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Because your quiet, unassuming spirit .. . Christlike attitudes .. . calmness in adversity ... appreciation for the highest in intellectual and cultural pursuits ... example in the tine art of Christian

living . .. loyalty to the ideals of the Master, the church, and the college inspire us to nobler attain-

ments in lite, we are proud to dedicate the ARROW at 1946 to you - -

PROFESSOR EARL V. GREER

Published by the Student Body of

BETHANY-PENIEL COLLEGE Bethany, Oklahoma Business Manager

Editor HARPER

L.

CoLE

Loms 0 . McMAHON

Associate Editor ALMETA MIZELL

A small group of holiness educational pioneers hewed from a blackjack grove their ideal of a Nazarene College. The prayers and dreams of yesterday were incorporated into the frames of two small . buildings. Today, the results of these efforts may be seen in the seven permanent buildings and numerous temporary structures of our campus. Monuments to our forefathers, however, are not chiseled from material structures but are moulded from the character of young lives . . . Following the pattern set by Christ as He "increased in wisdom and stature, and in favor with God and man," our Bethany Peniel College of today is striving to achieve in the lives of its students a fourfold purpose-mental, physical, spiritual, and cultural development. Thus, clues to the real riches of well-rounded living are in the possibilities of campus activities . Guide-posts that point to successful futures are in the words that fall from the lips of professors and in the principles which were ingrained into this school with the first brick laid.

KILLED IN ACTION Carter, Reginald Corley, Robert Hicks, Robert Newsome, Carl Stockett, Marvin CHAPLAINS Campbell, Joseph Carey Chilton, Claude L. Cobb, Paul R . Gilmore, R. E. Grim, Alden D. Hale, Edwin E. Langford, Lloyd E. Meredith, Archei R . Minyard, Alfred B. Moore, Josiah E., Jr. Moore, Mark R. Newsom, Reuben J. Peters, John L. Pitts, Joseph S. Roberts, Geren C . ARMY Abrahams, Robert J. Adams, Fred W. Alexander, Harvey R. Armstrong, William T . Arnold, Walter E. Atkins, James A. Baker, C . E. Bates, Elvis E. Biggers, Jullian

Black, Gerald W. Brasher, Milton W . Bugh, Vernon Bundy, S. H . Bynum, Terrel J. Christensen, V . J. Clark, Lewis R . Cleveland, Lander Cross, Graydon Cutting, Charles L. Daniels, Herbert Dawson, R : M . Douglas, Johnny Dunn, Lester L. Ethridge, Estel Ferguson, John Flynn, Sam F. Fopay, C . Fred Garrison, \ .:Villiam E. Green, Milton E. Hamilton, James W. Harmon, James Harper, Leonard Harvey, Ray Hicks, Glenn M . Hill, Double E. Hodges, Vernon House, Samuel L. Honsinger, Earl Ingersol, Robert H. Ingle, Roy Johnson, Marvin Johnson, William Keene, R. W .

Kromer, John Lambdin, J. C. Lewis, Clark H. Lytle, Glen E . Macrory, Harry Macrory, Paul Martindale, Weldon L. Meredith, Haskel Meredith, Herschel A. Messer, Don Messer, James Miller, Adolph Miller, Frank Minor, Thaine Moore, Paul McGill, William H . Parrish, Herman Parrish, Milton Pate, Conley Paylor, A. M ., Jr. Pearsall, Paul W . Peterson, Marvin Rhodes, Virgil Rhodes, Woody Rice, Paul Riggs, Donald Roberts, John Ed. Sanford, Luther Scudday, \.:Varren Schuneman, Donald E. Sharp, Major E. Shellenberger, Elmer B. Shepherd, Doyle M . Sherrill, Hershel

Shilling, Delton Short, James Simpson, Roy Sullivan, Alfred Taylor, Charles Ed. Theus, E. G., Jr. Theus, Harold C. Transue, Earl W. Treader, Maynard Toepfer, E. L. Thompson, James L. Wann, Claude W. Wiman, Cecil H. Wilson, Royce Wright, Vernon NAVY Armstrong, Kenneth Atkins, Gene L. Beresford, Daniel B. Bishop, Joe B. Bowman, Ray Browning, Charles Joe Brazeal, Maynard Brecheisen, C. B.

Cleveland, Jess Corlett, J. P. Cozby, David B. Creech, Harris Fauss, Darwin C . Fauss, Ed. Jr. Gillespie, James Graham, Calvin Hale, John Hamilton, James Harper, John W. Hodges, Donald Horger, J. C. Knight, ~arselle Messer, Joe E. Motsenbocker, Othel Munn, Luke E. McNamara, 0. H. McNeilly, Robert W. Owens, Charles 0. Phillips, Robert E. Purdy, Elgin W . Snowbarger, W. E. Swann, Wallace Taylor, Charles T.

Vaughn, Fred Wessels, Dean H. West, Willard H. Wiegman, Floyd M . Wilson, Warren Kenneth Yarbrough, Daniel James MARINES Canaday, Reese H. Dodson, Milton A. Foreman, James Stroman, David H. MERCHANT MARINES Hill, Harold Ronnekamp, George B. Van Arsdel, Roy C. COAST GUARDS Atteberry, Alton WAAC Hoyt, Harriet Miller, Audrey C . CADET NURSE Arnold, Barbara Frederick, Civilla Roeber, Johnnie

B. P. C.'s EX-SERVICEMEN: (First row) Simmons, Bynum, V. Phelps, Baldwin, Martindale, Bruce, Lee. (Second row ) Peterson, Shrefller, Johnson, Cotton, Milburn, V. Ledbetter, Bonnett, Horn, Makes Cry. (Third row) Mansveld, Newcomb, Guy, Cantrell, Largo, Munn . (Fourth row ) Harper, Carden, Lemmons, Loughridge, Kemendo, McGill, Bebout. (Fifth row) B. Scroggins, Cargill, Pollard, Massey, Martin, Walker, 0. Baldwin. (Sixth row) Conrad, J. Coale, Baker, Brazelton, Fulton. (Seventh row) Lynch, Little, Bean, Smith, Crawford, Burdue, Phelps. (Eighth row) Bowman, Miller, 0. Riggs, D . Hall, Wessels, Shellenberger, Davenport. (Ninth row) Lawrence, Burton, Hollingsworth, H. L. Green, M. Parrish, Newberry.

9

Dr. C. A. McConnell, Dean Emeritus of Religion, was a confirmed atheist until he was thirty-five. Today he is "the grand old man of Bethany-Peniel College." For fifty years Dr. McConnell lent his talents to journalism. During this time he established a religious paper which later became the "Herald of Holiness." Dr. McConnell's autobiography has been published only this year- the seventh book he has written. The Church of the Nazarene has found in him one of its most faithful laymen. Not only was he one of the charter members of the Church, but he was one of the seven men who met to establish Peniel College. At the age of fifty-seven Dr. McConnell accepted a professorship in Bethany-Peniel College. For twenty-five years he helped to mold the lives of Nazarene youth. He taught religion, English, history, and logic. Professor Dobson, Miss Lundy, arid Mrs. Lundy were English students of his; he taught Professor Floy9 history, and Professors McClung, Snowbarger, and Shannon were in his classes of religion . More than twenty Nazarene chaplains in the recent war had Dr. McConnell for a professor.

. . . Sunday School teacher . .. faithful laxman

Dr. McConnell has been a member of every General Assembly of the Church of the Nazarene. For a number of years he was a member of the General Board and served as Chairman of the Department of Foreign Missions. Even though he has passed his eighty-fifth birthday, Dr. McConnell is still active in Christian service as Sunday School teacher of the largest class in the local church a:nd treasurer of the Western Oklahoma District. The students and faculty affectionately call him "Uncle Charlie.:' Wherever students of his day an<1 today are found, the influence of our beloved friend is calling men to Christ. As long as BethanyPeniel College shall last, the name of Dr. C. A. McConnell will have a prominent place on its roll of honor.

. . . friend of youth

10

DR. C. A. McCONNELL, Dean Emeritus of Religion

ll

ARROW

12

CONTENTS BOOK ONE-LEADERS IN DEVELOPMENT BOOK TWo-MENTAL DEVELOPMENT BOOK THREE-PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT BOOK FOUR-SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT BOOK FIVE-cULTURAL DEVELOPMENT BOOK SIX-DEVELOPING GOODWILL

1-3

BOOK ONE 14

o{nJ }esus LncreaseJ Ln wLsJom anJ stature, anJ in favor with QoJ anJ man.

Preparation of youth for life in Christ-that is the highest earthly task. In the training of growing persons for fellowship with God, for the achievement of Christlike character, and for a life of exalted and sacrificial service, our Christian teachers must be "taught of God" through a victorious faith in Jesus Christ. As teachers they finj:} their rich reward in their obedience to the Great Teacher. Our leaders are men and women who have the ability to assemble and guide and con~rol groups for the achievement of definite objectives. In dealing -with Christian education, our leaders organize the work; classify and emphasize the aims or goals that should be sought; outline the methods that should be used; plan and carry forward the curricular agencies; teach and direct the classes; cooperate with other leaders; and secure united and progressive effort in all departments of the educational enterprise. Following humbly in the footsteps of the Great Leader and Commander of our most holy faith, our leaders govern with strength and graciousness, and guide.with wisdom. The divine service and the sacred privilege of Christian religious education find here their inspiring initiative and their s_ublime culumination.

LEADERS IN

DEVELOPMEN T

16

BOARD OF TRUSTI:I:S Bethany-Peniel College is governed by a Board of Trustees elected by the ten districts of the West-Central Educational Zone. Although this group is seen en masse only once each year by the student body, yet it would be impossible for any student to fail to sense their great concern for the spiritual and material welfare 路of the college. It is these men who have labored diligently to find the best administrative officials and faculty members possible to give the necessary Christian leadership to our Nazarene young people. One of the most recent actions of the Board has been the authorization of the $300,000 expansion program that will add six new buildings to the present campus. The outstanding manner in which these men have encouraged their home districts to meet their apportionment of this great program has been ample demonstration of their sincerity of purpose and resolve to give Bethany-Peniel College students the best in Christian education. A look at the personnel of the Board of Trustees reveals some interesting facts. Seventeen of the members are Alumni of this College. Four members, B. F , Neeley, G. M . Akin, J. F . Roberts, and W . A. Carter, have served on the Board for twenty years or more. The senior member is B. F. Neeley, who was first elected in 1908. Rev. W. A. Carter is completing his fourth year as chairman of the Board. He has been a pastor and superintend ent on this Educational Zone for twenty-five years, and a director of the college since 1926.

Rev. W . A. Carter, Chairman

(Fir~t row) Finch, McGraw, Carter, Taylor. (Second row) Williams, Garrett, Hance, Ogden, Hayes. (Third row) Donaldson, Kelley, Akin, French, Turner, Zacharey. (Fourth row) Smith, B. M. Hall, Stockton, Reed, Neeley. (Fifth row) Williamson, Aycock, W alker, Collar, Parks. (Sixth row ) H. Hall, Thomas, Wood, Diffey, Snowbarger. (Seventh row ) Johnson, Brown, Short, Roberts. (Eighth row ) Fisher, Dodd.

17

DR. 0. J. FINCI-I, President Behind every worthwhile endeavor there is always a man and a vision. On Bethany-Peniel College .campus Dr. 0. J. Finch is that man. With his leadership the College is making rapid strides in increased usefulness through a $300,000 Expansion Program, the development of a thorough and effective curriculum, and a more fervent spiritual emphasis. Having been born in a log cabin in Ohio, and having enjoyed the rigor of the homestead life of Nebraska, Dr. Finch journeyed to Illinois and then to California to gain his education. He graduated from Pasadena College with both an A. B. and B. D. degree. At Pasadena he served the student body as President of the Student Council and editor of the La Sierra-student year-book. In 1941 B.P.C. conferred on him the Doctor of Divinity degree and in 1945 he was elected to the Who's Who of America . Dr. Finch has served the Church of the Nazarene, which he joined when there were only 16,000 members, in a number of important positions. Following pastorates in the First Churches of Grand Rapids and Lansing, Michigan, and Wichita, Kansas, he was elected to the Superintendency of the Kansas District. He has served on the Boards of Trustees of Olivet, Bresee, and Bethany-Peniel Colleges, and for four years was a member of the General N.Y.P.S. Council. Dr. Finch's hobby, photography, is a source of great enjoyment to him and in turn has made possible the kodachrome photography in this ARROW. Although he has been our President for only two years, we feel that he is really one of us. He joins in our work and our fun, our joys and our sorrows. As President Finch leads on to greater mental, physical, spiritual, and cultural development Bethany Peniel College marches ahead!

18

19

FACULTY ·Students and faculty alike agree that PROFESSOR E. C. HALL Dean of Student Life, is the "man for the job." In spite of the fact that he has handled this unsavory job for six years, he is one of the most popular profs on the campus. He can say, "No," and make you like it. The Science and Education Departments claim all of his teaching . time. However, his classes, sprinkled gen· erously with the student's every day problems, keep his life from becoming routine. "Extra-curricular activities," such as Mayor of Bethany, Secretary of the Western Oklahoma District Advisory Board, and teacher of the Junior-Senior Sunday School class, keep him from having too many idle hours.

A Texan by birth and heritage, MRS. CAROL LUNDY has an outstanding frankness found lacking in most Texans-she admits that there are other states in the union. She received her M.A. in English from the University of Texas and is now working on her M.A. in Speech at the University of Oklahoma. She has taught at B.P.C. for seven years. Her three children, her hobby, fill most of her leisure time. In her idle moments, however, she loves to read books of poetry, to travel, and to write short-stories, some of which have been published. Mrs. Lundy interprets poetry with a characteristic uniqueness. She has clever ideas, is charming, and is a lovely person to know.

With his many achievements, his innumerable capabilities, DR. WILSON LADUE gives a never-ending contribution of brilliant mind and fine judgment to our College. His duties as professor of French and Spanish do not limit his extra-curricular life. He loves to occupy his leisure moments with gardening, photography, good classical music, and reading. One of •his chief delights is his family. B.P.C. is honored to have on its faculty Dr. LaDue, who belongs to Phi Kappa Epsilon and is recognized in "Who's Who in Chicago and Illinois," and "Who's Who of American Scholars." He is editor of "A Bible Scholar in Bible Lands."

20

FACULTY PROFESSOR W. HARPER WELCH, one of the new-comers, says, "You can't accomplish anything by wishful thinking!" Aside from teaching the theology classes and debate, preaching on week-ends, sponsoring the Junior Class, giving direction to the Young Married People's Sunday School Class as its president, and playing ping pong in the "Drag," Prof. Welch has nothing to do but enjoy his family, and fly, or golf, when he gets the chance. He has inherited a catchy sense of humor and an intense sincerity and feeling for religious implications from his revered grandfather-"Uncle Bud" Robinson. A scholar in his own right, Prof. Welch is a member of Phi Epsilon Theta.

MRS. ALICE CRILL says that she can "sympathize" with Bethany collegians, for she too had Dr. and Mrs. LaDue and Prof. Spalding as instructors. While attending Greenville College, Mrs. Crill edited the yearbook, and won the sportsmanship award all four years. She graduated with majors in music and education. On B.P.C. campus she is one of the favorites in the classroom as well as in extra-curricular activities. With her husband she has been co-sponsor of the Class of '48 for the past two years. Her piano students are always prepared for her frequent question, "Well, how's the practice this week?" However, they are convinced that she is really not so "tough" when they see her on the ball diamond supervising the Girls' Athletics.

In his first year on the campus, PROFESSOR JACK MOORE has distinguished himself as a teacher of philosophy, member of the Administrative Council, and sponsor of the Revielle Echo. Starting out life as a citizen of Danville, Illinois, Prof. Moore received his education in Canada, Massachusetts, Illinois, and North Carolina. In May of 1946, the Divinity School of Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, will confer on him the degree of Bachelor of Divinity. Before taking up the duties of a professor, Mr. Moore served capably in pastorates in Lawrenceville, Illinois; Bennettsville, South Carolina; and Greensboro and

Raleigh, North Carolina.

21

FACULTY Having found that her husband and her four daughters -her "Little Women" - did not take all of her time, MRS. RUTH TAYLOR has taught private piano lessons for the past fifteen years. Her charming personality and genuine interest in others has made her a favorite in any group of which she is a member. Aside from her teaching, she gives valuable leadership in such religious circles as: Sunday School teacher, First Vice-President of the Western Oklahoma District W.F.M .S., and President of local Business and Professional Women's Chapter of the W.F.M.S. She is assistant organist of the College Church and for five years has been organist for the Merritt Funeral Home.

Acting Dean of Liberal Arts this year has been PROFESSOR C. HAROLD RIPPER. His wife claims that he is slow-never in a hurry; he has not been slow, however, in gaining prominent recognition on the campus in the tour years of his professorship. At present he holds membership in the Pi Gamma Mu, Honor Society in Social Science, and in the Oklahoma Academy of Science. His main field of teaching is psychology, but he also instructs the Christian Doctrine classes. He has an aversion to onions, but he will eat them when he can not gracefully refuse. The Student Council has found in him a very enthusiastic and inspiring sponsor. Whether at a chess board, in the City Council, on the street corner, or in the classroom, Prof. Ripper is a favorite.

To know MISS ALICE LEWIS is to love her. She began her vocal career in 1915 by taking private voice lessons in Chicago. From 1916 to 1942, she was a member of the nationally known Aeolian and Edward's quartets. Following a tragic automobile accident in the latter year, which caused the disbanding of the . quartet, Miss Lewis became Director of Music at First Church in Hutchinson, Kansas. Since coming to B.P.C. in October, 1944, she has directed various vocal groups and taught private voice lessons. She is also very active in the local church work, directing the Junior Church, teaching a Freshman Sunday School Class, and singing in church services and revivals. In each detail of her busy, useful life she is truly Christlike.

22

FACULTY MRS. ELIZABETH WILLIS, a native of Cherokee County, Texas, attended Bethany-Peniel Academy and later received her B. A. degree from B.P.C . and her degree in Library Science from the University of Oklahoma. After eight years as librarian in the Amarillo Public Library and three in Ada, Mrs. Willis was selected by the administration to supervise the College library. Besides her duties as librarian, she is treasurer of the Bethany Church of the Nazarene and the Oklahoma Library Association. She has made many friends here because of her ability to get along with everyone. You may recognize her by her "little girl smile."

One of the most popular members of the faculty is our typical "man about town," PROFESSOR CHESTER C. CRILL-Dean of Fine Arts and teacher of private voice lessons. Each year he conducts the mass Christmas Chorus and directs the A Cappella Choir. His students say that the funny faces he makes in directing give them added inspiration to sing. As co-sponsor with Mrs . Crill of the Sophomore Class, his aptitude for getting things accomplished in an ever cheerful manner forms a pattern his students desire to follow. Professor Crill's outstanding ability has recently been given unusual recognition by his being selected to membership in the National Association of Teachers of Singing, in which there are only 150 members in the United States.

MRS MYRTLE THOMPSON GREER began teaching in the Home Economics Department as instructor of Color and Design, in the spring of 1945. Her artistic ability, however, is not present -just in her classwork, but carries over into home-life. Every meal is brightened by a clever centerpiece of "various and sundry things." In class, as well as at home, she is frequently heard to say, "The way to get things done is ... " Mrs. Greer is active in religious work. On Sundays she faithfully 路fills her place in the local church choir. _She is also Chairman of the Distric.t Committee of the Western Oklahoma Y.W .F .M .S.

23

FACULTY A cherry, "Howdy, brethren," in a marked southern drawl will greet you as you enter the office of the "man from Georgia" -PROFESSOR FRED FLOYD. In his classroom you will be sure to hear about the "continuity of history" and the "five types of personality." You witl find him to be vitally interested in the religious organizations of the campus-especially the Prayer and Fasting League of which he is sponsor. His "coast-to-coast" education, consisting of a B.S.E. degree from Mercer University in Georgia; an A.B . from Pasadena College, California; and a B.D . from Vanderbuilt University, Tennessee, enables him amply to qualify as Chairman of the H istory Department.

Although MISS MARIANA SEARS was born in Bethany, she went to Tulsa University for her college work. D uri~g her undergraduate days, she taught piano lessons on the side, and was president of Sigma Alpha Iotawomen's professional music organization. Her teaching activities at B.P.C . combine a generous portion of private piano lessons and English classes. One of her favorite pastimes is writing birthday jingles for members of her family, but she doesn't show them to anyone. She also has an intense interest in photography -when she can find the time and equipment. Being a very industrious person, Miss Sears plans to add an A. B. degree in English to her intellectual accomplishments.

PROFESSOR D . R. DANSKIN, Chairman of the Commercial Department, is especially fond of chocolate, calls his wife "Bird," feasts on the news, prefers making out plans for his classes to eating, and tries to grow hair on the top of his head- without much success. Having inherited a "business-turn" from his storekeeper father, Prof. Danskin has continued his interest in figures through years in State Colleges in Nebraska, and for more than a decade of teaching in Nebraska, Kansas, and Oklahoma. Everywhere he has been he has contributed to the leadership of the local religious institutions. At present he is Treasurer of the Bethany Navigators Society.

24

FACULTY REV. W. D . McGRAW, JR., Business Manager and Christian gentleman, is known best on the campus for his pleasanat smile and graceful knack of saying, "Money please!" Following a number of years in the ministry of the Church of the Nazarene as both pastor and district superintendent, Rev. McGraw was elected to his present position in February of 1945 . The Senior Class has expressed its sincere regard for the ''man of ten thousand jokes" by electing him as its sponsor. It has found in him one who is kind and considerate and an inspiration in all of the varying activities of a graduating class.

MRS. MARY FLICK, a home-town girl who made good, teaches in the piano department, likes to feed people -especially her husband-, enjoys gardening, prefers to play duets with Willis, and appreciates an opportunity to take care of little "kiddies." Following her graduation from B.P.C. with a B.F.A. degree in 1940, Mrs. Flick taught music in the public schools in Spencer and Ringling, Oklahoma, for four years. In 1945, during the commencement season, she was married to Mr. Willis' Flick, who at that time was an orchestra leader in the Navy. Mrs. Flick started taking piano lessons when she was only seven years old. Her interest in music increased to the extent that many times her mother would have to make her stop practicing.

Having been influenced by his older sister to follow a musical career, PROFESSOR DUANE SMITH began studying "do, re, me, fa, sol," in high school. Later he was privileged to study voice under the private tutorage of three outstanding men: George A. Murphy, noted author and opera singer in Grand Rapids, Michigan; D. A. Clippinger, author of numerous textbooks and former President of the Chicago Council of Teachers of Singing; and Stanley Baughman, dean of Michigan organists. Following ten years of voice teaching in Grand Rapids, concert and radio work (he was a research engineer during the war), Mr. Smith came to B.P.C . last fall to super-

vise the men's singing groups and give private lessons.

25

FACULTY After having served the Church of the Nazarene as missionary to Japan; Assistant General Secretary, Department of Church Schools, and Director of Leadership Training; as missionary to Peru; and as pastor, REV. C . H. WIMAN returned to Bethany to become registrar of our College. Last year he received recognition in "Who's Who of Religion" for his outstanding service. Professor Wiman, connoisseur of Spanish foods, mixes a dry humor, hot pepper, tortillas, American cheerfulness, and Peruvian hand-work to make many delightful entertainments for students and friends. His home reflects a Japanese neatness, a South American friendliness, and an all-American hospitality.

Having started her public career at the age of twelve by playing the piano for a revival meeting in San Antonio, Texas, MRS. WILLO MAY BERESFORD is continuing her interest in music by completing her sixth year as music instructor at B.P.C. When she does not have the opportunity to play the works of Chopin and Beethoven, she prefers to work crossword puzzles. In 1938 she climaxed a very successful "romance by correspondence" by marrying a B.P.C . alumnus, Dan Beresford, who entered the Navy in 1942. When the duties of taking care of her young son, Kenneth Wayne, decrease, she plans to start a collection of recordings.

PROFESSOR RAYMOND McCLUNG won the hearts of the Frosh, whom he sponsors, on initiation day by participating in all of the unpleasantries dished out by the important sophomores. His teaching duties ate divided between the English and Speech Departments. While attending B.P.C. in his under-graduate days, Prof. McClung worked in the library and edited the ARROW. His favorite sports are hunting, fishing, and tennis. He is an ordained minister, and previous to returning to his Alma Mater, he served as pastor of the First Church of the Nazarene in Fort Worth, Texas. On Sundays he takes opportunity to preach in neighboring churches and directs the Navigators Society in Bethany.

26

FACULTY Last September MRS . MARY WATSON LADUE came to our campus and immediately won a place in the hearts of her students with her bright, sincere smile. The members of the Sophomore Sunday School Class, of which Mrs. LaDue is co-teacher with her husband, are always thrilled to be invited to the LaDue home for an evening of culture. One who knocks on her door at opportune moments sees the entire LaDue family studying around the table; or sees Mrs. LaDue on another of those "dates" with Dr. LaDue-having candle-light tea in old English style. Mrs. LaDue knows how to make the common happenings of life surprisingly colorful events.

PROFESSOR WAYNE THORNE, the new band in: structor and the highly esteemed sponsor of the 1946 ARROW, rightfully deserves his title, "The King of the Trombone." Early in life his musical talents became evident, and in high school he directed the school band. However, Prof is not a "one-talent man." Preaching is one of his main interests. Churches over the Educational Zone have learned to love and appreciate his ministry in week-end meetings and youth conventions. "Singspirations" are his specialty. His vibrant personality and consecrated life have endeared him to all who know him.

The Class of '45 is honored to have one of its number, MISS GOLDIE PHILLIPS, on the faculty this year. After receiving her A.B. degree from Southwestern Louisiana Institute-with honors, she came to B.P.C. where she received her Th. B. last summer-with honors. Besides her duties of teaching the special students English, history, and theology, she has served as a member of the Faculty Committee on Social and Extra-Curricular activities. It seems that she has threatened several times to start a column in a newspaper giving advice on "love affairs." Although she is generally very modest, she likes to have her picture taken . Her only aversion is having to

live on the third story of a building.

27

FACULTY PROFESSOR BOYD SHANNON, Chemistry instructor, was the first to receive an A.B. degree in Chemistry at B.P.C. Following his graduation in 1932, he had a very successful career as a commercial chemist. As a result of a definite call to Christian service received two years ago, Mr. Shannon resigned his position as General Superintendent of the Rock Island Refinery in Indianapolis, Indiana, and came to the campus as professor in the fall of 1945. While teaching at Mangum, Oklahoma, he received distinction by coaching the girls' basketball team, which won the State Championship. Sunday School work is his hobby. He preached his first sermon at a "Youth for Christ" rally in Indianapolis.

Early in the morning or late at night are the most ideal times for practice according to the opinion of MISS IVALEE BOLERJACK, piano instructor. Although offered a scholarship to the Kansas City Conservatory of Music while in her senior year of high school, Miss Bolerjack preferred to make B.P.C. her Alma Mater, and she received her B.F.A. degree in 194 3. She received her Master's Degree in piano, with a minor in organ, from the University of Oklahoma in the spring of 1945. Miss Bolerjack's extra-curricular interests include the strenuous activities of bicycling, playing tennis, and rowing, as well as the more quiet pastimes of crocheting and reading.

One of the most interesting characters on the campus is PROFESSOR WAYNE SPALDING, Chairman of the Piano Department. Following two years study in France and Germany, Prof gave recitals in Munich and Paris. Returning to America, he received Master degrees in both music and language. Prof. Spalding is one of the faculty favorites. His superb playing has gained recognition through his appearances with the Oklahoma Symphony Orchestra and his solo work on the campus. Volumes of applause greet his every appearance. When any one needs some one to "tickle the ivories" Prof. Spalding is the man. Not only is he an ardent follower of music, but Prof.

Spalding is an enthusiastic sports fan . His appreciation of quality in all fields is an inspiration to his many admirers.

28

FACULTY The "mathematical mind" and the teacher of "problem students" is PROFESSOR E. V. GREER. In 1934 the University of Illinois conferred on him the M.A. degree, and he is continuing his graduate work there. Besides expounding daily on the intricacies of college geometry, "trig," al~ebra, and calculus, he manages to find time for a five-hour course in zoology each semester. Strangely enough, Prof's secondary interest, aside from playing pranks, is music. He is an accomplished pianist, a violinist, and a member of the church choir and men's octet. Since Prof is a member of the Bethany Fire Department, his classes may expect him to disappear suddenly, even in the middle of a sentence, if the fire alarm blows during class.

MRS. MARGARET DUNN ... a Kansan, and proud of it . .. a Republican, because her father is ... a collector of elephants; she has over one hundred to date. Although being a house-wife is her main interest, Mrs. Dunn finds time to devote to her favorite subject, music. Her duties on the campus are teaching private piano lessons and playing for special religious services. She says that her most enjoyable experiences are those in which she accompanies her husband in evangelistic meetings. Mrs. Dunn's teaching experience has been varied. In 1940 and '41 she directed the Junior Choir in the local church; from 1942 to '43 she taught music at the high school, and since 1942 she has added her bit to the college fine arts department.

The Athletic Director of B.P .C. is PROFESSOR VERNON A. SNOWBARGER. His untiring efforts in promoting the sports program and in building the prestige of the Redskins have greatly emphasized the importance of physical development on the campus. He also teaches courses in Social Science and Mathematics. An active member of the church, he is General President of the Bethany N.Y.P .S. Prof. Snowbarger's ability to keep up with all of these activities may be credited to his quick actions and. brisk walk. We agree with Mrs. Snowbarger when she says, "He's a wonderful man!"

29

FACULTY "I路 have come to tell you ... " Yes, meet DR. C. B. STRANG ... college pastor, Post Chaplain of the Putnam City American Legion, member of the General Board of the Church of the Nazarene, Trustee of B.P.C. He is also listed in "Who's Who." Nazarenes everywhere know him as the author of "Meeting Life's Situations" and the editor of the Young People's Department of the Sunday School Quarterlies. But the people of Bethany appreciate him particularly for his rich messages. On the campus and in his classes of Major Prophets and The Life of Paul, his sense of humor, his friendliness and optimism make all students feel that he is their own individual "parson."

MISS RUTH FESS, Acting Chairman of the English Department, graduated from college as valedictorian of her class, with majors in both English and Greek. There is "never a dull moment" in any of her classes, because she has a new method for each session, making it novel and colorful. When visiting in the cozy apartment of Miss Fess, one is introduced to "Hansel," "Gretel," "Aunt Phoebe," and "The Bookworm" which are a few of her rare collection of pictures. She adds lustre to campus banquets and dinners with her decorations of beautiful Old English lettering. The Honor Society expressed its respect for her interest in high scholarship, by choosing her as sponsor for the year.

MEDIC CAPTAIN LESTER DUNN rejoined the B.P .C. faculty in February after three years of service with the Army Medical Corps, thirteen months of which was spent overseas. Having been attached to the 99th regiment as commanding officer of a collecting company, Captain Dunn participated in the Battle of the Bulge. The last six months of his overseas service was spent in the vicinity of the world-famed city of Nurenberg, where he studied voice four months with Alex Miltschinoff, leading German Opera singer. B垄fore entering the armed service, Mr. Dunn was principal of Bethany high school and also a professor of voice here in the college. When you think of Dunn, you think of the army, singing, and sports.

30

FACULTY For the latest word on etiquette see MISS EURELA BROWN-the campus "Emily Post." Everyone enjoys being invited to the Home Ec "coffee room," because something good is sure to be served. As head of the Home Economics Department, she gives her students plenty of opportunities for practical experience in working out classroom theories. Miss Brown has many interests. Before coming to Bethany she had time for participation in horseback riding, golfing, swimming, and tennis. While in Springfield, Missouri, she was director of the Junior Art Museum. Her hobbies "dre collecting antique furniture (most of it is in the attics of various friends) and glassware.

We have missed PROFESSOR WILLIS B. DOBSON, who has been on a leave of absence at the University of Texas where he is working on his Ph. D. degree. Not only is Professor Dobson a favorite of the College, but he has contributed greatly to the town and church work through his activities with the Boy Scouts and his supervision of the Intermediate Department of the Sunday School. He is an accomplished pianist and an unusually well-informed and widely-read person . With him in Texas is his wife, Mrs. Naomi Dobson, a former teacher of Voice in the College, and Billy, their best and only child. Professor Dobson has taught here longer than any other faculty member, which makes us feel that, whether here or away, he belongs to us.

Canada's "good-will ambassador" to B.P.C . campus is MISS ELIZABETH NELSON, sponsor and director of the Treble Choir, teacher of private voice and church music classes. Her education inch.1des diploma in voice from Canadian Nazarene College, studies under Dr. Henry of the Henry School of Music in Saskatchewan, Canada, an A.B. degree from Northwestern Nazarene College, and an M. A. degree from Boston University. Miss Nelson's love of music, zest for life, enjoyment of association with people, and her voice which is a combination of rich contralto and soprano, make her a favorite among the students.

31

CAMPUS FRIENDS There are always a few indispensable persons on every college campus. At B.P.C. Mrs. Katie Drewry (top), Mrs. Mary Sears (center), Mr. and Mrs. Paul Simpson (lower left), and Mrs. Nettie Bracken (lower right) claim that distinction. It is

their responsibility to make an enjoyable "home-life" for the dorm students and to satisfy the ravenous appetites of 250 stpdents daily. In her "early days" MRS. MARY SEARS was a "natural" at teaching school. Having gained much practical experience in raising her own four children-two professors of B.P.C., and a Nazarene pastor, Mrs. Sears is today successfully filling the place of "mother" in the lives of hundreds of girls on the campus. With the advent of the new girls' dormitory unit this year, there was need for an additional girls' counselor. MRS. NETTIE BRACKEN, who spent a number of years as schoolteacher, business woman, and pastor's wife, was chosen to direct this new venture. She likes young people, but it troubles her that she is getting "old." Although the problems would tend to be greater than ever for the Perceptor of the boys' "dorm" by having the fellows scattered in different houses around the campus, MR. PAUL SIMPSON has gone quietly about his duties and has provided a happy "home-life" for the boys. He has taken an active part in basketball and softball and gained membership in the Honor Society for three semesters. The "captain of the college mess-hall," better known as MRS. KATIE DREWRY, graduated from the Arkansas State Teacher's College with a major in mathematics. After teaching for five years, she traveled with her husband-a piano tuner and collected the "best recipes" from the chefs of the hotels in which she lived. Today she is trying out those favorite recipes on the Bethany "dining hall gang."

32

OFFICE ASSISTANTS Some "poor, misinformed people" think that the officials keep the school ticking. No-the official's assistants "run the college." Let us introduce them to you. Your college career starts in the Registrar's office where you will meet MRS. LEONA McCONNELL, returned missionary, who has served faithfully for three years. She, with her helpers, records grades, handles registration files, works out class schedules, and prepares transcripts. In the business office the radiant smiles of MISS FLORENCE LUNDY and MRS. ROXIE ANN WESSELS make you feel at ease. These ladies are always ready to help you with your financial problems, and they are happy to "take" your money. Miss Lundy's tenure of service has been nineteen years. A very important personage is MISS BERNICE DAWSON, the secretary to our esteemed President. Her main duties are the handling of Dr. Finch's correspondence and keeping his appointments straight. Throughout the entire Administrative Building you will find countless secretaries and assistants who keep the professors straight. They are doing a magnificent job.

