Aspects - July 2022

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ASPECTS

News & views from SMGS

July 2022

In this issue... From the Principal | From the Head of School | From the Head of Junior School | From the Director of Residential | From the School Counsellor | Principal’s Merit Assembly | 100 Days of Kindergarten | The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award | Drama Update | Equestrian Championships | Wednesday Snowsports | The Redlands Cup and Scots Race | Cross-Country Skiing | Subaru ACT & NSW Regional Interschools | Alumni Update


Contents 04 From the Principal 08 IQ, EQ and AQ - The Shifting Focus for Success 12

Principal’s Merit Assembly

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From the Head of School

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From the Head of Junior School

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Kindergarten Events Writing Goals and 100 Days of Kindergarten

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The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award

26 Aeroplane Jelly Drama Present EXPOSED 28 Year 12 Drama 30 From the Director of Residential Boarding Updates

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32 From the School Counsellor 34 The Rob Kneller Youth Foundation and Keep it Cool 35

White Card Course

36 Dempsey Woolf and the ACT U15 Brumbies 37

Cross-Country Championships

38 Equestrian Championships

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40 Wednesday Snowsports 42 The Redlands Cup and Scots Race 44 Snowsports Athletes Named to NSWIS and National Teams 45 Cross-Country Skiing 46 Subaru ACT & NSW Regional Insterschools 50 Alumni Updates 51

Light Up Vanuatu Update

Edition

July 2022

Editor

Caroline Richards

Design

Brooke Darlington & Sarah Elliot

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The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award The Larapinta Trail in the Northern Territory Read the full story here

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From the Principal

From the Principal Welcome Back

Welcome to Term 3 for all students and families, both new and existing. Unlike in past years, the ACT & Regional NSW Interschools Snowsport Championships coincided with our return to school, which made it a considerable challenge. Thank you to everyone for your patience and to those who assisted in working around the many logistical challenges for Week 1. We will certainly be reviewing the duplication for 2023 and aiming to avoid this next time where at all possible to enable a more seamless commencement. With that noted, it is also great to see a return to snowsports competition for the first time since 2019. ACT & Regional NSW Interschools Snowsport Championships The ACT & Regional NSW Interschools Snowsport Championships were a tremendous success for our students, who performed incredibly well. I include all participants in all teams in that assessment, as the representation was overwhelming from our student cohort. With a clear majority of all students participating at some point during the week, SMGS represented more than one in four of all competitors on the hill during the week, with 105 teams taking a Top 5 result. A special mention to the Div 2 Girls SkierX who took a clean sweep, with teams placing 1st through to 5th! I do also wish to congratulate so many of our students, who again demonstrated that how we participate and compete is most important. They did so in an exemplary way, showing great sportsmanship, assisting other students, particularly younger or less experienced, and there were even some reports of our students

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helping members of the public in need in between races. Thank you to Mr Philpott and our team of staff for all their organisation of this event. Read the full article here Duke of Edinburgh’s Award For ten days during the recent school holidays, twenty-one members of our school community hiked with 20-28kg backpacks on the Larapinta Trail near Alice Springs, NT. I am in awe of the entire group for their efforts and, as is so often the case, also upon hearing just how superbly our students conducted themselves when away from campus. They even drew accolades from members of the public on numerous occasions, who made a point of finding out which school our party was from to compliment them. The total experience of the expedition provides so many life lessons for our students, who ranged from Year 9 to 12. Our DOE co-ordinator, Mrs Melissa Bell, praised their efforts, including their determination, resilience and interest in their surroundings. Thanks to Mrs Bell, Mrs Siegenthaler, Mr Frize and Matt Pearce too for volunteering to guide our students for a large part of their break period. Read the full article here Year 11/12 HSC Drama Evenings Congratulations to our senior students performing their Year 11 class piece and Year 12 individual and group pieces last week. The audience was entertained with a wide variety of genres, and the experience of performing in front of a live audience was invaluable to them, something that has been all too uncommon for some time.


From the Principal

Images of the Stage 2 sports courts and oval area in progress

I was interested to hear some of their reflections on this difference alone. We wish Year 12 all the best as they now prepare for their practical performances later this term with examiners. Read the full article here (Year 11) Read the full article here (Year 12) Year 12 HSC Trials We are all wishing our Year 12 students well over the next two weeks as they sit their HSC Trials. This will be their very final assessment contribution apart from the HSC examinations themselves in October-November. It will also mean just five weeks of coursework and revision before, in effect, they largely conclude their schooling. Few would be aware of just how hard they have been working at home and on campus, including quite a number studying late into the evening at school and on weekends in the school library. Thanks also to all our HSC teachers and Mr Horvath, who is fostering a highly diligent approach and enabling extensive after-hours study access at school. Best wishes to all Year 12. 100 Days of Kindergarten What a great milestone, which has come around so quickly for our youngest cohort who are developing amazing skills in such a short time. They had a little celebration for this milestone, and particular thanks to Mrs Rosheen Nikora for teaching and caring for each of them so incredibly well. Well done, Kindergarten! Read the full article here

