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12061 NINETEEN HUNDRED AND FORTY-THREE

Published by the Associated Students of Snow College Ephrai1n, Utah VoLUME 22


rryO

be ignorant of 1Vhat bappened before you 1Vere born is to be forever a child."


During the year 1942-43, students at Snow College-and everywhere-have been rr..:4 T ATTENTION." Sante have heard the bugle call; so111e have joined tbe ranks of industry; all have experienced a change in the once peacetime routine. There have been retrencmnents in activities, rationing of sugar and other itenH, a-nd shortages of 'Jnaterials such as gum and filnH. There have been roll calls for stantP Pu-r足 chases; progrants for conservation.

The curriculum lost

1nany of the traditional college frills and tunzed to the developntent of skills. It has been a year of assaying the benefits of being an Anterican, and of learning the duties of being an Anzeric:an. This book_ would preserve front the ravages of ti1ne such experi足 ences as yielded to pen and picture--within restrictions of vital 1naterials. The editors hope that the intangible mem足 ories will be self-preserving. The Snowonian of 1942-43 is offered to Lasting Peace.


ADMINISTRATION BUILDING

rry

he路 soul talzes nothing with her to the other world but her education and culture."

rry

he future of the wOJrld depends upon the soundness of 1nen's 1nind, body, and soul."

OLD GYMNASIUM


NE\\7 GYMNASIUM

rrrhe rung of a ladder is not to rest upon, but only to enable one to step higher."

"'Colleges in warti11�e are entrusted the respon­ sibility of giving specialized training."

MECHANIC ARTS BUILDING


LATTER-DAY SAINTS INSTITUTE BUILDING

rrQnce again, religion 111-USt C011�e to rescue the world /ron� barbarisn� and destruction."

rrEducation n�akes a people easy to lead, difficult to drive; eaS)J to govern, i1npossible to enslave"

MEN'S D·O·RMITORY


LENARD OLSEN (September 23, 1923; November 3, 1942)

rryhere

are stars that go out in the darkness,

But whose silvery light sbineth on; There are roses whose perfuntz-e still lingers When the blossontz-s are faded and gone; There are lives full of light and of sweetness When no longer their life current flows; Still their goodness lives on with the living Like the soul of the star a11d the rose."


Fro1n the wisdon� and experiences of the past, /ron� dJe problen�s of the present, CITIZEN SOLDIERS everyw·here 1nust distill a W'Ork.able, just plan for the future. This plan is a triple beacon ligl?t: Victory for the rights of self-detern�ination, a peace bringing security for generations to be, a world ruled by hu1nan needs and intelligence.


C t �r t Z E "I SOlDIERS


PRESIDENT JAMES A. NUTTALL

HIS MESSAGE This beautiful yearbook stands as a syntbol for the consumJJta�tion of a year's work. It has been a year full of pmblenH and uncertaJinties, a yeaw full of s.a:tisfaction and frustration, a year of bajJpincss and sorrow, and a year of success and disap­ pointment; b ut, after all, it has been a year of growth• and' experience, of effort and of achievement. Perhap·s more of us h·ave been bmught face to face with problems of reality more dur­ : e don�e 1nore ing this past year th.an in any other year of 01tr lives. Perhaps we hav th'inking relative to the values of life than a'l any other time, and, because of these experiences, we are leaving the institution with a more well-defined philosophy of life OJ1an has been the case with students of oth·er years. I am sure that our ajJprecia:timt for life; for religion; for our country and ou·r social and political imtitu.tions, jJrivileges, and obligations, have been greally increased because of the problems with· which we have been faced. With .this increased richness in our lives, we are P1'epared to meet the problems of the future with! a: sense of determination to do mtr pa1't and to 1nake the most of our opportunitie�· in sustaining the glories of civilization. May this yearbook ever carry with it pleasant memories; may it be tbe means of holding the bonds of friendship· ever tighter; and may it be a stimuJation to each of us to cany on in life, that it may become more beautiful and worthwhile.