ASSISTANTS AND SECRETARIES: (first row) Barbara Human, Dorothy King, Martha Hieronymus, Velma Reed. (second row ) Helen Faye Moore. Darlene Norris, Reba West, Peggy Bohannon, Mary Lou Langford . (Third row ) Earleen Johnson, Nova Baker, Loretta Oakes, Irene Baldwin, Geraldine Sutton , George Moore. (Fourth row) Genevieve Wilson, Juanita Baker, Yvonne \Vallace, Esther Steele, Virginia Moore.

Top left : Miss Bernice Dawson Top right: Mrs. Leona McConnell Center: Miss Florence Lundy Bottom: Mrs. Roxie Ann Wessels

33

THE STUDENT COUNCIL PRESIDENT for the school year 1945-46 has been Mr. Don Beaver. After coming to B.P.C. in the spring of 194 3, he early won recognition by being elected Secretary of the Sophomore Class the following fall. During that year the President of his class resigned and Don was elected to succeed him . In his Junior year he served as Vice-President of the Student Council and in his Seni-or year he has taken over the gavel. Don is a champion of democratic student government and feels that the Student Council should represent the entire student body in its program. He has sought to encourage the closest cooperation between the students and the faculty. To further demonstrate the breadth of his vision, Don has endeavored to make the student body program contribute to the fullest extent in developing a well-rounded, four-fold life. Mr. Don Beaver, the students of Bethany-Peniel College salute you!

34

Carl lngersol, STUDENT DIRECTOR OF RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES, has led the student body to a greater participation than ever before in the campus religious organizations . The high type of leadership given by Carl this year is a culmination of a number of years of Christian service. Converted at the age of seven, he was called to preach in October of 1942 and enrolled in B.P.C. the following year. In his home church at Stillwater, Oklahoma, he began his religious activities as Sunday School teacher, President of the Hi-N.Y., and member of the Church Board. Since coming to Bethany he has served as President of the Gospel Team, Vice-President of the Prayer and Fasting League, and student pastor at W ynnewood, Oklahoma . A fervent spiritual atmosphere among the students, and a vital interest in the religious organizations stand as a worthy tribute of the success of Carl's work this year.

35

STUDENT GOVERNMENT The student government of Bethany-Peniel College is centered in a Student Council consisting of a President, Vice~President, Secretary-Treasurer, Student Director of Religious Activities, and one representative from each of the four classes. This year the respective members of the Council have been: Don Beaver, Jim Hamilton, Joy Beaver, Carl Ingersol, Helen Faye Moore (Senior), Delene Stockton (Junior), Ted Hollingsworth (Sophomore), and Norman Howerton (Freshman). Prof. C. H. Ripper has been the sponsor. The activities sponsored by the Student Council have been varied and intensely interesting. During the first week of the fall term the new Student Handbooks and the student activity cards were issued at the Council Booth in the Administration Building. The All-School Get-together was on the first Friday evening. Much excitement was generated by comic numbers presented by both faculty members and students. Of course, there was the traditional solo by Prof. Crill-"The Green-eyed Dragon," and the suit-case race. In October Clean-up Day was observed with plenty of good, hard work. When dinner time arrived, the campus had received a real face-lifting. The fencing around the tennis court was given a coat of silver paint, windows in all of the buildings were washed, the parkway along the new College Street pavement was smoothed down, and the leaves were raked up and given a wheelbarrow ride to the incinerator. The night sleep came easy! The Annual Christmas Party had a particularly new feature -Prof. Wayne Thorne was Santa Claus. Before passing out the many exchange gifts, Santa brought gales of laughter from thefrolicking students by taking Jim Hamilton on his lap and asking him if he "had been a good boy this year." Everyone went home to enjoy a happy vacation-everyone but Don Beaver. Don sent

JIM HAMILTON, Vice-President JOY BEAVER, Secretary-Treasurer

REPRESENTATIVES: Norman Howerton , Helen Faye Moore, Del<: ne Stockton, Ted Hollingsworth.

PROF. C. H. RIPPER, SPONSOR

the Santa Claus suit home to its owner in Oklahoma City, but it didn't get there. Someone stole the suit! However, a small boy found it discarded in a near-by alley, and his mother, having read of the incident in the newspaper, notified Don in time for him to enjoy the New Year. During the early spring months several Lyceum numbers were given. On February 22 Rev. Claude A. Beesley gave an interesting "travelogue through New Mexico." His subject was "The American Nile." Rev. Beesley is Rector of the Church of the Good Shepherd at Wichita Falls, Texas. In March the Little Symphony of Oklahoma City gave a very profitable concert. One of the most captivating, although new, features of the year was the World Student Service Fund Drive. This project is for the purpose of contributing to the receducation of the youth of the war-torn countries. Elton Wood was selected to direct the Drive and was assisted by Jim Hamilton from the Student Council. A well-planned program was arranged and amid much enthusiasm the project went over with a great success. With the coming of peace to the world, the Council sought in choosing a gift for the College to pay tribute to the war heroes and at the same time to point to greater days ahead. Therefore, two gifts have been selected-a memorial plaque honoring the five B.P.C. men who paid the supreme price, and a sound-silent movie projector and screen which will be used exclusively for visual education purposes. The bronze plaque is 18"x24" and will bear the names and pictures . of: Reginald Carter, Robert Hicks, Marvin Stockett, Robert Corley, and Carl Newsome. The work of the Student Council has been very successful, and its high type of leadership is appreciated by everyone.

搂TUD'1Sl'\\':,.~s KL:I: D ~N Ac:路;cy \VL~RLD \\11\K ~! ~-----

1' l_L._

_1,_'--

Victor Allessandro, Symphony director The sound路silent movie projector. Dr. C . A. Beesley, lecturer T he Bronze Memorial Plaque (artist's drawing ) .

:.=:TUJ:lENT COU:.fCL !9-1:':- -k .路)

37

BOOK TWO

Dim library corners and tallow-drops from the midnight light ... the noise of many typewriters, rattle of old bones, the rise and fall of dramatic tones ... lines of figures that dwindle to pluses, zeroes, minuses . , . There are the surface ramifications of a student's college career. But beneath the maze of term papers, vocabulary cards, and semester exams is a purpose. The scientist, the minister, the missionary-physician, the wise, the good, and the great often are concealed in the plebeian and may only be discovered by a proper education. Learning is the apprenticeship of life. But the student is to be educated not only because he is to make shoes, hammer nails, draw blueprints, and guide the tractor, but because he should know the laws of God in nature and revelation that he may fashion his affections and will in harmony with those laws.

MENTAL DEVELOPMENT 40

FRESI-IMAN CLASS The largest Freshmen class ever to glorify the BethanyPeniel College campus, was initiated into college life in the fall of 1945. They came as the first peacetime class in Four Years. Much of the increased enrollment is due to the large number of returned servicemen who have started back to school under the G. I. Bill of Rights. The freshmen are happy over many things; first, that they emerged from the sophomore initiation completely unharmed but infinitely wiser; second, that they are the largest class in the history of the school; and third, that they are the golden anniversary class. These frosh haven't been idle during their first year on our campus. They had a big party at Lincoln Park early in the fall, and in the spring, on March 28th, they baqqueted at the Biltmore Hotel in Oklahoma City. Gov. Robert S. Kerr was their guest speaker, and a magician from Norman, Oklahoma provided entertainment. The president of the class, Ed Hadduck, has kept the class activities moving at a fast pace, setting a good example himself by being active in basketball and debate. The freshmen have a large majority of the servicemen, vocal and instrumental groups, and members on the ECHO and ARROW staffs, and members on both the all-school baseball and basketball teams. Curtis Horn, businessman extraordinary, won first prize in the ARROW sales contest. These freshmen have a mind of their own that runs in definitely new and interesting channels . It was none other than the yearlings who instigated the idea of starting a college Post Office for the student body. This has met with great success, and a plan is going to be worked out very soon to make this dream a reality . . . Thanks for good ideas from freshmen brains! We aren't worried about the outcome of this Freshman Class. In spite of the much-dreaded and longed-for orientation into college life, the frosh have made the proper adjustments and are already quite at home on the B.P.C. campus. They look forward to the next three years with happy hearts, for they expect to present a fiftieth birthday present to our college on its Golden Anniversary in 1949.

Ed Hadcluck, President

Fred Cason, Vice-President Rayburn Jones, Secretary

Lawana Loughmiller, Treasurer Prof, McClung, Sponsor

Norman Howerton, Representativ..:

41

FRESI-IMAN

Babcock, Dorothy Babcock, Lois Babcock, Margie

Baldwin, Gary L. Baldwin, Irene Ball, Mabel

Ballard, Albert Barnes, Opal Bates, Milton D ., Jr.

Bawcum, Koleta Bilby, Mary Nell Blake, Juanita

42

FRESI-IMAN

Blankenship, Harold Bohannon, Aldean Bohannon, Peggy

Bohannon, Myrl Boston, C. LeRoy Brasher, Clarabelle

Brewer, Herman Brogdon, Lola Anne Browning, Phyllis Lee

Butler, Veatrice Butler, M ildred Carlton, Sherrill

43

C

L A

S S

F R E s

M A N

c L A S S Carr, Venetia Carter, Ruth Cason, Janette

Cason, Janice Cason, Fred Cherry, Margie

Clauson, Frances Clay, Peggy Clemons, Barney

Collett, Alta Colson, Edwanda Conrad, Ernest

44

FRESI-IMAN

Coale, John L. Coppock, Bonnie Couch, Helen Ruth

Courtney, Geraldine Covey, Ruth Crawford, Lively

Cypert, Tommie Dalaba, Gene Darden, Fannie Beth

Dawson, Eileen Derby, Lavera Dixon, Ruth

45

C L A S S

FRESI-I MAN

C

L A

S S

Dockery, Pauline Dole, Bernice Duffy, Avis

Dunn, Verna Edwards, Marion Ester, Donna

Farmer, Constance Felter, Wanda Lou Flick, Willis

Floyd, John F. Francis, Ethel Friesen, Hilda

46

FRESI-IMAN

Gault, Joanna Gill, Mary Frances Gillespie, Inez

Girard, Margaret Gray, Robert Grisham, Elizabeth

Grissom, Robert Groff, Anna Ruth Hadduck, Edward

Hale, Mildrene Haley, Iva Dell Hall, Maurice

47

C

L A

S S

F R

s

M A N

c

L A S S

Hanlon, Dorothy Hargraves, Charlotte Harris, Earlene

Harrison, Charles Harrison, Jack Hathaway, John

Heap, JoAnn Henegar, Clarence 0. Hieronymus, Martha

Hinkle, Josephine Hoag, Virginia Holland, Lowell

48

FRES~MA

Hook, Francel Horn, Curtis C . Howard, Valeta

Howerton, Norman Human, Barbara Hyden, Valeta

Ingle, Adalene James, Beverly Jasper, Joyce

Jones, Rayburn Jones, Edith Jones, Phyllis

49

N

C L A S S

FRESI-IMAN

C

L A

S S

Johnson, Billy Ray Kent, Arlene King, Wilbur

Knippers, Douglas Ledbetter, Stanley Lee, Pauline

Lewis, Orlene Lindley, Beulah Little, Glen E.

Little, Margaret Loughmiller, Lawana Lunn, Mervel

50

FRESI-4MAN

Lynch, Pauline Lynn, Audie Luther, Aline

McCall, Charles McCollom, Russel McWilliams, Leila Mae

Manners, Betty Lou Marsh, Archie Masters, Tera Jane

Meador, Douglas Mizell, Dale Marie Moffatt, Marion

51

C

L A S S

FRESI-IMAN

C

L A

S S

Moore, Betty Moore, Charlene Mosshart, Jean

Nagel, Mildred Nash, Betty Nichols, Kenneth

Norris, Darlene Nye, Juanita O'Donley, Joann

Ohsfeldt, Grace Pace, Eunice Jo Patton, B. A.

52

FRESHMAN

Perdue, Beulah Phillips, Virginia Lee Plemons, Eugene

Porter, Bill Raymer, Ida Beth Reed, Sybil Rae

Reep, Kathleen Rhodes, Dorothy Rhoe, Betty

Rice, Pauline Riggs, Earl Rose, Martha Lee

53

C

L A S S

F R E s

M A N

c

L A S S

路 Rowlett, Marie Rutledge, Bertha Scarberry, Vivian

Scroggins, Burl Sistrunk, Werth Setliff, Pauline

Singletary, Robbie Smith, Mary Snowbarger, Wavelynn

Steele, Esther Sturdevant, Marcile Sullivan, Arwanna

54

FRES~MAN

Sullivan, Evelyn Sweet, Orpha Taylor, James Virgil

Taylor, Lloyd Thompson, Algree Thompson, Gale

Thurman, Betty Sue Traywick, Betty Turbiville, Artie Marie

Twining, Betty Ann Wallace, Yvonne Ward, Virginia

55

C L A S S

FRESHM A N

C

L A

S S

White, Imogene Willsey, Marietta Wilson, Genevieve

Wingblade, Paul Wininger, Reba Worthy, Jack

Wright, Lois Cheveallier, Pauline Emmert, Pauline

Gatrell, Nelda Lambert, Terry Lampp, Sue

56

FRESHMA N

Charles Attaway Melba Hamman Maxine Harris

Elton Rhodes Martha Lee Rose Herbert Scott

Simmons, Earl Ulmet, Ruth

57

C

L A

S S

SOP~OMORE CLASS

Neil Hightowei, President Lewis Thompson, Vice-President Tommie Johnson, Secretary-Treasmer

The Freshmen of 1944 arrived at B.P.C. one hundred and sixty strong, along with Dr. Finch, the new president. They prompt!y elected "the Crill's" as their sponsors and immediately became a forward moving class. They elected as their president Ted Hollingsworth, the first student to enter Bethany-Peniel College under the G. I. Bill of Rights. Such a good year was 1944-45, that about two-thirds of the freshman returned this past fall as sophomores. They immediately reelected the Crill;s as their sponsors. The sophomores started the year right by giving the freshmen a hectic week of initiation-Indian style-ending with a big party to honor the "papooses." Neil Hightower became president of the Sophomore Class, and he led them very ably in their activities which included a picnic at Will Rogers Park in the early fall, and winning the prize for having the best decorations at the Jamboree. At Christmastime the entire class was entertained by the Crills at a big party in the Youth Center. Second semester brought some new class members and many plans for spring. Mary Ellen Herrin won second place in the ARROW contest. Tommie Johnson and Elaine Sanford brought back honors from the Savage ForensiC Tournament at Southeastern College-Tommie in debate and Elaine in poetry. The greatest thrill of the year came when both the boys' and girls' basketball teams captured the tournament championships. The Sophomore Banquet on March 28th was a gala affair with laughs for everyone. The laughs were provided mostly by their after-dinner speaker, W . D. McGraw, genial college business manager. The banquet was held at the Y.W.C.A. again this year in accordance with the class budget plan. This budget provides for a Junior-Senior Banquet next year, and a Senior Trip the following year, and their gift to the school ir 1948. We must admit those Sophomores are a brainy class to budget their finances for the years to come; so their expenses won't be too high at graduation time. Not only that, but the Sophomores are already making plans for next year and their Junior . Play which they expect to begin early next fall . Watch out for this class of '48!

Ted Hollingsworth, Representative

58

Prof. and Mrs. Crill, Sponsors

SOP~OMORE

Akin, Leonard Baker, Nova Bea.ty, June

Bowman, Avis Brakebill, Ray Brown, Odis

Brummett, Neta Lou Butler, Alberta Carter, Earl

Casey, Ruth Cate, Mildred (Tillie) Close, Myrna

59

C LAS S

SOPI-IOMORE

C LAS S

Cloud, Eunice Crilly, Dorothy Davis, Neil

Davis, Sue Nell Dickerson, Maurine Doing, Peggy June

Dotson, Ester Duby, Ruth Faulkner, Darthymarie

Fugita, Nan George, Betty Ellyn George, Marcella

60

SOPI-IOMORE

Gregg, Juanita Grissom, Violet Gronemyer, Georgia

Hale, Deloris Hale, Elizabeth Harris, Irwin

Hamilton, Ann Evans Hathaway, Gwendloyn Hathaway, Noble

Herrin, Mary Ellen Hollingsworth, Ted Horn, Celestine Hebert

61

C L A S S

SOPHOMORE

C L

A

S S

Horst, Grace Janzen, Pauline Jared, Ralph

Jernigan, Charlene Johnson, Tommie Karns, Melva

Karns, Colleen Kellogg, Merreta Kifer, Boyd

Ladd, Forest Langford, Mary Lou Lemay, Marjorie

62

SOPHOMO R E

Lucas, Charles Lucas, Mary Jane Lynch, Ruby

Me Arthur, Glenn McMahon, Ruth McNair, Betty

Messer, Rubena Mizell, Jackie Murphy, Louise

Neufeld, Beulah Normandin, Marjorie Nye, Bob

63

C LA S S

S OPI-I OMORE

C L A S S

Nye, Monteen Shurn Oakes, Loretta Parrish, Milton

Payne, Effie Marie Porter, Birdie Potter, Lorraine

Price, Kenneth Rainbolt, Calvin Reed, Velma

Riggs, Olen Roeber, Pill Rosbrugh, Elvin

64

SOPI-IOMORE

Rowlett, Louise Pults, Ora Lee Woods Sanford, Elaine

Shaw, Luther Smith, Clara Jean Smith, Bill

Snow, Richard Snowbarger, Marietta Steele, Leona

Stevens, Wayinan Stockton, Kittie Jayne Sullivan, Ruth Ann

65

C L

A

S S

SOPI-IOMORE

C L A S S

Sutton, Geraldine Taylor, Ruby Taylor, Tressie

Thompson, Lewis Thompson, Luna Ruth Thompson, Mary

Thompson, Richard Timm, Pearl Wade, Lettie

Waggoner, Doris Warran, Winnie Watson, Jimmie

66

Watson, Loy Wiggs, Frances Williams, Rosy

Williamson, Lois Wilson, Betty Wood, Elton

Clara Jean Smith Neil Hightower

67

JUNIOR CLASS Jim Hamilton, President Virginia Couchman, Secretary

Our Junior Class, as the Freshmen of 194 3, came breezing into Bethany-Peniel College with the traditional bigger-than-ever Freshman Class. As sophomores they took all the athletic crowns of the year, except track. It seemed as if those Sophs just couldn't be kept down. At the speech tournament at Ada two of them brought back outstanding awards : George Moore, in interpretation of poetry, oratory, radio speaking, and afterdinner speaking, and Delene Stockton in debate. This year has been the most exciting of all for this, our Junior Class. In the fall they had a party at "Roger Haven," which is bound to make all history books. Immediately the class started working on their Junior Play. It took hours of grueling work, but when In His Steps was persented for the public, it sold out completely, and two performances were given to packed houses. The spiritual 路 and high moral tone of the play made it very popular op. the campus and in the community. The Jr.-Sr. Banquet was the highlight of the year for the host Juniors. Rev. L. J. Du Bois was the after-dinner speaker. The banquet was held at the Hotel Biltmore in Oklahoma City and followed a nautical theme. George Moore with his dry pointless jokes kept everything sailing, and Prof. Welsh, sponsor of the Junior Class, took honors with his poetic little missile which he tossed the seniors as a farewell toast. Deward Finch came back from the Savage Forensic tournaments at Southeastern State in March with debate honors for his school and class. He, with Tommie Johnson, were rated the No. 1 mixed team in the midwest. We mustn't forget the Junior Trip .. . three days of leisure and furr, ' followed by a sunburned, tired, but happy class returning home with many memories of what had been . . . and looking forward to their last year of this great adventure of college life.

Prof. Welch, Sponsor

Delene Stockton, Representative Reyndal Russell, Vice-President

68

J

u

0

N

Adams, Harriett Alger, Danford Baker, Wanda

Bebout, Meredith Blake, Wilma Bolerjack, Naomi

Bornamann, Charley Brock, Hildreth Brown, Alta

Browning, Lillian Buffington, Ralph Carl, Maxine

69

R

c

L

A

s s

J

u N

0

R

c

A

L

s s Cole, Harper Cooner, Mabel Couchman, Virginia

Dickerson, Marjorie Doyle, Don Duffy, Virginia

Eli, Helen Faulkner, Charles Fauss, Della

Ferry, Loy Finch, Deward Fletcher, Alberta

70

J

u

N

I

Frances, Ann Fry, Georgiamae Garrett, Earnest

Hamilton, Jim Harville, Carroll Henderson, Willard

Hendrickson, Phyllis Hogan, Glenellyn Hope, Stevie

Horn, Mary Jo Jones, Helen Kerr, Lee Dona

71

0

R

c

L

A

s s

J

u

N

0

R

c

L

A

s s Lunn, Alma Jean Mahannah, Maurice McGill, Bill

McGill, Charlotte Moore, George Northcutt, Claude

Parham, Ruth Patterson, John Pigg, Joyce

Purgason, Jean Reeves, Lois Reneau, Irene

72

J

u N

0

Roberts, Mildred Robertson, James Robnett, Clifton

Rogers, Ellen Russell, Reyndal Simpson, Paul

Sledge, Wayne Smith, J. R. Stewart, Retis

Stockton, Delene Thompson, Dorothy Thompson, Lerline

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SENIOR CLASS In the fall of 1942, one hundred nineteen enthusiastic freshmen enrolled at B.P.C. along with three hundred thirty-two upperclassmen. This year thirteen of the original class are graduating, having completed the four years together. The distinguished thirteen are : Blanche Andrew, Joy Beaver, Rachel Belcher, Betty Classen, Wilma Haley, Ester Marie Landtroop, Almeta Mizell, Virginia Moore, Mildred Russell, Lewis Andrew, Clester Pults, Howard Bynum, and William Marsh. The class of '46 has seen many changes take place in the world in general and also on our own College Campus. Having enrolled shortly after Pearl Harbor, many of the students left to answer the call of our country. This partially accounts for the small number of the original class members graduating this spring. With the first B.P.C. class to graduate in the postwar world, four ex-servicemen, Dean Wessels, Ed Taylor, John Harper, and Herman Parrish, have returned to the campus to receive their diplomas. One third of the class has been under three college administrations-Or. A. K. Bracken, Dr. S. T. Ludwig, and Dr. 0 . J. Finch . Recovering sufficiently from the "air-blitz" initiation accorded them as freshman, the seniors showed some signs of settling down in their strenuous sophomore year. . The Selective Service draft depeleted the man-power until the girls commanded a two-thirds majority by the time their junior year rolled around. In spite of the war time shortages, their Junior Play, The Barretts, was a smashing success. It was said to be one of the best plays ever given on the Bethany-Peniel College campus. Both their Junior-Senior Banquet and their Junior Trip to Price's Falls were major activities of the spring of 1945-. Climaxing their "fgur year loaf" the Senior elected two exservicemen, Dean Wessels and Ed Taylor, to lead their class this year.

Dean Wessels, President

Rev. W. D . McGraw, the business manager of the college and sponsor of the class, started the year off right with a steak dinner. Feeling in good spirits, the '46er'~ romped away with the softball pennant and the first prize in the ARROW sales contest selling a number equal to 58 % of the enrollment of the class. In the spring the seniors sponsored the Departmental Plays, struggled through their comprehensives, eased off with four days of horseback riding, skating, hiking, and eating at Prices Falls, on the Senior trip, and sighed with relief as they received their "Sheep-skin" from Dr. Finch in May.

Almeta Mizell, Treasurer Rev. McGraw, Sponsor

Helen Faye Moore, Representative Ed Taylor, Vice-President

75

IN

M~MORIAM

PFC. REGINALD CARTER, a member of the Class of '46, died of wounds on December 17, 1944, while a prisoner of war of the German government. Carter paid the supreme sacrifice in an attack in Hurtigen Forest. The Germans tossed

a hand grenade, and Reginald threw himself on the projectile to save the lives of his buddies. S/ Sgt. Robert A Johnston wrote, "I am sorry that it had to be Reginald because he was one of my best men and was liked very much by everyone. He made a good account of himself." Pfc. Carter, who was twenty-two years old, was a member of the infantry. During the three months he was overseas, he was stationed in England, Scotland, France, Belgium, and Germany. He was graduated from Okmulgee high school in 1941 and attended a business college there a year before he enlisted. After he entered the army in September of 1942, he attended Bethany-Peniel College, and the Huntsville .路 State College at Huntsville, Texas, for one semester, under an army training program. Pfc. Carter's father is Rev. W. A. Carter, the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of B.P.C. and pastor of the First Nazarene Church in Sapulpa, Oklahoma. Reginald's sister, Ruth, has been a member of the freshman class here for the past year. The Class of '46 is proud to have had as a member one who, by his unusual bravery and action beyond the call of duty, distinguished himself in World War II. His spirit and his example have set a pattern of service that shall ever inspire his classmates as they leave their Alma Mater to face the battles of life.

Reg and Ruth

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ALEXANDER, MAYME LEE : Jacksonville, Texas; RELIGION; Prayer and Fasting, Gospel Team, Missionary Band, Library Asst. ANDREW, BLANCHE : Wichita, Kansas; SPEECH; Junior and Departmental Plays, Orchestra, Prayer and Fasting, Graduate Speech Recital.

ANDREW, LEWIS: Portales, New Mexico; PHILOSOPHY; Student Athletic Director, Sec'y "B" Club, Phi Delta Lambda, Prayer and Fasting, Basketball and Softball letters. Stillwater, BAKER, JUAN ITA: Oklahoma; MATHEMATICS; Orchestra, Piano Ensemble, Prayer and Fasting, Missionary Band, Christmas Chorus, Recital, Student Teacher.

BEAVER, DON: Falls City, Nebraska; MATHEMATICS; Pres. Student Council, Vice-Pres. Student Council, Soph . Sec'y and Pres., Phi Delta Lambda, Junior Play, A Cappella Pres., Christmas Chorus, ARROW Staff, ECHO Staff, Who's Who, Thanksgiving Banquet Toastmaster, Softball letter. BEAVER, JOY: Bethany, Oklahoma; PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC; Chorus, Girl's Trio, Certificate and Diploma Voice Recitals, Pansey Ring Sec'y-Treas. Student - Council, Sec'y Junior Class, Phi Delta Lambda, Who's Who, A Cappella Choir, Christmas Club.

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s s BECKEL, VIVIAN ALTA: Bethany, Oklahoma; PSYCHOLOGY; Pres. Girls' Gospel Team, Sec'y Missionary Band, Treble Chorus, Prayer and Fasting, ECHO Staff, Girls' Trio. BELCHER, RACHEL: Melrose, New Mexico; PSYCHOLOGY; Editor ECHO, Soph. Vice-Pres., Phi Delta Lambda, Who's Who, Prayer and Fasting, ARROW Staff.

BYNUM, HOWARD: Pittsburg, Texas; RELIGION; Phi Delta Lambda, Gospel Team, Missionary Band. CLASSEN, City, Oklahoma; Soph. Class, Phi Play, Christmas

BETTY: Oklahoma ENGLISH; Vice-Pres. Delta Lambda, Junior Chorus, Library Asst.

GAMBLE, ALBERT: Eureka Springs, Arkansas; RELIGION; Pres. Prayer and Fasting, Manager Dragon Inn. GRONEMYER, BILL: Sedro Wooley, Washington; RELIGION; Pres. Dorm Council, Prayer and Fasting, Missionary Band.

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HALE, EVENGELINE: Bethany, Oklahoma; HOME ECONOMICS; A Cappella Choir, ARROW Staff, ECHO Staff, Sec'y Home Ec Club, Senior Cheer Leader, Junior Play, Sec'y N. Y. P. S. HALEY, WILMA : Roswell, New Mexico; PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC; Phi Delta Lambda, Girls' Glee Club, A Cappella, Prayer and Fasting, Pres. Dorm Council, Certificate and Diploma Voice Recitals.

HARPER, JOHN : Paradise, Kansas; MATHEMATICS; Prayer and Fasting, Student Teacher, High School Coach. HAYES, IRENE: Bethany, Oklahoma; PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC; Phi Delta Lambda, Orchestra, Oklahoma City Accordion Band.

HULL, KENNETH: Bethany, Oklahoma; RELIGION; Christmas Chorus, Missionary Band, Track letter. INGERSOL, CARL: Stillwater, Oklahoma; RELIGION; Pres. Freshman Class, Pres. Gospel Team, VicePres. Prayer and Fasting, Student Director of Religious Activities, Junior Play, Who's Who.

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s s KING, DOROTHY; Monroe, North Carolina; HISTORY; Phi Delta Lambda, Christmas Chorus, Missionary Band, Gospel Team. LANDTROOP, ESTHER MARIE: Maple, Texas; HOME ECONOMICS; Pres. Squaws, Dorm Council, Missionary Band, Softball and Volleyb:tll letters.

McMAHON, LOUIS: Post, Texas; PSYCHOLOGY; Bus. Mgr. of ARROW, Senior Athletic Director, Tennis letter, Vice-Pres. Gospel Team, Member of Debate Team. MARSH, WILLIAM : Portales, New Mexico; HISTORY; Pres. and Vice-Pres. Missionary Band, Prayer and Fasting, Basketball letters.

~

~

MIZELL, ALMETA: Sweetwater, Texas; HOME ECONOMICS; Assoc. Editor of ARROW, Who's Who, Treas. Senior Class, Dorm Council, Vice-Pres. Home Ec Club, Phi Delta Lambda, Asst. to Home Ec Teacher, ECHO Staff. MOORE, HELEN FAYE : Rocky, Oklahoma; SPEECH; Student Council Rep., Dorm Council, Phi Delta Lambda, Junior and Departmental Plays, Who's Who, Gospel Team, Prayer and Fasting, Graduate Speech Recital, Chairman Yokemates.

80

s MOORE, VIRGINIA: Roff, Oklahoma; CHEMISTRY, MATHEMAT ICS; Sec'y Sr. Class, Sec'y Soph. Class, Vice-Pres. Dorm Council, Phi Delta Lambda, Treble Choir, ARROW Staff, ECHO Staff, Student Teacher, Chem. Lab. Ass't., College Queen. NEUFELD, FLOYD : Guthrie, Oklahoma; RELIGION; Gospel Team, Student Pastor.

PARRISH, HERMAN: Bethany, Oklahoma; MATHEMATICS; Student Teacher in Science Department. PULTS, CLESTER: Bethany; Oklahoma; RELIGION; Pres. Jr., Class, Junior Play, Who's Who, Member Debate Team, Prayer and Fasting, Gospel Team.

RATCLIFFE, PEARL: Belleville, Kansas; RELIGION, ENGLISH; Prayer and Fasting. RUSSELL, MILDRED: Little Rock, Arkansas; RELIGION; Dorm Council Pres., Gospel Team, Missionary Band.

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SCROGGIN, EUGENE: Bethany, Oklahoma; RELIGION; Gospel Team, Student Pastor, Supt. of Buildings and Grounds. STANDS, JACOB: Seiling, Oklahoma; RELIGION; Vice-Pres. Jr. class, Jr. Class Play, Student Pastor.

STANDS, TALMADGE HORN: Beaumont, Texas; SPEECH; Director of Jr. Plays '44, '45; Certificate Speech RecitaL TAYLOR, ED: Norman, Oklahoma; RELIGION; Fresh. and Soph. Student Council Rep. , Vice-Pres. Student Council, Vice-Pres. Sr. Class, Who's Who, A Cappella Choir.

TAYLOR, MINNIE LEA : Bethany, Oklahoma; BUSINESS EDUCATION; Gospel Team, Prayer and Fasting, Missionary Band, Sec'y to Dean of Student Life. TUDOR, PERRY: Enid, Oklahoma; PHILOSOPHY; College Marshal, Orchestra, Band, Editor of ECHO, Phi Delta Lambda, Softball and Track letters, Who's Who.

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WALKER, W ANA: Hallsville, Texas; SPEECH; Choral Club, Cheer Leader, Junior Play, Departmental Play, Prayer and Fasting, Pansy Ring Club, Degree and Certificate in Speech, Teacher of Private Expression. WESSELS, DEAN: Bethany, Oklahoma; HISTORY; Pres. Sr. Class, Vice-Pres. Jr. Class, Phi Delta Lambda, Who's Who, Prayer and Fasting, Ass't Bus. Mgr. ARROW, ECHO Staff.

HUDSON, JAMES : Bethany, Oklahoma; RELIGION; Jr. Play Cast, Student Pastor, Baseball letter.

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SPECIALS The Specials Class was organized for the first time this year. Feeling that they should have equal recognition with the other classes, approximately 115 specials met and selected Bruce Wade, popular evangelistic singer from Texas, as their president. Rosey Hollingsworth, red-headed Fine Arts Special who hails from Enid, Oklahoma, took over the responsibilities of secretary-treasurer. Two ministerial students, Jerald Locke and Lillian Northcutt were elected as student council representative and athletic director, respectively. By unanimous vote Miss Alice Lewis was chosen as faculty sponsor for this group. One of the main activities of the year was a party given at the new Bethany Youth Center. Following some exciting games of ping pong, shuffie boards, checkers, carom, and several group games, the hungry classmen filled up on hot dogs and pop. Members of the Specials Class are students registered in Fine Arts, Theology, or regular college classes who are not taking enough hours to be classified as a full-time students. They contribute a vital influence to the college life. Included in this section are the pictures of part of the scond semester students. A large percentage of this group are World War II Veterans who have come to Bethany-Peniel College under the G. I. Bill of Rights. Already they are taking a very active part in all phases of the campus activities.

Bruce Wade, President Miss Lewis, Sponsor

Roselyn Hollingsworth, Secretary

84

Gerald Locke, Representative

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Barnard, Elnora Bornamann, Pauline Browning, Juanita

Bynum, C . H. Cornelson, Anna Culbertson, Nolan

Emmert, Velma Engleman, Maxine Gatlin, Verdi

Greene, Albert Harrison, Travis Hathaway, Patricia

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Hollingsworth, Johnie Hollingsworth, Roselyn Jared, Clara

Land, Herbert Locke, Jerald Locke, Thelma

Maxwell, Leatrice Northcutt, Lillian Riley, Cecil

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Roberts, Alvin Roberts, Edith Robertson, Gladys

Simpson, Alta Smith, Byron Stinson, Vernie

Stone, Lois Elaine Verbeck, Neva Wade, Beulah

Wade, Bruce Wickman, Alma Jo Wilson, Garrett

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SEMESTER

Adkins, Doris Mae Baker, Wilson Bean, Jo

Bockmann, Fern Bonnett, Robert Bowman, Ray

Brasher, Mildred Brazelton, Chuck Bruce, Robert

Cantrell, Bailey Carden, Leo Cargill, Bud

88

SECOND

Cargill, Neta Clouse, Lenora Collins, Carl

Cornelius, Ruben Craig, Peggy Davis, M. L.