Stage 1 and 2 Building Works Our sports precinct area is progressing, although the planned pouring of concrete for the multipurpose courts was scheduled for this week but had to be postponed because of the rain we’ve received. Hopefully, the weather is fine for later next week when it is scheduled. The special surface coating and line marking require a certain surface temperature and we will be waiting for the weather to warm up before this can be suitably applied. I am still hopeful we will see our students on the courts at some stage next term. The half-size oval area (first stage) is also taking shape, with the core work completed. To the west, the new Learning Hub has also had some footing work and below-surface infrastructure occurring and soon full attention shifts to this area, which we are excited to see. An Evolution in Schooling - from IQ to EQ to AQ Schools have long been centred around developing cognitive functioning of intelligence capabilities, where IQ has been well rewarded through the methodologies of teaching, learning and assessment in schools, now, for centuries. Emotional Intelligence capabilities referred to as the Emotional Quotient (EQ or EI) have also been of emerging importance in schools for some time, decades actually, as pastoral care and wellbeing programs aim to equip students with the awareness and skills to navigate many aspects beyond cognitive learning focal points. However, a newer quotient, Adaptability (AQ) is rapidly forging a path to share the importance of IQ and EQ in schooling, causing education smgs.nsw.edu.au

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From the Principal

systems to think further about more modern approaches to teaching and learning and equipping students for their future. Specifically, employment readiness is one key aspect of AQ and developing the ability to adapt to one’s surroundings which, given the fast-paced world we live in, is becoming more and more important. Also different is the number of times individuals in the workforce are changing not only jobs but whole careers, and adding to that the number of new jobs and career pathways that have never existed before, where new ground is being broken all the time. Developing the ability to adapt, be flexible, show ingenuity, process complex problems and develop creative solutions are examples of this facet that is emerging in importance to be more explicitly taught in the school journey. Adding to the importance is the significant change in recreational time of children and young people who are much more likely nowadays to be on a screen of some kind, rather than outside playing and using their imagination creatively in all sorts of scenarios, particularly when other children join them. The same when driving in a car - how often now do children just look out the window and wonder, imagine and create in their own minds for extended periods, rather than responding to onscreen prompts and being receivers of entertainment. As a parent, it is extremely difficult to avoid such expectations and even demands from children because they look around and want what everyone else seems to have in that vein. The tech age is here to stay and we need to work with it and find ways to develop attributes of AQ more than ever before. One key to that in education is to provide well rounded experiences, beyond academics, and another is to shape the curriculum to enable 6

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learning to be more readily applied to real-world experiences and use these as a stimulus, as opposed to unrealistic theoretical ‘front loading’ of information that disengages learners in minutes, if not seconds. We are continually working on updating our curriculum programs to include more real-world experiences and to provide more co-curricular experiences and develop leadership opportunities as we include aspects of AQ to help prepare our students for a future that is continually changing. If you are interested, I’ve written a blog on this topic which can be found via the link below and also appears in this edition of Aspects. Read the blog here

dr ANDrew Bell Principal [E] principal@smgs.nsw.edu.au


From the Principal

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From the Principal

From the Principal

IQ, EQ and AQ – The Shifting Focus for Success As experienced for decades, IQ (Intelligence Quotient) was considered the metric of success and key predictor of future success in schooling, university and in many careers. The traditional education system had long equated success in schooling on examination capabilities which, for the most part, relied heavily on factual memorisation and recall, leading to superficial enquiry. Exacerbating this issue has been the sheer volume and breadth of curriculum concepts required by teachers to teach-andtest in rapid-fire approaches to learning, leaving behind anyone needing more processing time or different approaches to learn. This approach of swiftness and vastness undermined any intent to develop IQ because teachers were compelled to teach-test all facets, whether or not learned by students to any meaningful depth or with any real complexity. It is true that some rather basic and not-so-basic calculation, analysis or evaluation has been part of the approach to incorporate an extension component for those more intellectually capable under these inflexible conditions. Skill development and application of real-world learning experiences have traditionally not been as valued to the same degree in school-based education as knowledge per se, although this too is changing, as the need to prepare students beyond the test and equip them for real-world learning and careers is gaining momentum, albeit slowly. Before unsettling anyone, there is no suggestion we should abandon or erode the establishment of core foundational knowledge; rather to consider beyond this glass ceiling that has existed for so long and where I believe there 8

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is a strong appetite, even determination, by teachers to achieve just this. EQ, also referred to as EI (Emotional Intelligence), has for some time now been a welcome addition in broadening the purpose within school-based education. This conception has gained greater acceptance in the importance of the development of young people, not just as adolescents-teenagers, but all the way down to young children as they start their schooling career in Kindergarten. As schooling is designed to do, such acceptance has also been a positive step forward in better preparing students for a future career, where EQ is highly valued in most workplaces in order to build teams, improve client-customer relations and enhance buy-in from employees. There is also the moral imperative to support students to deal with an increasingly complex and digital world, navigating social media and the internet, while a student is still in school. Evolving the ability to self-regulate, be selfaware, have empathy for others, be socially adept and manage relationships effectively are all absolutely complementary to IQ in contributing to overall success and effectiveness, whether at school, in the workplace or in life. We have learnt such skills are not just important for adults. Being well rounded as an individual is gaining momentum in the parent world, where it seems the aspiration for one’s child incorporates EQ and may even be outstripping the aspiration for IQ. An extension of these important attributes reaches into being collaborative, communicative,


