cleveland, Sand Springs, Okla. CLARK, JULIA 8 1 , 227 Clark Shoe Shop, DeQueen, Ark. CLARK, SALLY ------------------ 93, 1 30 Rt. 2, Independence, Kans. CLASSEN, HORACE ----------------- 8 1 2 0 8 N. College, Bethany, Okla. CLASSEN, PAULI E ----------------- 72 208 N. College, Bethany, Okla. CLEGG, CAROL --------------------- 9 3 309 Grape, Sweetwater, Texas CLINE, LOUISE 72, 1 7 1 , 224, 228 Gage, Okla. CLIPPINGER, ESTA 47, 72, 1 64, 1 84 529 S. Clinton, Iowa City, Iowa CLOUD, ALICE 73, 1 3 1 Higgins, Texas CLOUD, EDWIN 93, 1 28, 1 78, 1 89 4 1 06 Central Ave., Tampa, Fla. COKER, KENNETH ------------------ 7 3 5401 N. Portland, Okla. City, Okla. COLE, CARNA 93, 1 30 Farnam, Nebr. COLLINS, FRANCES 81 Box 1 4 1 , Bethany, Okla. CONWAY, DON 73, 87, 1 68, 190 l O S N.W. Second St., Bethany, Okla. COODY, KAREN -------------------- 8 1 505 N.W. Ave., Bethany, Okla. COONS, MAXINE 8 1 , 1 30 732 S. Main, Springfield, Mo. COPLAND, MOLLY 8 1 , 1 30, 1 84 Rt. 1 , Lowell, Ark. CORY, RALPH 93, 208 300 N. Redmond, Bethany, Okla. COSTON, OSCAR ------------------- 8 1 Box 5 2 1 , Bethany, Okla. COURTNEY, PAT 59, 1 30, 1 66 200 K. S.E., Miami, Okla. COX, ERNESTINE ------------------- 9 3 5 1 5 N. Fredonia, Nacogdoches, Texas ____

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CREWS, KEN 9 3, 203 1 3 1 5 W. 3 5th, Wichita, Kans. CRUMPLEY, REX ------------------- 7 3 Grove Springs, Mo. CUNNINGHAM, FORREST 93, 1 9 1 746 N .E. Washington Blvd., Bartlesville, Okla. CYPERT, CLAUD 8 1 , 204, 2 1 0 Rt. 3 , Brownfield, Texas CYPERT, ELI 59, 1 1 9, 1 80 726 N. College, Bethany, Okla. CYPERT, JEANNE 50, 59, 1 19 726 N. College, Bethany, Okla. ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______

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COY, ARLIS ------------------------- 8 1 1 700 N.W. 42nd, Oklahoma City, Okla. CRABB, IMAGENE 8 1 , 1 3 1 , 1 49, 1 50, 1 84 Box 2 5 29, Amarillo, Texas __

CRAIG, CARL 1 04 S.W. 5th, Bethany, Okla.

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59, 1 84

CRAIG, GRACE --------------------- 7 3 Meade, Kans. CRAVENS, SUE ------------------93, 1 30 Rt. 1 , Hartville, Mo. CRAWFORD, GENELL 93, 1 5 1 , 1 5 5, 1 64 1 1 07 E . College, Sherman, Texas ___

CRAWFORD, ROBERT High Springs, Fla.

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93

DAILY, HAROLD -------------------- 7 3 Rt. 2, Alma, Ark. DAMEWOOD, SANDY --------------- 60 1 5 1 6 W. 1 st, Coffeyville, Kans. DANELS, DONNIE 93 8 0 5 Dixie St., Blytheville, Ark. DAUGHERTY, MITCHELL 81 Drawer D., Monument, N . Mex. DAVE PORT, ASENATH ------------ 9 3 5 0 3 N. College, Bethany, Okla. DA\'IDSON, JOHN ------------------- 60 2 1 5 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. DAVIS, BARBARA ------------------- 7 3 5 1 2 Logsdon, Bethany, Okla. DAVIS, LEE 8 1 , 88 Rt. 3, Carthage, Mo. DAVIS, NANCY ---------------------- 73 Box 14, Walters, Okla. DAVIS, RAMONA ----------------93, 1 30 Box 1 4, Walters, Okla. DAVIS, RUTH ----------------------- 8 1 Ojito, N . Mex. DAVY, MELVYN 73, 1 76, 1 78, 1 84, 1 87 1 206 Beaver, Guymon, Okla. DAWSON, WANDA 93, 1 3 1 5246 E . St. Clair, Indianapolis, Ind. DAYHOFF, DELBERT ---------------- 9 3 2 1 09 30th St., Great Bend, Kans. DEAN, JEANINE 81, 185 4 1 2 Government, Fayetteville, Ark. DEFOYD, JACQUETTA 5 1 , 60, 82, 1 8 3 Box 4 59, Frederick, Okla. DEVORE, DORIS 94, 1 64, 1 8 5 509 W. Boulder, Golorado Springs, Colo. DODSON, ANN 27, 46, 60, 1 08, 1 6 5, 1 76, 1 77, 1 8 5 909 1 st Ave., Lawrenceburg, Tenn. DORR, DON 52, 8 1 , 1 28, 1 82 Box 7 1 4, Alva, Okla. DRISCOL, JACK 82, 1 28 1 1 2 3 VanHorne, Salina, Kans. DRYDEN, GERALD 73, 1 34, 204, 205, 208, 2 1 1, 2 1 2 9 1 9 . Beaver, Bethany, Okla. DUBOSE, DANEY 94, 1 3 1 , 192 3904 Auburn Drive, Lake Charles, La. DUFF, PHIL -----------------94, 1 66, 1 84 Box 245, Quinton, Okla. DUKE, BILLY ----------------------- 94 900 W. 6th, Cisco, Texas DUNCAN, GENE - --------- ---------- 94 Rt. 1 , Princeton, Texas DUREE, DORVALENE 94 3 1 5 E . Indiana, Walters, Okla. DYBDAHL, GENE ------------------- 94 2 8 1 4 6th Ave., Scottsbluff, Nebr. _ _ ________________