Defoyd, Betty Fulton, C. C. Fulton, Frances

Green, Henry Green, Milton Guy, Marion

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SEMESTER

SEC OND

SEMESTER

Henderson, Evelyn Henderson, Margaret Hudgens, Evelyn

Huffaker, Ruth Ingle, Junella Johnson, Alice

Johnson, Archie Johnson, Maxine Kemendo, Frank

Largo, James Lawrence, Truman Ledbetter, Ada

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SI:COND

Ledbetter, Vernon Lee, Jack Lee, Ouida

Lemmons, Roy Lester, Howard Lindaberry, Aleen

Little, Helen Loughridge, William Lynch, W . M.

Makes Cry, Albert Martin, Grace Corrine Martin, Tomie

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SEMES TI:R

SECOND

SEMESTER

Martindale, Weldon Massey, Charles Miller, Norman

Moore, Dorothy Moore, Nelda Lois Munn, Luke

Murray, Mary Kay Murphy, Trudy Overholt, Elva

Parrish, Harriet Pearce, Opal Petterson, Marvin

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SECOND

Pollard, Kenneth Rhodes, Troyce Shellenberger, Elmer

Shreffler, Charles Smith, Violet Smith, Wallace

Smock, Hazel Talbert, Bea Tinsley, Doris

Turner, Edwina White, Patricia Williamson, Margie

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SEME STER

REGISTRATION "Old Sol" did his best to encourage heat-conscious students to sign up on registration day by hiding his face behind a layer of cooling clouds. One hundred fifty-nine brave-hearts took courage and signed their names on the d0tted line. Professors Ripper and Snowbarger were on hand to give direction to the first and second semester respectively. Fifty-six new students were among the number who registered. The final verdict of everyone was that Summer School was not so bad after all.

Dr. Finch, President; Prof. Snowbarger and Prof, Ripper, Directors.

NEW COMERS-and Prof . Hall: (First row ) Leonard Harper, Almeta Spurgeon, Reatha Browning, Arlene Kent, Jeri Courtney. (Second row ) Dr. LaDue, Lois Ferry, Charlotte McGill, 路 Genevieve Boone, Veatrice Butler, Virginia Phillips, Bertie Frances Reames, Mrs. Ira Mann, Jessie Smith, John Coale, Maurice Hall, B. A. Patton, Norman Howerton, Herbert Scott, Prof. Hall .

96

THE WIMAN FAMILY: (seated) Mrs. T. 0. Wiman, Prof, Wiman, Linda Dianne, Mrs. C. H . Wiman, Mrs. Cecil Wiman, Charles Wiman .

WIMAN ANNIVERSARY More than 300 faculty members, students, and friends met in Bud Robinson Hall to pay honor to Prof. and Mrs. C. H. Wiman on their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary. Appropriate vows were exchanged as Dr. C . B. Strang read the ceremony, "Uncle Charlie" McConnell gave the bride away, and Mr. and Mrs. Emery McReynolds, their daughter and son-in-law, acted as- groomsman and brides-maid. Adding importance to the occasion, Rev. Wiman's family was reunited for the third time in twenty years.

Prof. and Mrs. Wiman exchanging vows.

GET ACQUAINTED PARTY The second occasion on the Summer Social Calendar was the Get-Acquainted Party, Friday evening, May 25. Prof. Snowbarger, Prof. Thorne, "Twig" McMahon, and Wana Walker were on hand with a bag full of games. Shouts of laughter greeted the boys' dirty feet in shoe-less, sockless, male relay race. Hardly less amusing was the girls' pie-eating contest. Rev. McGraw furnished the most excitement of the evening. when he entered a pillow-fight with Boyd Kifer (picture at right) .

97

(First row ) w. c. LaDue, c. H. Ripper, E . C . Hall, D. R. Danskin. (Second row) Elizabeth _Nelson, Elizabeth Willis, lvalee Bolerjack, Eurela Brown, Ruth Taylor, Mary Flick. (Third row) Carol Lundy, V. A. Snowbarger, C . H . W1man, W. M . Thorne.

SUMMER FACULTY~ While some of the "august" faculty were "sweating-it-out" in Bethany classrooms, others were "cramming-if in" in Universities in California, Wyoming, Illinois, Minnesota, Michigan, Oklahoma, Texas, and North Carolina. Over half of the entire teaching

"Blow hard, E. C."

staff were engaged in this improvement campaign. Meanwhile, B.P.C. was . welcoming two new profs to the Summer Session. Dr. LaDue expounded on the values of language, and Prof. Thorne revealed secrets of the Scriptures to his Old Testament students.

Thorne looks blank

98

Snowbarger-" 2=1"

SUMMER SPORTS The summer sports program was, for the most part, very informal, but that did not keep the fellows from getting a great deal of enjoyment and relaxation from it. In the evening hours the gang would gather for some rough-and-tumble games of football , softball, and volley ball. Weary muscles and drooping spirits were revived, and minds were cleared for the next day's tasks in the classroom. By popular demand a tennis tournament was organized and a new system of elimination was tried. The three best players were rated and it was necessary to defeat the number three man before one was eligible to play number two, etc. Louis McMahon, Maurice Hall, and Eugene Verbeck had little trouble winning the top spots. Just as competition was promising to be quite keen, McMahon and Hall were placed on the hospital list. From there on out they had to "enjoy" the tournament from the sidelines in company with their cane and crutches. Verbeck easily defeated all the remaining contestants and won the "tennis crown."

"Gene" Verbeck, Tennis Champ

In the evening hours . . . . football . .. and volley ball.

TENNIS CASUALTIES : "Twig" McMahon and Maurice Hall.

99

IMPROVEMENTS-A LA STUDENTS Each afternoon about one o'clock any one passing the open door of the campus workshop would have seen Paul Simpson priming eight or ten fellows for that day's improvement program . Various activities, which helped to "face-lift" the buildings and grounds, were completed by student labor. One of the main projects was the remodeling of the gymnasium. Eugene Scroggins shouted the orders while the others tore down the old platform and in its place erected a lovely combination instrumental rehearsal room and stage with fluorescent lighting and sliding doors. Two music studios, an instrument room, and a music library rounded out the job. All of the buildings were treated to a coat of fresh wallfinish and paint. Space does not permit us to tell of plastering, sealing floors, calking, removing trees, cleaning the campus, building partitions, preparing organ rooms . . . (Top ) Norman Howerton, W ayman Stevens, Paul Simpson, Danford Alger, and J. R. Smith talk it over. (Upper center ) Deward Finch and Danford Alger seal the dining hall. (Lower center) Norman Howerton screens some sand . (Bottom lett) Kenneth Nichols, Herbert Land, Neil Hightower, and Lewis Thompson .calsomine. (Bottom center) Jessie Smith nails it tight. (Bottom right) Paul Simpson caught in a mess.

100

â&#x20AC;˘

IMPROVEMENTS-A LA COMMERCIAL One day Rev. McGraw called Paul Simpson aside and advised him of the necessity of undertaking a most unpleasant job-tarring all of the roofs on the campus. While the work crew was in the process of dreading the inevitable, the sky clouded up, the winds blew, and the hail descended. Fortunately for everyone, except the insurance company, the damage was sufficient that the buildings had to be completely recovered. The Consolidated Roofing Company was called to the rescue, (upper left) and the student work crew was happy again . In conformity with the policy of the Business Office to keep everything in proper repair, a "steeple-jack" was obtained from Oklahoma City to paint the flag-pole (upper right) and hang a new cable. As Prof. Hall emerged from the "Ad" building, he was cheered to see a number of his meteorology students supposedly "studying the clouds." He, however, was speedily disillusioned when he followed their gaze to the top of the flag-polethere wasn't a cloud in the sky! Probably one of the most appreciated improvements of the season was the paving of the streets (center) to the west and east of the campus. The only inconvenience suffered from this project is that of doing away with the winter mud-puddle in front of the Fine Arts building. No longer can students enjoy free entertainment on their way to chapel, for no one will get stuck any more. The old, bumpy, country roads adjoining the College have become smooth, beautiful, city streets (lower center) . They are truly a credit to the school and the city. Of major importance to l\1rs. Drewry and her kitchen assistants was the extension of the kitchen (bottom) to include room for a walk-in refrigerator, ample room for washing kitchen utensils, and enlarged storing space.

101

NEW DORMITORY UNIT The first phase of the $300,000 Expansion Program was begun this summer. After the Board of Trustees' final approval of this new unit of Bud Robinson Hall, efforts were made to purchase materials. The contract was let to Mr. L. C. Cherry (left) on July 18, but difficulty in finding the proper mill work and finishing stones caused delay in actual building till October 1. However, all preliminary work, such as digging ditches, pouring foundations, plumbing, and laying the first sub-floor, was completed during the summer months. The building, as far as possible, matches Bud Robinson Hall in every particular. There are three stories with forty-four rooms, parlor, and supervisor's apartment.

102

The ditch digger (top) saved much back-breaking work. Kenneth Hull, Charles Harrison, and Wesley Meek put the finishing touches on the ditches. (center). The

first

sub-floor

(lower

right) was laid in August. Mr. A. S. Mersch, foreman, (lower left) watches the pouring of the first cement for foundations.

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â&#x20AC;˘

.... .

103

Summer Tent Meeting .. . Revs. Ellis and Ruth Teasdale, evangelists.

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES Those who participated this year were : Talmadge Stands, Elizabeth Hale, Geraldine Courtney, Herbert Scott, J. Russell Smith, Vivian Beckel, and Glenn McArthur.

The spiritual interests of the summer student body were well taken care of by Chapel services, Vacation Bible School, revival services, and Friday noon prayer and fasting services.

Initiating a new program, the College Church erected a large tent on the northeast corner of the campus and conducted a summer camp meeting, July 26 to August 5. Revs. Ellis and Ruth Teasdale were the evangelists. ThiS' young couple is unusually talented-they both preach, and together they play twelve different musical instruments.

Miss Alice Lewis and her assistants did a grand job of supervising the Vacation Bible School in the local church. Not only did the 323 children who registered profit by the talents of Miss Lewis; but the college group who assisted her were enriched by their association with her.

College students help form the parade line.

Miss Lewis, Elizabeth Hale, Geraldine Courtney, and Herbert Scott talk over plans.

104

Vivian Beckel teaches a Bible lesson.

SUMMER COMMENCEMENT Eleven students received their diplomas at the Third Annual Summer Commencement Program August 14. Rev. W. L. French, pastor of the First Church of the Nazarene at Norman, Oklahoma, was the guest speaker. In introducing the speaker, Dr. Finch called attention to the interesting sidelight that in every summer commencement so far the pastor at Norman has given the address. Rev. French pointed out to the graduates that "The secret of every great victory is getting good and ready. 'J?e battles are won, not on the battle fields nor locked in deadly combat, but on the campuses of college and universities ... "Education within itself is not enough to meet the demands ofthis age. You must be armed not only with facts in your head-you must have God in your heart . . . "Great tasks create and challenge a great people, and the task which is before you is a task that will call out the noblest activity; in doing it you will build the loftiest character possible." Honors were presented to Una Wright, Billie Ann Jones, and Goldie Phillips. Rev. W. L. French, speaker

Dr. Finch shows the graduates the plans for the Expansion Program . (Front row) J. C. Andrew, Cleon Powell, Dick Linton, Una Wright, Mrs. Ella Attaway, Dr. Finch. (Second row) Louis Perot, Don Newell, Louise Long, Vivian Beckel, Billie Ann Jones, Goldie Phillips.

105

BOOK THREE

When shouts are heard again, and the campus comes to life with school-spirit each September, one knows that it's baseball season. There may be a tennis or a basketball tournament, for the balls are flying. And, if the question is, "Why are the men all up in the air?" the answer is "Ah-h-h, it's pole-vaulting time!" The students, who seem to have forgotten the sedate college gait and have started running to classes, although they may not be tardy this time, are working up speed for the spring sprints .. . College days include self-discipline to the tune of the gymnasium-floor whistle, brightened by Jamboree colors, enlivened by the excitement of track day. They are thinking and willing with energy and accuracy. Rhythmic motion and ability to go one's limit are cultivated, and health is preserved as a religious moral duty. Promotion from first base on the campus ball-diamond to first base in the sphere of mature progression will be for the individual who has been well-instructed in the art of deliberating with caution, yet acting with precision, yielding with graciousness, or opposing with firmness.

P~YSICAL

DEVELOPMEN T 108

BOYS' ATI-ILETICS Although Bethany-Peniel College does not participate in inter-collegiate sports, this important phase of physical development is by no means overlooked. Starting with .softball in the fall and winding up with the annual track-meet in the spring, there is never an idle moment in the athletic department. The College administration fully appreciates the need of sufficient physical exercise for students who are giving the major part of their time to intellectual pursuits. Therefore, a definite program of physical education classes has been worked out along with an extensive intra-mural program . Competition in softball, basketball, and track is arranged between the . class organizations. Tennis, ping-pong, and horseshoes give ample opportunity for individual participation . To encourage outstanding performance and good sportsmanship, letters are awarded to those showing unusual ability. Those receiving a letter in any one of the sports are eligible for membership in the Redskins-better known as the Warriors and Squaws. The sports program this year has been enhanced greatly by the return of a number of war veterans. This has made possible a better quality of performance and a keener spirit of competition. Another factor contributing to the success of the athletic organization this year has been the remodeling of the gymnasium. During the summer months a new bandstand was built at the west end of the building. Also the entire interior was ceiled with celotex and new bleachers, capable of seating 800 persons, were installed. Prof. V. Snowbarger, Director

Lewis Andrews, Boys' Director

PENNANT-GRABBERS BOYS Softball --- -------- --- - ------ - - - - - --- - -------- --- Seniors Basketball ----- --- ------------------- --- ---- Sophomores Track - ---------- ------ ----- - --------- ----- - - - Freshmen GIRLS Softball ----------- -------------------------- Sophomores Basketbail ------------------ ------ - - -- - ----- Sophomores Track ----- - --- ---- --- - ----- - ----- - ------- - --- Freshmen

109

SENIORS (Front row) Stands, Gamble, Wessels, Beaver, H. Parrish, (second row) Pults, Harper, Hull, Andrew, 'Marsh, E. Taylor.

JUNIORS (Front row) Verbeck, Hamilton, Sledge, R. L. Thompson, J. R. Smith. (Second row) Hudson, Simpson, Alger.

SOFTBALL

Seniors ------------------------------4

2

.666

The 1945 softball season had more than its share of thrills and spills. A surprisingly strong aggregate from the Freshman Class scared ev~ryone, but, although more than half the All-stars were selected from this group1 the Frosh landed in the cellar. The Juniqrs, last year's pennant grabbers, made a real bid, but the Seniors, behind the stellar pitching of Andrew, came through on top. In the first game of the season the Juniors started out with a "bang" and rolled up six runs in the first inning. However; they were unable to rally again, and in the fifth Hull tied up the game for the Seniors by hitting a homerun with the bases loaded. The Seniors won 7-6. Two clays laler the Juniors again seemed to have things their own way ?gainst the Seniors, keeping a 2-0 lead throughout the entire gaine. In the last half .of the last inning Willie Marsh connected for a long home-run into right field with two men on bases. The Seniors seemed always to

Juniors -----------------------~------ 3

3

.500

have what it took just at the

Sophomores -------------------------3

3

.500

Freshmen ----------------------------2

4

.333

FINAL SOFTBALL STANDINGS Team

Won

Lost Pet.

llO

right time . In mid-season the Juniors came back with wins of 5-4 and 13-12

over the Sophomores and Freshmen respectively. Smith and Hudson drove in the winning runs in these con~ests . The Senior's pennant hopes were jeopardized when the rejuvenated Freshmen team came up with a surprise win of 3-2 on October 16. Further consternation gripped the upper-classmen when a few days later the Sophomores again turned the trick, and with the aid of the spectacular fielding of M. Parrish eked out a 5-4 victory. This Senior loss placed the Seniors in a three-way tie for first place with the Juniors and Sophomores. Excitement ran high as the two upper classes took to the diamond on October 23 to decide the championship. Both teams played good ball, and very few errors were made. However, the Seniors were not to be beaten, and they emerged on top with a 7-5 score. This softball season was one of the most exciting and evenly contested in several years. The games were well attended, and the spectators-including class sponsors-made the noise which is always necessary for a good ball game.

FINAL BATTING AVERAGES Ab. Player Little, fr _________________ _____ 21

H

R

Av.

7 5

Hamilton, Jr ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ 19

12 10 9

Conrad, fr _____________ ___ ___ 17

8

7

.571 .500 .479 .470

McArthur, fr -路 路---------------20

SOPHOMORES (Front row) L. Thompson, Hall, McArthur, Harris, Akin. (Second row) R. Thompson, M . Parrish, Nye, 0 . Riggs, Kifer, Hightower, Rainbolt, Brown .

FRESHMEN (Front 路row) Conrad, Crawford, Ledbetter, Horn, Meador. (Second row) Floyd, A. Marsh, E. Riggs, Plemons.

Ill

8

SOFTBALL REDSKINS GLEN LITTLE, catcher, practically ran away with the batting championship, being first in total hits with twelve. He was very alert, made but two errors during the season, and provided plenty

of chatter. LEWIS ANDREW, pitcher, a senior with his own peculiar delivery, won four games and lost two. Lewis's control, along with his fast ball, caused much grief for the opposition. He was the workhorse of the league, several times pitching two days in a row. The sophomore flash, ODIS BROWN, first base, was one of the classiest fielders on . the diamond. He played the full season without commiting an error and ended with a .3 33 batting average. He was always full of zip. STANLEY LEDBETTER, a freshman , was given the second base berth althoueh he played the infield around besides taking one pitching assignment. No matter where he played he was the mainstay of his team. During the season he committed but two errors . His batting average was .375, and he was second in runs scored. PERRY TUDOR, third base, played brilliant ball afield-only three errors at the hot corner were marked up against him-and hit a hot .4 38. He was very quick on a pickup, and his peg to first was excellent. He had a particular knack of playing the impossible skinners. The most versatile member of the junior team was DEWARD FINCH, who could play the hot spots of the infield as well as pitch . In this, his second year to make the all-school team, Deward led in number of runs scored and was second in number of hits made. He was the smartest baserunner in the tournament. His batting average was a healthy .440. JIMMY HAMILTON, utility, played catcher, short-stop, and rover for the juniors. Outstanding

McMahon hits a long one . . .

Little

Andrew

Brown

Ledbetter

Tudor

112

Riggs

Hamilton

Finch

McArthur

Plemons

Conrad

in keeping his eye .on the ball, he committed but one error and numerous times threw runners out who were attempting to steal bases. The "best throwing arm in the league" is possessed by EARL RIGGS, left field, who played third base for the freshmen . He is an excellent fly-catcher. and his ability at the plate .is exhibited in his .375 batting average. GLEN McARTHUR gained the center field berth and was runner-up for the batting championship with a sizzling .500. He was adept at throwing a runner out and was alawys found backing up a play. One of the best fielders this season was EUGENE PLEMONS, who placed as rover. He made many brilliant stops, and what he lacked in size he made up in hustle. His average was .333. The freshmen found in ERNEST CONRAD,

Scroggins is out by a foot . . .

right field, an all-round ball player. He hit a long ball whenever he connected, and he connected quite often, as his .480 average shows. In the field he was always on his toes.

113

McArthur, 0 Riggs, Brown, Hall, and Finch rest at quarter time.

JAMBOREE GAME Olen Riggs, Captain

Friday night, November 23, at nine o'clock, referee Withee tossed the ball into the air, and the boys' game of the annual B.P.C. Jamboree was under way. The Bethany Redskins were pitted against the King's Laundry team. This year Coach Vernon Snowbarger put one of the best teams in the school's history on the floor. Captain 0. Riggs connected with only six points, but from the sidelines one could easily see that the opposition rode him hard. Hall was high point man for the Redskins with 19 points, followed by Finch with 14, 0 . Riggs 6, Brown, McArthur, and Andrew with 2 points each.

114

Siebs led the scoring for the King's Laundry team with IO points while Sharpe followed one point behind. In the first half Hall connected for the Redskins with IO points, missed one free throw, and had two personal . fouls . Finch

made 8 points, missed one free toss, and did not foul. 0 . Riggs hit for 3 points, missed 3 free throws, and had 3 personal fouls. In that same half Irwin, Siebs, and Slagle hit one b1.1:cket each for the King's . Laundry, while Loveless slipped in 3 points and Sharpe scored 5. The score at half time stood at 21 for B.P.C. against 14 for King's Laundry. In the second half Hall came through with 9 points for the Bethanyites while Finch hit 3 field buckets and made one personal. 0. Riggs sunk 3 more points and added another foul to his list. Brown got 2 points and 2 fouls, while Andrew and McArthur grabbed one field bucket each. The boys from King's Laundry hit better in the second half, but their cause was hopeless. Miller added 5 points, while Siebs was hitting 8, Sharpe 4, and Thuringer l. The final score: B.P.C. 45, King's Laundry 32.

Referee Withee throws the ball into the air ...

Pos FG FT PF TP Name I9 I 9 Hall ------------.G 4 0 0 0 E. Riggs ________ G 4 o. Riggs ________ c 2 2 4 6 0 l Finch ___________ F 14 7 l 0 2 2 Brown ---------- F I 0 0 2 McArthur _______ c 1 2 Andrew _________ F 0 0 Total --- ---~- - ------- 21 3 15 45 KING'S LAUNDRY Pos. FG FT Name l 0 Irwin - - -~------- G 2 1 Miller ________ __ G 0 Siebs ___________ c 5 1 0 Thuringer __ __ ___ F 1 0 Slagle ___________ F Loveless _________ G 1 1 0 0 Vanhousen ______ G 1 4 Sharpe __________ c Total ________________ 14 4

... as 800 spectators look on.

PF TP 2 5 0 5 2 10 2 l l 2 2 3 0 1 9 3 16 32

(Legend : FG-tield goals; FT-free throws; PF-personal fouls; TP-total ppints.) A tense moment for Bethany.

ll5

SOPHOMORES: (Front row) McArthur, Jared, Rainbolt. (Second row) M. Parrish, Brown, Harris. (Third row) 0. Riggs.

BASKETBALL

FINAL CLASS STANDINGS Class GP w L PCT. Sophomores __________ _9 8 1 .889 _ 9 ___________ Freshmen 7 2 .778

Player G 0. Riggs, So _____ 8 G. Little, Fr. ____ 9

55 51

Juniors _______________ 9 Seniors __ _____ ________ 9

L. Andrews, Sr. __ 9 D. Finch, Jr. _____ 8

49 41

2 I

7 8

INDIVID UAL SCORING

.222 .Ill

116

FG

FT TP

AV.

12 122 15.2 13 115 12.6 12 110 12.2 II

93

11.7

Basketball enthusiasts who saw the class teams play in clean, sportsmanlike contests are well pleased with the 1946 season. Each of the teams began the tournament with a fiery determinination to have its class finish at the top. Although it just doesn't come out that way, it gives an enthusiasm and a tingling enjoyment to each tilt. From the very start it was evident that the Freshman and Sophomore teams were the boys to watch . Thirsty for revenge after a somewhat disasterous softball season, the lowerclassmen effected strong organizations and left nothing undone to give them the victory in this major sports event. In the first round the Frosh rallied around Joe Bean, Glenn Little, and Ed Haddock to come through with five wins and no loses. At each of the games the yearling's Pep Club was on hand to make plenty of noise for their aggregation. The second round had all of the vitality and eagerness of the preceeding round, and more. Anything could happen. Right at the start the Seniors eked out a win over the once powerful Juniors, producing a tie for the cellar position . To heighten the excitement the Sophomores trounced the Freshmen in a thriller, which threw these two teams into a tie for first place. The Frosh came back the next week and again won over the Juniors and the Seniors. This gave them seven wins and one loss. The Sophs, increasingly eager for the championship, won their next two games hands down to retain their tie in the pennant race. On the final evening of the season the four determined teams met for the play-off. In spite of the masterful playing of the senior ace, Lewis Andrews, who gathered 16 points, the Juniors managed to come out on the long end of the score, 27 to 23. In the main match t~e Frosh and Sophs played neck to neck throughout 路the contest. At the half time the Freshmen were trailing 18 to 11, but they had plenty of fight left. During the second half all ten players were going at top speed. In the fourth quarter the Sophomores pulled out in front. Having secured sufficient lead, the five in gold and black stalled the game. When ~he final whistle blew the Sophs found themselves the victors by a margin of 33 to 26, and the possessors of the coverted basketball pennant.

FRESHMEN' (Front row) Bean, Little. (Second row) Davis, Haddock, A. Marsh, Meador. (Third row) Cason.

JUNIORS (First row) Hamilton, Finch, Alger. (Second row) Verbeck, Henderson, Shellenberger, Peterson .

117

SENIORS (Front row) Stands, Gamble, Beaver, (Second row) Harper, H. Parrish , Hull, Andrews. (Third row ) W. Marsh.

BASKETBALL REDSKINS

0. Riggs

Andrew McArthur

Harris

Black

Brown

M. Parrish

Little

Bean

Finch

11 8

TENNIS

Louis McMahon Champ

Louis "Twig"- McMahon breezed through the single tennis tournament and took the championship in veteran style, Having featured in tennis for several years, McMahon was runner-up to Dave Sharp last year and reached the finals in the doubles tournament with Verbeck as his partner. The final match saw McMahon pitted against Baldwin, A newcomer to the campus, Baldwin displayed plenty of ability and a style all of his own, Serving from the south-side, he follows up right-handed and deals out a polished, accurate drive. Another of his specialties is that of placing high lobs in the extreme corners of the court. However, all of this was of no avail against McMahon, whose blistering serves and accurate cuts, together with an occasional drive, made competition hot for the best His distinctive ability to play the net was partially offset by Baldwins lobs, After a hotly contested match McMahon came off with the victory to the tune of 6-3; 6-2; 7-5; 6-L Following the new "perpetual" tournament system the winner was not declared champion until November L Under the new set-up the four top players may challenge the one immediately ahead of them in an effort to displace him. McMahon retained his place and came off with top honors in the 1945-46 season, The doubles tournament was not run off until after the ARROW went to press.

119

Gary Baldwin, Gene Verbeck

BOYS TRACK RECORDS EVENT yd. dash IOO yd, dash 220 yd. dash 440 yd. dash 880 yd . dash I mile run 2 mile run 120 yd. h. hurdles 220 yd. I. hurdles 440 yd. relay Discus Shot Put Hammer Throw Pole Vault High Jump Broad Jump

so路

TITLE HOLDER Curtis Smith John Ed Roberts John Ed Roberts Ponder Gilland Alfred Miller Odis Brown Doyle Felts Willis Snowbarger Frank Fuson Beta Olen Riggs Harold Garrison Robert Venable Lee Spradlin Paul Smith John Ed Roberts

RECORD 5.4 sec. I 0.2 sec. 22.2 sec. 52 .5 sec. 2.13 min. 5.I3% min. Il.l3 min. I8.05 sec. 27.8 sec. 43.7 sec. 112' 46'10" 12I'5" 11'2%" 5' 81A." 20'3%"

Neil Davis, Odis Brown, Elton Wood, and Iwin Harris toe the mark.

Neil Hightower

Olen Riggs

Neil Davis

Bean, Davis, Horn

Peterson and Hamilton

Douglas Medor

120

YEAR MADE I935 I94I I939 I939 I942 I946 1942 1942 1940 1935 1946 1932 I932 I943 I944 I941

WARRIORS and SQUAWS

SQUAWS : McGill, Lunn, Sears (sponsor), Baker, Horn, Herrin, Landtroop, Gregg, Wilson, Emmert.

WARRIORS: (First row) Black, Bean, Brown, Harris, Watson. (Second row) Snowbarger (sponsor), Andrews, Finch , 0. Riggs, Shellenberger, Conrad, M. Parrish, J. W. Hall, McArthur. (Not in picture) Hudson, Hamilton, Alger, W. Marsh, Beaver, E. Riggs, Hull, Northcutt, Little, Ledbetter, McMahon, Plemons.

121

GIRLS' ATI-ILETICS The Girls' Director of Athletics, MARY ELLEN HERRIN, a distinguished member of the Sophomore Class, came through with flying colors. One of her main aims has been to encourage increased interest in girls' athletics and to attract a larger percentage of participation. The success of "Shorty's" endeavor, through endless talking and voluminous writing, is shown in the large number of girls enrolled in the Physical Education Department this year. An athlete in her own right, she has lettered in three sports in her two years at B.P.C. The fact that she can handle the ball as easily as she can maintain a 3.00 average in her studies has contributed immeasurably to her outstanding success.

GIRLS' SOFTBALL FINAL SOFTBALL STANDINGS Team Won Lost Pet. Sophomores __________________ 4 0 1.000 2 .500 Freshmen -- -------~---------- 2 Junior-Seniors _________________ 0 4 .000

Mary Ellen Herrin, Girls' Director

SOPHOMORES (Front row ) Kellogg Williams L.

\~illi amson

George (Second row) V . Reed

Gregg Langford Cloud Herrin Casev

122

FRESHMEN

(Front row) C. Moore Lampp M. Babcock D . Rhodes (Second row) Masters Heap

P. Bohannon Lynn Coppock

JUNIOR-SENIORS

(Front row) Purgason Lunn Land troop McGill (Second row) Vl . Baker Horn

R. Wilson H. Jones

123

SOFTBALL REDSKINS In softball the sophomore girls proved to be the best of the three teams which competed in the tournament. The frosh and junior-seniors had good material, and enough of it, but what they lacked-and what the sophs had-was cooperation. There were no particularly exciting games-the closest score being 7 to 4-but there were plenty of outstanding players. JO HORN is still listed as one of the top softball players of the campus. As second baseman for the upperclassmen, Jo scarcely let a ball pass, and it seems that catching flies was a habit with her. BO N NIE COPPOCK is off to a nice sta.rt in her athletic career at B.P.C. Although definitely "undersize," she proved to be very efficient at second base and rolled up a batting average. Third baseman, pitcher, excellent batter, star of the sophomore team-that's ''NITA" GREGG. As a third baseman she can't be beaten for catching ground balls and whizzing them to first. When it comes to batting, there are few that can compare with Nita. She is one of the exclusive group of home-run sluggers of the season. "SHORTY" HERRIN is efficiency plus. She builds a blockade around first base. Her opponents regard her as a one-man team . Her deadeye gauge and poise are a combination that enable her to play her position top notch. A little on the noisy side, VELMA . REED plays an interesting game with an open eye for everything. With her quick, sprightly actions Velma is always at the right place at the right time. She never loses interest, but plays a good hard game. Her team work is one of her main points. B.P.C.'s star pitcher from Montana, LOIS W ILLIAMSON, dazzles her opponents by her wind-up and the swiftness of the balls she pitches. When her team is at bats, she lends inspiration to her teammates with her powerful "yells." JO ANN HEAP, another one of the frosh , is outstanding for her left-hand batting. Although swinging from the south side, she connected many times and drove in several runs during the season. "TURP" LANDTROOP is noted for her efficiency at first base and for her good batting average. She plays her position with constant energy. Her cheerful attitude under all circumstances makes her one of the most popular players on the diamond. An invaluable member of any team, because of her "playing attitude," is RUBY WILSON. Calm under all circumstances, she is not easily defeated, yet she doesn't foolishly try to out-play herself. She capably defended third base for -the upperclassmen. TERA JANE MASTERS is one of the best allround players of the league. She is equally good as pitcher, fielder, and batter.

124

Charlotte McGill, Champ

" Nita" Gregg, Lois \ Villiamson , \ Vanda Baker

TENNIS

The girls' tennis tournament was a real thriller with Charlotte McGill upsetting Juanita Gregg, who held the championship for the past two years. A veteran in her own right, Charlotte claims the title for the third time. Gregg and McGill had defeated Wanda Baker and Lois Williamson in the semi-finals. In the first set of the final match the score ran close. The tally showed a tie of four games each, but McGill took the next two and the set. Starting strong on the second round Gregg gained a two game lead. However, again McGill overcame her opponents strong serves and excellent returns and won in the last few games. In the final set Charlotte was at her best and exhibited a good backhand and fast footwork. Proving to be too much for Gregg, McGill took every game of the last set.

125

SOPHOMORES: (First row) Herrin, R. Sullivan, Janzen . (Second row) V. Reed, Lucas, Casey, (Third row) Williams, M. Snowbarger, L. Williamson.

GIRLS' BASKETBALL to 27. The sophomores then defeated the frosh and came out in the lead, only to be tied again when the juniorseniors were victorious over the yearlings for the second time. At. the beginning of the second semester Juanita Gregg, who until then had been the high-point f()rward for the sophomores, became a junior and joined the upper-class.mens team. This gave the junior-seniors a definite advantage, and it was hoped by them, and feared by the sophomores that they would win the tournament as a result of the change. The test came on February 4 when the junior-seniors and the sophomores met for their first game of the second semester. The score of this game was destined to be decisive. After an intensely exciting contest the sophomores 路emerged the victors by a score of 27 to 22. Nevertheless, the junior-seniors did not give up. They were to have one more game with the sophs. If the upperclassmen could win this crucial contest and .help the frosh to do likewise there would be the necessity of a play-off. With this in mind the junior-seniors practiced hard an路d struggled through the needed 路victory. In a final effort for the championship the upper-classmen began coaching the freshmen in the hope that they, too, would be successful against the sophomores. In tliis, however, they were disappointed, for the papooses went down to a 40 to 25 defeat and the sophs took the tournament.

The softball equipment had hardly been put away when the girls began preparing for the annual Jamboree game which would officially open the basketball season. Shakespeare has said, "All's well that ends well," but we do no violence to the statement to say, "All's well that BEGINS well." Certainly that was true in girl's basketball at Bethany-Peniel College this year. The successful beginning was largely the result of the interest and direction given by Mrs. Alice Crill, who coached the girls during their practices and arranged a preliminary game with Putnam City. This intensive training culminated in a decisive 30 to 16 victory over an independent Bethany team in the Jamboree game. The relative strength of the various 路 class teams began to show up early in the season and it soon became evident that the nine-week intra-mural tournament would be extremely interesting. Competition promised to be keen, especially between the Sophomore and Junior-Senior Teams. The prospects for the sophomores seemed to be slightly better than for the others, for they won all the pre-season games.

The junior-seniors .got off to a good start when they defeated the freshmen by a score of 28 to 17 in the first tournament game. Their luck did not last long, however, for they met the sophomores the next week and lost 22

126

JUNIOR-SENIORS : (First row) McGill, Landtroop. (Second row) W. Baker, H . Jones, Emmert, Gregg. (Third row) Horn, Lunn, Wilson. FRESHMEN: (First row) A. Sullivan, Masters, P. Bohanon. (Second row) Coppock, Turner, T . Rhodes, S. Reed. (Third row) Heap, D. Rhodes.

127

BASKETBALL REDSKINS Rosy Williams Arwanna Sullivan JoAnn Heap Lois Williamson Mary Ellen Herrin Charlotte McGill (top) Esther Marie Landtroop Alma Jean Lunn Wanda Baker Mary Jo Horn Ruby Wilson Juanita Gregg (bottom)

128

Snowbarger gives starting signal to Jo Horn, Bonnie Coppock, Velma Reed, and Mary Ellen Herrin .