From Enrichment the Principal

creative and solving complex problems which segue into the qualities of a third dimension, AQ. Whilst the two-type metrics of intelligence quotients above have dominated the underpinning of success and predictors of success, AQ (Adaptability Quotient) has been emerging as a third and an equally important dimension in the workplace and therefore also in education systems. This more recently identified quotient extends beyond EQ or EI. Defined loosely, it relates to the ability of a person to adapt to their changing environment, the ability to pivot when there is a need to adopt a different approach when something is not working optimally or change is imposed, an ability to ‘unlearn to relearn’ a new way and test assumptions, and to find the means to flourish in any globally fast-paced and rapidly changing environment. Unlearning and relearning are key tenets of a growth mindset illustrated well by The Backwards Brain Bicycle challenge by an engineer (Dustin Sandlin) who demonstrated the alternative neural pathway challenges in this experiment. If you haven’t seen it, it is worth an internet search. It turns out ‘you can teach an old dog new tricks’, although not always easily, but it can be done. We can adapt!

The parenting style of our generation (and I am guilty here!) exhibits a strong tendency to fiercely protect our children... More so now than ever, IQ is considered a minimum requirement to acquire a job, and no longer the sole metric of success at university or school. EQ enables an individual in any team to be more effective and AQ is considered as a greater enabler of success sustained over a longer period of time. Most of us have some aversion to change, inherently or ingrained over time, and this isn’t all that conducive to thrive in a modern world. It stands to reason that higher levels of anxiety can be associated with a difficulty in adaptation. It is not just about sustaining a career; underdeveloped AQ cannot be underestimated in the role of one’s holistic health. The parenting style of our generation (and I am guilty here!) exhibits a strong tendency to fiercely protect our children before anything can possibly go wrong, by removing all hazards smgs.nsw.edu.au

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From the Principal

ahead (aka ‘bulldozer parenting styles’), where we strip these away early, as well as their natural exposure to experiencing problems, failures and challenges, thereby not allowing children from an early age to develop skills to overcome such challenges. Adaptability, resilience, accurate reflection, optimism, positive self-narrative and embracing failures as rich learning experiences are so very valuable. The most effective learners have these characteristics, and we see more and more students with high IQ but with low AQ, whose learning diminishes over time as they protect their ego-identity as the ‘smart kid’, not wanting to burst the bubble. Those without this hindrance are free to explore and experiment in their learning and develop a multitude of AQ characteristics. There is solid evidence universities are changing their entrance criteria to better incorporate EQ and AQ features and moving away from a sole reliance on IQ. They too realise that IQ alone is not an effective predictor of future academic success, as the challenges escalate at tertiary level and where students merge into employment. Universities regularly boast ‘career preparedness’, hence the importance to the sector. Employees and workplaces are demanding graduates of both schools and universities to recruit well-rounded and adaptable

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people to be more effective in the workplace. Once in the workplace, the ability for the ‘talent’ to rise in levels of responsibility and leadership absolutely will command accomplishment in EQ and AQ, and arguably more than IQ. Between 2019 and 2022, 120 million people working in the world’s twelve largest economies were anticipated to be reskilled because of automation alone which, as one example, are not insignificant implications. (Murray, 2019, BBC retrieved at https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20191106is-aq-more-important-than-intelligence) So, what has all this got to do with Snowy Mountains Grammar School? Quite a lot, actually. Firstly, SMGS has had ‘…develop well-rounded young people…’ in its mission statement since its inception, such was the wisdom of the founders of the School back in 1995-96 when it wasn’t a common purpose-promise statement by schools. In fact, the determination of our school governance, leadership and whole staff is very much to service this need for all students, which incorporates a strong sense of values to underpin everything that is referenced above in this piece. Of second importance is that the newly developed SMGS Teaching and Learning Framework very much caters to this in its learning philosophy, where it goes well beyond mastery of foundational knowledge and skills to extending


Academic From the Development Principal

learning, as well as incorporating nurturing relationships and application of learning in realworld contexts. We have moved well beyond approaches of factual recall of knowledge. Of third importance is the development of our facilities, specifically the learning spaces. In the new Learning Hub, for instance, due for completion by mid-2023, the physical design incorporates spaces for more flexible multiclass-subject learning to tackle solutions to real- world problems in collaborative ways, as well as more traditional learning spaces when immersed in earlier stage mastery of foundational knowledge and skills. These will allow for IQ-EQ-AQ knowledge and skill development. We are preparing our students for future-oriented careers that don’t yet exist, as well as accommodating traditional careers of the past that still exist but will inevitably adapt and evolve their method and practice. This is occurring right now through carefully designed programs, facilities and support of our students, equipping them for an ever-changing world by professional, dedicated and inspirational staff at Snowy Mountains Grammar School who know and value each child in their care.

dr ANDrew Bell Principal [E] principal@smgs.nsw.edu.au smgs.nsw.edu.au

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Events

Principal’s Merit Assembly

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Events

On Friday 29 July, the Middle and Senior Schools assembled to recognise and celebrate the successes of our students as we looked back over the achievements of Term 2. The Principal’s Merit Assembly is a prestigious occasion where students are recognised for their high level of achievements across several fields over a long period of time. Awards were presented to students in Years 7 to 12 for Academic Honours and Endeavour. Congratulations to all of our students on their hard-earned achievements. At Speech Day, Academic Honours and Academic Endeavour recipients will be announced, and students will receive an authorisation for these awards to be embroidered onto their blazers. Remember, the awards received at the Principal’s Merit Assemblies are provisional. Students need to finish the 2022 academic year with a GPA over 4.5 and/or an average result of 80 or above across all of their subjects for this to occur.