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EDGE, DONNA 94, 1 8 2 60 1 N. Mueller, Bethany, Okla. EDGERTON, HOWARD 94 Box 373, Allerton, Iowa EDMONDS, DORIS 94 Dutton, Ala. EDMONDS, HAZEL ------------------ 94 Dutton, Ala. EDMONDS, PAUL 46, 72, 82, 1 5 1 , 166, 1 8 3, 1 9 1 Bethany, Okla. EDMONDS, SAM -------------------- 60 602 N. Redmond, Bethany, Okla. EGERTON, ROGER W . -------------- 94 305 S.W. 3rd, Bethany, Okla. ELLEDGE, DAVID - - ----------------- 7 3 14 N . Madison, Edmond, Okla. ELLIS, WINONA -------------------- 94 Isabella, Okla. ELLIOTT, FRANK 60, 1 28, 1 3 1 , 1 49, 190 Rt. 2, Box 1 73, Aurora, Mo. ELROD, RUTH ------ ---------------- 82 1 8 1 3 Faraon St., St. Joseph, Mo. EMERSON, LARON ------------------ 82 3 1 0 N. Redmond, Bethany, Okla. EMMERT, BEVERLY 82, 1 34, 1 92, 1 94 1 00 5 Cherry, Orange, Texas EMMERT, BUDDY 74, 90, 1 49, 1 67 1 00 5 Cherry, Orange, Texas EMMERT, JAMES -------- ----------- 9 5 1 06 S.W. Ave., Bethany, Okla. EWELL, ROSALIE ---------------94, 1 64 926 Crosby, Little Rock, Ark. EYESTONE, JACKIE 1 69 Bartlesville, Okla. ______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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FARLEY, BILL ---------------------- 94 2 5 1 9 N. Cincinnatti, Tulsa, Okla. FARMER, DARLENE --------------73, 94 1 1 4 N. Mueller, Bethany, Okla. FARMER, DON 1 49,' 1 66, 2 1 3 Rt. 3 , Ft. Scott, Kans. FARMER, ERNIE 72, 73, 1 8 3, 1 9 3, 200, 205, 208, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 1 1 4 . Mueller, Bethany, Okla. FARR, BUDDY 60, 1 8 1 , 1 84, 1 88, 2 1 4 1 7 3 2 W . 6th St., Texarkana, Texas FIKA, BILL -------------------------- 94 Intercession City, Fla. FINCHUM, IVONNE ---------------- 7 3 3709 S. Villa, Oklahoma City, Okla. FINDLAY, ELIZABETH 2 5 , 8 1 , 94 1 20 Lowman, Ft. Scott, Kans. FISHER, PHYLLIS 82, 1 86 308 S. Beaver, Bethany, Okla. FLAUDING, BELVA JEAN ------------ 60 1 008 W. Cottonwood, Independence, Kans. FLOOD, LARRY 82, 83, 1 28, 1 5 5, 1 90, 2 1 3 402 W . Lincoln, Blackwell, Okla. FOOTE, WILDA 94, 1 30, 1 64, 1 8 5 , 226, 228 Rt. 2, Seagraves, Texas _____________

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FORTNER, KAY -----------------94, 206 5 1 0 E. Main, Norman, Okla. FOSTER, ALICE JEAN Gering, Nebr.

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FOSTER, MARY -------- ------------- 82 4 2 5 N . Elm, lola, Kans. FOX, JAMES 3402 Culver, Dallas, Texas

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FOX, LOU ANN 82, 1 30, 1 82 9 1 2 Duncan Ave., Duncan, Okla. FRANKLIN, HAROLD 82, 1 30 835 A St., Delta, Colo. FRANKLIN, PAT 44, 82, 92, 1 30 2 30 1 Apple Lane, Hutchinson, Kans. FRANKLIN, ROY -------------- ----- 6 1 9 1 3 N. Mueller, Bethany, Okla. FRAZIER, DOYLE 9 5, 1 28, 1 66 Rt. 9, Box 748, Texarkana, Ark. ______________

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GREEN, RONNIE -- ----------- 9 5 208 W. Brooklyn, Dallas, Texas GREENE, WINOGENE 95 1 3 1 5 N . Rosedale, Tulsa, Okla. GREVE, MARJI 44, 54, 82, 1 84 Box 206, Newton, Iowa --

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HADDOW, BILL ------- ------ - - - - 7 3 1 1 2 1 Burlington Ave., Billings, Mont. HAGEMEIER, PAUL 61 720 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. HALE, JOANN .,.. - --------------- --82, 2 1 4 Box 7 3 3, Muleshoe, Texas HALE, ROBERT 6 1 , 1 2 3, 1 50, 1 54 508 N. College, Bethany, Okla. HALL, GLORIA ----- ------------- - - 9 5 Longdale, Okla. HALL, MARTHA ------------ ------- 82 3249 N. Madison, Tulsa, Okla. HALL, NELLIE, 2 3, 76, 9 5, 1 3 1 , 1 86, 206, 2 1 4 5 1 06 McCorkle Ave., Charleston, W. Vir. HALTOM, WILLIAM 73, 85, 1 4 5, 1 5 1 , 1 90, 2 1 2 4 1 6 Penn St., Coffeyville, Kans. HAMITER, ANN -------- -- - ----- 9 5 1 04 S.W. First, Apt. 6 , Bethany, Okla. HAMITER, DAN ----- --- ----- - -- 9 5 1 04 S .W. First, Apt. 6, Bethany, Okla. HANN, AMOS 73, 1 3 1 Udall, Kans. HARPER, CHUCK 72, 78, 82, 87, 1 28, 1 2 1 , 1 82, 1 8 3, 2 1 1 , 2 1 3 74 3 5 Wayne, Kansas City, Mo. HARRIS, BILLY JOE__83, 1 9 3, 202, 204, 2 1 0 6 3 2 E . Gandy, Denison, Texas HARRIS, HARRY 83, 88, 1 28, 1 30 1 207 Ray, Kansas City, Kans. HARRIS, SONDRA 2 3, 9 5 Waldron, Ark. HARRIS, SUZANNE 24, 8 3 4328 Pearl, Kansas City, Kans. HARTMAN, SHIRLEY 95 1 2 3 3 N.W. 99th, Okla. City, Okla. HARTPENCE, GARY 49, 9 5, 1 78, 1 9 0 2 1 6 Elm, Ottawa, Kans. HAYS, CELIA 9 5 , 1 84 Route 1 , Scottsbluff, Nebr. HAYS, CLARENCE ---------- ------ 9 5 Rt. 1 , Scottsbluff, Nebr. HEADLEY, PATTIE ----------- --- - 9 5 309 N. 1 9th, Colorado Springs, Colo. HEBARD, NELVA 82, 83, 192, 1 94, 2 2 3, 224, 227 Taloga, Okla. HELSEL, CHARLES 6 1 , 1 89 Box 245, Bethany, Okla. HENDERSON, MARY JENE 9 5, 1 30 1 5 3 5 Vermont, Dallas, Texas HENDRICKS, JOHN 83, 1 28, 1 30 1 3 1 4 N. Monroe, Topeka, Kans. HENDRICKS, ROBERT 1 8 3, 2 1 3 1 3 1 4 N . Monroe, Topeka, Kans. HERRICK, KENNETH 73, 1 8 5 , 1 9 1 , 2 1 4 Rt. 3 , Farmington, N . Mex. HERRICK, ROBERT --------------- - 8 3 Rt. 3 , Farmington, N . Mex. HERRON, VERA 96, 226 Box 263, Cimarron, Kans. HESS, DON ------------------96, 1 50, 209 Box 204, Sublette, Kans. --