10


Franc-is ]. G urney, Chemistry, Mathem,atics; Ernell ]. Mortensen, C ustodian ; Woodrow W. Beck, Physical Education; Don Simmons, Biological Science, Physical Education ; H. Ephraim Jensen, Agric ulture, Biological Science; Rulon Peterson, Physics, Mathematics.

Tippe tts, Social Science; H. A. Dean, Music; Dorothy Pederson, Secretary; ]. Orrin Anderson, Treasurer; Helen A. Nelson, Speeci:J', Drmnatics.

A. I.

]. S. Christensen, Business; Fern A. Young, English (On Leave of Absence); A. Russell Gray, English', Languages; Lucy A. Phillips, English; Gwen Greaves, Librarian; Wyona H. Frost, TyjJe, Physical Education.

Elmo Webster, Agriculture; Earl V. Hills, Auto Mecha路nics ; lrel Longhurst, Building Trades; J. H. Stansfiel d, Art; Thelm-a Jacobsen, Honte Economics; Merl Whittle, Secretarial Training; Alice B. Ob1ray, Home Econmnics.


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Director Fitzgerald, Principal Cheney

L. D. S. INSTITUTE rry

he Glory of God is I-ntelligence," and this belief has Pro 1n pted the Latter-day Saint Church to instigate a progra11� of edu. cation A paJtt of this plan is the Institute of Religion affili­ ated with Snow C'ollege. H. Alvah Fitzgerald and Silas L. Cheney undentood the proble11�s of the students and ad_apted the couJtses of study according!y.

They defin�ed religion,

pointed out its path through the ages-what it has atte11�pted to do for hu11�anity ,and why it �·as failed or succeeded. Thus were students better able to set thei1t own coune artd de1tive strength for

a

balanced life through intellige n t thinking.

12


EXECUTIVE COUNCIL President Vice-Preside !lt Secretary Snowonian Snowdrift Forem'ics Pro,grams Activities Cheer Leader Athletics Representative Representati·v'e Adviser Adviser Adviser

Perry Christensen Mary Austin, . Verna Anderson Helen Hansen . Royal Bagley Moyle Anderson Glenna Dean ]i111-- Killp�ack . Kent Thursby Evan Nielsen . Dale Jorgenson Miria m Fitzgerald Pres. Nuttall Theln1--a Jacobsen Don Si mmons

Leadership gives vision to organization.

Jacobsen, Simmons, Bagley, Killpack Jorgenson, M. Anderson, Fitzgerald, Dean, Nielsen Nuttall, Austin, Christensen, V. Anderson, Hansen

13


E. Nielsen, C. Thomson E. Thomson, E. Allred, Andersen, Peel, M. Nielson Frischknecht, Hansen, Newton, M.

Allred, Hulme

SNO·WONIAN STAFF Editor Associate Editor . Business Manager Copy . Copy Copy Typi�t Pictures Snaps Snaps Snaps CojJy Adviser Business Adviser . Photographer

Helen Hansen . Calvin Thomson Merrill Hermansen Maude Frischlmecht Grace Newtcn Jean Hulm,.e Mildred Allred E van Nielsen . Margaret Nielson Irene Foote Clinton Draper . Gwen Greaves . ]. S. Christensen F. ]. Gurney . SALESMEN

Elaine Allred Elayne Thomson

Reed Brown Barbara Peel

14

Zelma Nut tall Elaine Andersen


K. Andersen, Armstrong, Olsen, R. Andersen, Jorgenson, Rosenberg, Taylor Frischknecht, Bagley, E. Andersen, Lazenby, Hulme

SNOWDRIFT STAFF

Royal Ba,gley Elaine Andersen Robert Andersen Keith Andersen Jack Annstrong Maude F rischl{necbt Perry Olsen Clair Rosenberg Jean Hulm-e A my Lazenby . Dale Jorgenson Zane Taylor . L. A. Phillips