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Middle and Senior School

From the Head of School Middle/Senior School As I come to the end of the first couple of weeks of a change in my role, I am reminded by students, both new and past, that some may not truly know who I am, nor my core purpose. As the Head of School (Middle/Senior) at Snowy Mountains Grammar, I am passionate about the academic, social and emotional wellbeing of the students and families in my care, as well as providing an opportunity for our students to truly belong. To truly belong, students must be known and celebrated for their authentic selves. In the past week, I have spent time and place endeavouring to begin the process of truly knowing the senior students of Snowy Mountains Grammar School, who are new to my care. I have watched in the grounds, chatted in the library, asked questions about the person in front of me, smiled and laughed, and have listened with integrity … and have attempted to remember all that I have learned. I am a person of values and make no apology for the high expectations that I hold, not only of myself, but all with whom I interact and for whom I care. Of paramount importance to my work as the Head of School (Middle/Senior) is my belief in, and open demonstration of, our School Values. Our School Values allow for a common thread, a common goal, and give context to the care for ourselves and others. Underpinned by CARE: Courage, Authenticity, Respect and Empathy, our values are a fundamental element of our school culture and of who we are, both individually and as a group.

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Together with the School’s Mission Statement, “To inspire a love of life and learning”, the School Values create a space where the learning allows for our students to have choice beyond the school gates - real choice, grounded in the knowledge that they, with the support of their SMGS family, have left no stone unturned in their quest to follow their pathway. I am excited to begin a slightly adjusted journey of leading and learning at Snowy Mountains Grammar School; working alongside a community of students and families – some of whom I know well, and others who I am yet to learn more about. My door and my heart are always open; please do stop to say hello, introduce yourself and allow me to learn about the community that I am caring for.

JENNIFER THOMPSON Head of Middle/Senior School [E] jennifer.thompson@smgs.nsw.edu.au


Middle and Senior School

As I come to the end of the first couple of weeks of a change in my role, I am reminded by students, both new and past, that some may not truly know who I am, nor my core purpose...

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Junior School

From the Head of Junior School Developing a Student’s Flexible Mindset A flexible mindset goes hand in hand with a growth mindset in the development of a child’s positive self-awareness. Whilst a growth mindset determines how a child responds to setbacks, a flexible mindset is an interplay between self-awareness, adaptability and perseverance that empowers students to become selfdirected learners. The essential components that facilitate a child’s development of a flexible mindset work in unison to drive a student’s learning journey. They are: Metacognition The basis of self-awareness is the ability to reflect upon what you are doing. Selfdirected learners notice that something they are doing is not ‘quite working’ and pause to reflect and redirect. Positive Thinking This is a strand of growth mindset where a child learns from their mistakes and perseveres with a challenging task. They ask themselves “how can I learn from this mistake?”. They continue to ‘grow their neural receptors’, as the brain grows more when you are learning something new. Executive Functioning Executive functioning is about selforganisation and planning. How to get organised and plan the way you will approach a set task. Noticeably, some children need support in this area of selforganisation and others have a high level of executive functioning and very quickly become self-directed learners. This is a taught skill and begins at home during toddlerhood and carries through a child’s school and home life.

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The tools we use to develop a child’s flexible mindset are: 1. Positive language We need to use language at home and at school that models being receptive to feedback, that is solution-focused and committed. 2. Use a metacognitive approach Focus on a child’s self-awareness and the perspective of others. This will in turn support adaptability, problem-solving and critical thinking. 3. Normalise mistakes Teach a child the value of ‘not knowing’ and how it is an opportunity to ‘grow your brain’. 4. Provide feedback Productive feedback encourages the child to become reflective and to develop the ability to adjust their approach to a situation, task or challenge. The journey of developing a child’s flexible mindset is a home and school partnership. The focus is intentional, with the purpose of developing students who are adaptive, resilient and curious learners.

Heidi Shvetsoff Head of Junior School [E] heidi.shvetsoff@smgs.nsw.edu.au


Junior School

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Junior School

100 Days of Kindergarten

s ng i t i n r a a “Le sure th a s e a tr ollow it ere.” f h ryw will e v e er own se Chine

On Tuesday 26 July, our youngest learners reached a significant milestone in their educational journey – their first 100 days of school! Of this significant milestone, Kindergarten teacher, Rosheen Nikora, said, “You should be very proud of your achievements, learning and personal growth. Your willingness to learn and your kindness are an asset to our school community. Each day you enter our classroom and strive for your personal best.”

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Prov e

rb

Dr Andrew Bell said, “Congratulations to our Kindergarten student community, who have already begun to establish important lifelong learning habits that will serve them well on their journey throughout their early years, as well as the rest of their schooling and beyond. The class is progressing very well and they are working beautifully with Mrs Nikora, who provides them with exceptional learning experiences and a superb level of care and support. Well done on an excellent first 100 days, Kindergarten!”