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45, 9 5, 1 66, 203, 208, 209, 2 1 2, 2 1 3 309 Allison, Newton, Kans. GAINES, PAUL 82, 83, 1 44 2908 Stuart Drive, Fort Worth, Texas GARDNER, DALE 9 5, 1 28, 1 30 4 1 6 E. 1 2th, Pinebluff, Ark. GARDNER, JIM 73, 1 02, 1 1 3, 1 34, 1 36, 1 38, 1 4 5, 1 77, 1 82, 1 83, 1 90, 1 9 3, 203, 205, 209, 2 1 2 404 E . Kansas, Meade, Kans. GARNAND, IRMA 82, 1 30, 1 8 3, 1 84 409 N.W. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. GARRETT, EARNEST --------- 7 3 Bethany, Okla. GASSETT, DON --------------- ----- 7 3 2 1 9 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. GENTZ, MARJORIE --------------95, 1 3 1 320 Basswood, Houston 22, Texas GIFFORD, THELMA 9 5, 1 30 Lipscomb, Texas GILL, BERTHA 95, 98, 1 84 Box 1 384, Texas City, Texas GILL, RAY ------ - - ------- -----82 Vet. Hut 8, Bethany, Okla. GILLEY, J . C. ----------------------- 9 5 Wynnewood, Okla. GILPIN, ROBERT 102 Box 595, Bethany, Okla. GOETZ, HELEN --- ------------- 9 5 200 S. Grand Ave., Waukesha, Wise. GOLDEN, GLEN 73, 1 50 2 507 Ohsfeldt, Houston, Texas GOLDEN, JAMES 9 5, 96, 1 5 5, 1 66, 1 87 2 507 Ohsfeldt, Houston, Texas GONZALEZ, JOHN ----------- - --- 9 5 R.R. No. 2 , Kansas City, Mo. GOODEN, BILL 44, 92, 9 5, 1 28, 1 30 6 1 4 Osage, Augusta, Kans. GOODHUE, DELLA 95, 1 69 1908 N. Washington, Enid, Okla. GOODSON, BARBARA 73 2009 New Boston Rd., Texarkana, Texas GOODSON, BILL 6 1 , 1 54 2009 New Boston Rd., Texarkana, Texas GORDON, VONCIEL 82, 1 3 1 , 1 94, 227 Delight, Ark. GORHAM, BETTY 9 5, 98 Rt. No. 1 , Box 3 32, Goodman, Mo. GOUGH, GALAL -----------------95, 203 3020 Grail, Wichita, Kans. GRAHAM, MARLENE 82 1 507 W. 26th, Houston, Texas GRAY, BU�TON 82, 1 5 1 , 1 89 2009 McCormick, Wichita, Kans. GRAY, DOROTHY ------- - - - ------ 9 5 1945 S. Hobart, Pampa, Texas GREEN, DUANE 9 5, 202 721 N. Wells, Pampa, Texas _______

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HESS, ROBERT 83, 2 1 2 3 0 6 N . E . 2nd, Bethany, Okla. HESTER, ROBERT --------- -- --- -- 96 Thornberg, Ark. HICKMAN, BARBARA 83, 186 8 1 9 E. Fifth St., Pueblo, Colo. HIGDON, JANETT -- -------------96, 164 2 24 N.W. Ave. H ., Hamlin, Texas HIGHT, KENDALL 83, 201 , 202 Carl Junction,. Mo. HILL, 'PHILLIP 74, 190 Rt. 2, Box 548, Helena, Ark. HILTON, SARA FRANCES 83, 184 620 Quapaw, Hot Springs, Ark. H INES, RUTH ------------- - ---- -- 83 Kalvasta, Kans. HODGSON, BOB 5 3, 61, 102 1 4 0 1 S. College, Bethany, Okla. HOGAN, GERALD ----- ------- ---- 74 1 0 3 N.E. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. HOKADA, JAMES 74, 96, 1 28, 1 30, 167 Honolulu, Hawaii HOLCOMB, DOROTHY 6 1 , 1 30, 1 87 Rt. i, Warner, Okla. HOLLAND, FRANKIE - -- ---- - - - 96 Rt. 3, Okarche, Okla. HOLLAND, JUNE ---- ------- - -74 Box 373, Bethany, Okla. HOLLAND, LOWELL 61 Box 373, Bethany, Okla. HOLSCHUH, CHARLES ---------- - - 96 901 P h W. 7th Ave., Lakewood, Colo. HOPKINS, SHEILIA ----------------- 96 Box 383, Beggs, Okla. HORTON, DALE ---------- 62 Vet. Hut 1 1 , Bethany, Okla. HORTON, DEAN 83, 1 34, 1 5 5, 201, 204, 207, 208, 209, 2 1 3 5864 N.W. 38th, Oklahoma City, Okla. HOWARD, BETTY -------- 96 644 N.E. 30th, Oklahoma City, Okla. HUFF, DAVID ---- - ----------- 83 1 24 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. HULL, JERRY 83, 1 38, 1 9 3, 209, 2 1 3 1 0 5 S.W. Ave., Bethany, Okla. HUMAN, GERALD 83, 1 49, 202, 208, 209, 2 1 3 1 3 1 9 W. 9th, Stillwater, Okla. HUNTER, VIRGINIA 1 30, 1 84, 192 Sloan, Iowa HUTCHINGS, JERRY 96, 1 30, 226 Rt. 1, Ivanhoe, Texas _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ ______

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IMEL, JACK 83, 1 82, 193 2 200 Ohio St., Lawrence, Kans. INGLE, DELLA 62, 1 86 Rt. I , Antlers, Okla. INGRAM, ARLENE ----------- - 62 1 0 3 % N.E. Second, Bethany, Okla. INGRAM, BILL 74, 1 86, 2 1 2, 2 1 5 1 0 3 % N.E. Second, Bethany, Okla. INGRAM, JERRY ------- - -- - ------ 83 1 08 S . E. Second, Bethany, Okla. ISAACS, WALTER 84, 1 82, 1 87 1 002 E. Oklahoma, Enid, Okla. _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _____

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JAHDE, MYRNA 96, 1 85, 2 1 4 502 N .W. 5th, Bethany, Okla. JAMES, DICK - --------------- - ---- 96 2909 1 9th St., Port Arthur, Texas _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

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JANTZ, DOLORES 72, 74, 1 8 3 5 1 5 E . Third, Newton, Kans. JA 'TZ, LAWRENCE 72, 74, 1 8 3 1 2 5 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. JA TZ, MAC ------------------------ 96 Isabella, Okla. JARVIS, CLEM ---------------------- 8 3 Rt. 4 , Stillwater, Okla. JE NINGS, CLARENCE 83, 1 28 Box 876, Coolidge, Ariz. JERNIGA , BOB 83 1 08 S. Asbury, Bethany, Okla. JOHNSON, lOLA 83, 1 3 1 , 229 1 1 32 E. Park, Enid, Okla. JOHNSON, TALMADGE 90, 96, 1 28, 1 49, 202 Box 249, Duncan, Okla. JONTE, JOHN 96, 1 3 1, 149 1 78, 1 87 1 243 E. Wall, Fort Scott, Kans. ____________