GIRLS' TRACK 50 yd. dash .75 yd. dash 100 yd. dash Basketball Throw Baseball Throw 220 yd. relay

L. \Villiamson

Moore Tichmaker Antrim Gregg and Masters Masters Sophomores

T. \Vare

129

R~CORDS 6.3 sec. 10.1 sec. 12.9 sec. 75'8112" 165'11" 30.7 sec.

1943 1943 1943 1946 1946 1943

Jo Horn

ARROW 130

The fall term always starts 路out with hopeful students waiting in long lines (often the wrong ones) in the halls. Pauline Dockery and Arleen Kent (top left ) head the first line where Marceline Thompson (back to camera) gives instructions on how to register . . . Albert Green is always eager to be in the picture. At the other end of the line (top right ), Mabel Ball and Marjorie Babcock turned around just in time. First stop in registering is advising with your major professor . .. Arleen Kent and Prof. Shannon (upper center) talk over the inevitable conflicts and problems of required courses and desirable electives. James Hudson, Garrett Wilson, and Alvin Roberts have gone as far as the library ( lower center, left) where comfortable chairs and adequate tables ease the un路 pleasantness of filling out the numerous cards which Lee Donna Kerr and Myrna Close present to them. Meanwhile, Arleen Kent is in the Business Office (lower center, right) last stop where Miss Florence Lundy is figuring out her bill. A moment later Miss Lundy cheerfully collects Arleen's money and pronounces her Registrant No. 1 of 1945. In the main hall an excited group are collected around the student council booth (bottom ), supervised by Don Beaver and Jim Hamilton, where they receive their student activity cards and new Student Handbook. Marion Edwards and Peggy Doing are not very camera-shy.

132

The first social activity of the year was the Faculty Reception for the Freshman Class in the Drag. As the timid Frosh entered the door, they were confronted by the august faculty members (top) Miss Lewis, Prof. Hall, Mrs. Finch, and Dr. Finch are seen welcoming Audie Lynn, Juanita Nye, Peggy Clay, Peggy Bohannon, and others. Having lived through the ordeal of their first receiving line, Dale Marie Mizell, Peggy Bohannon, and Peggy Clay (center) are seen getting their soft drinks and cookies from an adequate supply"on the faculty." Feeling more at ease and somewhat happy over their new experience of " the first day at Bethany-Peniel College," the Frosh " un-lax" (bottom ) and get acquainted. Norman Howerton seems to have attracted the attention of the three young ladies in the foreground, while Albert Green, Virgil Taylor, Herman Brewer, and Fred Cason look on . Herbert Scott prefers to turn his back. In the background on the left 路 Beulah Perdue and Maxine Engleman observe with amnst'ment the Howerton tactics.

133

Freshman Recognition, September 27, started the night before. In Bud Robinson Hall the girls enjoyed a slumber party in which entertainment was furnished by the upper classmen-at the expense of the Frosh ___ Helen Jones, Alma Jean Lunn, Eva Mae Harper, Mary Jo Horn, and Virginia Moore pose (top) around the "gypsy campfire." Early next morning the unlucky Freshmen were introduced to the value of physical exercise in the wee morning hours. Curtis Horn, Prof. McClung ( Frosh sponsor), and Marion Edwards warm up on a "body-twist" (upper left center), while Neil Hightower has Norman Howerton, vociferous and unruly Frosh, demonstrate (upper right center), while Odis Brown looks on. To help work up an appetite, an early morning "hike" proved appropriate. Earlene Harris, Virginia Hoag, Russel McCollom, Audie Lynn, and Peggy Clay still look happy (lower center) as they pass Bresee Hall. Preceding breakfast is the proper time to clean your room, so Ed Hadduck, Frosh prexy, makes his bed (bottom left) while Leona Steel, Dorothy Rhodes, and Betty Nash, who have already arrived at the dining hall (bottom right), get their " warpaint" applied.

134

In true "papoose style" the 路Frosh sit on the floor and eat breakfast (top) as "papa" Leonard Akin keeps a fatherly eye on his charges. After their morning work-out the "greenies" agreed that anything, served anyway, would taste good. They were not disappointed. Following a day of varied activities, the Freshmen and Sophomores met in the Fine Arts Auditorium to "bury the hatchet." An interesting pro路 gram, featuring "memories of the past" was arranged and presented by the sophs. Earleen Johnson and Richard Thompson (center) played the leading parts as "Ma" and "Pa." One of the most exciting numbers路 was the old-fashioned school (bottom) in which Loretta Oakes starred as school mar'm. Boyd Kifer was a prissy high-brow; Earl Carter, the dunce; J. Walter Hall, Jr., the clown; and Elton Wood was Ruth Du路 by's "bare-foot beau." Good feelings were resumed around a " banquet table" where ice cream and cookies were served as long as they lasted .

. tl 135

All of the first week was not just fun for the incoming class. On Thursday evening they hesitatingly wound their way to one of the assigned classrooms to take the Psy路 chological Tests. Although frightened by the imposing name of this particular activity, the group pictured (top) were disillusioned by Miss Brown, their erstwhile professor, and all are busily re vealing the quality of theii I.Q . To fini sh the week in good style, the Student Council sponsored the Annual AllSchool Party. The excitement engendered by welcomes in French, German, and Spanish by Dr. LaDue, Prof. Spalding, and Prof. Wiman; intensified by vocal numbers by Prof. Smith, . Prof. Crill, and the Abilene Trio; brought. to a white heat by an instrumental trio composed of Dr. Finch, Rev. McGraw, and Prof. Floyd; and climaxed by the traditional "suit-case race" (center) which was won by Noble Hathaway and Charlotte Hargraves, who defeated George Moore and Rubena Messer; was cooled off by the generous helpings of ice cream, ice cold pop, and pie served by Albert Gamble and Almeta Mizell (bottom ) while Don Beaver bossed the job.

136

Douglas Meador and Terry Lambert (top lett ) believe that "all work and no play make Doug and Terry dull boys."路 The girls have their lazy moments too! Eileen Dawson, Dale Mizell, Norma Lee Hess, and Hilda Friesen (top right) take it easy on Cleanup Day as Don Beaver toils away in the background. At noon weary bones and muscles were rested and hunger-pains were relieved by a fine out-door meal. Lee Donna Kerr, Juanita Gregg, Phyllis Hendricbon, Alma Jean Lunn, Mary Ellen Herrin, Vangie Hale, Marcella George, Rosy Wllliams, Mary Lou Langford and Kittie Jane Stockton smile their approval (center) . Prof. (bottom left) and John (bottom right) prove that the Floyds aren't afraid of work. The seniors get a lift on their remodeling the College St. parkway, while Werth Sistrunk assists John m washing the library windows.

137

"Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home!" The girls of Bud Robinson Hall agree that their "college home" is the very best. Taking time out from their many activities, Neta Brummett and Eunice Cloud (top left ) pose for the ARROW photographer. "Screened" by numerous "personal" pictures, Algree Thompson's profile (top right) lends interest to the picture. "Snack-time" finds Juanita Gregg, Phyllis Hendrickson, Ruby Wilson, and Esther Marie Land troop (center ) enjoying some Sunshine Krispy Crackers, Heinz Green Pea and Tomato Soup. This is a tasty way of getting their daily vitamins. Sandy Faulkner (bottom left) looks up from the picture on her bureau as the ARRO\V "shutter-girl" walks in . Quite a pleasing picture, don't you think? One of the main purposes of the dorm "home" is to provide a quiet place to study, especially between seven and ten o'clock each evening. At least one girl, Dorothy HanIon (bottom right ), takes advantage of her opportunities. No wonder she is a topnotch student.

138

On November 8 the Freshmen, Sophomores, and Juniors laid aside their intellectual responsibilities to further their 路 social development . Finding one truck inadequate to supply transportation for the entire group, a large number of the 路freshmen forlornly waited around (top ), hoping they would not lose out on all the fun at Lincoln Park. Don't worry! Prof. Moore and his "new" truck came to the rescue. The sophomores evaded the photographer and sneaked off to \Vill Roger's Park where they claim they had a great time: We'll take their word for it! Meanwhile, the juniors were out at "Roger Haven" enjoying a scrumptuous meal prepared by Harriet Adams, Helen Jones, and Mrs. Rogers (center ). Jim Hamilton again proved his versatility by demonstrating his ability to overload plates with the delicious chili, potato salad, and "mansize" steaks. Wayne Siege looks mighty pleased with the prospects (bottom) as Tillie Ware, Wilma Blake, Joyce Pigg, Virginia Couchman, and Ellen Rogers discuss the eating problem . in the background.

139

The Annual Thanksgiving Banquet was held in Bud Robinson Hall November 27, with Don Beaver as Toastmaster. Prof. W. Harper Welch proved to be an ideal after-dinner speaker, specializing on his "J. Walter Hall, Jr., joke!" Some two hundred seventy-five guests enjoyed the delicious turkey and trimmings as ':per usual." Following the banquet, a giant Pep Rally was staged around the bon-fire in preparation for the Jamboree the next evening. Charlotte Hargraves, "Pill" Roeber, Nan Fugita, and Jo Horn (center) lead the enthusiastic crowd in some school yells. Several of the outstanding players (Maurice Hall, Olen Riggs, Glen Little, and Deward Finch) are seen in the background . In the Jamboree game the Bethany Redskins routed the King's Laundry cagers 45 to 32. Eight hundred eager spectators look on while Maurice Hall (bottom) takes a pass from Glen McArthur as Odis Brown comes up fast on the extreme right. Hall took scoring honors for the evening with a total of 19 points; Finch ran a close second with 14 points.

140

The College Girls' team proved at the annual Jamboree that the boys are not the only ones who can play basketball. Playing a team of Bethany town girls, the College won the opening game. Jo Hom, Ruby Wilson, and Velma Reed have a tense moment ( top), the town girls gasp, and Hampton Anderson prepares to call the play. Much excitement was created by an exhibition wrestling match (center ) between "Pee Wee" (Bob Troutman) and "The Giant" (Maurice Mahannan ) m which Referee Boyd Kifer was declared the winner. Norman Howerton,_ John Hathaway, Lively Crawford路, and Glenn Little stand by as seconds. Between the girls' and boys' games a new feature for the Jamboree was initiated. Olen Riggs (game captain) crowned Luna Ruth as Jamboree Thompson Queen (bottom) . The Queen was escorted to her throne by Suzanne Welch, flower girl, and Howard Vernon Snowbarger, crown bearer. Her attendants, who were nominees for queen, were Wana Walker and Stevie Hope. Glen McArthur and Deward Finch escorted the attendants.

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mtt, AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES

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M 0

M

R

A M

DR. R. T. WILLIAMS First graduate of Peniel College .. . former teacher and president ... charter member of the Church of the Nazarene ... General Superintendent thirty years . .. "The voice and 'pen of Dr. R. T. Williams have roused the militant spirit, and rallied the forces of the Church of the Nazarene ... In every great crisis we have looked to him for wise counsel and challenging leadership. He was richly endowed in qualities of body, and mind, and soul. He was mightily endowed with the power of the Holy Ghost.

When the history of the Church of

the Nazarene is written, the name of Dr. R'. T. Williams will be among those most highly, and most deservedly honored.

His

contribution to the progress of the Church he loved so well can not be measured-it is greater than we now know, or ever will, 'till heaven's books are opened."

i44

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\ DON BEAVER, the genial President of the Student Body, was elected to membership in the Who's Who in 1945. Truly one of B.P.C.'s outstanding students, Don has been a leader in all phases of campus life-A Cappella Choir member, four years; softball letterman; lead part in the Junior Play, 1945; song leader of the Young People's Department of the Sunday School, three years. Don duplicated his four years membership in the high school Honor Society by earning a place in Phi Delta Lambda during his four years in Bethany. Following graduation, Don expects to become an industrial chemist, although he dearly loves the undertaking business. 146

HELEN FAYE MOORE, one of the home-town girls, is best known on the campus for her intense interest in spiritual things. A Senior, she is a member of both the Prayer and Fasting League and the Gospel Team. For five years she has served capably and earnestly as Sunday School teacher in the High School Department. She has been President of the Yokemates' this year. Helen Faye was a member of Phi Delta Lambda this year and represented her class on the Student Council for the second consecutive time. She collects readings and poems, enjoys sewing, and is building a fine library.

148

Freshman Class President ... Vice-President of the Prayer and Fasting League ... President of the Gospel Team . . . Student Director of Religious Activities ... and all-round good fellowCARL INGERSOL. When not in the library or on the softball diamond, Carl will probably be found at the Interurban Station waiting for Lillian. On Sundays he spends his time in Wynnewood where he pastors the Church of the Nazarene. Durir.g vacation he likes to hunt and fish. His nickname is "Stack."

150

DELENE STOCKTON, another home-town girl, has had plenty of limelight while at B.P.C. She was secretary of her Freshman Class, Treasurer of the Sophomores, and Student Council Representative of the Juniors. She is the only member of the Junior Class in Who's Who. Last year she, with Tommie Johnson, won first place in the Junior Women's Division at the Ada Debate Tournament. This year she won distinction with an important part in the Junior Play. She is a member of the Honor Society. Someday she hopes to receive an A.B . in Speech.

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CLESTER PULTS had been pastoring at Hennessey, Oklahoma for three months. In December the church discovered the need for a pastor's wife. Ora Lee Woods oblingingly answered the call, and everyone seems well pleased. B.P.C.'ers will never forget Clester's characteristic little laugh. It has not yet been definitely established whether or not there is any connection between it and his wife's favorite saying, "you're an old horse!" He was the energetic President of his class in his Junior year. Basketball and track are his favorite sports. He plans to be an evangelist.

154

One of the intellectual leaders on the campus is RACHEL BELCHER from Forest, New Mexico. A trip to Chicago with the 4H Club, which she won as an award for her achievements in the organization, was perhaps the most outstanding event of her freshman year. Her talent in writing was displayed in her junior year when she was editor of the Reveille Echo. In spite of many extra-curricular activities she has maintained a four-year membership in the Honor Society, which entitles her to become a permanent member of the society. A major in psychology and a warm personality will aid Rachel in realizing her ambition-to do personal counseling.

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The popular Vice-President of the Senior Class is CHARLES EDWARD TAYLOR, ex-serviceman with thirty missions over Germany to his credit. When asked how many semesters he had been in the Honor Society he said, "Ncit a chance! How did I get into this mess anyway?" His most enjoyable pastime is singing and directing a choir cantata. This past year he has been choir director and N.Y.P.S. President at First Church Norman, Oklahoma . He says that his wife calls him "Charles Edward" when she's peeved, but it's "darling," in the sweetest of tones, when she wants something.

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An imposing list of secretaryships is worthily accredited to JOY BEAVER. Her election as " jot-em-down" girl for the Junior Class in '45 and for the Student Council this year give evidence of her increasing popularity. Aside from Don Beaver, her main interest is music. She has been a member of the A Cappella Choir and Girls Trio. She has received both a certificate and diploma in voice. In her leisure moments she enjoys trying to recognize the works of different musical composers. Last spring she announced her intentions to replace the "Miss" in front of her name with "Mrs."

160

In the Navy he was known as "Doc." His wife calls him "Dean Howard." But the students of B.P.C. know him best as just plain DEAN WESSELS. No one on the campus is better liked or more respected. In his Freshman year he was Student Council Representative, as a Junior he was Vice-President of his Class, and as a Senior he is Class President and Assistant Business Manager of the ARROW. Dean likes baseball and track, but he claims that he is not very good. Roxie Ann, however, will assure you that "Dean can't be beat anywhere."

162

When something needs to be done, one is tempted to say, "Let ALMET A MIZELL do it!" There is no question whether or not it will be done right-and on time. She is known as the "Home Ec girl." As could be expected, her hobbies are centered around costume design, home decoration, and art. In her senior year she has contributed a valuable service to her school mates as treasurer of her class and Associate Editor of the ARROW. Her love for ping pong and her interest in football has not kept her from membership in the Honor Society for the past two years.

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"Where is that fellow going m such a hurry?" "Oh-that's PERRY TUDOR-he's always going on the 'double quick'." Perry has been a member of the Phi Delta Lambda Honor Society for three years. He is the only member of Who's Who possessing two All-School letters-track and softball . For four years Perry has been a member of the Oklahoma Symphony Orchestra in which he plays the French horn. His major is philosophy. He was elected editor of the Reveille Echo in the spring of 1945.

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BOOK FOUR 168

Acquisition of culture and development of intellect are as sounding brass and tinking cymbal without religion in the heart. Following in the footsteps of the Master Teacher gives depth of purpose to our lives. True religion shows its influence in every part of our conduct; it is like the sap of a living tree, which penetrates the most distant bough. Thus, the religion offered to Bethany-Peniel students has been carried through the years in the lives of those who have gone before into the fields of harvest. The foundation of a Christian life is faith; its action, works; its temper, holiness; its aim, obedience to God in improvement of self and benevolence to men. May we so live, exemplifying the tenets of Christianity, that our lives will be the illustration of His glory.

SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT

THE COLLEGE

CHURC~

Bethany-Peniel College is a Christian institution. The ideals and standards of holiness are of prime importance. Therefore, the College Church is cherished as the center of religious emphasis on the campus. Each service is planned with great ~are so as to give the maximum of spiritual life md fervor. As one enters the sanctuary on Sunday morning he feels an immediate· "call to worship" extended by the soft organ ,music. The choir, composed Jf stuc1ents, faculty, and members of the comnunity, lends dignity and inspiration to the sertice with the singing of hymns and anthems as t is led by Prof. Crill, the Bethany ·"minister >f music." Dr. C. B. Strang guides the destiny of the :hurch with ease and poise. His intensely pracical messages are effective guideposts for "meeting ife's situations." His vital concern for each one .s an individual personality and his desire to de·elop a sound religious experience in the heart of 'ach student makes us feel that he is our own •ersonal friend.

Dr. C. B. Strang, Pastor

The "Golden Anniversary" Class of 1949 participates in a Convocation Service.

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SUNDAY SCHOOL

Rev. A. LeRoy Taylor, Sunday School Superintendent.

One phase of the religious life on the campus that probably has a more personal touch to each student than any other is the Sunday School. Since the attendance in Bethany warrants the organization of more than fifty Sunday School classes, there is abundant opportunity for College students to gain valuable training in religious education. The Young People's Department is under the capable direction of Mrs. Vernal Dodds. It is significant that duringthe Six Weeks Sunday School Emphasis Campaign this department was the only one in the entire school which went over its quota. The cooperation that she has received this year demonstrates that the college students are fully conscious of the genuine interest that Mrs. Dodds has for their spiritual welfare. The Activities of the College Department have been characterized by a heightened interest in the opening exercises. Each Sunday morning the young people are inspired as they sing hymns and choruses, pray together, listen to special speakers, or enjoy programs sponsored by district groups. Working to a great extent behind the scenes is one who wields a mighty influence in binding together the interests of the College, the Church, and the town- Rev. A. LeRoy Taylor, member of the Board of Trustees, Sunday School Superintendent, and Superintendent of the Bethany Public Schools. No effort on his part is spared to give the young people of Bethany the very best in leadership. This year he chose Dr. LaDue, Prof. Hall, Mrs. Sears, Miss Lewis, and Mrs. Strang as teachers of the College classes.

Mrs. Vernal Dodds, Young People's D epartment Supervisor

Some learn by listening ... others learn by teaching.

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AUXILIARIES The College Church offers many opportunities for acquiring experience in the different departments of church administration. This past year the N.Y.P.S. has been reorganized in order to give more persons a chance to participate and to serve the different age groups better. Of particular interests to the College students are the Navigator and the Yokemate Societies. Rev. Raymond McClung has served very effectively as the chairman of the Navigators, assisted by Willis Flick, vice-chairman . This group consists of young people between the ages of twenty-five and forty. Prof. D. R. Danskin, program chairman, has arranged many interesting and profitable services. One of the most impressive programs was presented by the College Missionary Band, featuring a ~ 'candle-light ceremony" and testimonies by prospective missionaries. This society has been a very effective means of developing the spiritual interests of the young married couples. Miss Helen Faye Moore, popular senior co-ed, has done an outstanding job of leading the Yokemates. Although in its first year, this group has had a fine attendance and the programs have been of a very high quality. With Miss Moore on the executive committee have been Elizabeth Hale, vicechairman; Evangeline Hale, secretary; Danford Alger, treasurer; and Goldie Phillips, program chairman. There has been a wide variety of programs, including pageants, the "Life of Christ" in pictures, Men's Night program, "Showers of Blessing Radio Program," pictures of South America, and "The Alphabet in Questions and Answers." The General N.Y.P.S. Executive Committee, which correlates the activities of the different groups, has been Prof. Vernon Snowbarger, President; Harper L. Cole, VicePresident; Eugene R. Verbeck, SecretaryTreasurer; and the committee chairmen. Another important activity which furnishes excellent training possibilities is the Sunday morning "youth work." During the Morning Worship service in the main auditorium, the Junior Church and the Youth Church meet for their own individual services. Miss Alice Lewis is in charge of the Junior Church. She has been assisted this year by Mabel Ball, June Beaty, and Helen Faye Moore. The Youth Church is for Junior and Intermediate Department boys and girls. For the past two years Rev. Albert Gamble, prominent religious leader on the campus, has been the successful

N.Y.P.S . OFFICERS: (seated ) Helen Faye Moore, Yokemate Chairman; Prof. Snowbarger, President; Elizabeth Hale, Yokemate Vice-Chairman. (standing ) Prof. McClung, Navigator Chairman; Harper Cole, Vice-President; and Eugene Verbeck, Secretary-Treasurer.

JUNIOR CHURCH DIRECTORS : Mabel Ball, Miss路 Lewis, June Beaty, and Helen Faye Moore. YOUTH CHURCH LEADERS: Mrs. Audrey Gamble, Rev. Albert Gamble, Miss Mariana Sears.

pastor.

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CI-IAPEL SPEAKERS During the school year the students of BethanyPeniel College have the privilege of meeting and hearing many of the outstanding ministers and leaders of the holiness movement. The year 1945-46 has been no exception. Early in the fall Dr. D. Shelby Corlett, editor of the "Herald of Holiness," conducted revival services in the College Church and spoke in chapel. Many young people found the Lord . Dr. Finch set the tone for the high spiritual quality of our worship periods in the first chapel service of the year. He urged that "the greatest thing that we will receive on this campus is that ennoblement, enrichment, enlargement of character that enables us to face life with manhoodto have vision to go into a world of tragic need, to live a life of influence that will count for God ." In October we were privileged to hear Miss Geraldine Chappell, R. N., tell of God's keeping power in a Japanese prison camp. Charles HastingsSmith, an alumnus of B.P.C., stirred our hearts with his unique message on "The Cross of Jesus." On November 5 Dr. U . E. Harding addressed the chapel on "Why doesn't God stop war?" Other noted speakers during the fall season were Chaplain Mark Moore, an alumnus of the College and a prisoner of war in Germany; and Rev. Elmer Schmelzenbach, who was born in Africa, trained in America, and who has spent the past nine and one-half years as a missionary in Africa .

Dr. D . Shelby Corlett, Fall Revivalist.

Rev. Mack Anderson, Spring Revivalist.

Dr. Roy Cantrell, Superintendent of the Minnesota District, was Aycock Lecturer in the fall. His messages were characterized by a dynamic love for the cause of Christ and a practical application from his many experiences. One of the most interesting and popular chapel speakers of the year was Chaplain Wilson Lanpher, who came to us four different times. During the winter three representatives of our Nazarene works in foreign countries roused our missionary zeal. Re'{S. Lyle Prescott and LebronVelasquez told of our new works in Cuba and Puerto Rico, respectively. Following the General Board meeting in January, Dr. George Frame, Superintendent of the British Isles, spent several days on the campus. His keen intellect, his fervent spirit, and his zeal for the cause of Christ will not soon be forgotten.

174

Dr. Roy Cantrell _ . . Aycock Lecturers ... Rev. Lauriston DuBois

In February the College Board of Trustees met on the campus and in their annual chapel service presented Dr. G. B. Williamson, pastor of the Kansas City First Church and former President of Eastern Nazarene College, as the special speaker. This is always one of the most outstanding chapel periods of the year. On the 21st of the month the spring Aycock Lectures began . Rev. Lauriston J. DuBois, General Secretary of the Nazarene Young People's Societies, brought some very interesting and profitable lectures on the subject "The Psychology of

Rev. Charles Smith

Holiness." The attendance was so large that it was necessary to have the lectures _in the Fine Arts Auditorium. Climaxing a great year of spiritual blessings, the spring revival was a means of genuine spiritual uplift with Rev. Mack Anderson of Ada, Oklahoma, as the evangelist. Rev. Anderson's messages were straight from the shoulder and driven home by interesting and forceful illustrations. Thestudents of Bethany-Peniel College appreciate the effort of their leaders to give them the best in religious leadership.

Rev. U. E. Harding

Rev. Lebron-Velasquez

175

Dr. G eorge Frame

PRAYER AND FASTING LEAGUE The PRAYER AND FASTING LEAGUE is the largest student religious organization on the campus. Each Friday noon between 150 and 200 young people meet in the College Church to -spend an hour in communion with the Lord. The main purpose of the league is to contribute to the development of the student's devotional life. The services this year have been highlighted by an intense sincerity of purpose. Following an impressive devotional program and opportunities for prayer requests, the major part of the hour is spent in prayer. The unusual quality of the spiritual fervor is suggested by the fact that altar services have climaxed many of these noon-tide hours . The leaders have contributed much to the religious experiences of our young people by spending considerable time in personal work. Left: Albert Gamble, President. Above: (first row) Hieronymus, H e rrin, O' Donley, B a rna rd, . N ye, Stoc kton, Buffington, Gamble, Ingersol, Floyd, Gault, K e nt, Cloud , H or s t , Ingle. (Second row) Hale , Mosshart, Bake r , Sulliva n, Moore , Lindley, Colson, Wininger, Phillips, Hinkle, Rutledge, Pults, Oa k es, Broc k, Johnso n , Dickerson, Hanlon, Parham, Crilly, King, Reed, Sutton. (Third r ow) Potter , Karns, Janzen , Setliff, Brun1mett, Cason , Gas.on , Wes t , Norris, H ope, Sullivan, Bohannon, F'riesen , Lynn , Barnes, Cherry , Ge org e, J o n es, Snowbarger, Kellogg. (Fourth row) Huma n , Dots on , Luthe r , Raym er , Taylor, Courtney, Wade, F a rmer, B ohannon , Horn, F r a n ce, McCall, Fletcher, Alexander, Wade, Bolerjack, Cla uson, Cocn er, B utler, Snowbarger. (Fifth row) Emmert, Edwa rds , Wood , Wiggs, M esser, B utl e r , Collett, Porter, Twinning路, Alge r, Baldwin, Lampp, Couc hman , K a rns . (Sixth row) Masters, Williams, Faulkner, Smith, Kifer, Sle dge , R eneger, Davis, MacArthur, . Pults, Felton, McCollum, Gree n , B eck e l. H a ley , Baker, Belcher. (Seventh row) 路 Thompson, Carter, Brown, Ladd, Cra wford, Russell , McMahon, Hall, Cason , Harris, Porter, Bebo路ut, Conra d , S cott, Johnson .

176

GOSPEL TEAM 'f.he GOSPEL TEAM ha_s a two-fold purpose: ( 1 ) to foster among the students a greater interest in personal evangelism; and ( 2) to send out groups or individuals for Christian service during the school year.

During the first semester the main activities included revival services in Marlow, Oklahoma, and Fort Worth, Texas, conducted by the McMahon Quartet Group; a District Young People's Convention by the Married Men's Quartet; and several tours with Dr. Finch by the Sophomore Quartet. Second semester gave major emphasis to week-end meetings and N .Y.P.S . services in near-by churches. Other activities of the year were centered in personal visitation work. In connection with the other religious organizations the entire town of Bethany was visited during the Fall and Spring Revivals. Several groups were a means of inspiration at the Crippled Children's Home near the College campus, where they visited on Sunday afternoons. R igh t : Boyd Kifer, Pres id en t B e low: (Fir s t r ow) Nor r is, M c Maho n , Sha nno n, Kifer, Inge~s o l,. Oa k es. (Second row) L indl e y , P hilli ps, Hinkl e, Rutl ed g e, Pults, Broc'k, 路King, Gau lt, Nye, Barnard. (Third r ow ) Russell, MUrphy West, Johns on, Dickerson , F ri esen , S t ockto n, H a nlon, J on es , K e nt Hieronymu s, Mossh art. (Fou r th r ow) L ee, Emm ert , Dotson , Potter, J a nze n , McCall, Fletc h er , Alexand er, Cla u son, Butl er, Snowba r ger , H e rrin . (Fifth r ow) Thurma n , R h od es, Raym e r , Co u r tn ey, W a d e; Farm er, Turbiville, Porte r , Twinning, Alge r , W a d e, Buffin g t on , Ch evealli e r, H a le . (Sixth r ow ) Hinkle , Willia ms, Faulk ner , S m ith , Sledge, R e n eger , McArthur , Pults , F e lter, B eckel, Gree n , J oh nson, J e rniga n . ( S eventh row) Tho mpso n, H a rrison, Hall, Carte r, Ladd, R u ssell , H a rris, P orte r, Cas o n , S c r oggins, B ebout, Conra d, Col e.

177

MISSIONARY BAND The MISSIONARY BAND meets once a month to create and develop interest in missionary endeavor. Although the group of approximately 75 students who attend are not all called to the foreign fields, included in the membership are young people who at present are preparing for service in Africa, India, Australia, South America, Borneo, and the countries of Europe. In the regular meetings this group has been privileged to have a number of special speakers such as: Chaplain A. D. Grim, Dr. C . A. McConnell, Prof. C. H. Wiman, and Chaplain E. E. Hale. In one service of particular interest one of B.P.C.'s war veterans, Lively Crawford (Freshman), told of the need of missionary work in the South Pacific area. In an effort to increase missionary interest and influence, a number of effective programs have been given in Oklahoma churches. Those who were privileged to see and hear the "Candle-light Program" will not soon forget the import of its message. MISSIO NARY BAND Left: William Marsh, President Above: (F'irst row) Ladd, Wade, Marsh, Wiman, Fletc h er, Inger sol. (Second row) West, Hale, Mosshart, Lindley, Friesen, Nye, Gault, Brock, Herrin, Hieronymus . (Third row) Johnson, Russell, Hinkle, Alexander, Snowbarger, Kent, Stoc kton, Oakes, King. (Fourth row) Murphy, Janzen, Jones . Clauson, Hanlon, Beckel, Brumm ett. (Fifth row) Landtroop, Thurman , Courtney, Porter, Twinning, Alger, Steele, Beaty. (Sixth row) Buffington, Hinkle, Williams, Faulkner, Reneger, McArthur, McCollum, Felter, Cheveallier, Cloud. (Seventh row) Patton, Kifer , Carter, Porter,

178

Scroggins, Harris, Bebout,

Conrad, Johnson.

STUDENT PASTORS: (First row) Clester Pults, Jacob Stands, Garrett Wilson, H. C. Emmert, James Hudson. (Second row) Louis McMahon, Eugene Scroggins, Noble Hathaway, Carl Ingersol, and Albert Gamble. SUNDAY SCHOOL TEACHERS: (First row) Helen Faye Moore, Veatrice Butler, Delene Stockton, Blanche Andrew. (Second row ) Goldie Phillips, Lettie Wade, Virginia Couchman, Talmadge Stands. (Third row) Vernon Ledbetter, John Harper, Dean Wessels, Loy Watson, and Lively Crawford.

179

RELIGIOUS ACTIVITIES

MISSIONARY BAND PROGRAM includes : Bill Porter, Reba West, Werth Sistrunk, Grace Ohsfeldt, Lettie Wade, Willie Marsh (President), Sandy Faulkner, Beverly James, Vivian Beckel, Betty Thurman, Vernon Ledbetter, and Goldie Phillips.

CHAPLAIN A. D. GRIM stirred the Missionary Band with a message on the spiritual needs of the war-torn areas of the earth.

The emptiness of heathen worship is portrayed by Avis Hinkle w!Io kneels before an image of Buddha in the "Candlelight Service."

180

One of the most popular and interesting speakers of the year was CHAPLAIN WILSON LANPHER, who appeared in chapel four different times.

ALBERT GAMBLE, a leader in religious activities on the campus, helped to initiate organized visitation programs in the town of Bethany and was so successful in his endeavors that the College Church selected him to serve in the capacity of Church Visitor.

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ARROW

THE ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CHORUS presented a cantata, "The Christ Child" in the church auditorium Sunday evening, December 9. The 160 members of! the mass choir are shown above with their leader, Prof. C. C. Crill (center ) . Soloists were: Mrs. Eva Mae Harper, contralto; Prof. Duane Smith, tenor; Mr. Clark Brandt, baritone; Miss Elizabeth Nelson, soprano; (front row center).

MOVING DAY passed without any serious mishaps, but Verna Dunn, Tillie Cate, and Pill Roeber look distressed as Douglas Meador and Harold Blakenship "rock the boat" in their endeavor to help the girls move to their new dorm home.

184

THE FIRST 700TH REGISTRANT in the history of the College, Mary Louise Trager, is being instructed about her transcripts by Prof. Wiman, Registrar.

February 5, was OJ)e of the most important days of the yearthe Board of Trustees visited the campus and the Alumni basketball team played the College All-Stars . Starting off with a challenging chapel service in which Dr. G . B. Williamson ( upper left ), pastor of First Church Kansas City and former President of E.N.C ., brought the message, the

Board spent a busy day making plans for the coming year. A few, however, found time for a leisure chat (upper fight ) . Despite their stiff muscles and creaking joints the Alumni team (bottom) managed to gather 18 points while the All-Stars rolled up a measley 63 markers . Charles Hastings Smith and Julian Biggers were up to par in entertaining the spectators. This proved to be a good substitute for points .

ALUMNI TEAM: (First row) Charles H. Smith, John E. Roberts, Dick Littrell , Julian Biggers. (Second row ) Herman Beaver, Leon Jennings, \ Vavne Cozzins, Lesrer Dunn, \ Villis Snowbarger.

185

THE LIBRARY On the second floor of Bresee Hall one finds the college library. Here are reading materials for all purposes: for classwork, for spiritual aid, and for pleasure.

When approaching the entry way to "ye reading room" a newcomer is impressed by numerous signs warning one not to talk too loudly or hold detailed conversations with his friends. If he has any inclination to studiousness at all he readily . appreciates this effort of Mrs. Elizabeth Willis, head librarian, to make the library conclusive to study. Just inside the library doors is the desk where books are checked in and out, fines are charged and collected, and information is given free of charge. To the left of the desk is the card file in which each book and magazine in the library is listed for convenience in locating them. Behind the desk are the stacks . They contain books on every possible subject. In 1944 the Student Council sponsored a book drive which brought the total number of books to nearly 15,000. Each year new books are purchased from the library fund to provide up-to-date references for the different classes. Much of the success and efficiency of the library is due to the excellent supervision of Mrs. Willis, whose office is conveniently located at the east of the stacks. She has spent a number of years in public library work and holds her degree in Library Science 路from the University of Oklahoma. To assist in the detail work, Mrs. Willis has thirteen student assistants -eleven girls and two boys. At the west of the stacks is the reference room where one finds bound copies of the outstanding secular and religious periodicals covering a period of several years. In the library proper is found a large reading room accomodating approximately one hundred fifty students. Along the walls of the reading room are the reference shelves containing encyclopedias, Bible reference books, commentaries, and other general reference materials. In conspicous racks, conveniently placed, are current newspapers, magazines, government and other official reports, and "bestsellers." Beautiful paintings adorn the walls of the library and give one a greater appreciation for the finer things of life. The students of Bethany-Peniel College are proud of their library. It is an enjoyable place to study because of the atmosphere, the pleasant lighting, the attractive way in which it is decorated, and because

there one finds educational enlightenment, food for . his soul, and books of laughter for a lonely hour.