Junior School

Kindergarten Writing Goals

It’s been a productive start to Term 3 for our youngest learners! From the first day of Wednesday snowsports at Thredbo to Regional Interschools! This week, our Kindergarten students have also started setting individual goals for their learning. Today they self-assessed their writing and identified specific actions to improve. Their goal rockets are ready for stickers and to soar for the stars!

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Enrichment

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award The Larapinta Trail, NT

The Duke of Edinburgh’s Award at Snowy Mountains Grammar School continues to focus on fostering the lifelong skills of perseverance, resilience, teamwork and optimism through individual participation in a number of components. The Adventurous Journeys are undoubtedly the most rewarding and lifechanging part of the program for our students. From Saturday 25 June to Monday 4 July, seventeen students from Years 9 to 12, along with four adults, embarked upon the most challenging Adventurous Journey ever undertaken by the school. The Larapinta Trail in the Northern Territory is well known amongst hiking communities to have some of the most spectacular scenery, steepest gorges and rugged ridgelines and most challenging encounters with wildlife within Australia. The expedition party completed the first three sections of the Larapinta Trail over a six-day period, in which they experienced the sheer beauty and harsh climate of the arid landscape, which traversed through Euro Ridge, Simpson’s Gap, Bond Gap and Stanley Chasm, to name a few. The students carried five nights’ worth of provisions in a very heavy hiking pack, set up camp each night, prepared their own meals, navigated along the hiking trail and worked together in small groups to repair equipment and patch wounds, along with encouraging and supporting their team-mates. In addition to 20

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this, the students adapted exceptionally well to hanging their food bags and hiking packs in the shelters and trees each evening to prevent mice and dingoes from attacking their belongings. The mice and dingoes could certainly be heard each evening scurrying around camp but never threatened to dampen our spirits. After completing the Larapinta Trail, the expedition party was rewarded with hot showers and a few days of sightseeing. Exploring the spectacular domes of Kata Tjuta (the Olgas), a Segway tour and indigenous cultural studies of Uluru, along with hiking around the impressive Watarkka (King’s Canyon), provided some breathtaking and deeply enriching experiences, as well as a magnificent finale to the trip. The attending staff were both impressed and very proud of the resilience, perseverance, teamwork and determination demonstrated by our students, which was tested each and every step of the way. The expedition party certainly epitomised the school motto of challenge, belong and explore!

Melissa Bell Head of Faculty – Educational Support and Enrichment [E] melissa.bell@smgs.nsw.edu.au


Enrichment Sport

The experience of trekking through the country so uniquely beautiful and rich with Indigenous history, alongside like-minded staff and students, was a privilege I will never forget. Scott Frize, Head of Technology

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Enrichment

I loved watching the scenery change through the day as we made our way across the track. Each day was filled with stunning sunrises and magnificent views of the Tjoritja National Park. Here we had the amazing opportunity to learn not only about the geographical processes that led to these magnificent features but what they mean to the Aangu and Arrernte people. Lucy Cross, Year 12

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Enrichment

It was a unique experience that brought us together as we explored the heart of Australia.

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Enrichment

It was just so rewarding; after each hill climb, you get a truly stunning view, and there was such a beauty in it that the camera on our phones couldn’t quite capture. It just made me want to see the rest of the world with my own eyes. Harry Willsmer, Year 12

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Enrichment

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Creative Arts

Aeroplane Jelly present

EXPOSED

It was my pleasure to be part of the Exposed performance, hosted at Snowy Mountains Grammar School, this week. My peers and I put in much hard work and effort throughout Term 2 and the following holidays, including weekend rehearsals. It was enjoyable to see how everyone added to the plot and character development as this play evolved. Writing in two extra characters, directing and designing costumes, set, lighting and sound, meant that Exposed was unique and fitted in with our directorial purpose and personal styles. It was a great learning experience for me and our group to be able to perform in front of the large crowd that attended. Having the audience react to the intended funny moments really helped to reinforce our confidence while performing. I felt that in the latter half our nerves had finally died down and we could find the rhythm of this

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production. Overall, it was a great experience. I know the team is looking forward to working towards our next performance opportunities that will arise throughout our upcoming studies of Year 12 Drama. Watching this year’s HSC Drama students present their Group and Individual Presentations gave us some insight as to what we would be in for. They inspired us with their meaningful and quirky performances. While some have quite a bit of work to do before their practical examination in about 5 weeks, it was obvious some students have talent and commitment. We wish them all the best on this final journey of their studies of Senior School Drama. Ben Reigada (Year 11 Drama student)


Creative SportArts

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Creative Arts

A Class Act

Year 12 Drama Congratulations to our Year 12 Drama students who presented their HSC Group and Individual Presentations as works in progress. The first performance, entitled Sweat it Out, focused on two very different perspectives of sweatshops, while Whispers and Whistles explored a parallel world of sexism turned on its head. The Year 12 students also performed their ‘nearly finished’ HSC monologues: exploring the worlds of motherhood, mystery, psychotherapy, psychopaths and psychodrama. Students will continue to refine and polish their performances to be ready to present to the external HSC examiners in approximately 6 weeks.