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KASTNER, MARY LOU 47, 74 1 1 6 S.W. Second, Bethany, Okla. KAUTH, MARILY 96 Rt. 3, Feredonia, Kans. KEHR, DORIS ----------------------- 74 Ingalls, Kans. KEHR, EMA UEL 62 Ingalls, Kans. KEITH, LOYD ----------------------- 8 3 Elkhart, Kans. KELLY, JOHN 74, 1 9 1 , 209 1 6 36 Junction Ave., Sturgis, S. Dak. KEN EDY, ALLYN 7 5, 207, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, 2 1 5, 2 1 6 Rt. 7 , Box 5 1 8, Texarkana, Texas KENT, JANICE ---------------------- 96 601 N. 1 4th, Frederick, Okla. KEYS, REBA 84, 149 1 008 Logan, Canon City, Colo. Kl! G, HENRY -------------------96, 1 66 1008 Hickory, Sweetwater, Texas KING, ORWOOD ------------------ 84 Gueyden, La. KING, SHIRLEY 84, 1 84, 228 West Helena, Ark. KINNE, MARILEE 74, 1 84, 1 86 Rt. 2, Box 14, San Benito, Texas KIRBY, DORSEY -------------------- 62 36 1 8 Campbell St., Kansas City, Mo. KNIERIM, LAVERNE 7 5, 1 3 1 , 1 89 Tabor, Iowa K IGHT, LESTER 84, 1 00, 1 50, 1 78, 1 82, 1 87 1 2 1 6 S.E. 4th, Mineral Wells, Texas KNIPPERS, MELVA 80, 84, 1 30, 1 84 Box 328, Mtny, La. KNUTSON, GLENN 96, 1 49 822 Circle Q, Hastings, Nebr. KNUTSO , J EAN -------------------- 62 822 Circle Q, Hastings, Nebr. KOHNK, ALTHEA 74, 1 6 5 , 228 903 W. 4th St., Grand Island, Nebr. KOTWITZ, ALFREDA 74 Drexel, Mo. KUHNS, DICK -------------------96, 203 29 1 1 Amidon, Wichita, Kans. ____________

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LACKEY, GEORGE 62, 1 54, 1 69, 1 80, 1 8 5 Rt. 1 , Pharr, Texas LAKE, MARILYN -------------------- 96 1 0 1 1 N. 7th, Burlington, Iowa __

LAl\IAR, ROSE 63, 1 83 403 E . Okla, Anadarko, Okla. LAMB, HARRY ---------------------- 6 3 7 1 4 N. College, Bethany, Okla. LAMBERT, BILLY ------------------- 96 1 00 E. Sycamore, Blytheville, Ark. LAMBERT, MADIE ------------------ 6 3 1 19 N. Asbury, Bethany, Okla. LANA, PAUL ------------------------ 96 7 1 4 N. Weigle, Watonga, Okla. LANGFORD, JAMES 63 2 1 1 "A" N. College, Bethany, Okla. LANGLEY, MARTHA 97, 1 3 1 , 1 49 2 544 Minnesota, Topeka, Kans. LAWRENCE, GLYNELLE 84, 1 84 Rt. 2, Box 4 1 7, Robertson, Mo. LEDBETTER, HOWARD 63 Box 63, Bethany, Okla. LEFFEL, RICHARD 97, 1 28, 209, 2 1 3 1 5 1 9 E . 3rd, Hutchinson, Kans. LAY, RUTH ANN 84, 1 86 526 E. Oak St., Chandler, Okla. LE Z, GLENN ---------------------- 97 Roseland, Nebr. LEWIS, GRETA --------------------- 97 508 2 3rd St., Texas City, Texas LEWIS, JOH � 97 801 E , Dodge City, Kansas LEWIS, KENNETH ------------------ 97 1 1 04 Elm, Sweetwater, Texas LEWIS, RICHIE ------------------97, 1 67 vVeston, Mo. LEWIS, ROBERT 5 1 , 74, 1 50, 1 87 Fleetwood, Okla. LIMBOCKER, SHELDA 89, 97 Box 3 5 3, Olton, Texas LI DLEY. BOB ---------------------- 6 3 402 N.W. Third, Bethany, Okla. LINNELL, JOHN ---------- --------- - 84 1 2 5 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. LOCK, CORA ----------------------- 97 503 N. Kentucky, Mangum, Okla. LONG, KENNETH ------------------- 84 8 1 0 5th St., Pawnee, Okla. LONG, KENNETH 97, 202, 2 1 0 Rt. 1 , Olton, Texas LOTSPEICH, DUANE 97 Long Pine, Nebr. LUDWIG, OLETHA 85, 94, 97, 1 3 1 , 1 6 5, 1 82 6946 Paseo, Kansas City, Mo. LUKENS, GRAHAM ------------------ 84 3 1 7 N. 7th, Atchinson, Kans. LUNDY, BEVERLY 84, 1 20, 1 8 3, 1 88 1 29 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. LUNSFORD, WALTER 84 Box 545, Bethany, Okla. LUTHER, KENNETH 84 1 1 0 S. M ueller, Bethany, Okla. ____ __ __ __ _ _ __ _____

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McCRAW, FAYE -------------------- 63 3732 Bales St., Kansas City, Mo. McCURLEY, CLIFFIE 84 Rt. 2, Fayetteville, Ark. McELYEA, EUGENE 97, 1 54, 1 67, 1 89 1 1 1 S. Grace, Crockett, Texas McELYEA, JEAN 76, 97, 206, 2 24, 2 2 5 , 226 Box 503, Crockett, Texas l\lcGINNIS, JEWELL ----------------- 97 Box 2 1 89, Univefsity Sta., Enid, Okla. McGUIRE, MARILYN ---------------- 84 22 5 E. Lincoln, Mangum, Okla. l\lcGUIRE, ROGER ------------------ 74 2 1 8 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. MciNTYRE, GAIL 84, 1 84 Coolidge, Ariz. McKAUGHAN, RUBY 82, 84, 92, 1 9 2 20lf.l W . Las Animas, Colo. Springs, Colo. McMINN, MARTHA JANE 97 406 E. Lake Dr., Gladewater, Texas McNABB, CAROLYN 4 1 , 63, 75, 1 84 Box 7 7 1 , Bethany, Okla. McNABB, CLIFTON 84, 1 83, 1 9 1 , 2 1 0 1 2 0 5 S . Floydada, Wellington, Texas Me AMES, LAURA 97, 1 3 1, 1 84, 2 26 Box 503, Claremore, Okla. McPHAIL, CLARK ------------------- 97 2801 N.W. 20th, Okla. City, Okla. McPHERSON, NAOMI --------------- 74 40 1 S. Alleghany, El Dorado, Kans. ____ ___________

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MACE, ALVIN ---------------------- 97 6720 N .W. 27th, Okla. City, Okla. MACE, GLENN -------------- -- ------ 97 6720 N.W. 27th, Oklahoma City, Okla. MADISON, BOB 74, 96, 1 49, 1 67, 209, 2 1 2 2 0 1 6 1 st St., Galena Park, Texas MANWARREN, HOWARD 52, 84, 1 66, 1 9 3, 209, 2 1 3 Rt. 3, Lyons, Kans. MATHIAS, ROBERT ----------------- 84 2 5 80 S. Julian, Denver, Colo. MATHIS, DAVID -------------------- 97 604 N. Asbury, Bethany, Okla. MAY, GENE 74, 1 9 1 7 1 3 E . inth, Dewey, Okla. MAYO, MARYETTO ----------------- 97 1 809 Sayle, Greenville, Texas MEADOR, BOBBIE -------- - - --------- 97 1 706 Rosewood, Grand Prairie, Texas MEIER, IRENE 1 7, 84 Dariouzett, Texas MERCER, RON ---------------------- 86 Camargo, Okla. MERRILL, SUE 77, 8 5 , 1 02, 1 30, 1 79 4 1 07 Victory Dr., Marshall, Texas M IKKELSON, VERNA 32, 74, 1 44 3 346 1 6th Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minn. MILBURN, EVELY 27, 50, 85, 1 6 5 , 192, 227 7 1 1 9 Paseo, Kansas City, Mo. MILEY, CHARLOTTE --------------- 97 R.R. No. 2, Chanute, Kans. __