Editor Associate Editor Business Manager Sports Sports Editorial Editorial Exchange Editor Reporter . Reporter Feature Feature Ad vi5路er CONTRIBUTORS

Irene Foote Sarah Anderson Miriam Fitzgerald Joyce Tew

Virginia Cox Halbert Garbe Merna Rae Christensen Belle Boyte r

15

E van Nielsen Zella Anders-on Rhea Huntsman


e

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rrAll the world's a stage, and all the 1nen and women merely p·layers : They have their exits and their entrances; And mze ntan in his time pla:ys many parts"-and it is as much the role of the players to be in the audience as on the stage. The Seniors this year both viewed and acted under the direction of Conrad Keller, president; and Roger Nielsen, vice-president. In addition to pa' rrties there was the Senior Bal'l', over which Verna Anderson and David Pickett reigned.

The Seniors watched the panorama of world events, located their places in the united stand of a grea'f nation against the challenge of its enemies, and pledged their lives and servi. ces to the task of keeP'£ng the stan and stripes wa:ving in freedom over every campus in the land. To some, the responsibilities of leadership came. To them, and to the others, the motto for the ye: ar was : Have a purpose -which will help in some small way toward everlasting pea·ce, and,

m

the fray , ne-uer flinch in duty or

lose faith in the chosen ideals.

At the end of the school year there came, for those whom, the Bugle' had not already called, the beginning of service in actu.al use of the skills or in pre­ paration for more difficult roles. Commencemen t day, an apex, was reached: The past was reviewed for its worth; and the veil hiding the future became thinner, revealing not darhness, but glorious light, showing that they like other men rrhad come this far and would not go back."

16


�OW I:

Ro ge r Nielsen, Salina; Pe r ry Ch ristensen, Manti; Frank Neilso1�, Mt. Pleasant; .

Willis Olsen, Ephraim. ROW II: Mildred Allred,

Fountain Green; G. L. (Jim) Killp.acl�, Ferron; Grace New�on,

Murray; Elna Collings, Monroe; Moyle Ande rson, Ep hraim; I ris Goodwin , Gro·vcr;

Royal Ba gley, Moroni; Maude Frischknecht, Gunnison; Clair Rosen berg, Center­ field; Helen Hansen, Cent erfield ROW III:

.

Verna A n derso n , Ephraim; David Pi c h ett , Gunnison; Barbara Laze nb y ·

,

Manti; Conrad Keller, Manti; Mary Austin, Ferron; Ward Olsen, Eph raim; Glenna Dean, EjJ hraim; Evan Nielsen, Salina. PICTURES NOT AVAILABLE:

Keith Andersen, G u n n ison; Ray Blaclunan, Moroni;

Allan Green, EjJhraim; Luella HamjJton, Marysvale; Clai1' Moffitt, Manti; Albert Peterson, Manti; J. Boyd Seely, Mt. Pleasant; Kent Th ursby, Eph:raim; Carol Anderson, EjJhraint; Blaine Christensen, Ephraim; Lane Fjeldsted Gunnison. ,

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I

It is a popular conception that the Junior class exists nzainly for sponsoring tlx Junior Pro11z, but this year that triumphant e vent did not blind t/:;c Juniors to the problems they face.

Rather, it e mphasized them with a

spirit not yielding to despair. Building around the theme rrWhen the Lights Come on Again All Over the World", the Juniors prepar.ed, not for the biggest prom ever, but the best in

a

sense that it was youth's

answer to the challenge of the times. The class officers were Ted Killpacl?.. , president; Jean Hulme, vice-president; and Margaret Nielson, activity agent.

The special pro m committee consisted of Arcilee Allred and

Virginia Cox. The honored Prom Lady and Ma'n were Carol Crawford and Clinton Draper. The j-uniors proved themselves capable of accepting transition in immediate and impending occurrences. Membership thinned, and pre-college dreams were postponed or scrapped for something with more endurance. To the call for conservation , they replied with ready acceplance of curtailed extra-curricular activities.