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Creative Arts

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Boarding

From the

Director of Residential It has been a fast transition into the role of Director of Residential at SMGS. Not only has my office been relocated, but the focus and attention has shifted to our residential students and their families. This has been a welcome shift, allowing time and energy to be dedicated to a very important section of our community. Boarding has always been an integral and central part of our community. We currently have sixtyfour boarding students this term, which makes up 20-25% of the Middle and Senior School student numbers: thirty-seven full boarders, eleven weekly boarders and seventeen ESA/ T3 students. These students add so much to our school community, and the research shows having boarders in your community benefits in the following ways. Boarders increase participation in events, they become involved in the life of the school, they add stories to who we are, broaden our understanding of new places, from countries overseas to city life. They understand patience and tolerance, they’re grounded, they create a sense of community and SMGS boarders need to be independent! They pack their own bags and their lunch and wash their own clothes, and this independence helps to raise the bar for our day students. I have always loved working with our boarders. There is banter and laughs, but there are often stronger relationships too. They know they need to make the most of their opportunities, so they are quick to try hard and access help. It allows you to create bonds and they are always grateful for that time and connection. It gives staff a great sense of purpose.

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So, a little detail for clarity. My role is now in the Executive Leadership area of Boarding@ SMGS. This really means that my role is to advocate for the people and the programs that involve boarders and their families. Whilst I am involved every day with the community, my role is not managing the day-to-day. This is most certainly with the boarding supervisors and our Head of Boarding. Since the start of this term, I have met with staff, students, the Boarding Captains and our catering team. The main goal is to understand what is currently happening in Boarding and to ask about their needs. Over the term, we will conduct a more formal survey of students, staff and parents to gather feedback for planning for 2023. This will be in the form of both a written survey and, potentially, focus groups in person (or telephone/ Zoom), so we can really work together to improve what we offer in Boarding at SMGS and how we offer it. The Junior Girls’ Common Room is open and is a wonderful space. It’s being used for cooking, craft, fun games and of course entertainment on the big screen. We are planning on an official afternoon tea opening and the Junior Girls will host staff and students in their new space. Of course, parents can follow us at #smgs.boarding on Instagram. Voting has concluded for the Boarding Representative Council for Semester 2, 2022. Every semester, two students in each year group (Years 7-10) and three from Year 11 are elected to the Boarding Representative Council. The council is chaired by the Boarding Captain(s) and meets fortnightly. The aim of the council is to offer the


Boarding

students a voice in matters affecting boarding house life and to generate ideas and activities and events for boarders. We will hold our first meeting in Week 3 and we are already excited about the ideas flowing from the students. Students were inducted to their leadership positions at the recently held Principal’s Merit Assembly. Congratulations to the new BRC students: Year 7 - Isla Robertson and Dana Ezra Year 8 - Ella Owens and Aidan O’Connor Year 9 - Callie Beare and Taylah Klemm Year 10 - Will Alexander and Nic Ottley Year 11 - Blyss Burke, Harrison Jovanovski, Spedding Pearce and Mitchell Riepon

Kelli Wilson Director of Residential [E] kelli.wilson@smgs.nsw.edu.au

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School Counsellor

A Balancing Act Between school, studying, assessment tasks, family, friends, chores, work, maintaining a social life, and getting enough exercise, there are a lot of things for young people to juggle each week. Life is a balancing act and young people have the difficult job of having to manage multiple tasks and roles each week. Winter can bring on added pressure. There are fewer daylight hours, resulting in many young people now needing to perform their chores in the dark. It can also seem as though there are not enough daylight hours to socialise with friends outside of school or engage in important selfcare practices. Many people also feel more tired. This is because the reduced sun exposure can affect our circadian rhythm, causing our bodies to produce more melatonin, the result being that we feel sleepier. So, what happens when we are out of balance? Common impacts can include burnout, feeling stressed, low mood, loss of enjoyment, loss of motivation and increased lethargy. There is no one size fits all approach to restoring balance. Each person will have different needs depending on how they operate, and it is important for everyone to find what works best for them. Here are three useful tips for restoring balance and prioritising what is important to you.

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1. Create a list of what needs to be done (for example: assessments, chores, sleep, attending school), what you would like to get done (for example: social activities, sport). Reflect on the number of hours required for each of these activities. 2. The next step is to reflect upon how you would like your week to look. There are 168 hours in a week. If you factor in sleep at approximately eight hours per day, time spent at school, travel time to and from school, and time to eat meals, you are likely to have approximately sixty hours per week to spare. Go back to your list created in step 1 and allocate hours to the things that you need to do and would like to do. If you get up to sixty hours and there are items remaining on your list, it is time to think about which activities matter the most. 3. Use a planner, calendar or diary to write down your timetable. This will assist you to follow and stick to your routine. Set time limits to activities. Setting an alarm is a great way to remind you when it is time to stop. Speak to your family to determine what the expectations of you are at home. This will assist you to timetable chores and other family commitments. Work out what activities you can remove if you have a particularly busy week. And take breaks and be flexible. Some days you might feel tired or have more commitments than others and it is ok to modify your schedule to suit you.