186

LIBRARY. Mrs. Willis ..

Neil Hightower, Calvin Rainbolt, and Marietta \Villsey get expert assistance from Rosy Williams and

187

HOME ECONOMICS. Clothing design and construction are major activities in the Home Economics lab. (Left to right) Avis Duffey, Margie Cherry, Rosy Williams, Milly Hale, Ruth Carter, Marie Rowlett, Margaret Girard, and Sue

Lampp.

188

HOMI: I:CONOMICS DI:PARTMENT The Home Economic Department specializes in teaching future housewives and teachers the fine points of clothing, foods, and home management. In the Foods Classes the girls not only bake good pies, but they learn to serve them with poise. Good coffee is also one of their major accomplishments. Visitors to the campus furnish a good excuse for meeting class requirements of preparing and serving a luncheon, a dinner, or a tea. One also learns to bake delicious, fluffy, golden-crowned biscuits and light bread. Usually some of the professors and fellow students are called in to serve as official testers and critics.

In the Nutrition Class, besides the "heavy book-work," dietary needs based on daily campus activities are calculated and special menus are prepared. One of the most interesting courses is that of Color and Design. Here one learns the basic principles of attractive interior decorating and pleasing costume design selection. After a careful study of their present wardrobes and determining the style and color of possible additions, the students master techniques and skills of making and remodeling their own clothes in the Clothing Construction Classes. Upper division work in the department consists of classes in Child Development, Home Management, Home Relationships, and Home Decoration. These courses are made intensely interesting through the use of round-table discussions, guest speakers, experiments, observation, and demonstrations. The department offers some forty-eight hours of work-thirty-eight of which are required for a maror. Those receiving their degree in Home Economics are given a formal tea at commencement time as a fitting climax of their successful college career.

189

SCI~NC~ D~PARTMENT The Bethany-Peniel College department of science touches nearly every student on the campus sometime during his college career, because several science hours are required for almost any recognized degree. Some students feel that the time spent in a science class is mere drudgery, while others eat, drink, and talk science from dawn to dark. One cam路 pus critic has remarked that the only people who really dislike all the sciences are those who know absolutely nothing or very little about them, for once one really understands what science is about, he can't help being interested in some phase of it. Zoology is taught by Prof. E. V. Greer. This year he has instructed the largest class ever enrolled in this subject about the intricacies of life from the anatomy of an amieba to the disection of a cat. Numerous colored charts and enlarged models of various organisms have been added to the equipment this year. Maurine Dickerson and Grace Horst are the laboratory assistants. Herman Parrish, an ex-serviceman, is teaching the navigation classes. He is a former army captain and was instructor in an army flying school in Texas, consequently Mr. Parrish's knowledge 路 froiJl books has been amply supplemented by practical experience. The chemistry department is rapidly developing under the expert direction of Prof. Boyd Shannon. Classroom and laboratory instruction has been greatly aided by the addition of new materials. Prof. Shannon has given outstanding evidence of his efficiency in teaching a large class of gen~al chemistry students all about molecules and atoms, and their reactions. Virginia Moore; Don Beaver, and Ann France provide excellent assistance in mixing those mysterious "unknowns" and answering many questions for the newcomers. Prof. Hall makes you feel right at home in the physics class. From his ample instruction one learns the whys and wherefores behind the electric light, the radio, the combustion engine, and the laws of physical science. In this class, Prof. Hall passes all of the questions that he cannot answer on to his assistant, Calvin Rainbolt, who invariably knows where to find the solution-See Prof. Hall.

190

SCIENCE. Prof. Shannon and Herman Parrish try a new experiment with a complicated apparatus.

191

COMMERCIAL. Prof. Danskin looks on as his typing class "beats out its assignment."

192

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT One of the newest departments on the campus is the Commercial Department.

Professor D. R. Danskin has efficiently organized and co-ordinat~d the subjects offered, thereby making a strong department. The courses in business education are 'of several kinds designed to meet different needs. The student whose aim is to master the techniques applicable to secretarial positions may follow the TwoYear Secretarial Course. Those interested in business education preparatory to teaching in the public schools may follow the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Education. Students who receive this degree meet the current requirements for a life certificate for teaching in the public schools 路 of Oklahoma. The Business Law class is one of the most interesting. It affords one an opportunity to become acquainted with the intricacies of the law in business dealings. Practical experience is gained through presentation of cases in the classroom and by excursions to the law courts in Oklahoma City for路 observation. Most of the other courses in the Commercial Department are on different phases of stenography. Shorthand is offered, and practice is given in' taking dictation and transcription. The more modern elements of office procedure are included in instruction in the use of the dictaphone. Students who have enrolled in these classes have been able to p.ut their knowledge to use in doing secretary work in the administration offices or for the professors. Typing is a very popular subject. It has been discovered by many students that secretaries are not the only ones who benefit from this class. Term papers, English composition, and notebooks have a far more pleasing , appearance when the author has learned the fine points of typing. Bookkeeping and accounting are also offered. These are subjects which are useful to the average person in his everyday li(e. One learns how to make out a personal budget and put it into practice, as well as the more complicated procedures of commercial bookkeeping.

t

193

BOOK FIVE

It may be elevating symphonic strains; the inspiration to follow "In His Steps," motivated by the challenge of a dramatic presentation; or the recital on ENOCH ARDEN that deepens appreciation for the expression of. literature-but it all pertains to the refinement of cultural tastes by aesthetic training. The quickening of the ECHO reporter's "news-ear" in response to unusual commotion indicates a growth of personality and practice in portraying school life. Whether one is enticed to become an ARROW salesman, write copy, interview "characters," or develop films, he is enriching himself by the versatility of his campus experiences. The Honor Society pin wearer realizes that knowledge must be "worked for, studied for, thought for, and prayed for." True cultivation is that which gives us sympathy with every form of human life, enabling us to work most successfully for its advancement. Then it is that the common and the uncommon things are etherealized and animated by the sheen of true appreciation.

CULTURAL DEVELOPME NT 196

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Harriett Adams plavs the practice organ

FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT The Fine Arts Department is one of the fastest growing departments of BethanyPeniel College. During the second semester of this year 380 students were enrolled. There were approximately 600 private lessons given each week. The entire curriculum has been revised to meet the state requirements for degrees and the requirements of the National Association of Schools of Music. A three manual Moler Church organ has been purchased by the department and will be installed in the near future. This instrument will be known as the "H. 0. Fanning Memorial Pipe Organ." In order to make organ lessons available this year, an electric practice organ (pictured above) was installed, and seven students have taken lessons. Degrees are offered as follows: B . Mus. in piano, voice, organ, and church music. B. Mus. Ed. in vocal and instrumental public school music. The B. F. A. is offered for those who desire a general fine arts degree. English and Speech are included in this latter degree.

197

A CAPPELLA and TREBLE CI-IOIR

Peggv Doing, Clester Pults, recitalists

The two most important vocal groups on the campus are the A Cappella Choir and the Treble Choir directed by Prof. C. C. Crill and Miss Elizabeth Nelson, respectively. Each group is limited to forty voices selected each semester. The officers of A Cappella Choir are: President, George Moore; Vice-President, Carroll Harville; Secretary, Elizabeth Hale. The A Cappella Choir sang one Sunday evening of each month at the local First Church. It has also presented programs at Norman, Guthrie, Oklahoma City First Church, Britton, and the Youth for Christ in Oklahoma City. In the spring a tour of the Western Oklahoma, Eastern Oklahoma, and Kansas Districts was made. Arrangements are in progress for future tours that will cover the entire Educational Zone in the next four years. The Treble Choir is an all girls' organization with Doris Waggoner as the accompanist. President is Nova Baker, and the Secretary is Reba West. Dressed in chic uniforms of black skirts and white blouses with a monogramed treble clef, the group makes a very impressive appearance. Some of the outstanding numbers presented by the choir have been "The Lord's Prayer," "So's I Can Write My Name," and the old favorite, "Were You There," sung as background music for the reading, "The Crucifixion," from "God's Trombone" read by Mabel Cooner. This organization has appeared in ensemble programs, church services, and at the Youth for Christ in Oklahoma City.

Celestine IJorn , Jov Beaver, recitalists

\ Vilma Haley, Stevie IJope, recita lists

198

A CAPPELLA: (First row ) L. R. Thompson, Lindley, E. Hale, E. Dawson, Fauss, Hollingsworth, Roeber, Nash. (Second row) Dotson, Casey, Beaver, Janzen , Norris, Haley, Fugita, V. Hale, Lucas. (Third row) Faulkner, Harville, D. Beaver, G. Moore, M. Lunn, R. Thompson, Plemons, Cel. Horn. (Fourth row ) 路wiggs, McArthur, Hadduck, Finch, J. Harrison, Hightower, Ball. (Fifth row ) Patton, C. Horn, Jernigan , L. Thompson, Snow.

J.

TREBLE CHOIR : (First row ) \Vaggoner, (pianist ) Hargraves, Dunn, P Jones, Lynn, Farmer, West, Gillespie, Sistrunk, Hieronymus, Miss Nelson (conductor). (Second row ) Sutton, France, Purgason, Parham, J. Horn, Clay, Cooner, Masters, Setliff, Stockton. (Third row ) Lampp, Williams, M. Thompson, Beatty, Rice, Hyden, White, Haley, Dockery, N . Baker, Lee, V. Moore.

199

BAND: (First row) Vinson, Harden, Draper, Scott, E. LaDue, Groseclaud, E. Rhodes. (Second row) Brummett, Heap, Farmer, C. Lucas, E. LaDue, Raymer, F. Cason, Carter, Horn, Harris, Kifer. (Third row) Flick, Smith, Neal, McGill, Winters, Hathaway, Thorne (instructor ) , George, Hayes, Bamilton, Kellogg, Shirey, McWilliams.

ORC~ESTRA

Willis Flick, instructor

and BAND

The Band was organized this year for the first time and was directed by Prof. \ Vayne Thorne. It has become one of the most popular campus organizations, having presented numerous concerts and programs. The first presentation of the band was on Jamboree night, and the last appearance of the year was a concert in May, which proved to be the crowning success of the year's efforts. With the return of a number of former servicemen, the band has been greatly strengthened both in quality and quantity. Among the outstanding additions is Willis Flick, a former professional clarinet and saxaphone artist, who has been a student instructor in woodwind instruments. Numbers included in their repertoire are: "Morning, Noon, and Night Overture," "Invitation To the Waltz," and "Ballet Egyptien Suite." A small band, composed of ten instruments, has played each week for the basketball games. Prof. Thorne also directs the college orchestra which is a combination of string, woodwind, brass, and precussion instruments. It has played three successful concerts and made appearances at the Oklahoma City First Church and at a student body assembly. Prominent among their selections are : "Triumphal March," "II Bachio," "Valse Triste," "In a Persian Market," and "Minuet in E Flat."

200

PIANO ENSEMBLE : Lois Elaine Stone, Doris Waggoner, Rosie Hollingsworth , Earlene Harris, Barney Clemons, Mrs. Alice Crill (director ), Joan Frank, Jean Purgason, Virginia Duffey, Pill Roeber, Merreta Kellogg.

BRASS CLASS: Bill McGill, Curtis Hom , Elton Rhodes.

ORCHESTRA : (First row) Hoag, Bolerjack, Scott, LaDue, Nye, Human. (Second row) McGill, Beaty, Rainbolt, LaDue, Brummett, Flick, T wining, Bockmann . (Third row) Osfelc!t, 0. Baldwin, George, Hamilton , Kellogg, Thorne (director ), Rhodes,_ \Vilson, Carter, Harville (pianist ) , Horn , Murphy, T . Rhodes.

201

QUARTETS Students with outstanding vocal talent are grouped together for quartet and trio work. This year there have been nine ladies' organizations and five men's. Prominent among the girl's groups are the Abilene and Cleo Trios and the Aeolian Quartet. During the year they have contributed music for chapel programs, church services, and college tours. A trio of prospective missionaries includes Vivian Beckel, Daurthyq~arie Faulkner, and Goldie Phillips. A sextet, composed of Reba West, Mary Jo Horn, Mabel Cooner, Nova Baker, Ann France, Mary Lou Thompson was selected from the Treble Choir. One of the five male quartets sang in. cllapel on Monday of each week. On Sundays these groups

SOPHOMORE QUARTET : Boyd Kifer, Lewis Thompson, Neil Hightower, Jack Harrison. VICTORY QUARTET : Deward Finch, Lloyd Taylor, Virgil Taylor, Ed Hadduck.

McMAHON EVANGELISTIC PARTY: Wayne Sledge, Louis McMahon, Hall, Richard Snow.

J. Walter

202

TRIOS participated in services in neighboring churches, and often took time out to hold revival meeting. Revivals have been conducted in Oklahoma, Kansas, and Texas during the year. The Sophomore Quartet made two tours with Dr. Finch in Kansas and Texas. The McMahon Evangelistic Party kept busy in week-end services, young people's. rallies, and largescale revivals. The Married Men's Quartet participated in the Kansas District N.Y. P. S. Convention, and sang in neighboring churches. Each of these groups has endeavored to make a lasting contribution to the spiritual welfare of the churches where they have sung. The main purpose has been to win the youth of our Educational Zone to Christ.

AEOLIAN QUARTET: Grace Horst, Frances Wiggs, Mabel Ball, Rosy Hollingsworth. DAWSON 'TRIO: Bernice Dawson, Charlene Jernigan, Eilene Dawson.

ABILENE AND CLEO TRIOS: Barbara Human, Nan Fugita, Beulah Lindley, Deloris Hale, Esther Dotson, Merretta Kellogg.

203

SPEEC~

DEPARTMENT

The Speech Department deals with four phases of expression : public speaking, debate, interpretation, and dramatics. There is a total enrollment of 225 in the department and five teachers. In the annual dramatics presentation a series of four one act plays were given . These were: "The Confessional," directed by Delene Stockton; a comedy, "Thursday Evening," directed by Helen Faye Moore; a 路tragedy, " Hearts Enduring," directed by Blanche Andrew; and a religious play, "The Challenge of the Cross," directed by Ruth Parham. Three students presented graduate speech recitals. On November 2 Blanche Andrew gave "An Evening With Tennyson," featuring a condensation of the famous poem "Enoch Arden." A male quartet sang "Crossing the Bar" and "Sweet and Low." Mariana Sears provided background music on the organ. Wana Walker featured "Poetry Written in America's Three Greatest Wars-the Civil War, World War ,1, and World War II." Patriotic decorations gave an appropriate setting, and favorite songs of the different wars were sung by the Sophomore quartet .. On November 30, Helen Faye Moore presented "Tell Me the Story of Jesus" by giving in scripture and poetry the various phases of the life of Christ. The outstanding part of her program was a portion from the famous book, "The Robe," by Lloyd Douglas. She w~s assisted by Carroll Harville and Virginia Hoag.

Mrs. Lundy, Prof. McClung

Blanche Andrew

Wana vValker

204

Helen Faye Moore

Blanche Andre\\路

DEBATE The Debate squad, under the direction of Prof. Harper Welch, had a very profitable year. Participating in several tournaments, the Bethany teams came out on top in competition with leading colleges and universsities of the middle western states. The question this year was, RESOLVED : that the United States should direct its policy toward the establishment of free trade among the nations of the world . Going to Ada, Oklahoma, for the first tournament December l to 3, the teams made a good showing. Deward Finch and Tommie Johnson were undefeated 路 in the mixed division, and Myrna Close and Blanche Andrews placed first in the Junior women's division. A trip to Springfield, Missouri, in January netted a "world victory." However, George Moore came through with a second in oratory. The whole debate class was privileged to participate in a practice tournament at the University of Oklahoma at Norman . Bethany-Peniel College was honored to have Tommie Johnson chosen as one of four speakers to appear before the Oklahoma Education Association in an exhibition forum. The biggest and most important tourney of the year, The Savage Forensic, came during the first week of March at Durant, Oklahoma. In this event eighteen states were represented by their leading universities. Competition was keen. After "sweating out" the preliminary rounds and pulling through to the final s our team of Deward Finch and Tommie Johnson defeated a crack team from University of Louisiana 路 to win the trophy in the senior mixed division .

G ene Dalaba Eel Haddock Tommie Johnson D ewarcl Finch

D ebate Troph v

205

PLAY CAST : (standing ) J. R. Smith, Paul Simpson, Carroll Harville, Danford Alger, Meredith Bebout, Lillie Mae Davenport, Mary Jo Horn, Mabel Cooner, George . Moore, Jim Hamilton, Reyndal Russell, James Hudson , Jr:ugene Verbeck . (Seated ) Harriett Adams, Ann France, Delene Stockton, Stevie Hope.

JUNIOR CLASS PLAY The Junior Class Play this year, according to students, faculty, ministers, and friends, "would be a credit to any school, anywhere." In keeping with the high ideals of the College, a script with a definite spiritual emphasis-"IN HIS STEPS" - was chosen. Mrs. Talmadge Stands, a major in the Speech Department, directed the cast in a most efficient manner. Playing the part of Rev. Maxwell was George Moore. A great deal of the credit for the success of the play goes to Paul Simpson, the stage manager, who also played the part of Rev. Gray. The ticket sales contest, won by Don and Joy Beaver, was such a booming success that it was necessary to give the performance on two sepal'ate evenings. Those largely respon-

sible for the excellent organization of the sales program and fine exhibition of the class project were the President of the Class, Jim Ha~ilton, and the Sponsor, Prof, Welch .

206

HONOR SOCIETY: (Standing) Gene Verbeck. (First row) Horst, Miss Fess (Sponsor), A. Mizell. (Second row) G. Moore, Close, L. Andrew, B. Andrew, Belcher, Ladd. (Tl1ird row) Johnson, Herrin, Jernigan, Beatty, Hayes, Murphy, King, Snowbarger. (Fourth row ) Classen , ·Rogers, E. Hale, D. Beaver, Wessels. (Fifth row) H. F. Moore, Stockton, M. Dickerson, Simpson, McGill, Cole.

Gene Verbeck, President

P~ l

DELTA LAMBDA

The Phi Delta Lambda Honor Society is not necessarily made up of the "brains" of the college. As Pre~ident Verbeck pointed out to a chapel group, the members of this · group have been successful mainly because they study consistently, work · hard, and use their time wisely. Membership in this organization is achieved when one 'has . earned a grade point ratio of 2.50 for two consecutive semesters while carrying a full college load. Permanent membership is Iccorded those students who have a four-year ratio of at least 2.40. In the spring two major activities were sponsored by the Eta Chapter. A very impressive candle-light installation service .vas presented in chapel in which the new members, elected 1t the beginning of s·econd semester, were officially taken into :he society. Those receiving ·reeognition in this program were: "'ova Baker, Howard Bynum, Melva Jean Karns, Colleen Karns, ::laude Northcutt, Loretta Oakes, Marieta Snowbarger, Bob froutman, and Eula Merle Simpson. The year's activities :losed with a banquet in March. The officers of the Chapter are Eugene Verbeck, President;

::;.eorge Moore, Vice-President; Grace Horst, Secretary; and Vliss Ruth Fess, Sponsor.

207

ARROW Work on tht:: 1946 ARROW began last spring soon after the student body elections. Plans were laid on the basis of not only publishing a book for the enjoyment of the student body, but of preparing one that could be sent out over the Educational Zone to portray the advantages of Bethany-Peniel College. When plans for production were completed . an enormous task loomed up before the staff-the preparing of at least 100 pages more than ever before, the inaugurating of a subscription camp'aign, the contacting of all the churches on the Zone for advertisement, the taking and developing of hundreds of pictures . . . November 16 the Subscription Campaign was launched in a rousing Student Body Assembly. The results of the initial attempt at volume sales for the ARROW was very successful. The Seniors won the class competition with sales equalling 58 % of the membership of their class. Curtis Horn and Mary Ellen Herrin won individual honors with 43 and 36. sales respectively. Louis McMahon, assisted by Dean \V es.sels, did a grand job as Business Manager, formulating the largest advertising section ever to appear in an ARROW. The credit for doing all of the "dirty work" and supervising the make-up of the book goes to Almeta Mizell, the Associate Editor. There was never a task too hard for her to undertake. Harper L. Cole, Editor

Prof. Thorne, Sponsor

ARROW STAFF: (First row ) West, Murphy, Sanford, Jernigan, J. Mizell, V . Hale. (Second row) France, Horst, Stands, Herrin, (Third row ) 0. Riggs, L. Andrew, M. Lunn, Smith.

208

STAFF Elizabeth Hale, Literary Editor, is the girl who always knows the right word to use at the right time. The fact that there are a

larger number of write-ups in this ARROW than usual made her job just that much harder. The lonesome job of the staff-darkroom manager-fell to the girl from Minnesota, Ethel Francis. Her patience and good nature helped to "balance the crew." In order to keep the Editor and Business Manager straight, Jackie Mizell and Grace Horst were "hired" as Staff Secretary and Financial Secretary. Many others shared in writing, make-up, photography, and selling ads to help make this book what it is. Our ever-faithful sponsor, Prof. Thorne, was always on hand when problems were to be worked out, when major decisions of policy were formulated, and when refreshments were served. And what of the Editor? He sat back and "cracked the whip" while the others did the work. After all, there have to be some advantages in being "boss." Several innovations are included in the 1946 ARROW-infra-red photography, increased number of pages, more literary material, student index, kodachrome pictures, and, most of all, the lithographic process of reproduction. We hope that you will be proud of your '46 ARROW! Louis 0 . McMahon, Business fv!anager

Elizabeth Hale, Literary Director

Almeta Mizell, Associate Editor Dean \Vessels, Asst. Bus. Mgr.

209

Ethel Francis, Production Manager

REVEILLE

EC~O

STAFF

The work of the Reveille Echo staff was highly efficient this year in making their publication a complete and accurate report of 路all happenings on the campus. Realizing that the college newspaper is but a mirror, every !Zlews report was brought before the public in its own true light. The editor and the staff both desired that the paper be in line with high !journalistic standards and at the same time portray Bethany-Peniel's own distinctive spirit. Failure to take this into consideration would indeed be a. fallacy and the Echo would fall short of its own purpose. During the first semest~r, under the editorship of Perry Tudor, the paper was changed from four to eight pages. This gave the publication a more attractive appearance, and provided room for more advertising and news articles. Bruce Wade, Business Manager, who has a knack for salesmanship, was so successful with his advertising section that, with the allotment from the student council, there was sufficient money' to provide added equipment for the staffroom. Two portable typewriters, beveled-edged glass desk tops, fluorescent desk lamps, a metal filing cabinet, a Meriam-Webster unabridged dictionary, several large waste baskets, and a gas stove were purchased . . At mid-semester Alma Jean Lunn, popular junior co-ed, was selected to' guide the fortunes of the Echo for the remainder of the year. She endeavored to edit a paper that would have 'public appeal with the students, the faculty, and the college constituency. Alma Jean's right-hand-man and Associate Editor was her 'kid' brother, Mervel. It seems that the Lunn's are "naturals" in the publishing business. Together they have done a grand job of presenting an Eclw which was enthusiastically received by everyone. Seven departmental editors assisted in the 194 5-46 production: Charlene Moore (News), Elizabeth Hale, (Religion) , 路Grace Horst (Feature) , Olen Riggs and Mary Ellen Herrin (Sports), and Lee Dona Kerr (Make-up) . Bonnie Coppock, cartoonist, gave sparkle to the paper and also to the sraffroom by her interesting drawings. One of the most important members of the staff, Prof. J. W. Moore, sponsor, worked quietly behind the scenes, but his advice and counsel were major factors in giving the paper' its high quality.

Alma Jean Lunn, Editor Bruce Wade, Business Manager.

210 .

STAFF : (First row) Grace Horst, Charlene Moore, Vangie Hale, Elizabeth Hale, Mary Ellen Herrin.· (Second ·row} Ann Franc~, Olen Riggs, Bonnie Coppock, Veatrice Butler, Ruth Ulmet, Virginia Moore, Mary Louise Trager, Georgiamae Fry, Lewis Thompson, Charlene Jernigan. (Not in picture) Lee Doria Kerr, Gene Dalaba, Nan Fugita, Clara Jean Smith, Don Beaver, Ruth Parham, George Moore, Rachel Belcher, Charlene Wooten, Lloyd Taylor, Bill McGill, Lois Elaine Stone, Calvin Rainbolt.

In . recognition of. outstanding service, honor keys were given to the departmental editors as a permanent recognition of their fine service in journalism this year. The entire · volume of the fourteen .issues of this year's Echo was bound and presented to the college library to be a part of the permanent files. It is hoped that each future editor will make it part of his policy to ·give succeeding classes an opportnuity to view the highlights of the past terms with a bound volume of his publication. The Reveiiie Echo has efficiently served its purposestudents found outlets for creative expression, the spirit of cooperati.on was generated in working to meet bi'-monthly deadlines, interests of the college were unified and promoted, and the leadership qualities in the various editors

were developed. Congratulations to · a grand editor and her excellent staff for an Echo that was tops! Mervel Lunn, Associate Editor (Center) Prof. Moore, Sponsor (Bottom)

211

ARROW

It's a date!

JUNIOR-SENIOR The Junior and Senior Classes took a "Bon Voyage" on the good ship "S. S. Bethany," one of the Blue Pacific Company's great white fleet, on Thursday evening, February 21. Sailing from the Biltmore Hotel with George Moore at the helm, the happy passengers

A pressing mn tter

Finishing touches

They're off

214

End of a perfect day

BANQU ET were entranced by the beautiful music played by Doris Waggoner and Virginia Hoag, radio operators. The voyage was brought to a successful conclusion by a thought provoking address from "L'Envoi," Rev. L. J. DuBois.

Good night!

Watch your step, please

Elmer and Marjorie ...

215

WORK STUD~NTS Many of B.P.C.'s students have the privilege of working their way through school. A number of this fortunate group are pictured on these pages, ranging from "boss" to "chauffer" to "k.p.'s." Beside these there are numerous individuals who work in stores in Bethany and Oklahoma City, the Post Offices, hospitals, telephone office, in the college dining hall, administrative offices . .. By working these persons gain greater appreciation for their education and at the same time contribute a large share in making their town and college better.

"Gene" Scroggins, \V ork Supervisor.

Bertha Rutl edge, Mrs. Drewry, Betty Manners, and D orothy M oore, kitchen crew.

Ralph Buffington, chief fix-it man .

216

Archie Marsh and Burl Scroggins, K.P .

Boyd Kifer, official chauffer.

Richard Thompson, watch repairman.

John Hathaway, janitor.

Betty Ruth Lynch, secretarv to the business manager and 'Vestern Union girl.

"Gene" Verbeck, machinist.

Clester Fults, bird-bath expert.

Curtis Horn and Lewis Thompson , work on music; Prof. Smith works his mouth; Jack Harrison works on a candy bar.

B. A. Patton, broom-man.

217

Loretta Oakes, pastor's secretary.

THE DRAG "THE DRAG" is without question the most popular place on the campus. It is here that one can go to play ping pong, pound on the piano, gossip with a friend, eat his meals, buy an ice cream cone, let off steam, or just do nothing. The casual atmosphere created by "Papa Dragon" -Albert Gamble- and his helpers contributes in a large measure to the success of the College recreational center. In the spring of 1944 the Drag came into being. At th<1t time there was one large room with a make-shift counter and some game equipment. The Student Council in 1945 took as their project for the year the remodeling of this establishment and installed an A-1 fountain with a separate lunch room. This year the Drag has increased in popularity and usefulness and relieved many otherwise dreary hours for the campus gang.

Albert Gamble, " Papa Dragon."

Verna Dunn, Beulah Lindley, Reyndal Russell, and Evelyn Hudgens know how to give the best fountain service in Betham¡.

â&#x20AC;˘ 218

Ruth Casey, Genieve Wilson, M . L. Davis, and Lloyd Taylor look at pictures and chat while eating breakfast.

Margaret Henderson plays ping pong, while " Celery" Horn, " Mibs" Lunn, Leonard Akin, and "Fuzzy" Riggs watch the fun.

Mary Lou Langford and Deward Finrh "study" and have a "friendly" chat.

219

The " Cason twins" enjoy the company of Ted Cottam and Albert Ballard.

Russell McCollum and Leonard Burton get the Governor's autograph .

FRESHMEN BANQUET

The Annual Celebration Dinner of The Freshmen, Inc., construction engineers working on the post-war project, was held at the Hotel Biltmore Thursday, March 28, 1946 at 6:00 p.m. Ed Haddock served as construction chief for building a better Christian world. Following an interesting program which presented as guest artists, Betty Nash, Doris Beaver, Lester Dunn, Wayne Thorne, and Wayne Spalding, the class was addressed by the Honorable Robert S. Kerr, Governor of the State of Oklahoma . The banquet hall was beautifully decorated in patriotic colors and a center piece which called attention to the fact that the Freshmen of 1946 will be the Fiftieth Anniversary Class of 1949.

Celestine Horn pins a carnation on the speaker, Governor Kerr.

220

Commander Parrish takes it easy.

Sophomores clear decks for action.

SOPI-IOMORl: BANQUET

The U. S. S. Crill was launched at the Y.W.C.A. on Thursday, March 28 at 6:00 p.m. by the Sophomore Class. Officers on the bridge included the Admiral, Prof. Crill; the Captain, Neil Hightower; the Commander, Milton Parrish; and the Ship's Chaplain, Dr. C . B. Strang. Music was furnished by members of the class and two guest artists, Marlene Briscoe and Carroll Harville. Climaxing a very enjoyable evening Rev. W. D. McGraw, Jr., unloosed a gay variety of his "1 0,000 jokes"

to keep the passengers in good spirits as they headed for the dock. Rev. W. D. McGraw,

221

Jr., 3muses

feilow passengers.

Pearl Ratcliffe, Howard Bynum, and Wilma Haley relax and examine their diplomas in the President's office.

"Free at last," Dorothy King, Willie Marsh, and Mildred Russell look pleased over their scholastic attainments .

Mrs. Finch congratulates Minnie Lea Taylor and Vivian Beckel on their graduation.

222

Dr. 0 . J. Finch, President, prepares to present Alrneta Mizell with a B.S. degree in Horne Economics. Twenty-nine other Seniors received their diplomas in the graduation exercises May 14.

223

l-lonoring today' s heroes Training tomorrow's leaders Commemorating fifty years of service

225

Dr. R. T . \ Villiams, General Superintendent

Dr. J. B. Chapman , Genera] Superintendent

ALUMNI DIRECTORY

ABBOTT, VIVIAN, '20

ALGER, GEORGE C., ' 34

Chase, Kansas. Occupation : Bookkeeper.

2124 N. E., 18th; Oklahoma City, Okla. Wife: Ru)?y Ella Hood. Children: Ronald Edd, Charles Wayne. Occupation: U. S. Postal Clerk.

ALDRIDGE, W. RAY, ' 39 226 S. Carolina; Mangum, Okla. Wife: Daisy Spray. Children : Venevian Ruth. Occupation :- Pastor.

ALLER, ALVIN RAY

ALBERTSON, ANNICE (PEELEE), '36

Box 506; Corvallis, Oregon. Wife: Florence Snowbarger. Children: Wayne Kendall. Occupation: Navy Lieut.

Box 31; Johnson, Kansas. Husband: R. E. Albertson. Children : Sharon Lee. Occupation : Teacher.

ARMSTRONG, ERNEST, ' 34 1215 E. Lead; Albuquerque, N. Mex. Wife : Pearl. Children: Kenneth, Vestal, Ernestine. Occupation: Pastor.

BEAVER, DON, '37 325 N. Euclid; Pasadena 4, Calif. Wife: Natalie G . Beaver. Occupation: Lane Paper Co.

BEAVER, HERMAN E ., '22 200 N. Peniel; Bethany, Okla. Wife: Prebble. Children: Joy and Doris. Occupation : American Nat'! Ins. Co. Asst. Supt.

Vernon A. Snowbarger, Alumni President

BEAVER, PREBBLE, '21 200 N. Peniel; Bethany, Okla. Husband: Herman . Children: Doris and Joy. Occupation: Housewife.

BEBOUT, R. E., '28-'30 Box 658; Blythe, Calif. Wife: Lelah. Children : Meredith S., Naomi Ruth, Virginia. Occupation: Pastor.

BECKEL, VIVIAN ALTA, '45 Bethany, Oklahoma. Student, Fifth year.

Occupation:

Bethany-Peniel

BIERSCHBACH, MARTHA (WARKENTIN), '33 Route 1; Sedgurick, Kansas. Husband: Walter Bierschbach. Occupation : Farmer's wife.

226

BORGMAN, MAE (BOWMAN), '24 2660 Sichel St., Los Angeles 31, Calif. Husband: Ber· nard Ben. Children: Dorothy, Victor, Lorraine, Nor· man, Emmett, Leon, Ronal, Judy. Occupation: House· wife.

BOUNDS, SADIE, '39 306 N. College; Bethany, Okla. Occupation: Social worker for State Dept. of Public Welfare.

BREEDING, HARRIETTE (BAILEY), '39 3246 Perry St., Denver, Colo. Husband: Cpl. R. J. Breeding. Occupation: English Teacher.

Eula \ Vretling, ' 21

BROCKMUELLER, J. F., '40 Marienthal, Kansas. Wife: Gladys Newberry. Children : Lois Jean. Occupation: Pastor .

BROWNING, CHARLES, '44 Hagerman, New Mexico. \Vife: Jessye Collins. Occupa· tion: U. S. Navy.

BROWNING, JESSYE (COLLINS), '41

CALLAWAY, HAZEL (CHAPMAN), '40

Hagerman, New Mexico. Husband: Charles. Occupa· tion : Teacher.

124 S. Wellesley; Albuquerque, N . Mex. Husband: Charles W. Children: Esther Charlene, Robert Edgar, Clifford Kay. Occupation : Housewife.

BR"UNKAU, H. 0 ., '26-'28 Box 186; Plainville, Kansas. Wife: Ida . Children: Verla:, Erline, Roma. Occupation : Pastor.

CAMPBELL, IRA L., '16 717 Iowa Ave.; Chandler, Okla. Wife: Myrtle. Children: Ramona Ann, Jean Paul. Occupation: Pastor.

CALLAWAY, CHARLES W ., '36 124 S. Wellesley; Albuquerque, N. Mex. Wife: Hazel Chapman. Children: Esther Charlene, Robert. Edgar, Clifford Kay. Occupation: New York Life Insurance Co.

CAMPBELL, MADIE M., '24 Box 129· Nowata, Okla. Husband : S. M. Campbell. Children; Ernestine (Cotton ), Richard, Virginia Mae. Occupation : Pastor's wife.