Exem plary of this spirit of sacrifice was the

relinquishing of the Post Prom. Of the traditional education of the college, the Juniors were exposed to enough to see that rreven in this debacle we're a long way from the primitive cave." As they prepared to assume the responsibilities of leadership in the school for the coming year, they realized that their task would be harder than that of any preceding class, for theirs was the duty of keeping alive the ideals and traditions of the school.

18


ROW I:

Darell Stewart, Fairview; Rhea Huntsman, Torrey; H..arold Graham, Fairview; Zella Ander­

son, Ephraim; Cumorah Petersen, Mt. Pleasant; Helen Thorpe, Eph.raim; Lloyd Parry, Manti; Zelma Nuttall, Ephr.ai1n; Glen Goodwin, Grover; Wanda Peterson, Ephraim; Don Johansen, Mt. Pleasant; Virginia Cox, Nephi; Paul Newton, Mona; Amy Lazenby, Aurora; Clair Sorensen, Mt. Pleas.ant; Roxey Jensen, Emery; Calvin Thomson, Ephraim.

ROW II:

LeDale Ba:iley, Ephra:im; Perry Olsen, Ephraim�; Lyman Nelson, Mt. Pleas.a nt; Elaine Ander­

sen, Monroe; Earl Ericksen, Manti; Marguerite Humphrey, Arcilee Allred, Mt. Pleasant; Paul Daniels, Ephraim;

Orangeville; Halbert Garbe, Manti;

Nora Winget, Monroe;

Vaughn Larsen,

Manti; Belle Boyter, Panguitch; LaMar Sorenson, Ephraim; Joyce Tew, Nephi; Robert C. Anderson, Manti; Dorothy Mortensen, Mo•nroe; LaRane Jensen, Ephraim.

ROW III:

Clinton Drap.er, Spring City; Irene Fo ote,

Nephi; Donald Crawford,

Ferron;

Rebecca

Curtis, Manti; Kendal Stevenson, Ste·vensville, Montana; Jean Hulme, Manti ; T. N . (Ted) Kill­ pad., Ogden; Margaret Nielson, Manti; Vernon Carlson, Manti ; Carol Crawford, Manti; Von Madsen, Manti; Barbara Peel, Mt. Pleasant ; Reed Brown, Koosharem�.

PICTURES NOT AVAILABLE:

Calvin Crawford, Manti; Merna

Hermansen, Ephrai1n; Bruce Irons, Mormti ; C arol

Rae Christensen,

SjJarks, Ephraim ; Craig

Ferron ; Merrill

Blackham,

McGill,

Nevada; Donald Frisch!vuch,t, Manti; Eric Schlo er, Ephraim; Elmn Fillis, Mt. Pleasa. nt; Boyd Olsen, Ferron.

19


0

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Ill

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Where are the beginnings of wisdom ? The Sophomores could answer "In our class. " This class was forced t o nurke decisions t o problems which would, i n other thnes, have been postponed. One of the main issues was that of forming a1 p·bilosopby of life with its roots far enough in the past and its vision fa·r enough in the fu ture to give broad understanding of men and the circumstances which tend to disrupt the course of a planned life. Thus, they may well have written: rrThe lesson of life is to learn what the yean and the centuries say as against the days and hour�."

The Sophomores had to accept the fact that the first duty to be performed was that of training for service to the nation or to humanity at large. Their answer to the call for skilled workers was seen in their registralion for war-need cltlJsses. They bad to find that the path they were on was not without foosteps to shou:· the way; for if they had thought they were alone and lost, they would have failed in the major cause-that of understanding themselves as a: basis of under­ standing others toward the common brotherhood of m-en and races.

The class activities were socials and participation in the Lower Division Ball. The Hostess and Host for the dance were Shirley Dean and Adrin Anderson, both Sophomores. Officers for the year were Robert Andersen, president; Sarah Ander­ son, vice-president; Lila Jackson, secretary; Reed Brown, activity agent; and Gale Brady and Doris Olsen, cheer leaders.