School Counsellor

Finding a balance between school and your personal life is essential to remaining happy and motivated. A good mix between free time and school time gives young people the opportunity to recharge after studying, engage in self-care activities, and enjoy time connecting with family and friends. For parents and guardians wishing to refer your child to the school counselling service, you can speak to your child’s relevant head of school or assistant head of school to complete a referral form. Alternatively, you can contact either myself or Miss Brown and we will email you a referral form to complete and send back to us. If you have any questions about the referral process or what type of support is offered by the school counselling service, please do not hesitate to contact me directly.

alex dawson School Counsellor [E] alex.dawson@smgs.nsw.edu.au

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Service Learning

The Rob Kneller Youth Foundation and

Keep it Cool

In Term 1, members of our school community attended the Keep it Cool planting day at Illangani, Dalgety. The Rob Kneller Youth Foundation (RKYF) donated $5 for every tree planted towards sporting equipment for the local schools in Jindabyne, including our school! Lucas Wilkinson, the Founder of Keep It Cool, and Scott Kneller, who founded the RKYF with his brother Luke Kneller, visited SMGS to talk about how their organisations came into being, as well as the impact of their work on our community and beyond.

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This year the funds from the event have provided SMGS with the opportunity to purchase mobile basketball nets as we await the completion of our Sports Precinct. Thank you to Keep It Cool and RKYF for their generosity and incredible contributions over the years to the youth and environment in our remarkable region.


Careers

White Card Course

Well done to all the students who completed their White Card course. Thank you to the wonderful team from Global Skills Development, who facilitated the course, and Regional Industry Education Partnerships, who funded the program.

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Sport

ACT U15 Brumbies

Dempsey Woolf Over the last two months, Year 9 student Dempsey Woolf has been training for the ACT U15 Brumbies. During the holidays Dempsey played for the U15 ACT Brumbies in the Southern States Championships in Canberra. The team competed in the U16 group, and Dempsey was very proud to be the team captain. The team played against the Northern Territory, South Australia, Tasmania and the South Coast and Southern Inland Rugby teams. The team came third overall out of a total of six teams. Dempsey played very well and was ‘Man of the Match’ in three of the team’s four games. Following his success through the school holidays, Dempsey has been training with the U16’s Brumbies as they prepare for the Australian U16 Championships. Congratulations, Dempsey, on a spectacular season so far!

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Sport

On the Run...

Cross-Country Championships Congratulations to Year 8 student Axel Potocki who was recently selected to represent Team ACT at the 2022 Australian Cross-Country Championships in Adelaide!

Axel Potocki - 9th place for All Independent Schools 14/15 years old and 88th Overall in this age group in NSW

We wish Axel all the best in his preparations for Nationals!

Tessa Paxton - 11th place for All Independent Schools 13 years and 33rd Overall in this age group in NSW

Three students headed to the NSW All Schools competition on Friday 22 July. Well done to the following students on their superb results:

Ayla Mawhinney - 9th place for All Independent Schools 12 years and 131st Overall in this age group in NSW.

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Sport

2022 National Interschool

Equestrian Championships

The Snowy Mountains Grammar School Equestrian Development Academy (EDA) has had a banner first year under the guidance of coordinator, Gidge Fairfield-Smith. The competition season culminated with three students punching their tickets to the National Interschool Equestrian Championships as part of Team NSW. Alexandra Fairfield-Smith, Indiana Burke and Beth Richardson-Dunn will be heading to the Sydney International Equestrian Centre in September. Of the nomination, Zani, who recently won the EVA 80 at the 2022 NSW State Interschool Equestrian Competition, said, “I’m so excited to be offered a position in the NSW equestrian team for Nationals in my final year of school.” 38

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“The growth of the Equestrian program, which also saw the opening of the SMGS EDA agistment facility, has been fantastic. Gidge and her team, with the support of parents, has done an exceptional job building up the program this year. To have three students heading to Nationals from our school is such a wonderful outcome after a number of disrupted years. The future of the equestrian program at SMGS is certainly very bright. We wish Zani, Indi and Beth the best of luck in their preparations for Nationals”, said SMGS Director of Sport, Mr Martin Philpott.


Sport

I’m so excited to be offered a position in the NSW equestrian team for Nationals in my final year of school. Alexandra Fairfield-Smith

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Sport

Sunshine and Smiles

Wednesday Snowsports The return of Wednesday snowsports was met with excitement as our K-12 student body headed to Thredbo and Perisher for the start of the ten-week snowsports program. It was fantastic to see so many students out enjoying the spectacular alpine environment, learning new skills and meeting new friends.

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Sport

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Sport

2022 Snowsports Kick-Off The Redlands Cup and Scots Race The Redlands Cup and Scots Race provided a great opportunity and atmosphere for our skiers and snowboarders to hone their racing legs ahead of the Regional and ACT Interschools. SMGS Director of Sport Martin Philpott was elated to see the successful kick-off of the race season, saying, “We are thankful to be heading to the start gates after a tumultuous few years. As always, our students’ school spirit and sportsmanship shone brightly, with many achieving a personal best and beyond”.

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After a massive day on the piste, SMGS posted some fantastic results, including:

Over at Perisher, Year 10 student Keisha Tickle took the top step of the podium in the Division 2 Alpine event.

Year 12 student Letitia Murphy started her final school season by taking home the Redlands Cup with the fastest time on the day. Letitia also won the cup when she was in Year 9.

Congratulations to everyone who competed and thank you to all our staff, parents, carers and students for their assistance on the day.