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McCALEB, BETH 97, 98, 1 30, 1 78, 1 80, 1 8 5 8 1 5 S . Jefferson, Enid, Okla. McCASLIN, LUELLA ----------------- 74 Rt. 2, Broken Bow, Nebr. McCLEERY, LEE ROY --------------- 97 Harmon, Okla. McCLUNG, MYRNA 97, 1 64, 1 68 3004 Lebanon Road, Wichita Falls, Texas McCORMACK, BERNITTA ----------- 84 Kirwin, Kans. __

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MILLSAP, KATHRYN 90, 98, 1 38, 1 76, 1 8 2 Box 597, Hominy, Okla. 1ITCHELL, BOBBY ----------------- 8 5 Yet. Hut No. 1 2 , Bethany, Okla. MITCHELL, CHARLES 8 5, 1 8 5 Tabor, Iowa MITCHELL, FLO RENE 98, 206 1 8 1 8 S. Van Buren, Little Rock, Ark. MOBLEY, ORVILLE 75 208 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. MONTGOMERY, DELMA 98, 164, 1 69, 1 8 2 3 2 1 S.W. 24th, Okla. City, Okla. MONTGOMERY, WILMA 73, 75, 1 3 1 , 1 34, 16� 1 6� 1 82, 1 8� 1 87, 206 321 S.W. 24th, Okla. City, Okla. MOORE, BOBBIE 64, 1 54, 226, 227, 228 Box 37, Lelia Lake, Texas MOORE, GENE 75, 1 54 Box 37, Lelia Lake, Texas MOORE, HAROLD WAY E 85, 202, 2 1 0 Box 4 1 3, Wellington, Texas MOORE, JANE ---------------------- 98 803 S. 3rd, Temple, Texas MOORE, MAURICE 64, 1 02, 1 09, 1 28, 1 3 1 , 1 45, 1 82, 1 9 3, 2 1 5 2700 University Ave., Dubuque, Iowa l\IOORE, MERLIN 98 3523 Ave. R., Lubbock, Texas MOORE, WILLIS -------------------- 98 Fairview, Okla. MORGAN, KARLOS 7 5, 1 28, 1 30, 1 87 3 1 5 Woodruff St., Lake Charles, La. MOSELEY, DELETTA 98, 226 R.R. No. 1, Stephenville, Texas MOSIMAN, DUANE ----------------- 98 Rt. 2, Valley Center, Kans. MOSIMAN, WAYNE ----------------- 8 5 Rt. 2, Valley Center, Kans. lULLIES, CARL 98, 1 3 1 , 1 89, 202 3209 S. Benton, Kansas City, Mo. MURROW, WAYNE 7 5, 88, 1 30 Rt. 2, Alva, Okla. 1YERS, FLOYD 64, 1 86 Kalvesta, Kans. __

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NICHOLS, JAMES 64, 1 89 Ryan, Okla. NOFFSINGER, EUNICE -------------- 8 5 406 Curtis, Brush, Colo. NOFFSI GER, JIM 64, 1 38, 1 79, 1 82, 1 9 1 , 1 9 3, 200, 2 1 5 406 Curtis, Brush, Colo. ________________

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OSBORN, DICK

5 1 , 64, 1 00, 1 02, 1 28, 1 50, 1 82 291 5 Ivandell St., Dallas 1 1 , Texas OWENS, BARBARA 8 5, 1 84, 1 86 Rt. 2, Woodward, Okla . OWENS, NOLA JOYCE 64, 1 30, 1 3 1 , 1 84, 227 1 2 1 Texas St., Woodward, Okla. OXNER, BILL ---------------------- - 8 5 2 1 4 S. Sixth St., West Helena, Ark. OZIAS, ESTHER 8 5, 1 30 Centerview, Mo. ______

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PITTS, RODNEY 85, 202 1 72 3 Foster St., Lake Charles, La. . PITTS, UMSTED -------------------- 65 304 . Donald, Bethany, Okla. PITTS, VIRGINIA 75, 184 1 72 3 Foster St., Lake Charles, La. POSEY, MARALYN ------------------ 99 1 0 2 5 \Vesterly Pl., Wichita Falls, Texas POSEY, ROBERTA 75, 1 80, 1 8 3, 184, 1 88, 228 1 20:5 8th St. : Wellington, Texas POTTS, VERA ----------------------- 99 808 N. Asbury, Bethany, Okla. PRENTICE, CARL 65, 202 400 N.W. 3rd, Bethany, Okla. PRENTICE, GEORGE 65, 202 506 S. Rock Island, El Reno, Okla. PRICE, BEVERLY 99, 185 5 3 5 3 N.W. 4 5th, Oklahoma City, Okla. PUGH, CHARLES 86, 1 30 304 . Donald, Bethany, Okla. PULLIAM, LENA 95, 1 30, 184 Box 1 296, Duncan, Okla. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

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NAGEL, DELORES ------------------ 98 Box 4 5 3, Hooker, Okla. NEAL, DWIGHT -------------------- 8 5 1 3 1 2 W. Ponca, Ponca City, Okla. NEAL, MELBA LYN 44, 7 5 207 . Peniel, Bethany, Okla. NEEL, WILFRED -------------------- 8 5 Box 1 5 5, Loraine, Texas EELY, DIANE 85, 1 80, 1 82, 1 8 3, 1 84, 1 88 1 1 4 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. NEFF, DEAN 8 5, 1 82, 202, 204, 2 1 0 Phillips, Texas NEUENSCHWANDER, DWIGHT 75 5 0 8 N. Asbury, Bethany, Okla. NEUENSCHWANDER, JAMES 98 Crowley, La . NEUFELD, RICHARD --------------- 98 Watonga, Okla. EWLIN, YIRGI lA 8 5, 1 6 5 Cordell, Kans. NEWMAN, BARBARA 98 6 1 1 E . First, Bartlesville, Okla. EWTON, DICK 7 5, 1 1 5, I 28, 1 7 1 , 1 77, 1 82, 1 9 0 Box 9 5 , Chetopa, Kans. ______________