Mary Lee Campbell, '37

Evelvn Gribble, '45

227

Katherine Jernigan, '38

Lucille Pritchett, '4 3

CAMPBELL, S. M., '24 Box 129; Nowata, Okla. Wife: Madie. Children: Ernestine (Cotton), Richard, Virginia Mae. Occupation: Pastor.

· COTTON, CLARENCE, E., '42 Box 463; Cheyenne, Okla. Wife: Bertie Porter. Occupation: Pastor.

CAMPBELL, MARY LEE, '37

CRAWFORD, HUEL BASCOM, '41

12 3 East 2nd; Watonga, Okla. Occupation: Primary Teacher.

7604 Main; Kansas City 5, Mo. Wife: Helen Madlyn. Children: David Bresee. Occupation: Student, Nazarene Theological Seminary.

CLAYTON, FRANCES WISLER, '38 Box 159; Ketchikan, Alaska. Husband: Frank R. Clayton. Children: Sandra Lee. Occupation: Housewife.

CRIST, KYLE (MYERS ), '·1-1 2923 Troost Ave., Box 52 7; Kansas City 10, Mo. Hus· band: Wesley Franklyn. Occupation: Evangelist.

CRIST, WESLEY FRANKLYN, '41 2923 Troost Ave., Box 527; Kansas City 10, Mo. \Vife: Kyle Myers. Occupation : Evangelist. ·

DICKERSON, L. H ., '20 204 S. Peniel; Bethany, Okla. Wife: Ruby. Children: Artis, Maurine, Marjorie. Occupation : Pastor.

Crace Fauver, '36

DILLINGHAM, MRS . M. V . 2808 Frederick; Shreveport, La . Children: Mrs. H . B. London, Mrs. J. C . Dobson, Mrs. David Sharp. Occupation: Pastor.

DILLON, F. VERNON, '·10 1718¥.! Sierra Bonita; Pasadena, Calif. Wife: Erlene. Occupation : Graduate student, Pasadena College.

DOLE, ALGAR H ., '13 4524 S. 17th St.; Omaha, Nebraska. Wife: Hazel D. Children: Rodger, Elizabeth, Dwight, Bernice. Occupation: National Life and Accident Ins. Co.

228

ELLYSON, E. P., Pres. Peniel College 3539 Fairfield Ave.; Kansas City, Mo. Wife : M. Emily (deceased) . Children: Ruth, Joseph, Edith. Occupation: Retired.

EMMERT, J. LOUIS 109 W. Jenkins; El Reno, Okla . Wife: Velma Mae. Children: James Edward, Helen Elaine, Raymond Louis. Occupation : Pastor.

ERDMANN, H . A., ' 17 Marsing, Idaho. Wife: Zelia F. Children : Esther, Fred. Occupation: Supt. of Schools.

FAUVER, GRACE, '36 182 Harrison Court; Biloxi, Miss. Occupation: Inst. in A.A.F. Tech. School, Keesler Field, Miss.

FINGER, LORENE (GRANT), ' 39 P. 0. Box 381; Palacios, Texas. Husband : J. Ray. Oc路 cupation: Teacher, Palacios Jr. High School.

Rev. and Mrs. Raymond Hum, '43

FINGER, J. RAY, '40

Box 381; Palacios, Texas. V/ ife : Lorene Gra~t. Occu路 pation : Pastor.

GARRETT, AYLIFFE, '29 Box 564; Erick, Okla. Occupation: Teacher of H. S. Math.

GARRISON, HARRELL E., '32 Box 351;. Peabody College; Nashville 4, Tenn. Wife: Clarice Taylor. Children: Linda and Sandra. Occupa路 tion: Child Study Clinic .

GATES, ROBERT M., '38 APO 684; Alexand ria, Egypt. Wife: Olga. Occupation : Civil Service, U. S. Army (War Dept. )

GASSETT, JONATHAN T., ' 39

GISH, CAROL (SPELL ), ' 30-' 38

5 50 S. II th; Salina, Kansas. Wife: Bernadine. Children: Sherry!. Occupation: Pastor.

519 Juniper; Nampa, Idaho. Husband : D. R. Gish. Children: Barbara, Delbert, Jr. Occupation Housewift.

GOODWIN, LEONARD, '32 Olivet Nazarene College; Kankakee, Ill. Wife: Una Mae Eagan . Children : Edward L., Eunice Pauline, Jeannine Faye. Occupation : Modern Language Teacher.

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Sullivan, '40, '39

Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Rice, '33

229

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Miller, '44

Mrs. Martha Warkentin Bierschbash, '33

GRESHAM, L. PAUL, '33

HARRIS, WILLIAM HENRY, '44

Trevecca Nazarene College; Nashville, Tenn. Wife : Martha E. Children : Loren Paul, Daniel Kay. Occupa路 tion : Teacher.

72 Mt. Vernon St.; Boston, Mass. Occupation : Student, Boston University.

HARTIN, MARGARET (NATION), ' 37

HANCOCK, CLESS, '31

Arlington, Texas. Husband: Dr. Richard B. Children: Cynthia Marie, Thomas Edward. Occupation: Housewife.

Burr Oak, Kansas. Wife : Gertrude Miller. Children : Alan, Gary. Occupation : Merchant.

HARRIS, VERA (TATE), '39

HERAN, HELEN L., '42

4407 Francis St.; Kansas City 3, Kansas. Husband : Frank E. Occupation : Pastor's wife.

413. N. Bradley; McKinney, Texas. Occupation : Medical Librarian; Ashburn General Hospital.

HENDRIX, MRS. H . V., ' 39 11041 N. E., 73rd St.; Kirkland, Wash . Husband: H . V. Hendrix. Children : Sonia Marie, Marvin L., Hursnel Leon. Occupation : Homemaker.

HILLIARD, JAMES, '37 Modoc, Ind. Wife: Ruth Conley. Children : James, Robert. Occupation : Pastor.

Mr. and Mrs. Ray Roy, '39

HOAG, PAUL, ' 30 503 N. Willow; Bethany, Okla. Wife: Jessie Lynn. Children: Virginia. Occupation : Hoag-Hall Insurance Agency.

HOFFPAUIR, ADAM E., '37 1103 Grove St. ; Clearwater, Fla. Wife : Vera W. Occupation : Pastor

HOLMES, ZITA MAE, '45 Cooperton, Okla. Occupation : Pastor.

HOOVER, EDITH, ' 36 500 N. Redmond; Bethany, Okla. Occupation: Teacher.

230

HOUSTON, EDWARD R., JR., '45 Box 102; Council Grove, Kansas. Wife: Gracie Lee. Children: Graydon Lee. Occupation: Pastor.

HOYT HAROLD B., '40 717 N. Main; Eureka, Kansas. Children: Connie Sue. Occupation: Pastor.

HUDSON, MARJORIE (WHEELER), '41 Box 283 ; Marshall, Texas. Husband: Grady Hudson. Occupation: Housewife.

HURN, RAYMOND W., '43 570 N. Denver; Tulsa, Okla. Wife: Madelyn. Children : Constance Lynn. Occupation : Pastor.

INGLE, J. LEWIS, '38-'39 Box 594; Erick, Okla. Children : Robert Lewis, Ruth Jolene. Occupation: Pastor.

INGLE, KITTlE MAE, '38 Ray Sherrill, '3 7

13710 Milan Ave.; Cleveland, Ohio. Husband : John D. Children: John D., Jr. Occupation : Doctor, Cleveland Clinic.

JENNINGS, LEON, '43-'44 Box 494; Stafford, Kansas. Wife : Mabel Eakin. Occupation: Pastor.

JERNIGAN, KATHERINE, '38 205 N . Donald; Bethany, Okla. Occupation: Teacher, Bethany High SchooL

JONES, C. WESLEY, '31

JOHNSON, SPENSER, '45

902 First Ave.; Cheney, Wash. Wife: Velta H. Children: Velta Evadene, Maynard Keith.

Box 25 : Frederick, Okla. Occupation: Ministry.

JONES, VELTA (SMITH), '31

LAMBERT,

902 First Ave.; Cheney, Wash . Husband : C. Wesley. Children : Velta Evadene, Maynard Keith . Occupation : Housewife.

J. WILMER,

'40

3104 First St.; Des Moines, Iowa. Wife : Evaleen G. Children : Janet Sue. Occupation: Pastor.

LAMBERT, WILLIS J., '45 800 W . Jefferson; Dallas, Texas. Wife: Margaret Kerby. Occupation: Lamar and Smith Funeral 路Home.

Chester Morgan, '44

Don Beaver, ' 37

231

W. T . White, ' 33

Zita Mae Holmes, '45

LARSON, HELEN E., '39 21161;2 Milit~ry Ave.; Omaha 3, Neb. Occupation: Social Security Board .

LE JEUNE, BYRON E., '36 Bainbridge, Georgia. Wife: Mamie F. Children: Orval Dean, Clarence Edwin.

LUNDY, BERT, '30 129 N. Donald; Bethany, Okla. Wife : Carol. Children : Beverly, Ronald, Russell. Occupation: Postal Clerk.

LUDWIG, S. T., '21 Kansas City, Mo. Wife : Clara . Children: Martha E., Oletha Mae, Marvin Theodore (deceased ). Occupation : General Secretary, Church of the 'Nazarene.

LUNDY, CAROL S., ' 31 129 N. Donald; Bethany, Okla. Husband: Bert. Children : Beverly, Ronald, Russell. Occupation: Professor. Bethany-Peniel College.

MARTIN, MAE (WALTON ), ' 32 414 E. Eighth St. ; Coffeyville, Kansas. Husband: William G. Occupation : Teaching.

MEREDITH, ARCHEL R., '38-'40 1000 E. 30th St.; Kansas City, Mo. Wife: Margaret Willis. Occupation : Student, Nazarene Theological Seminary.

J. E. Moore, Jr. , '37

MEREDITH, MARGARET (WILLIS), '41 1000 E. 30th St. ; Kansas City, Mo. Husband : Archei R . Occupation : Assoc. Librarian, Nazarene Theological Seminary.

MILLER, ALFRED, '44 Kivimba, Kitega; Urundi, Congo Beige, Africa. Wife: Ruth Madden. Occupation : Missionary to Africa .

MILLER, ARTHUR A., '15-'16 2511 N . W. 1st Ave.; Amarillo, Texas. Wife : Grace E. Brink. Children : Allen B., Pauline E., Helen E. Chisum, Norman 0., Wen dell L. Occupation : Pastor.

232

MILLER, JANE (FLANIGAN) Box 864; Abilene, Texas. Husband : W. Knight . Children: Cristeen (Mrs . Jack Jolly) .

MIZELL, DURWARD M. Ill 0 Crane St.; Sweetwater, Texas. Wife: \ Villie Mae Flanigan. Children: Almeta, Jackie, Dale Marie. Occu路 pation: Clerk in Levy Bros. Dept. Store.

MONTANDON, CARLOS, ' 34 Ringling, Okla. \ Vife : Marilee. Children: Jenny Lynn, Carlos, Jr. Occupation: Superintendent of Schools.

MOORE, C. OLAN, '25

Kenneth A. Ri ce, ' 30

123 E. 8th St.; Tempe, Arizona. Wife: Mattilee Neely. Children: Bill, Zoe. Occupation: Teacher, Phoenix Union High School.

MOOR.E, JOSIAH E., '37 Hq. 86th Inf. Div. Arty, Apo 450 . c/ o P. M., San Fran路 cisco, Calif. Wife: Mary Virginia. Children: Jimm y, Mary Jo. Occupation: Chaplain, U. S. Army.

MORGAN, M . CHESTER, '43-'44 72 Mt. Vernon St.; Boston, Mass. Occupation: Student, Boston University.

MORRIS, R. T., '36 1000 Ave. C. ; Dodge City, Kansas. Wife: Edna Marie Tate. Children : Jeanene, Rose Marie, Barbara Ann, Carol Joan . Occupation: Pastor.

MORRIS, EDNA MARIE (TATE), ' 35 1000 Ave. C.; Dodge City, Kansas. Husband : R. T. Children : Jeanene, Rose Marie, Barbara Ann, Carol Joan. Occupation: Pastor's wife.

MURPHREE, ODEAN, '45 Box 8; Henryetta, Okla. Occupation: Teacher.

MORRIS, HAROLD W., ' 38

NEWELL, DON L., '45

809 N. Raynor; El Paso, Texas. Wife: Ruth Ingrim. Children: Harold Lee, Gary Wayne. Occupation: Pastor.

503 Highland St.; St. Joseph, Mo. Wife: Margaret. Occupation: Pastor.

Re1路. :mel l\ lrs. Adam Hoffpa uir, ' 37

1\ !r. and 1\ Irs. I!. A. Erdmann . ' 17

233

Mrs. Art Sidles, '30

Elliott J. Sheeks, ' 16

NORELL, CLIFTON A., ' 37

RAIRDON, JACK T., '路45

900 E. l Oth; Winfield, Kansas. Wife : Cora Irene. Children: John R. , Martha Jo. Occupation : Pastor.

Box 292; Elkhart, Kansas. Wife: Lillian. Occupation : Pastor.

POWELL, CLEON G ., '45

RAY, ROY F., ' 39

Albany, Oklahoma. Wife: Alice Jo. Children : Billy Thomas. Occupation: Pastor.

224 22nd Ave. So.; Nampa, Idaho. Wife: Delma Walker. Children : Carol Ann, Roy F., Jr. (deceased ). Occupation : Professor, Northwest Nazarene College.

PRITCHETT, FRANCES LUCILLE, '43

REAZIN, LAWRENCE V., '45

Rt. 10, Box 486; Oklahoma City 7, Okla. Occupation : Joske's, San Antonio.

328 E. Walker; Breckenridge, Texas. Wife: Leone. Children : Virgil. Occupation : Home Mission Project, Church of the Nazarene.

RICE, KENNETH A., '30 1512 N. Broadway; Burbank, Calif. Wife : Jewell McAninch . Children : Everett, Irene. Occupation : U. S. Weather Bureau, Meteorologist.

RICE, FRANKL., ' 33

Mae ' Valton l\'lartin , '32

415 Mississippi; Lawrence, Kansas. Wife: Nettie Troub. Children : Justin Curtis, Linda Kay. Occupation : Supervisor-Chemist, Hercules Powder Co.

RIDINGS, DOUGLAS L., '40 823 N. Ashbury; Bethany, Okla . Wife: Dorothy. Children : Linda Carol. Occupation: Building Contractor.

RIDINGS, PAUL. '35 119楼..: N . Asbury; Bethany, Okla. Wife : Lois Yerkvitz. Children : Joy Elizabeth, Paul Carl. Occupation : Building Con tractor.

SANFORD, THAINE F., '39-'40 115 E. 9th; Carthage, Mo. Wife : Maxine. Children : Kendall Thaine. Occupation : Pastor.

SHEEKS, ELLIOTT J., '16 512 N . Plum; Hutchinson, Kansas; Widow.

234

SHELLENBERGER, ELFRIEDA, '43 1538 N. Waco; Wichita 4, Kansas. Occupation: Teacher, Whitewater High School.

SHERRILL, RAY E., '37 2 8 ~0 N. W. 24th; Oklahoma City, Okla. Wife : Mary. Children: Alan, Linda. Occupation: National Life and Accident Ins. Co.

SIDLES, MRS. ART, '30 201 E. Shintaffer; Britton, Okla. Husuand: Art. Children: Catherine Sidles Calkins. Occupation: Housewife.

SLACK, DARRELL., '37 926 E.. 7th; Wellington, Kan sas. vVife: Oletha. Children: Sharon, Leland. Occupation: Pastor.

SMEE, FLORENCE G., '22 I 014 Clarence St. ; Lake Charles, La . Occupation: Supervisor, Children's Home.

Don Ne,yeJI. '-f5

SMITH, CLARA, '21 2220 Classen; Oklahoma City, Okla. Children : Clara Jean Smith. Occupation : Window Shades and Linoleum.

SMITH, MARY V. (KEMPER ), '25 __ _____ _ 210 N. College; Bethany, Okla. Husband : J. P. Smith. Children: Jeanne, Jimmy. Occupation: Housewife.

SNOWBARGER, LOIS (ROEBER) , '40 211 N . Donald; Bethany, Okla. Husband : Vernon A. Children : Thaine Alvin , Howard Vernon . Occupation : Housewife.

SNOWBARGER, E. W., '16 Sylvia, Kansas. Wife: Mary King. Children: Willis, Velma, Marion, Katherine. Occupation : Farming.

SNOWBARGER, VERNON A., ' 38

SNOWBARGER, MARY (KING), '13

2ll N. Donald; Bethany, Okla . Wife: Lois Roeber. Children : Thaine Alvin, Howard Vernon . Occupation : Professor, Bethany-Peniel College.

Sylvia, Kansas. Husband : E. W . Children : Willis, Velma, Marion, Katherine. Occupation: Housewife.

SNOWBARGER,

J.

W ., '16

SNOWBARGER, WILLIS, '42

R. F. D.; Marienthal, Kansas. Wife : Blanche. Children : Darrel, Marieta, Wave Lynn, Eulela, . Darlene. Occupation : Farming and stock-raising.

404 S. Webster; Norman, Okla. Wife : Wahnona Horger. Occupation: Graduate Student, University of Oklahoma.

Goldie Phillips, '45

Harold IIO\t, '-tO

235

Kyle Myers Crist, '41

Wesley Crist, '4 1

SNOWBARGER, WAHNONA (HORGER)'45

SPICER, CHARLES, '43

404 S. Webster; Norman, Okla. Husband: \Villis. Occupation: Housewife.

331 vV. 7th St.; Junction City, Kansas. Wife: Elizabeth Boyd. Children: Clyde Ronald . Occupation: Pastor.

SODOWSKY, PAUL MILFORD, '39-'40

SPRUCE, FLETCHER, ' 36

210 E. Jackson; lola, Kansas. Wife: Kathleen O'Hara. Children: Linda Kathleen. Occupation: Pastor.

2414 N. I Oth; Kansas City, Kansas. Wife: Irene Holloway. Children : James Robert, Sara Elizabeth. Occupation: Pastor.

SPEAR, MILDRED, '39

SPRUCE, HEARNE W., '31

Delaware, Okla. Children: Johnie Alfred. Occupation: Housewife.

1108 Fresno Ave.; McAllen , Texas. Wife: Ophelia. Children: Kay Dianna, Jill Elaine. Occupation : Pastor.

STOCKTON, JOHN L., '23 21 9 W. 68th Terrace; Kansas City, Mo. Wife: Ruth Bost. Children: Del en e. OcCilpation : General Treasurer, Church of the Nazarene.

STOCKTON, RUTH (BOST) 219 W . 68th Terrace; Kansas City, Mo. Husband : John L. Children: Ruth Del en e. Occupation: Housewife.

SULLIVAN, ALFRED M., '40 Gladvs (llappv) Williams, '4 I

107 Ivy; Nampa, Idaho. "Wife : Beulah. Children: Wesley \V. Occupation: Asst. Speech Professor, Northwest Nazarene College.

SULLIVAN, BEULAH, ' '39 107 Ivy; Nampa, Idaho. Husband : Alfred M. Children : Wesley W. Occupation: Housewife.

TAYLOR, MENDELL, '33 5740 Grand; Kansas City, Mo. Wife: Gertrude Pendercraft. Children: Dillard Stanley. Occupation: Professor, Nazarene Theological Seminary.

TAYLOR, VIQLA PARRISH, ' 37 Sallisaw, Okla. Husband: Joe H . Occupation : Director, Sequoyah County Dept. of Public Welfare.

236

THEUS, HAROLD C., '37 Bethany, Okla. Wife: Imogene. Children: Janet Kaye.

Occupation: Officer, U. S. Army Air Corps.

THEUS, IMOGENE (DAWSON), '39 Bethany, Okla. Husband: Harold C. Children: Janet Kaye. Occupation : Housewife.

THOMAS, HOYLE C., '41 73 1 Murphy; Joplin, Mo. \ Vife : Juanita. Occupation : Pastor.

THOMAS, JUANITA, '42 731 Murphy; Joplin, Mo. Husband: Hoyle. Occupation: School Teacher.

TILDEN, EDO (McCONNELL), '31 1504 Atchinson St.; Pasadena 7, Calif. Husband: Children: Mike, Robert. Occupation: Ward Clerk, Huntington, Hosp.

Avliffe Garrett, ' 29

TROUTMAN, MINNIE RUTH (MAYO), '45 709 Seventh St.; Lake Charles, La. Husband : Robert P. Occupation: Housewife.

VENABLE, GENEVIEVE (PIERCE), '34 Wilson, Okla . Husband: Robert C. Children: Sharon. Karen. Occupation: Grade School Teacher.

VENABLE, ROBERT C., '34

VOGT, WILLIE, '43

Wilson, Okla. Wife : Genevieve Pierce. Children: Sharon, Karen. Occupation: High Schooi Principal, Athletic Director.

705 N. 5th St.; Sayre, Okla. Wife: Dorothy. Children : Laquita. Occupation: Pastor.

WARKENTIN, CLARENCE A., '32-'33

VOGT, KENNETH, '43

Box 22; Burr Oak, Kansas. \Vife: Thelma. Occupation: Pastor.

1324 5th St.; Box 116; Wasco., Calif. Wife: Ruby C. Children: Dennis Lee. Occupation: Pastor.

WEAVER, LEVERT I., ' 39 21 ~ North Highland; Fullerton, Calif. Wife: Opal. Ch1ldren: Harold Von, Carolyn, Barbara. Occupation: Pastor.

Mr. and Mrs. Clell Hancock, '3 1

237

WHITE, W. T., '33 Durant, Okla. Wife: Josie. Children: Ovid, Louvenia, Billie Katherine. Occupation: Pastor.

WILLIAMS, GLADYS EL, '41 1321 N. Harvey; Okla. City, Okla. Occupation: Webster Jr., High Teacher, Oklahoma City, Okla.

J.

WILLIS, ELIZABETH A., '33

'V . Snowbarger, ' 16

Bethany, Okla. Occupation: Librarian, Bethany-Peniel College.

WILSON, EVELENA (BARBER), '43 200 W. 6th St.; Cherryvale, K ansas. Husband: Eugene Royce (Lt.) Children: Cheryl Kathleen. Occupation: Housewife.

WRETLING, EULA, '21 818 N. College St. ; Bethany, Okla. Husband: J. E. Children: Charles, Betty Lou. Occupation: Housewife.

WRIGHT, UNA, '45 811 S. Fifth; Kiowa, Kansas. Occupation: Teacher.

YOUNG, 0 . W. 315 W. Culver; Phoenix, Ariz. Wife: Margaret. Chile\路 ren : Thomas, Betty. Occupation: Pastor.

YOUNG, MARGARET 315 W . Culver; Phoenix, Ariz. Husband: 0. W. Children : Thomas, Betty. Occupation : Housewife.

KELLY, ERMA SEARS, '39 2710% Main St., Anderson, Ind. Husband: ';\/illiam A. Occupation: Housewife.

Melton Thomas, '43 Lvman 'Voocl, '43

Una Wright, '45

238

BOOK SIX 240

The business men of Bethany and Oklahoma City have proven their sincere friendliness and concern for our success in many ways this year. As a symbol of the financial integrity of our college town the BETHANY FIRST NATIONAL BANK holds a prominent place in the community. The manager, Mr. Flavel Davis, (picture on division page) is always ready to give sound counsel to the college students and aid them in their financial difficulties.

DEVELOPING G 0 0 D 路W ILL 242

CCke MEXIHOT BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

Mrs. OLETA REEDER, Proprietor

* Gene Verbeck, Prof. Spalding, and Miss Lewis enjoy the good, wholesome, home cooking and the refreshing atmosphere which is always found at the MEXIHOT.

* "We cater to the College Trade"

243

Up through the years, Lady Fortune has laid a favorable hand upon the destiny of Oklahoma. Since 1907 when she was admitted to the Union, Oklahoma has grown from wild Indian territory to the thriving enterprising state it is today. Through these progressive years, natural gas has played a vital part in the development of your state. The contributions made by natural gas are hundred-fold ... and we in the gas industry take pride in presenting to you the record of accomplishments made by natural gas in your state during the past several decades.

~.a g路 ..H'RIG~F,A~ION w-.1'拢11.

.___ _H_I-."TING路

0

~

T OI>AY

e

Back in the early days before Oklahoma became a state, the only peo路 pie using natural gas were those living close to sources of supply. This was largely due to lack of pipe line facilities.

e By

1910 natural gas pipe line facilities had been expanded . Almost every home in metropolitan areas was using natural gas because of its many, many advantages over other types of fuel. Natural gas service, being more dependable, less costly, and more efficient, opened a new era of living for Oklahomans.

e

Today, nearly everyone in Oklahoma enjoys good, efficient gas service to heat their homes in winter, to cook their meals 365 days in the year, and for dozens qf other household uses .

e

The fact that natural gas is used so nearly unanimously by Oklahomans contributes greatly to keeping Oklahoma cities clean and healthy. In your city there is neither smoke nor soot to mar the sparkling beauty of your modern buildings, schools, churches and parks.

OHLRHOffiR nATURAL r;u~

Natural Gas Service Has Played a Vital Part In The Growth and Development of Oklahoma Since 1900.

244

GREENE'S SERVICE STATION

J.

M. GREENE Owner

* "Bethany's home of Phillips 66"

ELDRIDGE SEED AND FEED CO. Phone 645

Bethany Merits Feeds get Results

245

We invite you to visit a Complete Camera Store CASTLE FILMS FOR SALE OR RENT

• EASTMAN • ARGUS • MOVIE CAMERAS Scene from B.P.C.'s production-"The Prodigal Son"

• PROJECTORS

a SCREENS

Costumes rented from

• EXPOSURE METERS

The C9olonial C9ostume Shop REEVES CAMERA STORE

128% W. Main

123 No. Robinson

Oklahoma C9ity

Phone 3-3030

OKLAI-IOMA CITY 2, OKLA.

"We operate our own film finishing plant"

"Costumes for all occasions"

FLOYD HARRIS TYPEWRITER CO. W. P. O'Neal, Manager-39 years 405 West Main Street

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA (Phone 7-7012)

Authorized Dealer

Typewriters and Adding Machines Rebuilt

NEW CORONA ROYAL • UNDERWOOD and REMINGTON PORTABLES

Repairing Rentals and Sales

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

246

Norma Lee Hess, Olen Riggs, "Pat" Dinwiddie

116 S. W . Main Phone 504

J. B. "Pat" Dinwiddie, Proprietor

"Bethany's Quality Cleaners"

247

H. B. FRANK STORES We are proud of the eight students and college "widows" who helped to give efficient service this year.

VARI~TY

248

& DRY GOODS

~~The

Bank of Friendly Service" All we ask is the opportunity to prove that this is more than just a slogan

-..... \ I _,

"'

'â&#x20AC;˘

IBERTY XALBAIIK

HANCOCK GROCERY and MARKET

FROZEN FOOD LOCKERS We butcher-keep and prepare your meat ready for the table

STREET and SMITH BARBER SHOP BETHANY 5946 N . W . 39th St. "Haircuts guaranteed to fit!"

BETHANY 609

249

f:lze Printer

THROUGH countless centuries of time, from pyramid building to cathedral building, civilization limped along, dragging one foot wearily after the other, unmindful of passing years, ignorant of the thought world, and not suspecting the possibilities of the common man. Then came the printer, heaven-appointed prophet of the new ages to be, opening the doors to worlds unknown. Civilization leaped forward, alive and eager, romping through the years, scattering new ideas with a prodigal hand as seeds into the fertile soil of human minds. Today, thanks to the printed word, the common man, conscious of his powers, may look upon a broader horizon than did the wisest men of old. Tomorrow, perchance, the sky will brighten into an unclouded day of human progress-a day worthy of the cumulative efforts of the ages.

LITHOGRAPHING

PRINTING

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLAHOMA

408-14 NORTHWEST SIXTH ST.

250

COMPLIMENTS OF

PAYNE WHOLESALE BOOK CO.

LEE THAGGARD MUSIC CO.

BETHANY, OKLA.

407 West Main

OKLAHOMA CITY We Furnish Churches

*

and Ministers A Complete Line of Books at W~OLESALE

"Complete .Music Store"

PRICES

* Writ:e for free Cat:alog Phone 3-8 355

f9ongratulations and .18est Wishes To the f9lass Q.f '46 ~«;~\tO~--<:' . 0

:; I.U

::;:

..:..

A

THE

FIRST NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY OF OKLAHOMA CITY

251

College Grocery

Mrs. McConnell, Audrey Gamble, and Neva Verbeck enjoy the friendly, efficient service accorded them by Bruce Wade and his co-workers.

BUFORD INGRAM, Owner

252

.Lee Dona Kerr, Jack Worthy, Bruce Wade, Leonard Aiken, and Bob Nye enjoy an afternoon snack, served by Wana Walker ...

LIBERTY CAFE BETHANY, OKLAHOMA and prepared by Oma Bynum, Alta Hicks, and Grace McCurry

253

1Paul Says: Come to our Fountain for Delicious Malts, Milk Shakes, Sodas, and Sundaes made With Highest Quality STEFFEN'S ICE CREAM. "We are here to serve you!"

WEHRENBERG PHARMACY COMPLETE DRUG AND PRESCRIPTION STOCK Phene 636

Bethany

254

KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL

PAUL STUART MUSIC CENTER 224 N. W. First

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

OKLAHOMA CITY

EVERYTHING IN MUSIC

Records Phonographs Instruments RAY BARNETT, President Sheet Music

HAL OWENS ~RROW

PHOTOGRAPHER

GREENE'S STUDIO 224 W . MAIN OKLAHOMA CITY

3-1733

255

DR. FINCH FILLS HIS TANK WITH SOME ETHYL AT

LUNSFORD,S SERVICE STATION CORNER OF HIGHWAY 66 AND COLLEGE

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

256

TYPEWRITERS

Acme Gold Leaf Potato Chips

ADDING MACHINES GUARANTEED

Potato Chips The New Way

REPAIR SERVICE

With An Automatic Machine The Most Clean and Sanitary Way Established 1917 RENTALS NEW PORTABLES

"WHERE TO BUY THEM"

AMERICAN TYPEWRITERS CO.

ACME POTATO CHIP CO. 1112 N. W. 5th

416 North Robinson Street

2-3620

DIAL 3-7662 OKLAHOMA CITY

KASSEL MUSIC SHOP

GREETINGS FROM

1201;2 W. Grand

VERA BELL'S Phone 2-4542

BEAUTY SALON

OKLAHOMA CITY

* INSTRUMENTSNew and Used

EXPERT REPAIR SHOP Phone 2341 K. L. SEXTON, Proprietor

257

Bethany

fOR fUlUR£ BU\lD\NG be sure you' re both · ht mate · · · " tl1at l . Pick th e ng . t e and h ave "tastes the home-lovlng yp ·n be reasona~ly the san1e. n Wl start paying down o 2. Save your money . . . . will be valuable od building Slte that a go l time to come. t for a ong · proper Y .11 be glad to Stewart who Wl . . t ou in selectlng 3 Contact Barney . d . ed and asslS y . keep you a VlS f materials that . k ds and types o the nght ln . b .lding your home. money ln Ul will save you . , d reputable . h a rehable an 4 Make a deal Wlt . house that will . builder who will build you a stay put. ) happiness you'll (hon1e If you want future 've a lot more 5· . ~ of course, we follow th1s P anus any time\ by to see d to tell you, so rop

For Building Supplies and Lumber Call Barney Stewart's Number

MIDWEST CITY YARD

STOCKYARDS FARM STORE

Across from Air Depot Gate No. 3

1515 South Agnew

MAIN YARD

39th & MAY AVE.

APPLICATION SALES DEPT.- 910 NO. WALKER

258

College Barber Shop

BRACK McLAIN

Bethany, Oklahoma

Real Eslole-lnsuronce-Renlols

J. B. Rogers, Owner

BETHANY, OKLAHOMA

259

IT PAYS TO PAY CASH FOR CLYDE CAMERON SUITS

AT

HIRAM PAUL'S MAIN STREET

OKLAHOMA CITY

THE OLDEST

Courfeslj

FOUNTAIN PEN SHOP IN OKLAHOMA Offers You a Complete

of

REPAIR SERVICE

NEW POINTS FOR

NASH

Parker "51" Sheaffer Triumph Eversharp And All Others

FINCH

WE SELL

PARKER "51" PENS

co.

SMITH the PEN MAN Established 1930 922 Perrine Bldg.

2-1714

260

Pat Hathaway Tidwell, Charles Faulkner

JAKE'S SERVICE STATION

Jack Tidwell

BETHANY FOOD MARKET

Main and Donald Sts. J. G . MciNTYRE, Owner

Floyd E. Payne, Proprietor

THE COLLEGE SHOE SHOP Mr. Bates, Milton Bates, and Willie Marsh keep the college students feet well shod!

261

The H. E. LEONHARDT LUMBER COMPANY Bethany

ROY BROWN, Manager

SEVEN LARGE YARDS TO SERVE YOU

Roy Brown

262

R. D . DAVIS First Vice-President

BRACK McLAIN Treasurer

OTIS PECK Second Vice-President

C . HAROLD RIPPER Secretary

BETHANY COMMERCIAL . CLUB rr13oosters for a Better 18ethany"

FRED FLOYD, President

DIRECTORS: Ray Barnett F. L. Davis

Howard Frank E. C . Hall

W. D. McGraw, Jr. A. Leroy Taylor

JANITOR SUPPLIES FOR THE HOME

CLARENCE TACKETT

SUPPLY CO. * BETHANY MOTOR CO.

WAXES, SOAPS, BULBS, MOPS WAXING MACHINES FOR RENT

H . E . WALLACE, Prop.

*

"We Specialize in Satisfying" 205 W. Second

263

Phone 2-0221

Ora Lee and Clester Pults followed other wise B.P.C. couples in purchasing their wedding decorations and flowers

from the Bethany Flower shop where they received courteous assistance from Mrs. Hill and Mrs. Lorett.

BETHANY CLEANERS

"We help keep B.P.C. Students Looking Right"

JAY R. JACOBS, Prop.

f9ongratulations

COMPLIMENTS

To The Class of "46"

of We wish to take this opportunity to congratulate you for your achieve-

DAVIS GROCERY

ment and to extend to you our sincere best wishes for your future success in the fulfillment of your missions.

DEE'S PHOTO SUPPLY 219 North Broadway Phone 3-2949

"DOUG" DAVIS, Proprietor

OKLAHOMA CITY 2, OKLA . .

265

Mrs. Moore and Mrs. Welch give efficient, friendly service AT

THE BOOK SHOPPE 108 S. E. Main, Bethany

BOOKS - PICTURES - GIFTS - OFFICE SUPPLIES MASTERWORK COLUMBIA RECORDS SONG BOOKS - CHORUSES

W . HARPER WELCH

"Buy in Bethany"

266

JACK W. MOORE

THE BETHANY GIRLS WHO REALLY CARE SAY:

~~&jet

my C9orsage From Higdon's"

If it's Flowers

We Have It!