The next generation is coming on strong with Year 6 student Alessia Diver clocking the fastest time for the Junior School girls. Year 10 student Cameron Tu r n e r claimed the Redlands Cup for the fastest snowboarder of the day.

View Redlands Cup Results View Scots Race Results


Sport

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Sport

Snowsports Athletes Named to

NSWIS and National Teams

Congratulations to Year 9 student Lottie Lodge who was recently named as an NSWIS scholarship recipient and also named in the Australian Mogul Team. Year 12 student Angus Falconer was also announced as a recipient of an NSWIS training scholarship for Slopestyle. Both athletes were named in the Snow Australia Emerging Talent Program announced earlier this year. Photos: The Mogul Ski Academy, Perisher and Thredbo

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Sport

Cross-Country Skiing Our students involved in Nordic skiing have had a fantastic season, posting some great results at the state and national championships held over the last few weeks at the Perisher Nordic Centre and Falls Creek. ACT Junior Sprint Championships Under 12 Female Ivy Potocki - 3rd Zara Potocki - 4th Under 18 Female Charlotte Walker-Broose - 4th Perisher Schools Nordic Event Division 2 Gabi Forman - 4th Division 3 - Female Willow Bakogiannis- 2nd Erica Egger - 3rd Axel Potocki - 4th Division 4 - Female Madeline Lloyd - 1st Zara Potocki - 3rd Ivy Potocki - 4th NSW Junior Freestyle Championships WU20 Alexi Cross - 2nd MU16 Axel Potocki - 2nd WU12 Madeline Lloyd - 1st Zara Potocki - 2nd Ivy Potocki - 3rd Australian FIS Continental Cup Zana Evans - 1st

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Sport

2022 Subaru ACT & NSW Regional Interschools

Snowsports Championships A winter wonderland greeted competitors at the 2022 Subaru ACT & NSW Regional Interschools Snowsport Championships. With a focus on participation, fun and in the spirit of the AOC Have A Go month, the week saw close to 250 SMGS students across K-12 challenge themselves to reach their personal potential and beyond. Director of Sport, Mr Martin Philpott, was proud of the students’ efforts through the week, saying, “It was so wonderful to be racing again and getting back to the events and opportunities we all enjoy so much. There were so many amazing performances and personal bests, and every student should be proud of their efforts. It was also so special to have some of our Year 12 students out on the course with the next generation.” Of her first interschools competition, Year 2 student Sofia, said, “At first, I was a bit nervous, but when I was at the starting gate, I felt very excited! I skied and snowboarded my hardest and had lots of fun!”

who represented their school with maturity and sportsmanship well beyond their years. Thank you to the Year 12 students who assisted the younger members of our school community. What wonderful role models you all are.” To the Team Behind the Team Thank you to our Director of Sport, Mr Martin Philpott, and his team for their tireless hours of organising, logistics, course marshalling, timing and judging, and all with huge smiles. To all the parents who helped out through the week, these events would not be possible without your assistance. Well done to Perisher for setting some fantastic courses through the week and to the Snow Australia Interschools team for another fantastic event. Bring on States! To view the results and daily reports, head to the links below: Day 1 Report and Results

Sofia’s teammate Heidi agreed, saying, “It was a lot of fun, but the best was skiing with my friends.”

Day 2 Report and Results

The Junior School had record participation across Div 4, 5 and 6, a testament to the growth of that area of the School. Head of Junior School, Ms Heidi Shvetsoff, was pleased to see so many students taking the opportunity to experience their first snowsports race, saying, “What a fantastic week for our Junior School students

Day 4 Report and Results

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Day 3 Report and Results Day 5 Report and Results


Sport

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Sport

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Sport

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Service Learning

Alumni Updates

Congratulations to alumnus Toby Mallon (Class of 2016) who has been selected as one of three cadet pilots to fly with Torres Strait Air (Torres Strait Air is a regional airline, flying twin turbo prop aircraft, servicing northern Queensland and Papua New Guinea). Of Toby’s cadetship, SMGS Aviation program coordinator, Phil Ryrie, said, “I believe Toby is a great example of a young person whose perseverance, hard work and dogged determination enabled him to reach his dreams.” Congratulations to alumnus, Timothy Brunette (Class of 2012), who was recently named in The Australian’s Top 100 Innovators.

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After completing a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical (Space) Engineering from the University of Sydney and a Master’s Degree in Information Technology (Artificial Intelligence) from UNSW, he founded CryptoTaxCalculator with his brother, Shane Brunette, in 2018. The product simplifies tax reporting for crypto currency investors. The software has been so successful that they have received $4m of investment so far. Read More Here


Service Learning

Light Up Vanuatu Campaign Update Thank you to all our families, staff, students and wider community members who so generously supported our Light Up Vanuatu Campaign. We have raised an incredible $3920! The Light Buddy solar light kits have been ordered. This term we will lock in a time to assemble the kits and write letters to the children of remote Vanuatuan villages. We look forward to sending our gifts of light to address energy poverty in Vanuatu.

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Snowy Mountains Grammar School 6339 Kosciuszko Road Jindabyne NSW 2627 (02) 6457 1022 info@smgs.nsw.edu.au

www.smgs.nsw.edu.au