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PACKWOOD, JACK 98, 1 28 Rt. 3, Kemah, Okla. PAGA , PATSY 1 7, 75, 1 3 1 , 1 83, 1 87, 228 Rt. 2, Box 50, Stroud, Okla. PAGE, MONTE -------- ------------ ?? 5 2 5 West 16th, Hays, Kans. PARKS, BERTIE 98, 1 30 1 1 5 West 6th, Chadron, Nebr. PARRISH, JERRY 98, 1 68, 1 8 7 3222 N. Sixth, Enid, Okla. PAUL, DALE 85, 1 8 5 229'-h W. Main, Ada, Okla. PAYNE, BARBARA 98, 1 3 1 , 1 49 Garfield, Ark. PEARD, JACK ----------------------- 98 Yici, Okla. PELLEY, LEON 190 Rt. 1 0, Box 3 37, Oklahoma City, Okla. PENQUITE, BILL ------------------- 8 5 7 2 3 E . Eighth, Minneapolis, Kans. PERKINS, DEALINE 98, 203, 2 1 3 7 1 2 N. Monroe, Hutchinson, Kans. PERSHALL, RICHARD --------------- 64 3 1 1 2 N. Sheldon, Clovis, N. Mex. PETERS, CHARLES ------------------ 8 5 1 2 1 4 Division, Burlington, Iowa PETETE, CLYDE -------------------- 98 61 1 2 N .W. 58th, Okla. City, Okla. PETTY, JO ANNE 5 5, 6 5, 1 38, 1 64, 1 8 5, 2 1 4 Star Route, Clovis, N. Mex. PHILLIPS, JANELLE 7 5 , 1 30, 1 6 5, 1 78, 1 80, 1 8 5 207 S . Asbury, Bethany, Okla. PHILLIPS, JENNIS 6 5 85, 1 82, 1 84 1 6 1 7 Millington St., Winfield, Kans. PHILLIPS, ROBERT ----------------- 98 906 N. Walker St., Okla. City, Okla. PICKEL, DOYAL -------------------- 98 Rt. 2, Box 1 06, Henryetta, Okla. PIERCE, HARRY 80, 8 5 , 1 28, 202, 2 1 1 Rt. 1 , Sarcoxie, Mo. PIERCE, RUTH 8 1 , 85 Box 1 4 1 3, Ponca City, Okla. PITTS, MYRLE E 47, 7 5 , 1 30, 1 84 304 N. Donald, Bethany, Okla. ______________

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REESE, JOHN ----------------------- 75 Yet. Hut 7, Bethany, Okla. REEVES, LARRY 99, 204, 210 1 444 . Main, Paris, Texas REIFF, ARLENE --------------------- 86 1 409 N. Main, Garden City, Kans. REINHOLD, MIRIAM ---------------- 75 Kadoka, S. Dak. REYNOLDS, LILLIE 99, 164, 178 Box 508, O'Donnell, Texas RHODES, BOBBY -------------------- 86 2203 W. Eleventh, Texarkana, Texas RIDENOUR, WILLIAM 65 Box 4 3 5, Bethany, Okla. RIDLEY, JUDY 86, 1 3 1 , 149 1 020 Davis, Clovis, N. Mex. RIGGS, ROGER 78, 86 1 08 N. Mueller, Bethany, Okla. RILEY, RUTH ---------- ------------- 86 309 W. Mound, Carthage, Mo. RIPPER, JOYCE 99, 1 82 501 N. Willow, Bethany, Okla. ROBERTS, FRANKLIN --------------- 86 601 S. E . 32ncl, Okla. City, Okla. ROBI SON, PATSY 75, 165, 1 8 3, 1 84 1 8 2 5 Baylor, Waco, Texas ROBINSON, SUE -- --- ---- ----------- 99 Box 4 5, Dover, Okla. RODGERS, CHARLES 99, 1 49, 202 1 3 32 Locust, Muskogee, Okla. ROGERS, DANIEL ------------------- 99 Bruno, Ark. ROGERS, DELTA ----------------99, 164 Box 5 37, Post, Texas ROGERS, JOHN ------ --------------- 75 2420 Ash St., Parsons, Kans. 86 ROGERS, KENNETH Box 5 37, Post, Texas _____________

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ROHLMEIER, BILL Pawnee City, Nebr.

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99, 1 28, 1 3 1 , 1 89, 202, 211, 213

ROLAND, LESSLEY ----- ----- -------- 76 2629 orman Ave., Okla. City, Okla.

ROPER, DENZIL ------ --------------- 6 5 Rt. 3, Box 3027, Arcata, Calif. ROSE, ROSALIE --------------------- 86 Box 1 32, Alien, Okla. 2 1 , 65, 1 6 5 ROSS, IRMA LEE Elkhart, Kansas ROUSSELLE, EVELYN 75, 1 8 1 , 1 84, 2 2 5 , 227 Rt. 2, McCook, Nebr. RUTLEDGE, BILL ----------------99, 1 8 5 4 3 3 Catalpa, Clarksdale, Mo. ______________

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SAFADI, FU'AD ---------------------- 99 Box 416, Amman, H. K. of Jordan SAMPLES, WYNONA ---------------- 99 Selman, Okla. SANDERS, HIRAM 99, 1 82 2740 E. 1 2th, Tulsa, Okla. SAXTON, LYLE 99, 1 30, 1 60 Vici, Okla. SCALES, EULA MAE ---------------- 66 Box 804, McLean, Texas SCALES, WAYNE -------------------- 99 Box 804, McLean, Texas SCHAUER, DOROTHY --------------- 7 5 400 N . Asbury, Bethany, Okla. SCHOENHALS, HARRY 86, 1 28 Box 84 1 , Darrouzett, Texas SCHUBERT, JOH 76, 86, 206 1042 W. 1 7th, Houston, Texas SCHULER, ARDITH 86, 92, 1 3 1 , 1 49, 1 84 Ness City, Kans. SCOTT, DARLENE ------------------ 99 160 1 S. Old Manner, Wichita, Kans. SCOTT, GRAZELLE 7 5, 1 89 1402 West Ave., Wellington, Texas SCOTT, MARY JO 7 5, 1 3 1 , 1 82, 2 1 4 3601 N . 48th, Fort Smith, Ark. SEARLE, DON ------ ---------------- 99 602 W. 1 1 th, Bartlesville, Okla. SEETO , LUCILLE 86 Rt. 1, Box 308, Texas City, Texas SELLS, MARY LOU 86, 1 30, 1 6 5, 1 8 3 May, Okla. SHACKELFORD, CHARLOTTE 76 2 1 1 2 N. Rhode Island, Okla. City, Okla. SHAFER, CHESTER ----------------- 86 205 . Mueller, Bethany, Okla. SHAW, DA NY --------------------- 99 1 719 N. Lewis Pl., Tulsa, Okla. SHEDD, WANDA 99, 164 Box 594, Post, Texas SHEEKS, JACK -------------------99, 1 88 521 W. 2nd, Pine Bluff, Ark. SHEPHERD, RAYMOND 99 52! Lincoln, Emporia, Kans. SHERRILL, KEN -------------------- 86 Rt. 2, Box 3788, Vicksburg, Mo. SHOEMATE, JOE -------------------- 99 820 Lea Street, Clovis, N. Mex. SHORE, EUGENE 99, 1 66, 203, 209, 2 1 3 Johnson, Kans. SHORT, FAITH ------------ -- -------- 76 8 1 8 N. Central, Bethany, Okla. SHOTTS, DALE 86, 1 28 Sterling, Kans. SICKENBURGER, ARDE 86, 1 28 Vancouver, Wash. SIEMS, FREDERICK 99, 2 1 0 Rt. I , Box 1 28, Texas City, Texas ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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SIMPSON, DENE 99, 1 7 1 , 1 79 3 0 1 2 E. 27th St., Kansas City, Mo. SIMPSON, ROY 82, 86, 1 3 1 , 1 69, 1 8 1 , 1 8 5 3 0 1 2 E . 27th St., Kansas City, Mo. SIMPSON, SHIRLEY ----------------- 99 1 07 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. SIPES, BILL ------------------------- 86 Manter, Kans. SIPES, MYRNA ---------------------- 99 Manter, Kans. SKILLER , ROY -------------------- 99 McAlester, Okla. SKI NER, EARL 76, 1 9 1 , 209 5 2 1 5 3 3rd Ave., Kenosha, Wise. SLOAN, DOROTHY 86, 1 8 5 Cleveland, Kans. SLOAN, FRANK --------------------- 86 2 3 1 9 S. Ewing, Dallas, Texas SLOAN, LENORE 74, 76, 1 69, 1 84, 228 3 2 3 W. Fulton, Blackwell, Okla. SLOAN, LUCILLE 76, 1 4 5 , 1 49, 1 50, 1 84 Aline, Okla. SMITH, ALMA 1 00, 1 30 Box 3464, Corpus Christi, Texas SMITH, CARL 1 00 627 S.W. 5th, Okla. City, Okla. SMITH, DIXIE ----------------47, 87, 227 Carl Junction, Mo. SMITH, ERNESTINE 1 00 304 N. College, Bethany, Okla. SMITH, ERNIE 1 00 1 60 5 W. Broadway, 1-Ienryetta, Okla. SMITH, ROBERTA 1 00, 1 84 304 N. College, Bethany, Okla. SMITH, WILMA FAY 76, 145, 1 8 3 Rt. 9 , Alva, Okla. SMITH, WILMA GLEE 87, 1 84 Vici, Okla. SNOW, CARSON -------------------- 76 7 1 5 N. College, Bethany, Okla. SNOWBARGER, KATHERINE 90, 1 00, 1 3 1 , 1 80, 1 82 Rt. 2, Sylvia, Kans. SNOWBARGER, MARION 66, 1 02, 1 04, 1 2 1 , 1 3 1 , 1 60, 1 82, 1 84, 1 89, 2 1 5 Sylvia, Kans. SNYDER, JIM 87, 1 5 5 Rt. 1 , Carthage, Mo. SOOTER, HELEN 1 00 406 S.W. D., Bentonville, Ark. SPARKS, LA DONNA 87 1 07 '-h S. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. SPOON, DARRELL --------------- ---- 66 2 1 9 % N. Redmond, Bethany, Okla. SPOON, REBA ----------------------- 76 2 1 9 1h N. Redmond, Bethany, Okla. _____________