HIGDON'S FLOWER SHOP and NURSERY 3022 N . W. 39th Dial 8-5566

Norman Miller,

J. Walter Hall, Jr., and Harold Blankenship make their selections.

267

M rs. Simpson an (lower d Mrs. Bula nght) I?ake Mrs. Sears

268

e:

1 d路es of Bethany look trim. ~;ular customer.

MRS. BULA'S BEAUTy BALON

Lerline Thompson and Almeta Mizell take advantage of the friendly service of Joe Meador who has been serving Bethany customers for 5 years.

HENRY'S I. G. A. STORE

Jim Robertson and Alvin Roberts take special pains to satisfy Elton Woods and the other college students who trade with them.

Henry Vaughan, Henry Butler Proprietors

269

L. C. CHERRY CONTRACTOR * BETHANY, OKLAHOMA New Girls' Dorm Unit

New Bethany business buildings

BUILDING A BETTER BETI-IANY

New Putnam Christian Church

270

EARL OWENS ' owner 路 an order whil . ' wntes out d e his wife and aughter look on .

Chad Grant ' Gl enn L't l Cecil Fulto 1 t e, and n, expert upholsters

271

LAVA LON BEAUTY SALON ON THE MAIN STREET OF BETHANY

Owned anJ Operated blJ

Bolletp!- StuJenl!

*

ALTA BROWN RUBY ROBNETT

272

KNIGHT'S GRILL BETHANY. OKLAHOMA

273

p R E

s

E

N T

s 0

CJ.he CRe£l!.~!Jl!_/}cho

'46 HUMBER ID

Revival Services Begin Tomorro We Went, Saw, Conquered 'a..-~ ~nch Declared Tops .Della lambda

"'rs New Members s~l~l ·Uy, in a

~ire

Drills Added As New Curriculum

Chapel byThflr;;e:c•,..

brought into the ty here i& •·

· pru .,..

;;.~~·~iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii-

Within the last year, has reanr had its face li~ paved streets, a new ~­ dona, more .tidewal'" rung of the la,..

·nother of our unportant landsr ·nizations, the Honor io,·

Mack Anderson, Evangelist Spiritual Tide itirring Many been announced tha1 a Meeting under the direcof Evarieelist Mack Anderwill be held March 13-,,.

BI:TJ-IANY-PI:NII:L COLLI:GI: BOOSTI:RS HIGHWAY CHURCH of the NAZARENE

LAMAR CHURCH of the NAZARENE Rev. E. M. Elrod, Pastor 102 West Eighth Street Lamar, Missouri

Rev. Leonard L. Silvey, Pastor Route 2; Ava, Missouri

CHEROKEE CHURCH of the NAZARENE

CEDAR SPRINGS CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. L. E. Stover, Pastor 4 21 South Kansas Cherokee, Oklahoma

Rev. Robert E. Hollis, Pastor Chester Star Route Fairview, Oklahoma

CHASE CHURCH of the NAZARENE

ATWOOD CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. C. A. Sturdevant, Pastor Box 303; Chase, Kansas

Rev. A. F. Daniel, Pastor Route 1; Atwood, Oklahoma

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE

ROPESVILLE CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. Lee A. Bolerjack, Pastor 511 West Walnut Independence, Kansas

Rev. Doyle D. Wilson, Pastor Box 134; Ropesville, Texas

LARNED CHURCH of the NAZARENE

DERIDDER CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. Claude G. White, Pastor 109 East Eleventh Street Larned, Kansas

Rev. B. R, Smith, Pastor Bryan and Shirley Sts. DeRidder, Louisiana

GAYLORD CHURCH of the NAZARENE

HOOKER CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. J. F. McClung, Pastor Gaylord, Kansas

Rev. Joe Bishop, Pastor Box 304; Hooker, Oklahoma

ALIX CHURCH of the NAZARENE

KALVESTA CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. Miss Lola Wilkins, Pastor Alix, Arkansas

Rev. M . E. Walden, Pastor Kalvesta, Kansas

TOPSY CHURCH of the NAZARENE

BETHEL CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. Elmer A. Leidig, Pa ~ tor P. 0 . Box 288 Lake Charles, Louisiana

Rev. Milton Huxman, Pastor Johnson, Kansas

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE

NATCHITOCHES CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. L. Lee Gaines, Pastor (One block north of Six Points on Alameda) Corpus Christi, Texas

Rev. W . C. Fowler, Jr., Pastor Natchitoches, Louisiana " WE BOOST BPC"

QUEENSBORO CHURCH of the NAZARENE

GREAT BEND CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. Mrs. M. V . Dillingham, Pastor 2808 Frederick St. Shreveport, Louisiana

Rev. Clarence E. Rowland, Pastor Twelfth and Stone Sts. Great Bend, Kansas

TYLER CHURCH of the NAZARENE

FAIRBURY CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. L. 0. Trimble, Pastor 725 West Bow Street Tyler, Texas

Rev. R. A. Gilster, Pastor 314 Seventh St. Fairbury, Nebraska

BURR OAK CHURCH of the NAZARENE

ARKADELPHIA CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. Clarence A. Warkentin Box 22; Burr Oak, Kansas

Rev. Marie Brown, Pastor 807 Crittenden St. Arkadelphia, Arkansas

DALHART CHURCH of the NAZARENE Rev. S. L. Wood, Pastor 807 Cammack St. Dalhart, Texas

SWEETWATER CHURCH of the NAZARENE Rev. Elbert Labenske, pastor 609 Oak Street Sweetwater, Texas

ARLINGTON CHURCH of the NAZARENE Rev. Martin L. Patton, Pastor 504 West Main Street Arlington, Texas

SEMINOLE CHURCH of the NAZARENE Rev. Jimmy Heasley, pastor 520 Simpson Street Seminole, Oklahoma

GRACE CHURCH of the NAZARENE Rev. Harry Lawyer, Pastor Grinnell, Kansas

.

BIG SPRING CHURCH of the NAZARENE Rev. W . R. McClure, pastor Fourth and Austin Streets Big Springs, Texas

COLEMAN CHAPEL CHURCH of the NAZARENE Rev. James J. Hudson, Pastor Box 304; Bethany, Oklahoma

COMANCHE CHURCH of the NAZARENE

GAINESVILLE CHURCH of the NAZARENE

Rev. Floyd Dean, pastor Box 1 Comanche, Oklahoma

Rev. Leo L. Lawrence, Pastor 417 North Ritchie Street Gainesville, Texas

HALLTOWN CHURCH of the NAZARENE Rev. Ray Geren Box 8 Hailtown , :~Ji ssouri

278

SCENES IN LAKEVIEW PARK, KANSAS CITY DISTRICT CENTER Jarrette Aycock, District Superintendent

279

PASTOR W. T. WHITE

and the

DURANT CHURCH of the NAZARENE have an enthusiastic, growing Sunday School

A. E. GREEN, Superintendent

~~ flll

out Fo1r 18ethany-Peniel C9ollege"

282

WELLINGTON CHURCH of the NAZARENE WELLINGTON. TEXAS

WE ARE 100% FOR BETHANY-PENIEL COLLEGE

REV. AND MRS. AUSTIN MOORE

283

REV.

J.

F. HAMM Pastor

MRS. V. H. SCROGGS N.Y.P.S. Pres.

CHURCH of the NAZARENE NORTH FORT WORTH, TEXAS (Abilene District Herald of Holiness Campaign Contest Winner)

CHURCH BOARD: (First row ) Art McCullough, Lee Burgner (S. S. Supt.), Raymond Teague, Wilburn Harwell. (Second row) J. F. Hamm (Pastor), Mrs. J. F. Hamm, Mrs. Glenna McCullough, Mrs. Malverine Carter, Mrs. H. V. Scroggs, H. V . . Scroggs. (Not pictured) C . A. Johnson, Mrs. C. A. Johnson, Harold McCullough.

284

Charles Hasting Smith 6vanqelisl

(Alumus and former ARROW EDITOR)

f9angratulations TO A GREAT YEARBOOK FOR A GREAT YEAR

CHURCH of the NAZARENE

AT

West Seventh and Avenue F

A GREAT COLLEGE

CISCO, TEXAS

BETN ANY PENIEL-COLLEGE

*

REV. AND MRS. L. H. CLEGG Pastor and Wife FROM :-

First Church of the Nazarene 900 E. Fourth PITTSBURG, KANSAS L. WAYNE SEARS, Pastor

285

LUBBOCK CHUf~CH

of the NAZARENE

14th and Q Streets

LUBBOCK, TEXAS

CONGRATULATIONS for her

TO

B. P, C.

• Record-breaking Registration • Excellent Administration and Faculty • Deeply Spiritual Atmosphere • High Scholastic Achievements

0 . V . McMAHON, S. S. Supt. MRS. ANNA LAURA GOODMAN, N.Y.P.S. Pres. MRS. T . P. GIBSON, W .F .M.S. Pres.

ALBERT F. LAING, Pastor

286

SATURDAY NIGHT SPENT RIGHT

YOUTH FOR CH.RIST OKLAHOMA CITY JOHNNIE HOPE, Director Located in the Municipal Auditorium

287

PORT ARTHUR FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE

OUR CHURCH EXTENDS TO EVERY GRADUATE ITS SINCERE CONGRATULATIONS.

WE FEEL THAT WE HAVE NOT ONLY

INVESTED IN THE COLLEGE, BUT IN YOU; AND WE ARE CONFIDENTLY EXPECTING LARGE SPIRITUAL RETURNS FROM OUR INVESTMENT. GOD BLESS YOU!

REV. G. S. RODGERS, Pastor 11th and Galveston Sts.

Port s:q rthur, Texas

288

Fl RS T CHURCH of the NAZARENE 901 N. W. 6th Street

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKlAHOMA

R. T. WILLIAMS, Jr. "The Singing Pastor"

WAYNE M. THORNE "The King of the Trombone"

289

Compliments of

THE

NEBRASKA DISTRICT

REV. OGDEN Superintendent

290

QUINDARO BOULEVARD CHURCH of the

NAZARENE

REV. & MRS. FLOYD SMITH

*

* of the NAZARENE FAIRPARK CHURCH

2414 North Tenth St. Kansas

1833 N. E. 11th St. Phone: 2-6597

City 2,

Kansas

*

FLETCHER SPRUCE Pastor

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

CENTRAL NAZARENE CHURCH 570 N . Denver

TULSA OKLAHOMA

We are for B.P.C ., its work of Christian Education, and the grand Student Body of our Church College.

Our High School Graduates are receiving a briefing about where to go to receive a college education.

RAYMOND HURN, Pastor

291

EASTERN OKLAHOMA DISTRICT DISTRICT ADVISORY BOARD W. A. Carter W . H . Johnson George Miller Leonard Hale W . R. DONALDSON Superintendent

DATES TO REMEMBER N.Y.P.S. Camp and Institute - June 24-28 Camp Meeting - August 8-18

"Congratulations to Bethany--Peniel College" 292

LITTLE ROCK FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE

HONORS HER REPRESENTATIVES at

BETHANY --PENIEL COLLEGE

Jack Harrison, Mary Ellen Herrin, Olena Phillips, Ted Hollingsworth, Johnnie

Hollingsworth,

Maxine

Carl, Mary Louise Trager, Ray Brakebill, Neil Hightower, Charles Harrison. (Not pictured) Mr. and Mrs. James Hudson, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Grissom.

293

DALLAS CAMP MEETING AND DISTRICT ASSEMBLY August 25 to September 1

REV. I. C. MATHIS Superintendent

SCOTTSVILLE CAMP MEETING GROUNDS SCOTTSVILLE, TEXAS (On U. S. Highway 80, eight miles east of Marshall, Texas) MRS. I. C. MATHIS W .F.M .S. President

REV. LUTHER CATWELL Ch. Church School Board

N .Y.P.S INSTITUTE and CONVENTION June 24-28

REV. REX WEISINGER N.Y.P.S. President

Scottsville Camp Meeting Grounds

DISTRICT 294

THE ARROW AND

BETHANY,. PENIEL COLLEGE YOU HAVE OUR

CO- OPERATION APPRECIATION GOOD--\NILL AND PRAYERS FOR-

Greater usefulness and Christian success in your responsibility of spreading BIBLE HOLINESS in life and precept around the earth.

SAN JACINTO

CHURCH of the NAZARENE AMARILLO, TEXAS 90 North McMaster Street Phone 2-5745

ARTHUR A. MILLER. Pastor

295

YUKON CHURCH of the NAZARENE (The F1our Center, seven miles west of Bethany on Highway 66)

YUKON, OKLAHOMA

HOBART WICKENS, S. S. Supt. MRS. HAZEL PERRY W .F.M.S., Pres. C. M. CLASON, Sec.-Treas

"The Friendly Church by Life's Highway"

BEITY TRAYWICK, N.Y.P.S. Pres.

REV. 0 . C. PERRY, Pastor

Rev. WOOLMAN

REV. & MRS. NOBLE HATHAWAY

Evangelist 716 E. Ponca St.

@J.urch o/ fl~e C'Ylazarene

PONCA CITY, OKLAHOMA

®aler/oo, <9£/aJ.oma

296

路- -

CHURCH of the NAZARENE Corner Second and Weatherly Streets BORGER, TEXAS

AMOS R. MEADOR, Pastor L. M. POSTON, S. S. Supt.

297

C. B. STRANG Proposed Ch ' D . D ., Pastor urch and Educational Un't 1 .

' I

) -- I '

New y

HARPER L CO .

298

h out Center LE, Youth D uector ' 路

C~ARACTER

CULTURE

C~RIST

OUR COLLEGE IS THE ANSWER TO YOUR PROBLEM CCke Problem of tke Parent: Where should I send my son or daughter to College?

CCke ProbLem of Youth: Where can I receive a Christian Education?

CCke ProbLem of tlze Ckurck: Where can we fulfill our obligation to our youth and who will train our future workers?

CCize ProbLem of tke StewarJ: Where can I invest my money that I may receive eternal dividends?

BETHANY -PENIEL COLLEGE Bethany, Oklahoma

299

GREETINGS from the

ARKANSAS DISTRICT REV. J. W. SHORT Superintendent

REV. BOYD HANCOCK N.Y.P.S. President We appreciate the splendid faculty, great student body, ;md the forward program of-

BETHANY-PENIEL COLLEGE

300

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE Harrison at Forty-first

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

Pastor: C. B. Williamson Visitor: Robert E. Harding Music Director: Ray Moore Organist: Mrs. Robert Edwards Sunday School Supt: F. C. Davis Youth Supervisor: Kenneth Robinson Pres. W. F. M. S.: Mrs. Phil Milburn Pres. N.Y.P.S.: Miss Ethel King Sec'y to Pastor: Mrs. Robert Harding

G. B. WILLIAMSON, D. D., Pastor

301

ABILENE DISTRICT OFFICERS 0. V. McMAHON, Sec.-Treas. A. L. LAING, Ch. Church School Board

ODELL BROVVN, N.Y.P.S. President MRS . VV. R. McCLURE, VV.F.M.S. President

Sound in :!Joclrine Sane in Gfppeal

REV. VV. B. VVALKER Superintendent

£van9elislic in £mphasis eomlruclive in ekaracler

DISTRICT CAMP MEETING July 22 to 28 CISCO, TEXAS

302

DISTRICT CONGRATULATIONS lo

tke

CLASS OF '46 from tke

ABILENE YOUNG PEOPLE!

DISTRICT N.Y. P. S. OFFICERS: REV. ODELL BROWN N.Y.P.S . President

HAROLD C. DAVIS, First Vice-f>res. OLETA HUESTIS, Second Vice-Pres. LAVONIA BENSON, Third Vice-Pres. MRS. F. F. FIKE, Sec.-Treas.

303

GREETINGS from

ABILENE FIRST CHURCH "United we stand for Bethany-Peniel College"

ABILENE, TEXAS Parsonage, 1773 Sycamore St. REV. ODELL A. BROWN, Pastor

N. Y. P. S. Group

304

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE Trudgeon and Eighth HENRYETTA, OKLAHOMA R. B. KELLY. Pastor

Wichita FIRST

Parsonage: 805

W~

Gentry

CHURCH

P.

J. BARTRAM,

Pastor

Extends Congratulations to The Class of '46 and

Arrow Staff

305

EASTSIDE CHURCH of the NAZARENE REV. L. H. DICKERSON, Pastor

BETHANY,

OKLAHOMA

rrServing a 2Jrowing 18ethany"

WE BELIEVE IN: Bethany-Peniel College Her Administration Her Faculty Her Student Body Her Work and Her Future

WOODWARD CHURCH of the NAZARENE 1118 Fifth Street WOODWARD, OKLAHOMA REV. ERNEST E. ORTON, Pastor REV. E. L. LOOMAN, Pastor

CHURCH of the NAZARENE RINGFlSHER, ORLAHUMA

306

HASTINGS CHURCH of the NAZARENE A. F. HAYES, Pastor

HASTINGS, NEBRASKA EXTENDS CONGRATULATIONS TOTHE CLASS OF '46 AND THE ARROW STAFF

1Britton C9hurch of the naacarene

MILDRED JONES • Not a Mission, but a Missionary Church-

SONG EVANGELIST

• Project this year: Dittmore Memorial Church to be erected in India.

THOMAS A. EPPLER, Pastor (Picture of Pastor on Division Page)

COMPLIMENTS OF THE

NEBRASKA DISTRICT N.Y. P. S. A. F. HAYES, Dist. Pres.

307

NORMAN CHURCH of the NAZARENE Alemeda and Apache Streets

NORMAN, OI'ILAHOMA

REV. W. L. FRENCH, Pastor

Church Choir, Ed Taylor, Direc.tor

308

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE 718 S. Fourth St.

SPENSER JOHNSON

PONCA CITY, OKLA.

Bethany, Okla.

Congratulations to BETHANY-PENIEL COLLEGE for the largest enrollment in her history. "100 % for B. P. C."

REV. L. W. QOLLAR, Pastor

CROWN HEIGHTS CHURCH of the NAZARENE 1002 N. W. 46th St.

OKLAHOMA CITY

(Picture on Division Page)

"Meeting human needs with REV. AND MRS. FRANK McCONNELL

Spiritual Life"

CHURCH Of The NAZARENE 311 North Oak Avenue

Ada, Oklahoma

REV. H. C . EMMERT, Pastor

309

SAN ANTONIO Congratulations and Best Wishes to the Class of '46

REV. HADLEY A. HALL Superintendent

REV. WARD B. CHANDLER Ch . Church School Bd.

MRS. PEARL KEETON W. F. M. S., Pres.

310

)!STRICT San Antonio's Young People Greet the Students of Bethany,Peniel College!

REV. LYMAN WOOD Dist. N.Y.P.S. Pres.

DISTRICT N.Y.P.S. COUNCIL: Lyman Wood, L. E. Lucky, W. C. Emberton, J. Marvin Harrison, F. W. Rogers, Mrs. F. W. Rogers; Spurgeon Lynn, J. B. Rose. (Not pictured) Mrs. J. E. Moore, Jr., Mrs. E. D. Hill, Mrs. H. W. Spruce, Miss Constance Spruce, Mrs. Robert T. Ford.

3ll

REV. E. E.ZACHAREY Superintendent

KANSAS DISTRICT

REV. E. L. RODDA N.Y.P.S. Pres.

312

(Left ) Saturday Night Young People's Prayer Meeting

J. S. NORTON, Pastor

CHURCH of the NAZARENE POST, TEXAS

FIRST CHURCH of the NAZARENE "A Live Church With a Live Message" 46 Waugh Drive

HOUSTON 7, TEXAS

GREETINGS FROM HOUSTON FIRST CHURCH

REV. CHESTER A. SMITH, Pastor Mrs. Smith, Barbara Mae, Rev. Chester Smith (Pastor), Ma~orie Jo, Chester A., Jr.

CHURCH of the NAZARENE PURCELL, OKLAHOMA "The Progressive Church"

J. C. ANDREW, Minister

313

Church of the Nazarene

@!turch o/ lhe cnazarene Po t e a u, 0 k Ia h om a

J.

• Bethany-Peniel College has our full cooperation . • Our compliments to the Class of '46.

LEWIS INGLE, Pastor

AYLIFFE GARRETT, S. S. Supt.

• Long live Bethany-Peniel College! ''A Growing Church in A Growing Community"

V. B. ATTEBERRY, Pastor

~race C9hurch of the na~arene 307 East 35th Street

Austin, Texas

Honors her students zn BethanyPeniel College!

REV. LYMAN P. WOOD, Pastor

ARTIE TURBIVILLE

314

IMOGENE WHITE

CHURCH of the NAZARENE Lexington, Oklahoma

BESSIE L.

FIRST CHURCH of theN AZARENE

SCRIBNER, Eighth at Topeka Blvd. Minister TOPEKA, KANSAS "Topeka's Downtown Evangelistic Center"

REV. ORVILLE JENKINS, Pastor

REV. and MRS. VVESLEY F. CRIST Evangelists

SEE!

HEAR! Illustrated Hymns Solovox music of 27 instruments Gospel preaching Special singing Original poems

Alumni of B.P.C. Mrs. Crist at the Solovox

Hymns pictured in colors

315

The

Door

of your Publishing House â&#x20AC;˘

LS

The Door of Opportunity in obtaining

Progressive & Pertinent Publications /or Growth in Experience and Assistance in Christian Service Over 40 years of Profitable and Faithful Service

2923 Troost Ave., Box 527, Kansas City 10, Mo.

GROUP OF CHURCH OFFICERS: A. F. Duke, Pastor (extreme left); George Reager, N .Y.P.S. Pres. (left center); W. T. Bessire, S. S. Supt. (right center) ; R. L. Helm, Ch. Bd. Stewards (rear right)

CHURCH

306 W. ELM ST.

of the NAZARENE A. F. DUKE, Pastor

317

HILLSBORO, TEXAS

BOYS' DORMITORY

GENERAL INDEX ADMINISTRATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES ___________ _ 17 CAMPUS FRIENDS ______ __________ 32 FACULTY Beresford, Willo Mae ________________ 26 Bolerjack, Ivalee ____ ___ __ ________ 28, 98 Brown, Eurela _: _________ _________ 31, 98 Crill, Alice _______ ____ __ 21, 58, 184, 201 Crill, Chester ________________ 23, 58, 184 Danskin, D . R. __________ 24, 98, 192,193 Dobson, Willis ------ ---- ----------- -31 Dunn, Lester ___________________ 30, 185 Dunn, Margaret __ ______ _____ ______ __ 29 Fess, Ruth --------------- - -----30, 20 7 Finch, Oscar_ ___ __ 17, 18, 19, 96, 105, 133, 223, 256 Flick, Mary _________ __ ________ __ _ 25, 98 Floyd, Fred ___ ___ _____ 24, 137, 176, 280

McConnell, C. A. _________ ___ 10, 11 , 280 McGraw, W. D. _____ _ 17, 25, 75, 97, 221 Moore, Jack ___________________ 21 , 211 Nelson, Elizabeth _____ ____ 31 , 98, 184, 199 Phillips, Goldie ____ _____________ 27, 235 Ripper, Harold ______ 7, 22, 36, 96, 98, 214 Sears, Mariana ___________________ 24, 121 Shannon, Boyd __________ 28, 132, 177, 191 Smith, Duane ______________ 25 , 184, 217 Snowbarger, Vernon ______ 29, 9(5, 98, 109, 120, 121 , 129, 173, 226, 281 Spalding, Wayne ___ ___ ____ ____ __ 28, 24 3 Strang, C . B. ______ ____ __ 30, 97, 171, 298 Taylor, Ruth ___ ___ _____________ __ 22, 98 Thorne, Wayne _____ _27, 98, 200, 201, 208, 289 Welch, Harper_ __________ 21, 68, 205, 214 Willis, Elizabeth _____________ 23, 98, 187 Wiman, C. H. __________ 26, 97, 178, 184

EVANGELISTS Crist, Wesley and Lyle ____ _______ ___ _ 315 Johnson, Spenser ___________________ 309 Jones, Mildred ____ _________________ 307 Smith, Charles H . __________ _________ 285 Woolman, E. L. _____ _____ ___ ______ 296 KANSAS Burr Oak ------------------ - --- --- 278 Chase ___ ________________ __ ____ ___ 278

OFFICE ASSISTANTS --------------3 3

Ga0ord -------------------------- 278 Great Bend -- -- - ------------------ 278 Grinnell -------------------------- 278 Independence --------------- - -- ---- 278 Johnson ---- ------------- - -------- 278 Kalvesta -------------------- ------ 278 Kansas City --- ------------------- 291 Kansas District ---------------------3 12 Larned ----- ---- ------- ----- ------ 278 Pittsburg ------- --- -- ---- -- - ------ 285 Topeka ------------------ -------- 315

STUDENT GOVERNMENT ______ 34, 37

LOUISIANA

Greer, Earl ---------------------3, 4, 29 Greer, Myrtle ____________________ ___ 23 Hall, E. C. ___ _________ 7, 20, 96, 98, 13 3 LaDue, Mary __ ____ _______ __ _____ __ _ 27 LaDue, Wilson ______________ 20, 96, 98 Lewis, Alice ______ 22, 84, 104, 133, 173, 243

.Alix - - - - - ---------- -------- ---- - - 278

Lundy, Carol _______________ 20, 98, 204

Arkadelphia --------------- - ------- 278

MISSOURI

McClung, Raymond ______ 26, 41, 134, 173, 204

Arkansas District __ ___ ____ ____ ______ 300 Little Rock ________________________ 293

Ava ------ ---------- - -- ---------- 278 Halltown --- --------------- ------- 278

ADVERTISEMENT- CHURCH

DeRidder ------------------ - ------ 278 Lake Charles __ ____ __ _______________ 278 Natchitoches ---------------------- 278 Shreveport ---------------------- -- 278

ARKANSAS

320

Kansas City District ---------------- 279 Kansas City First -------------------301 Lamar -----------~------ - -- -- -- -- 278 Nazarene Publishing House ___________ 316 7

NEBRASKA Fairbury -------------------------- 278 Hastings -------------------------- 307 Nebraska District ___________________ 290

Poteau --------------------------Purcell -------------- ------------Seminole ----- - -- - ---------------Tulsa Central ---------- ----------Waterloo ----- --- ----------------Western Oklahoma District ______ 280,

314 313 278 291 296 281

Woodward -------------- - --------- 306 Youth for Christ __ _______ ___________ 287 Yukon ---------------- ----------- 296

Nebraska N .Y.P.S. ----------------- -307 OKLAHOMA Ada - ---------- - -------------~--- 309 Atwood -------------------------- 278 Bethany Eastside ---- -------------- - ----- 306 First Church ____________________ 298 Bethany-Peniel College _______________ 299 Britton --------------------------- 307 Cherokee ------------------------- 278 Coleman Chapel ------------------- 278 Comanche ---- - ------------------- 278 Durant --------------------------- 282 Eastern Oklahoma District ___________ 292 Erick ---------------------------- 314 Fairview _________________________ _ 278 Henryetta --------------- ---------- 305 Hooker -------------------------- 27B Kingfisher ------------------------ 306 Lexington ------------------------ 315 Norman -------------------------- 308 Oklahoma City Crown Heights _________________ 309 Fair Park ------ ---------------- 291 First .Church __________ __ _________ 289 Ponca City ------ --------- --------- 309

TEXAS Abilene District _______________ 302, 303 Abilene First ----------------------304 Amarillo ------------------------- 29 5 Arlington ------------------------- 278 Austin --------- ------------- ----- 314 Big Springs _______ _______ __________ 278 Borger --------------------------- 297 Cisco ------------ - --------------- 285 Corpus Christi __ ____ _______________ 278 Dalhart ------------------- - ------- 278 Dallas District _______________ ___ ___ 294 Gainesville ------------------------ 278 Hillsboro ------------------------- 317 Houston First ----------- ------ - ---- 313 Lubbock -------------------------- 286 North Fort Worth ______ ___ ________ 284 Port Arthur -~- -- ---- ------ -- - - ---- 288 Post ------------------- ----- ------ 313 Ropesville ------------------------ 278 San Antonio District ____________ 310, 311 Sweetwater --------- -- ----- -------- 278 Tyler ---------- --- - --------------- 278 Wellington ---- ---------- --------- 283

LA CASITA~BOYS' ANNEX

321

ADVERTISEMENT-COMMERCIAL Acme Potato Chip Co. _____ _________ 257 American Typewriters Co. ____________ 2 57 Barney Stewart Lumber ______________ 258 Bethany Cleaners _______ ____________ 265 Bethany Commercial Club __ _________ _263 Bethany First National Bank ______ 2.41, 242 Bethany Flower Shop ________________ 264 Bethany Food Market ______ ___ _____ 261 Bethany Motor Co. ___________ ______263 Book Shoppe, The __ ______________ __266 Brack McLain ___ ___ ______ _________ 259 Bula's Beauty Salon, Mrs. _________ ___ 268 Cherry, L. C. _____________________ 270 Clarence Tackett Supply Co. _____ ___ __ 263 College Barber Shop ____________ ____ 259 College Grocery _______ _____________ 252 College Shoe Shop ____ _____ _________ 261 Colonial Bread -------------------- 259 Colonial Costume Shop __ ___ _________ 246 Davis Grocery ______________ ___ ___ _265 Dee's Photo Supply ________________ 265 Eldridge Seed and Feed Co.___ _____ __ 245 First National Bank ________________ 2 51 Floyd Harris Typewriter Co. __________ 246 Frank Stores ____ ______ ____________ 248 Greene's Service Station _________ ____ 245 Hal Owens ---- - ----- - - ------ - - --- 25 5 Hall-Hoag Agency - --------- - ---- -- - 245 Hancock Grocery and Market_ _______ __ 249 Henry's I.G.A. Store ________________ 269 Higdon's Flower Shop and Nursery ______ 267 Hiram Paul's ______________ _____ ____ 260 Jake's Service Station _______ ______ ___ 261

PROPOSI:D COMPLI:TI:D BUD ROBINSON HALL

Kassei Music Shop __ ____________ ____25 7 Kiwanis International _________ ___ ___ ..:2 55 Knight's Grill ___ ______ ______ ____ __ _ 273 Lavalon Beauty Salon ___ __ ___ ___ ____ 272 Lee Thaggard Music Co. ___ ______ ___ 25 1 Leonhardt Lumber Co. _____ ___ ___ ___ 262 Liberty Cafe ___ __ _______ ____ ____ ___253 Liberty National Bank ______ ______ __249 Lunsford's Service Station ____ _____ ___ 256 Mexihot, The ________ _____ ___ _____ 243 Nash Finch Co. __ ________________ __ 260 Oklahoma Natural Gas Co.__ _____ ____ 244 Owen's Furniture _____ ____ ______ ____ 271 Paul Stewart ' Music Center __________ 255 Payne Wholesale Book Co. _____ ___ __ __ 251 Reeves Camera Store ________ ________ 246 Reveille Echo ______ _________ _______ z74 Smith the Pen Man _____ __ __ ________ 260 Street and Smith _____ ______ ______ __ _ 249 Trave-Taylor Co. __ ______ ____ ___ ____ 250 Up-To-Date Cleaners _________ __ __ ___ 247 Vera. Bell's Beauty Salon _____ _______ 25 7 Wehrenberg Pharmacy _________ ___ __ _254

CLASSES Freshman - --- --- ---- --- - - - - ----- 41-57 Junior -- - - ------------ --- - ------ 68-74 Second Semester ___ ___________ ___ _87-93

ALUMNI DIRECTORY __ __ __ ______ 225

FALL DAZE All-School Party _________________ __ 136

ATHLETICS-BOYS' Basketball __ _____ ____ _____ __ ___ 114-118 Softball _____ __ __ __ ___ __________ 110-112

Class outings - -------- ----- ------- - 139 Clean-up day ---------------- - ----- 137 Dorm life -------------- -- - - - - - --- 138 Frosh reception ____________ _____ ___ 13 3

Tennis -~ - ---- - - - - --- -- - --- --- ~-- - 119 Track - --- - --------------------- -- 120 W arriors - - ------- ------- - -------- 121

Senior ------ --- ---- ------ --- ---- 75-83 Sophomore ----- ----------------- 58-67 Special _______ ____ _______ ________ 84-87

Gospel Team - - - ------------------- 177 Missionary Band --- ~ - -- - -- -- - ---- -- 178 Prayer and Fasting League - ------ - --- 176 Student pastors - - ------------- ----- 179 Sunday School __ ________ ___________ 172 Sunday School teachers ______ _______ 179 SERVICEMEN ____ ________ ___ ___ __8-9

CULTURE A Cappella Choir ___ ______ ______ 198-199 Arrow Staff _________ ____ _____ ___ 208-209 Band ------- - --- - -- - - ------- --- -- 200 Debate - -- ------ -------- ----- ----- 205 Echo Staff ____ __ __ _____ ____ __ __ 210-211 Fine Arts Department __ ___ _____ __ ___ 197 Junior Class Play __ ____________ ______206 Orchestra - - - ----------------- ---- 201 Phi Delta Lambda _____ __ ______ __ __ ..: 207 Quartets & Trios ___________ _____ 202-203 Speech Department -- ------------- - 204 Treble Choir ______ _____ _____ ___ i 98-199 DEDICATION ___ ______________ ___ _ 2-3

SPRING LIFE Commencement -------- ------ - - 222-223 Drag, The ___ ____ ___ _______ ___ _21 8-219 Freshman Banquet ___ ____________ ___229 Junior-Senior Banquet __ ______ ____ 214-215 Sophomore Banquet -------------- -- 221 Work Students ____ __ ______ _____ 216-217 SUMMER ACTIVITIES Commencement --- ------ - - ------ - - 105 Faculty 路 - - ------ -------- --------- -- 98 Improvements 路 ________ ______ ___ _100-101 New Dorm Unit ___ ___ _____ __ __ 102-103 Registration -- - - - - -- -- ---- - - - ------- 96 Religious activities - - - --- ------- ---- 104 Social events - - - --- -------- --------- 97 Sports - - - --- - ------ ---------------- 99 WHO'S WHO - - ------ ------- ---- 167

ATHLETICS-GIRLS' Basketball ~-- -------- -- ----- --- -126-128 Softball ____ __ ____ ___________ ___ 122-124

RELIGION Chapel speakers ___ __ ___ _____ ____ 174-175

WINTER GRIND Alumni Team ---- -- --------- ------ 185 Board of Trustees - - ----- - - - -- - --- -- 185 Christmas Chorus ----- - ---------- - - 184 Commercial Department -- - -----~192-193 Home Economics Department __ __ 188-189 Library, The ____ ___ ___ .:_ ________ 186-187

Squaws - -------- - - - - ----- --------- 121 Tennis - ---- -------- --- -- ----- - --- 125 Track 路-- - ------- -- -------------- 129

Church auxiliaries - - - ---- - - - - --- - - - 173 Church visitor ------------ --- - ----- 181 College Church -- -------- - -- - ---- - 1.71

Moving Day --- ---- - ---- - -- ---- - --- 184 Science Department ____ ___ ______ 190-191 700th Registrant __ ________ ______ ___ 184

11\itiation - - - - - ----- -- - - ---- -- - 134-135 Jamboree ____ :__________ ___ ___ _ 140-141 Registration -- -- --- ---------- ---- -- 132