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ROW 1:

Shirley Dean, Zane Taylor, Delorus Peterson, LaMar Bailey , Miriam� Fitzgerald,

Billy Larsen, V a Lene De-nnis:on, Robert Larsen, V onda Hansen, June Kelson, Lloyd Lund, Maxine Briggs, Dale Nielsen, Dorothy Jensen, Robert Allred, Winona Greaves. ROW II:

Thurman Sorensen, Robe1-•t Jensen, Mary DeMill, Jack Annstrong, Larene

Young, Dale Jorgenson, Fern Poulson, Bruce Christerrsen, Ela:yne Thomson, Charlrs Nielsen, Ruti:J' Hermansen, Clair Erickson, Ricl:�'ard Jensen. RO\'Vr III:

HalCJlMZ Lane· rt, Adrin Anderso n - , Doris Olsen, Reed Brown, Lila Jaclucn,

Robert Andersen, Sara Anderson, Gale Brady, Betty Cherry, David Christensen, Bula Anderson. PICTURES NOT AVAILABLE:

Jack Hansen, Calvert Johanson, Reid Jensen.

21


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e

ID

' e The Freshmen this year made the first readin,g , but it will lak

n a

second reading, or

perhaps m.any, before an understanding of the world and the whys and where­ fores of its turning is. thoroughly learned. They sought to !mow what in the affairs of man and the state determines th'e range of opportunities offered youth. However, lacking knowledge, the Freshmen accepted the advice of the sages and lined up behind the front lines to give in service. and take in learning and experi­ ence. Realities for them went hand-in-hand with the context of books, proving and disproving so that the truth might stand revealed.

Their officers: President LaVaun Cox; Vice-President Bonnie Christensen; Secretary­ Treasurer Nada Pa·u.lson; and Activity Agent Junior Thorpe, collaborated with the officers of the Sophomore class in making the social activities of the Lower Division a success. The main event was the Lower Division Ball. Cheerfully the class accepted existing conditions and held their ball in the same settin,g created for the Junior Prom. They made few revisions and relied upon their own personali­ ties to make the dance different and successful.

The Freshnun were also initiated to the speech and dramatic contests of the school and played on the Lower Division ball teams. They were determined to be pre­ pared to lead in either peace or continued struggle, whichever the case might be.

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ROW I:

Lola Anderson, Audrey Larsen, Keith Sudweeks, Rachel Thompson, Gaylen

Nielson, Nornta Peterson, Maeser Edwards, Ka: thryn Peterson, H,al Jensen, Mar足 jorie Anderson, John Polster, Lois Mae Davidson. ROW II:

Boyd Brady, Beverly Nielson, Robert Rasmuson, Eva Jorgenson, Leo Ericksen,

Elaine Cherry, Ray Christensen, Ruby Olsen, Rodger Jorgensen, Bernice MacKay, Rich:ard Armstrong. ROW III:

La Rue Anderson, Stanley Tippetts, Shirley Nielson, Junior Thorpe, Bonnie

Christensen, La Vaun Cox, Nada Paulson, Clark Mortensen, Elaine Allred, Ronald Cbrislensen, Letha Jorgenson.

PICTURES NOT AVAILABLE:

Neff DeLeeuw, Boyd Larsen, Eldon Mortensen,

Roland Olsen, Kenneth Poulson, Pauline Sparlu, Roger Sondrup.

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[all J0

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[olo r�

rrMan was not born for hi1nself alone, but for bis country."

CONRAD KELLER

TED KILLPACK

CLINTON DRAPER

CLAIR MOFFITT

KEITH ANDERSEN

EVAN NIELSEN

DONALD FRISCHKNECHT

DAVID PICKETT

BLAINE CHRISTENSEN

DARELL STE\\7ART

BLAINE CROWTHER

ERIC SCHLOER

CLAIR ROSENBERG

CLAIR SORENSEN

ELMER FILLIS

FRANK NEILSON

LE DALE BAILEY

A

great country net'er sends out a call for defenders which is not ful­ filled. The fellotus who have left s-no�u College to ansu'er the nation's Call to the Colors a1re proving that they llave fditb in their countr)J, in what it 1neans to then�, and in tvhat they -want it to 1nean to their posterity.