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STARK, JAMES ---------------------- 66 206 W. 3rd, Prescott, Ark. STEELE, EVANGELINE 76, 1 34, 1 36, 1 5 1 , 1 64, 1 82 702 E. 8th, Coffeeville, Kans_ STELL, ROBERT 1 00 Star Rt., Fleetwood, Okla. STEVENSON, GEORGE -------------- 87 9 2 3 Wink Ave., Odessa, Texas STEWART, BURT -,------- - - --------- 76 2 1 5 S. Asbury, Bethany, Okla. STEWART, JAMES PAUL 1 00, 1 28, 1 49, 209, 2 1 3 200 3 W . 1 Oth St., Jasper, Ala_ STEWART, MARY HELEN 1 00, 1 49 Box 850, Jasper, Ala. STEWART, W_ R 1 00 403 N. 5th, Henrietta, Okla. STONE, VERA 1 00, 1 3 1 , 1 49, 1 86 1 709 Ellis, Wichita, Kans. STRAWN, CHARLES 78, 87, 1 30, 1 78, 198 541 Gilbert St., Borger, Texas STROTHER, DOYLE 1 00, 1 28 42 5 E. SE, Ardmore, Okla. STRUBLE, COLLEEN 1 00 407 S. Perry, Ponca City, Okla. STUART, CHARLES 67, 1 0 3, 1 49 401 Peniel, Bethany, Okla. STUMP, RICHARD 87, 1 80 Texhoma, Okla. SUMNER, FLOYD 76, 1 3 1 Gen. Del., Hugo, Okla. SUTTER, VERNON 1 00 807 N. Mueller, Bethany, Okla. SWIGART, PAT 8 1 , 1 00, 1 3 1 , 1 80, 1 8 2 1 602 1 4th St., Woodward, Okla. SWIM, CAROL -------- -------------- 76 5625 Park Ave., Kansas City, Mo. SWIM, VERNON 52, 87, 1 28, 1 34, 1 68, 203, 209, 2 1 2, 2 1 3 4 1 6 E . Ninth, Hutchinson, Kans. SYKES, JIM 67, 7 5 1 06 N.W_ 2nd, Bethany, Okla. __

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STAGGS, lOLA Batesville, Ark. STAGGS, IONA Batesville, Ark.

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66, 1 84, 1 88, 227

66, 1 84, 1 88, 227

STAHLEY, NORMA ------------------ 87 Rt. 5, Newton, Kans. STANGELAND, SHIRLEY

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705 N. Pine, Ponca City, Okla.

:_77, 1 30, 1 8 3, 1 84, 228

STANLEY, CHARLOTTE_ _ 1 00, 1 3 1 , 1 49, 2 26 54 3 Rochester School Rd., Topeka, Kans. STAPLETON, LEE Bar-S-Bar, Sublette, Kans.

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TABOR, SHIRLEY 1 00, 168 1 7 1 0 . Madison, Hutchinson, Kans. TAYLOR, ALICE 87, 1 50, 1 84 308 S_ Ohio, Roswell, N. Mex_ TAYLOR, JANET. 1 00 1 28 E . Sycamore, Blytheville, Ark. TAYLOR, NADINE 1 00 304 S. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. TAYLOR, PAULINE 8 1 , 8 5 , 87, 1 82 209 N. 1 4th, Parsons, Kans. TAYLOR, SHERMAN 67 Hemingford, Nebr. TEAS, JOYCE 87, 1 64 Box 343, Lovington, N. Mex_ TERRY, KENNETH ------------------ 67 1 0 5 S.W. 5th, Bethany, Okla_ THAYER, WILLIAM H. 1 00 302 N. College, Bethany, Okla. THOMASON, BOBBY R. 101 Box 573, Bethany, Okla. THOMPSO , BARBARA 101 1 20 5 Ash, M uskogee, Okla_ TIMMER, DOLLIE ------------------ 87 Wray, Colo. TIMMER, RICHARD -- --------------- 76 Box 429, Gallup, N_ Mex. _____ __________

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TOMPKI S, BARBARA 1 0 1 , 1 3 1 , 1 49 509 N. Greenwood Ave., Ft. Smith, Ark. TOWNS, SHIRLEY 1 0 1 , 1 3 1 , 1 84, 2 26 Palco, Kans. TRACY, JIM 87, 1 49, 1 69, 2 0 1 , 202, 203, 208 6027 E . 1 2th, Kansas City. Mo. TRUAX, MARIAN 78, 87 202 Buena St., San Antonio, Texas TURNER, HELE 76, 1 64, 1 86 Rt. 2, Eastland, Texas TUTTLE, DALE 46, 76, 1 1 2, 1 78, 1 8 3, 1 8 5 , 1 76 Kalvesta, Kans. TYLER, FOREST -------------------- 87 Rt. 1 1 , Hillsboro, Texas ______