322

STUDENT INDEX -AAdams, Harriette (]) ___ ___ 69, 139, 197, 206 Adkins, Doris (F) ___________________ 88

Akin, Leonard (So) ____ __59, 135, 219, 253 Alexander, Mayme (Sr) ______ 77, 176, 177, 178 Alger, Danford (]) ______ 69, 100, 110; 117, 176, 177, 178, 206 Andrew, Blanche (Sr) ______ 77, 179, 204, 205, 207 Andrew, J. C. (Sp) _______ _______ 105, 313 Andrew, Lewis (Sr ) ______ 77, 109, 110, 112, 118, 121, 207, 208 Attaway, Charles (Sp) ________________ 57

-BBabcock, Dorothy (F) ________________ 42 Babcock, Lois (F) ------------------42 Babcock, Marguerite (F) ______ 42, 123, 132 Baker, Juanita (Sr) ___________ 33, 77, 176 Baker, Nova (So) ________ 33, 59, 176, 199 Baker, Wanda (]) ______ 69, 121, 123, 125, 127, 128 Baker, Wilson (F) ---------------- 9, 88 Baldwin, Gary (F) ________ 9, 42, 119, 176 Baldwin, Irene (F) _______________ 33, 42 Baldwin, Oliver (Un) _____ __ __ 9, 192, 201 Ball, Mable (F) _____ 42, 132, 173, 199, 203 Ballard, Albert (F) ------- ----- --42, 220 Barnard, Elnora (Sp) ________ 85, 176, 177 Barnes, Opal (F) ---------------42, 176 Bates, Milton (F) -- ---------- ---42, 261 Bawcum" Koleta (F) -----------------42 Bean, Joe (F) ________ 9, 88, 117, 118, 120, 121 Beaty, June (So) ___ ___ 59, 173, 178, 199, 201 , 207 Beaver, Don (Sr) ______ 34, 37, 77, 110, 118, 132, 136, 146, 199, 207

Beaver, Joy (Sr) ______ 36, 77, 160, 198, 199 Bebout! Meredith (J) ______ 9, 69, 176, 178, 206 Beckel, Vivian (Sr) ______ 78, 104, 105, 176, 177, 178, 180, 222 Belcher, Rachel (Sr) ____ 78, 156, 176, 207 Bilby, Mary Nell (F) ______ _______ ___ _42 Black, Wayne (F) ______________ II8, 121 Blake, Juanita (F) ------------------42 Blake, Wilma (]) _______________ 69, 139 Blankenship, Harold (F) ______ 43, 184, 205, 267 Bockmann, Fern (F) __ ____ __ _____ _88, 201 Bohannan, Peggy (F) ______ 33, 43, 123, 127, 133, 176 Bohannan, Aldean (Sp) - ------- --4 3, 176 Bohannan, Myrl (F) -----------------43 Bolerjack, Naomi (J) ______ __ 69, 176, 201 Bonnette, Robert (F) ----- --- ------9, 88 Bornamann, Charles (Sp) ____________ 69 Bornamann, Pauline (Un) ------ - - ---- 85 Boston,. Leroy (F) ------------ ------43 Bowman, Nadine (So) _________________ 59 Bowman, Ray (F)-----------------9, 88 Brakebill, Ray (So)-------------- 59, 293 Brasher, Clara Belle (F) ___ ___ ________ _43 Brasher, Mildred (F) _________________ 88 Brazelton, W. W. (Sp) ----------- --9, 88 Brewer, Berman (F)---------------- --43 Brock, Hildreth (J) ___ ___ 69, 176, 177, 178 Brogdon, Lola Anne (F) ______________ 43 Brown, Alta (]) ________________ 69, 272 Brown, Odis (So) ______ 59, 111, 112, 114, 116, 118, 120, 121, 134, 140, 176 Browning, Juanita (Sp) _________ _______ 85 Browning, _Lillian (Sp) ________________ 69 Browning, Phyllis (F) ________________ 43 Bruce, Robert (F)-------- --------9, 88

Brummett, Neta (So) ______ 59, 13.8, 176, 178, 200, 201 Buffington, Ralph (J) ______ 69, 176, 177, 178, 216

Burdue, Ora (F) - ---- --- --- - - - - - - --- 9 Burton, Leonard (F) ---------- ----9, 220 Butler, Veatrice (F) ______ 43, 96, 176, 177, 179, 186, 211 Butler, Mildred (F)-----------------43 Butler, Alberta (So) ________ _____ 59, 176 Bynum, C. H. (Sp) ________________ 9, 85 Bynum, Howard (Sr) _____________ 78, 222 ~C-

Cantrell, Bailey (J) ----------------9, 88 Carden, Robert (F) ----------------9, 88 Cargill, George "Bud" (F)----------9, 88 Cargill, Juanita (Un) _________________ 89 Carl, Maxine (So) _______________ 69, 293 Carleton, Sherrill (F) ----------------4 3 Carr, Venetia (F) -------------------44 Carter, Earl (So) __ ___ _ 59, 135, i76, 177, 178, 200, 20 I Carter, Ruth (F)--------------44, 76, 188 Casey, Ruth (So) _____ _ 59, 122, 126, 199, 219 Cason, Fred (F) _____ _41, 44, 117, 133, 176, 177, 200 Cason, Jaqette (F)----------44, 176, 220 Cason, Janice (F) ____________ 44, 176, 220 Cate, Mildred (So) ______________ 59, 184 Cherry, Margie (F)----------44, 176, 188 Cheveallier, Pauline (F) ____ __ 56, 177, 178 Classen, Betty (Sr) ___ ___________ 78, 207 Clauson, Frances (F) ______ 44, 176, 177, 178, 189 Clay, Peggy (F) _________ 44, 133, 134, 199 Clemons, Barney (F)------------44, 201 Close, Myrna (So) ___ __ _ 59, 132, 205, 207

PROPOSED SECOND BOYS' DORMifORY

323

PROPOSED FINE ARTS INSTRUCTION BUILDING

Cloud, Eunice (So) ______ 60, 122, 138, 176, 178 Clouse, Lenora (So) ____ __________ ___ _89 Coale, John (F)----------- -----9, 45, 96 Cole, Harper (J)_-_____ 70, 173, 177, 207, 208, 298 Collett, Alta (F) ----------- ----44, 176 Collins, Carl (F) ______ _______________ 89 Colson, Edwanda (F) _____ ______ 44 ~ 176 Conrad, Ernest (F)------9, 44, ll1, 113, 121, 176, 177, 178 Cooner, Mabel (J) _____ _70, 176, 199, 205 Coppock, Bonnie (F) ______45, 123, 124, 127, 129, 2ll Cornelius, Ruben (F) ______________ __89 Cornelson, Anna (Sp) __ ______________ 85 Cottam, Theodore (Un) _______ __ _9, 220 Couch, Helen (F) ______________ ____ _45 Couchman, Virginia (J) ______ 68, 70, 139, 176, 179, 190 Courtney, Geraldine (F) ______ 45, 96, 104, 176, 177, 178, 190 Covey, Ruth (F) --------------------45 Craig, Peggy (So) __ ________ __ ________ 89 Crawford, Lively (F) ______ 9, 45 ~ ll1, 141, 176, 179 Crilly, Dorothy (F) _____________ 60, 176 . Culbertson, Nolan (Sp) ______ __ _______ 85

Derby, Lavera (F) --- - --------------45 Dickerson, Marjorie (J) __ ___ _70, 176, 193, 214, 215 Dicker$On, Maurine (So) ____ __ 60, 177, 190, 209 Dixon, Ruth (F) --------------------45 Dockery, Pauline (F) ________ 46, 132, 199 Doing, Peggy June (So) ______ 60, 132, 198 Dole, Bernice (F) -------------------46 Dotson, Esther (So) ______ 60, 176, 177, 199, 203 Doyle, Donald (J) ___________________ 70 Duffey, Avis (F) ________________ ...:46, 188 Duffy, Virginia (J) ______________ 70, 201 Duby, Ruth (So) ________________ 60, 13 5 Dunn, Verna (F) __ ____ 46, 184, 199, 218

-EEdwards, Marion (F) _____ _46, 132, 134, 176 Eli, Helen (J) _______________________ 70 Emmert, H. C. (So) __________ _____ _ 179 Emmert, Pauline (Sp) ______ 56, 176, 177 Emmert, Ruth (So) ___ ______ 74, 121, 127 Emmert, Velma (Sp) ___ __ _________ __ 85 Engleman, Maxine (Sp) __________ 85, 133 Eppler, Thomas (Sp) ____ ___ _________ 277 Ester, Donna (F) __________________ 46

Cypert, Tommie (F) -----------------45

-DDalaba, Gene (F) ---------------45, 205 Darden, Fannie Beth (F) ________ 45, 189 Davenport, Lee (Un) ----------------9 Davenport, Lillie Mae 0)------ 74, 189, 206 Davis, M. L. (F) __ _________ _89, ll7, 219 Davis, Neil (So) ______ ___ __ __ 60, 120, 176 Davis, Sue Nell (So) _______________ __ 60 Dawson, Eileen (F) ______ 45, 137, 192,

199, 203 DeFoyd, Betty (So) _______ ___ _______ 89

-FFarmer, Constance (F) _____ _46, 176, 177, 199, 200 Faulkner, Charles (J) _____________ 70, 26'1 Faulkner, Darthymarie (So) ______ 60, 138, 176, 177, 178, 180, 199 Fauss, Della (J) __________________ 70, 199 Felter, Wanda (F) _____ _46, 176, 177, 178 Ferry, Loy (J) __ _____________ ___ _70, 96 Finch, Deward {J} --- --- 70, 100, 113, 114, ll7, ll8, 121, 140, 141, 199, 202, 205, 219

324

Fletcher, Alberta (J) ______ 70, 176, 177, 178 Flick, Willis (F ) _____________ 46, 200, 201 Floyd, John (F) ______ __ __ __46, ll1, 137 France, Ann (J) ___ __ _71, 176, 199, 206, 208, 2ll Frank, Joan (Sp) ___________________ 201 Francis, Ethel (F)---------------46, 209 Friesen, Hilda (F) ______ 46, 137, 176, 177, 178 Fry, Georgiamae (J) __________ ____ 71, 2ll Fugita, Nan (So) __ ____ __ 60, 140, 199, 203 Fulton, Cecil (F) ____________ 9, 89, 271 Fulton, Frances (Sp) _______________ __ 89

-GGamble, Albert (Sr) ______ 78, llO, ll8, 136, 173, 176, 179, 181, 218 Garrett, Earnest (J) __________________ 71 Gatlin, Verda ' (Sp) __________________ 85 Gatrell, Nelda (F) -------------------56 Gault, Joanna (F) ___ ___ 47, 176, 177, 178, 192 George, Betty Ellyn (So) ______ 60, 176, 200, 201 George, Marcella (So) ______ 60, 122, 137,

192 Gill, Mary Frances (F) ______________ 47 Gillespie, Inez (F) ______________ 47, 199 Girard, Margaret (F) ________ 47, 188, 189 Grant, Chad (F) __________ ________ __271 Gray, Robert (F) ---------- - ---------47 Green, Henry (Un) ----------------9, 89 Green, Milton (F) ____ _______________ 89 Greene, Albert (Sp) __ ____ 85, 132, 133, 176, 177 Gregg, Juanita (J) ______ 61, 121, 122, 124, 125, 127, 128, 137, 138 Grisham, Elizabeth (F) ____________ ___ 47 Grissom, Robert (F) ___ ________ __ ___ _47 Grissom, Violet (Sp) ________________ _61 Groff, Anna Ruth (F) --- - -----------47

Gronemyer, Bill (Sr) - ----- - ---------78 Gronemyer, Georgia (So) ______ __ ______ 61 Guy, Marion (F) -- -- - - ------------9, 89

-HHadduck, Edward (F) ______ 41, 47, 11 7, 134, 199, 202, 205 Hale, Deloris (So) __________________ 61 Hale, Elizabeth (So) ______ 61, 104, 173, 176, 177, 178, 199, 207, 209, 211 Hale, Evangeline (Sr) ______ 79, 137, 199, 208, 211 Hale, Mildrene (F) ________ _____ _47, 188 Haley, Iva Dell (F) _____________ _47, 199 Haley, Wilma (Sr) ___ ___79, 176, 198, 199, 222 Hall, Maurice (F) ______ 47, 96, 99, 114, 140 Hall, George (F)-------- - - - ---------- 9 Hall, J. Walter (So) __ __ .c._111 , 121, 1~5, 176, 177, 202, 267 Hamilton, Anna (So ) ________________ 61 Hamilton, Jim (J) ______ 36, 68, 71, 110, 113, 11 7, 120, 132, 139, 200, 201, 206 Hamman, Melba (F) ----------------57 Hanlon, Dorothy (F) ______ 48, 138, 176, 177, 178 Hargraves, Charlotte (F) ______ 48, 136, 140, 199, 273 . Harper, Eva May (Sp) __________ l34, 184 Harper, John (Sr) ______ 9, 79, 110, 118, 179 Harris, Irwin (So ) ______ 61, 111, 116, 118, 120, 121 , 176, 177, 178, 186 Harris, Earlene (F) _____ _48, 134, 190, 201 Harris, Maxine (F) ______________ 57, 200 Harrison, Charles (F) ________ 48, 103, 293 Harrison, Jack (Sp) __ ____ 48, 199, 202, 217, 293 Harrison, Travis (F) _____________ 85, 177 Harville, Carroll (J) _____ _71, 199, 201, 206 Hathaway, Gwendolyn (So) ______ _61, 296 Hathaway, John (F) ____ _,_ 48, 141, 200, 217 Hathaway, Noble (So) ______ 61, 136, 179, 296 Hathaway, Patricia (Sp) _____ _____ 85, 261

Hayes, Irene (Sr) ____________ 79, 200, 207 Heap, JoAnn (F) ___ __ _48, 123, 124, 127, 128, 140, 200, 206 Henderson, Evelyn (F) --------;-----90 Henderson, Margaret (F) ______ ___ 90; 219 Henderson, Willard (Jr) ---------,_-71, 117 Hendrickson, Phyllis (Jr) ______ 71, 137, 138 Heneger, Clarence (F) _____ _48, 176, -177, 178 Herrin, Mary Ellen (So) ______ 61, 121, 122, 124, 126, 128, 129, 137, 176, 177, 178, 207, 208, 211, 293 Hess, Norma Lee (Sp) ______ _,_ 86, 137, 247 Hieronymus, Martha (F)----'-- 33, 48, 176, 177, 178, 199 Hightower, Neil (So) ______ 5S, 67, 100, 111, 120, 134, 187, 199, 202, 293 Hillerman, Charles (Sp) - ------- ,------86 Hinkle, Avis (Sp) ______ 86, 177, 178, 180 Hinkle, Jo (Sp) _____ ____ 48, 176, 177, 178 Hoag, Virginia (F) -------- -48, 134, 201 Hogan, Glenellyn (Jr ) _______________ 71 Holland, Lowell {F) ________________ 48 Hollingsworth, Johnnie (Sp) ______ 86, 293 Hollingsworth, Ted (So) ___ ___ 9, 36, 58, 61, 192, 293 Hollingsworth, Rasey (Sp) __ ____ 84, 86, 199, 201, 203 Hook, Francel (F) ------ ------------49 Hope, Stevie (Jr) ____ __ 71, 141, 176, 198, 206 Horn, Celestine (So) _____ _61, 198, 199, 219, 220 Horn, Curtis (F) ___ ___9, 49, 111 , 120, 134, 199, 200, 201, 217, 262 Horn, Mary Jo (Jr) ______ 71, 121, 123, 124, 127, 128, 129, 134, 141, 176, 199 Horst, Grace (So) ______ 62, 176, 190, 203, 207, 208, 211 Howard, Valeta (F) ------- ---------- 49 Howerton, Norman (F) _____ 36, 41, 49, 96, 100, 133, 134, 141 Hudgens, Evelyn (F) ____________ 90, 218

Hudson, James (Jr) ____ __ 83, 110, 132, 179, 206 Huffaker, Ruth (F) ------------------90 Hull, Kenneth (Sr) ______ 79, 103, 110, 118 Human, Barbara (F) ______ 33, 49, 176; 201,

203, 273 Hyden, Vilata (Sp) --------------49, 199

-IIngersol, Carl (Sr) ______ 35, 79, 150, 176, 177' 178, 179 Ingle, Junella (F) ______________ _____ 90 Ingle, Adalene (F) - ----- --------49, 176

-JJames, Beverly (F) ___ ___ ________ 49, 180 Janzen, Paulene (So ) _____ _62, 126, 176, 177' 178, 199 Jared, Clara (Sp) ______ _________ 86, 248 Jared, Ralph (So) ________________ 62, 116 Jasper, Joyce (F) ------------------ --49 Jernigan, Charlene (So)------62, 177, 199, 203, 207, 208, 211 Johnson, Alice (F) --- - - - --------90, 192 Johnson, Archie (F) ________________ 9, 90 Johnson, Bill (F) ____ __ 50, 176, 177, 178 Johnson, Tommie (So) ______ 33, 58, 62, 135, 176, 177, 178, 205, 207 Jones, Edith (F) ---------------------49 Jones, Helen (Jr) _____ _7l , 123, 127, 134, 139, 189 Jones, Phyllis (F) __ ____ 49, 176, 177, 199 Jones, Rayburn (F) __________ ____ 41, 49

-KKarns, Melva (So) ___ ___ 62, 176, 192, 193 Karns, Colleen (So) ______ ____ 62, 176, 192 193 Kellogg, Merreta (So ) ____ __ 62, 122, 176, 200, 201, 203 Kemendo, Frank (F) --- ------------9, 90

PROPOSED LIBRARY AND CLASS ROOM BUILDING

325

Kent, Arlene (F) ______ 50, 96, 132, 176, 177, 178 Kerr, Lee Dona (Jr) ______ 7l, 132, 137, 253, 273 Kifer, Boyd (So) ______ 62, 97, Ill, 135, 176, 177, 178, 200, 202, 217 King, Dorothy (Sr) ______ 33, 80, 176, 177, 178, 186, 207, 222 King, Wilbur (F) _____ __ ____ ________ 50 Knippers, Douglas (F) ________________ 50

-LLadd, Forrest (Jr) ______ 62, 176, 177, 178, 207 La Due, Eldreth (Sp) __________ 200, 201 La Due, Elmer (Sp) ____ ___ _____ 200, 201 Lambert, Terry (F) __ __ __________ 56, 137 Lampp, Sue (F) _____ _ 56, 123, 176, 188, 199 Land, Herbert -(Sp) __ ____________ 86, 100 Landtroop, Esther Marie (Sr) ______ 80, 121, 123, 124, 127, 128, 138, 178 Langford, Mary Lou (So)-----.-33, 62, 122, 137, 189, 219 Largo, James (F) -----------------9, 90 Lawrence, Truman (F) ________ ___ __9, 90 Ledbetter, Ada (F) __________________ 90 Ledbetter, Stanley (F) ______ 50, 111, 112 Ledbetter, Vernon (F) ____ __ 9, 91, 179, 180 Lee, Jack (F)--------------------9, 91 Lee, Pauline (F) _____________ 50, 177, 199 Lee, Ouida (F)----------------------91 Lemay, Marjorie (So) _______________ _62 Lemmons, Roy (F)----------------9, 9i Lewis, Orlene (F) ______ _________ 50; 193 Lindaberry, Aleen (F) ________________ 91 Lindley, Beulah (F) __ ____ 50, 176, 177, 178, 199, 203, 218 Little, Glenn (F) ______ 9, 50, 105, 112, 11 7, 118, 140, 141, 271 Little, Helen (F)---------------------91 Little, Margaret (F) __________________ 50 Locke, Jerald (Sp) ________________ 84, 86 Locke, Thelma ( Sp) __________________ 86 Loughmiller, Lawana (F) ______ ____ 41 , 50 Loughridge, Bill (F) ________________ 9, 91 Lucas, Charles (So) ________ 63, 193, 200 Lucas, Mary Jane 路 (So) ______ 63, 126, 199 Lunn, Alma Jean (Jr) ____ __ 72, 121 , 123, 127, 128, 134, 137, 210 Lunn, Mervel (Jr) ______ 50, 199, 208, 211, 219 Luther, Aline (F) ________________ 51, 176 Lynch, Pauline (F) ------------------ 51 Lynch, Ruby (So) __ __ __ __ __________ _63 Lynch, W . M. (F) _________________ 9, 91 Lynch, Betty (Sp) ____ __ _____ _______ 217 Lynn, Audie (F) ______ 51, 123, 133, 134, 176, 199

-MMcArthur, Glenn (So) ___ ___ 63, 104, 111, 113, 114, 116, 118, 121, 140, 141, 176, 177, 178, 199 McCall, Charles (F) _________ 51, 176, 177 McCollom, Russel (F) _______ 51, 134, 176, 178, 220 McGill, Bill (Jr) ___ ___ 9, 72, 200, 201, 207

McGill, Charlotte (Jr)------72, 96; 121, 123, 125, 127, 128 McMahon, Louis (Sr) ____ __ 80,97, 99, ll2, 119, 176, 177, 179, 282, 209 McMahon, Ruth (So) ________________ 63 McNair, Betty (So) __________________ 63 McWilliams, Leila Mae (F) _______ 51, 200 Mahannan ~ Maurice (Jr) ---- - ---- 72, 141 Makes Cry, Albert (Jr) _____________ 9, 91 Manners, Betty Lou (F) ________ __ 51, 216 Mansveld, Wilbur (So)------ - ---------9 Marsh, Archie (F) ___ ___ 51, 111, 117, 216 Marsh, Willie (Sr) ______ 80, 110, 118, 178, 180, 222, 261 Martin, Grace Corrine (F)--------- ---91 Martin, Tomie (F)----------------9, 91 Martindale, Weldon (So)-----------9, 92 Massey, Charles (Sp) ---------------9, 92 Masters, Tera Jane (F) ______ 51, 123, 124, 127, 176, 199 Maxwell, Leatrice (Sp) _____ ___________ 86 Meador, Douglas (Sp) ______ 51, 111, 117, 120, 137, 184 Messer, Rubena (So) _________ 63, 136, 176 Milburn, Charles (Sp) _________________ 9 Miller, Norman 路(So) __________ 9, 92, 267 Mizell, Almeta (Sr) __ ____ 75, 80, 136, 164, 207, 209, 223, 269 Mizell, Dale Marie (F) ______.51 , 133, 137 Mizell, Jackie (So) _______________ 63, 208 Moffatt, Marion (F) _________________ 51 Moore, Betty (F) _______________ _____ 52 Moore, Charlene (F) ________ 52, 123, 211 Moore, Dorothy (Sp) -------------92, 216 Moore, George (Jr) ______ 33, 72, 136, 199, 206, 207 Moore, Heleo Faye (Sr) ______ 33, 36, 75, 80, 148, 173, 176, 179, 204, 207 Moore, Nelda Lois (F) ________________ 92 Moore, Virginia (Sr) ______ 33, 75, 81, 134, 199, 211 Mosshart, Jean (F) ____ __ 52, 176, 177, 178 Munn, Luke (F) ________________ _9, 92 Murphy, Trudy (F) ______________ 92, 208 Murphy, Louise (So) __ ____ 63, 177, 178, 201, 207 Murray, Mary Katherine (Sp ) __________ 92

-NNagel, Mildred (F) ______________ 52, 248 Nash, Betty (F}-------------52, 134,199 Neufeld, Beulah (So) ________________ 63 Neufeld, Floyd (Sr) ________ ________ __ 81 Newberry, Aaron (So)----------------9 Newcomb, Donald (F) ------ ------ -----9 Nichols, Kenneth (F) _______ __ ___ 52, 100 Normandin, Marjorie (So) _____________ 6 3 Norris, Darlene (F) ______ 33, 52, 176, 177, 199 Northcutt, Claude (Jr) _______ ___ ______ 72 Northcutt, Lillian (Sp) ___ __ _______ __ _86 Nye, Juanita (F) ______ 52, 133, 176, 177,

178, 201 Nye, Monteen (Jr) ___________________ 64 Nye, Bob (Sp) __ __ ____ :._ _____ 63, 111 , 253

326

-0Oakes, Loretta (So) __ ____ 33, 64, 135, 176, 177, 178, 217 O'Donley, Joann (F) __ ______ 52, 176, 273 Ohsfeldt, Grace (F) _________ 52, 180, 201 Overholt, Elva Ellen (So)-------------92

- PPace, Eunice Jo (F) __________________ 52 Parham, Ruth (Jr ) ______ 72, 176, 190, 199 Parrish, Harriet (Sp ) __________________ 92 Parrish, Milton (So) ______ 9, 64, Ill, 116 ~ 118, 121, 220 Parrish, Herman (Sr) ______ 8l, 110, 118, 191 Patterson, John (Jr) _______ ____ _______ 72 Patton, B. A. (So) ______ 52, 96, 178, 199, 217 Payne, Effie Marie (So) ____ ________ ___ 64 Pearce, Opal (F) ---------------------92 Perdue, Beulah (F) ____________ ,.._ 53, 133 Peterson, Marvin (So) _____ _9, 92, 117, 120 Phelps, Paul (Sp ) ---------------------9 Phelps, Virgil (Sp) --------------------9 Phillips, Goldie (Sp) ______ l05, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180 Phillips, Olena ______ ___ _______ __ ___ 29 3 Phillips, Virginia (F) ____________ 53, 96 Pigg, Joyce (Jr ) _________________ _72, 139 Plemons, Eugene (F) _____ 53, 111, 113, 199 Pollard, Ken (F) ___ _______________ 9, 93 Porter, Bill (F) ______ 53, 176, 177, 178, 180 Porter, Birdie (So) ______ 64, 176, 177, 178 Potter, Lorraine (So) _________ 64, 176, 177 Price, Kenneth (So) _________________ 64 Pults, Clester (Sr ) ______ 81, IIO, 154, 176, 177, 179, 198, 217 Pults, Ora Lee (So) ___ ___ 65, 176, 177, 264 Purgason, Jean (Jr ) ______ 72, 123, 199, 201

-RRainbolt, Calvin (So) ____ __ 64, 111 , ll6, 187, 190, 201 Ratcliffe, Pearl (Sr ) _______________ 81, 222 Raymer, Ida Beth (F) ______ 53, 176, 177, 189, 200 Reed, Sybil Rae (F) _____________ _ 53, 127 Reed, Velma (So )-- ----33, 64, 122, 124, 126, 129, 141, 176 Reep, Kathleen (F) _______________ __ 53 Reeves, Lois (Jr) ----------------72, 192 Reneau, Irene (J r) ___ _______ _____ 72, 189 Rhodes, Dorothy (F) __ __ __53, 123, 127, 134 Rhodes, Elton (F) ___________ 57, 200, 201 Rhodes, Troyce (F) _______ __ 93, 127, 201 Rhoe, Betty (F)-------- ---- ---------53 Rice, Pauline (F) __________ _____ _ 53, 199 Riggs, Olen (Jr ) ___ ___ 9, 53, 64, 111 , ll4, 116, 118, 120, 121, 140, 141 , 208, 2ll , 247 Riggs, Earl (F) ____ ______ __113, 111, 219 Riley, Cecil (Sp) ___________ ______ ____ 86 Roberts, Alvin (Sp) __________ 87, 132, 269 Roberts, Edith (Sp) ________________ __87 Roberts, Mildred (Jr ) ____________ ___ __ 73

Robertson, Gladys (Sp) _______________ 87 Robertson, James (Jr) __ ____ ___ ____ 73, 269 Bobnett, Clifton (Jr) _________________ 73 Roeber, Mildred (So) ______ 64, 140, 184, 199, 201 Rogers, Ellen Marie (Jr) ______ 73, 139, 207 Rosburgh, Elvin (So) __ _______________ 64 Rose, Martha Lee (F) _____ __ ___ __ 53, 57 Rowlett, Frances (So) ___ ____ __________ 65 Rowlett, Marie (F) ______________ 54, 188 Russell, Reyndal (Jr) ____ __ 68, 73, 176, 177, 206, 218 Russell, Mildred (Sr) _____ _81, 177, 178, 222 Rutledge, Bertha (F) ___ ___ 54, 176,177,216

-SSanford, Elaine (So) _______ __ _____ 65, 208 Scarberry, Vivian (F) __ _____________ __ 54 Scott, Herbert (F) __ ___ _ 57, 96, 104, 133, 176, 200, 201 Scroggin, Eugene (Sr) ______ 82, 54, 113, 179, 216 Scroggins, Burl (F) ______ 9, 176, 177, 178, 216 Setliff, Pauline (F) ___________ 54, 176, 199 Shaw, Luther (So ) __ ___ ____________ __ 65 Shellenberger, Elmer (J) ______ 9, 93, 11 7, 121, 214, 215 Shreffler, Charles (F)---------------9, 93 Simmons, Earl (F)----------------- 9 ~ 57 Simpson, Alta (Sp) _____ ________ _87, 268 Simpson, Paul (J) ______ 100, 110, 206, 207 Singletary, Robbie (F)------ - ---- -- - - 54 Sistrunk, Werth (F}------54, 137, 180, 199 Sledge, Wayne (J} _____ _73, 110, 139, 176, 177, 202 Smith, Byron (Sp) ___________ _______ 87 Smith, Clara Jean (F) ________ 65, 67, 208 Smith, Duane (Sp ) __________________ 184 Smith, Floyd (Sp ) -- - --------------- 291 Smith, J. Russell (J) ______ 73, 100, 110, 176 177, 206, 262 Smith, Mary (F)---------------- ---- 54 Smith, Violet (Sp) -------------------9 3 Smith, Wallace (F)-------~-------- 9, 93 Smith, Bill (So) _____________________ 65 Smock, Hazel (F)------ - -------------93 Snow, Richard (So) _______ _65, 199, 202 Snowbarger, Marieta (So) ____ 65, 126, 176. 207 Snowbarger, Wave Lynn (F) __ __ __ 54, 176, 177, 178 Stands, Jacob (Sr) ___ ___ 82, 110, 118, 179

Stands, Talmadge (J) __ ______ 82, 179, 208 Steele, Esther (F) -------- -- --- -路- --33, 54 Steele, Leona (So) ___________ 65, 134, 178 Stevens, Wayman (So)---------- - q5, 100 Stewart, Retis (J) ______ __ __ _________ _73 Stinson, Verhie (Sp) _____________ ___ _87 Stockton, Kittie Jayne (So) ____ __ 65, 137, 199 Stockton, Delene (J ) ______ 36, 68, 73, 152, 176, 177, 178, 206, 207 Stone, Elaine (Sp) ________ _____ __ 87; 201 Sturdevant, Marcile (F) _______________ 54 Sullivan, Arwanna (F ) ___ __ _ 54, 127, 128, 176 Sullivan, Evelyn (F) __ ___________ 55, 248 Sullivan, Ruth Anne (F) ______ 65, 126, 176, 193 Sutton, Geraldine (F) ___ ___ 33, 66, 176, 199 Sweet, Orpha (F) ___ ___________ _____ 55

-TTalbert, Beatrice (F )-----------------93 Taylor, Ed (Sr) _____ _75, 82, 110, 158, 193, 308 Taylor, Lloyd (F) ----------- 55, 202, 219 Taylor, Minnie Lea (Sr) ______ 82, 176, 193, 222 Ta0o~ Rubye (So ) __ ___ ___ __ ______ __ 66 Taylor, Tressie (Sp) __ ___ __ _____ ______ 66 Taylor, Virgil (F) ~- -- ---- --55, 133, 202 Thompson, Algree (F) ___ _________ 55, 138 Thompson, Dorothy (J) _________ __ ____ 73 Thompson, Gafe (F) _________________ 55 Thompson, Lerline (J) ___________ _73, 269 Thompson, Lewis (So) __ __ ____ 58, 66, 100, 111, 177; 199, 202, 205, 211, 217 Thompson, Luna Ruth (So) ______ 66, 141, 199 Thompson, Mary Louise (So) ___ ___ 66, 199 Thompson, R. L. (J) _____________ 74, 110 Thompson, Richard (So) ________ 66, 111, 135, 176, 199, 217 Thompson, Marceline (Sp ) ___________ 132 Thurman, Betty Sue (F) ______ 55, 177, 178, 180 Timm, Pearl (So) ___________________ 66 Tinsley, Doris (Sp ) --- ----------- - ---93 Tragey, Mary Louise (So) ____ 184, 211, 293 Traywick, Betty (F) __ ___ __ ___ ___ 55, 296 Troutman, Robert (J) ____________ 74, 141 Tudor, Perry (Sr) ___ ___ 82, 112, 166, 186 Turbiville, Artie (F) _________ 55, 177, 314 Turner, Edwina (F) __ _____ ______ 93, 127 Twining, Betty Ann (F) ___ ___ 55, 176, 177, 178, 201

327

- UUlmet, Ruth (F)-------- - ------- 57, 211

-VVerbeck, Eugene (J) ______ 74, 99, 110, 117, 119, 173, 206, 207, 217, 243 Verbeck, Neva (Sp) ___ _, __ ____ 87, 248, 252 -W~

Wade, Beulah (Sp) __________ 87, 176, 177 Wade, Bruce (Sp) __ 84, 87, 176, 210, 252, 253 Wade, Lettie (So) ______ 66, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180 Waggoner, Doris (So) ___ ___ 66, 199, 201, 273 Walker, Tella (Sp) - ------------- -----9 Walker, Wana (Sr) __________ 83, 141 , 204 Wallace, Yvonne (F) _____________ 33, 55 T ___

Ward, Virginia (F)-------------------55 Ware, Tillie (J) ______________ 74, 129, 139 Warren, Winnie (So) _______________ _66 Watson, James (So) --~----------66, 121 Watson, Loy (So) _______________ 67, 179 Wessels, Dean (Sr) ______ 9, 75, 83, 110, 162, 179, 207, 209 West, Reba Ol -- ----33, 74, 176, 177, 178, 180, 199, 208 White, Imogene (F) ___ __ __ ___ 56, 176, 314 White, Patricia (F)--------------93, 199 Wickham, Alma Jo (Sp) __ __ __________ 87 Wiggs, Emma Frances (So) ______ 67, 176, 199, 203 Williams, Rosey (So ) ______ 67, 12.2, 126, 128, 137, 176, 177, 178, 187, 188, 199 Williamso?, Marjorie (J) -------- ------93 Williamson, Lois (So ) __ ____ 67, 122, 124, 125, 126, 128, 129 Willsey, Marietta (F) ___ ____ _____ 56, 187 Wilson, Betty (So) __________________ 67 Wilson, Garrett (Sp) ___ __ ____ 87, 132, 179 Wilson, Genevieve (F) ________ 33, 56, 219 Wilson, Ruby (J) ______ 121 , 123, 124, 127, 128, 138, 141, 201 Wingblade, Paul (F) _________________ 56 Wininger, Reba (F) _____________ 56, 176 Winter, Selma (So) _______ __ ____ 200, 248 Wood, Elton (So) ______ 67, 120, 135, 176, 177, 190, 269, 273 Worthy, Jack (Sp) __________________ 56 Wright, Lois (F) ___ _____ ___ ____ ____ 56


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