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UITTS, CLAIR 101 Rt. 4, Independence, Kans. ULRICH, ROBERT ------------------ 67 1 09 .E. Main, Apt. 1 6, Bethany, Okla. U RUH, RUTH 67, 1 83, 1 8 5 , 224, 227 Rt. 1 , Nevada, Mo. _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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VAN OSTRAND, MYR A

47, 67, 1 30, 1 83, 1 84, 227

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Box 7 1 1 , Bethany, Okla. VAUGHN, BILL 76, 87, 1 02, 1 4 5 , 1 2 1 2 W . Arlington, Ft. Worth, Texas VERMILION, ELVIN 87, 3401 Gabriel, Parsons, Kans. VICE, OEL 101, 211, Shubert, Nebr. VISER, BOB 78, 87, 1 50, 1 76, 423 Dutton Dr., Dallas, Texas _______

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WACHTEL, EUNICE LOVE 67, 1 64, 1 9 2 1 342 Stratford, Nashville, Tenn. WACHTEL, REBECCA 101 1 342 Stratford, Nashville, Tenn. WADE, HOWARD 1 0 1 , 1 28 Box 1 1 6, Friendswood, Texas WAGONER, ELEANORE 102 Vet. Hut 20, Bethany, Okla. WACO ER, HENRY 1 02 Vet. Hut 20, Bethany, Okla. WALKER, GWEN 101, 1 3 1 Rt. 2 , Gentry, Ark. WALLACE, LEVOY 87, 1 30 821 Fourth Ave. West, Birmingham, Ala. WARD, DORIS 101 Broken Bow, Nebr. WARE, LAVONNA ------------------- 87 1 1 9 W. Suffolk, Dallas, Texas ___

WASHBURN, PHILLIP 101, 185, 191 1 703 Link St., Orange, Texas WATSON, NAOMI ------------------- 67 Box 594, Post, Texas WEBSTER, HAROLD ---------------- 87 Box 388, Rogers, Ark. WELLMON, DELORES 1 02, 1 30 520 N .W . 8th, Bethany, Okla. WESAW, D. W. --------------- - ----- 76 720 N. Beaver, Bethany, Okla. WEST, DORIS 54, 87, 227 Rt. 1 , Box 406A, Alvin, Texas WEST, LYLE ------------------------ 87 4 1 3 Mesa Rd., Colorado Springs, Colo. \VESTMORELAND, JOHN A. 101 1 664 Dunmoor, Memphis, Tenn. WESTMORELAND, JOHNNY G. 45, 1 0 1 , 1 3 8, 200, 202, 208, 2 1 3 509 N . Willow, Bethany, Okla . WHITE, MARY JO 67, 1 1 0, 1 4 5 , 1 76, 1 80, 1 84, 1 88, 2 1 4 Rt. 3 , Box 6 , Muleshoe, Texas WHITE, WALLACE 1 0 1 , 1 28 1408 Ave. 0, Lubbock, Texas WHITSETT, TOM 83, 1 0 1 , 202 740 N. Columbia, Tulsa, Okla. WIGGS, PAUL 1 0 1 , 202 E. Nettelton & Sycamore, Jonesboro, Ark. WILLIAMS, BONNIE 101, 1 31, 185 1 504 Rosebank Ave., Nashville, Tenn. WILLIAMS, DONALD WAYNE 68 1 2 2 5 S. 9th St., Centerville, Iowa WILLIAMS, FLOE ------------------- 88 2962 Trenton Rd., Akron, Ohio \VILLIAMS, REBECCA --------------- 68 Box 607, Manning, La. WILLIAMS, VIRGINIA --------------- 88 1 1 5 N .W . Ave., Bethany, Okla. WILLIAMS, WANDA 88, 1 86 1 1 5 Vaughn, Tyler, Texas WILLINGHAM, GLORIA RAMQUIST 68 6 5 5 5 Holmes, Kansas City, Mo. WILSON, ARLESS 88, 1 82 Rt. 5, Box 1 48, Marshall, Texas WILSON, 0. W. 68 32 1 3 N.W. Pioneer, Okla. City, Okla. WILSON, SHIRLEY 101 1 04 N.W. 2nd, Bethany, Okla. WIMBERLEY, FRA CES 50, 68 Box 447, Rt. 3, Okla. City, Okla. WIMBERLEY, LOIS 1 01 Box 447, Rt. 3, Okla. City, Okla. WINTER, VERA RUTH 8 1 , 1 00, 1 0 1 , 1 3 1 , 1 6 5, 1 82 Hooker, Okla. _____________

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WIRE, LEROY 1 0 1 , 186 5 1 8 N. College, Bethany, Okla. WI RE, MARY JEANNE 1 0 1 , 186 5 1 8 N. College, Bethany, Okla. WI RE, PAUL 101 2 1 2 N. Peniel, Bethany, Okla. WISDOM, GERALD 101 Rt. 3, Box 1 74, Lake Charles, La. WISSBROECKER, E. K. 68 326 Aurora St,., Antigo, Wise. WITTLER, MARY LOU 88, 185 Jansen, Nebr. WOMACK, CLARA 88, 1 30, 227, 228 Rt. 1 , Telephone, Texas WOMACK, ROBERT 101 Lamesa, Texas WOODS, RUTH 88, 144 4 1 6 S. 4th St., Floydada, Texas WRIGHT, EUGENE 88, 101 Sublette, Kans. WRIGHT, IRMA JEAN --------------- 88 909 E . Cayuga, Tampa, Fla. WRIGHT, MADOLYN DOUGLAS 5 1 , 76, 1 83 243 5 N. Jordan, Okla. City, Okla. WUESTER, ALFREDA 68, 1 84, 1 88 Box 1 5 3, Bethany, Okla . WYSS, LEON 76, 149, 202 2 9 1 0 Troost, Kansas City, Mo. _ _ __________ _ ____

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YAKLE, LINA 102 5 1 9 . Wheeler, Bethany, Okla. YAMAMOTO, KOICHI 73, 88 Student Union, B-N.C., Bethany, Okla. YAMAMOTO, NANA ---------------- 88 Student Union B-N.C ., Bethany, Okla. YARBROUGH, GLENNA 88, 2 14, 1 87 Rt. 1 , Box 66, Vinson, Okla. YORK, MARY 1 0 1 , 164 506 S. Spruce, Roswell, N. Mex. YOUNG, ROY ----------------------- 88 Alma, Ark. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _______

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ZALETA, HE RY 88, 191 8 1 1 Becks Run Rd., Pittsburgh 1 0, Penn. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

ZE TZ, CRYSTAL 101 241 5 W . Boulder St., Colo. Springs, Colo. ________ ___ ________

ZIEBARTH, ELLIS Box 1 49, St. James, Minn.

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ZIMMERMAN, ROBERT ------------- 68 Bertha, Minn .

IN DEX A Cappella Choir

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Jernigan Hall

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B Clubs Biology Club

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Music Club Parties

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Curricula

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Recitals

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Dorms ----------------------

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Recorder

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Drag -----------------------

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Registrar

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ECHO Staff -----------------

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Residence Counselors

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Faculty

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Sophomores ------------------

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Sophomore Outing

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Specials ---------------------

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Twirp Week

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Seniors

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Who's Who -----------------

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AUTOGRAPHS

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AUTOGRAPHS

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AUTOGRAPHS

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1955 Arrow