The students 1re1naining at school, and those who have gone to take positions in industry or agriculture pay tribute to their class1nates u:ho are U'illing to sacrifice so 1nuch for their country.

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ASSOCIATED MEN'S CLUB

Green, Neilson, Irons

THE ASSOCIATED MEN'S CLUB,

-under the direction of Frank Neilson, jnesident;

Allan Green, vice-jnesident; and Bruce Irons, activity agent, sponsored a P1'ogra路m for the social welfare of its m-embers and for the coeds. O-ut5'tanding activities were the Sadie Hawkins dance and the Snow Carnival. Their carnival queen was Glenua Dean, formally hono1'ed at the Preference Ball and at the Carnival.

THE STRAGGLERS

decided to have fun as their major objective. Evan Nielsen was

chosen president; Kendal Ste venson, vice-p1'esident; Grace Newton, secretary; and Belle Boyter, activity agent. Their get-.a cquainted jJ'arty was held at Miss Phillips'

home, aml they met socially once each quarter thereafter.

STRAGGLERS Students fro1n everywhere.


ASSO�CIATED WO'MEN'S CLUB

E. Cherry, Newton, B. Cherry Thomson, Huntsman, Goodwin, Larsen

THE ASSOCIATED WOMEN'S CLUB

teas, one of which was

on

sponsored a get-acquainted party, two 11-wthers'

Coed Day, and the annual' Preference Ball. Activities

were directed by Iris Goodwin, president; Rhea Hunts1rMn, vice-jnesident; Halcyon Larsen, secretary; Elayne T ho1nson, activit;' agent; and the followin,g class rej;­ resentati ves: Grace Newton, Wanda Peterson, Betty Cherry, and Elaine Cherr;1.

THE SCRIBBLERS,

witb serio-us intent, studied language arts and entered into; the

various co1npetitions in the school with the objectives of adding to tlN collection of Snow's creative writing, and sti1nulating personal development. Conrad Keller, president, and Miss Phillips, adviser, s uggested and helped with activities.

SCRIBBLERS

Pen pushers.


PEP CLUB- SNOW BOOSTERS

THE PEP CLUB

was one of the dyn'amic G1'ganizations on tbe campus. Carol Crawford

was p�resident; Helen Tharpe, vice-president; Bula Anderson, secretary; and Zella Anderson, activity agent. This group fu.n�ished spirit and 1norale at th'e ball gan�cs and sponsored the Pep Club dance. THE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB

was officered by Donald Crawford,

president ; Carol Anderson, vice-president; Helen Th:orpe, secretary; and a pro­ grant committee consi5'ting of Wanda Peterson, Royal Bagley, and Rebecca Curtis. The membership met bi-monthly and discussed, with' Mr. Tippetts' aid, national and international problems.

INTERNATIOI'-JAL RELATIONS STUDENTS OF WORLD AFFAIRS


MUSIC CLUB THE SHARPS AND FLATS

THE MUSIC CLUB

111-et at intervals throughout the year and enjoyed a pro,g ram of

entertainment and musical education arranged by Mary Austin, president. The purpose of the club was to foster an appreciation of music by stimula�ting interest and providing understanding of popular and classical selections.

THE HOME ECONOMICS CLUB

swung into the army of conservationists and made

as their aim the study of ways in whi, ch to lin1it the use of essential materials and find suitable substitutes for them. Their meetings were presided over by Mildred Allred, pre5'ident; Margaret Nielson, vice-president; and Grace Newton, secretary.

HOME EC·ONOMICS CLUB THE HOME FRONT

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THE MAN WHO CAME TO DINNER

by Hart and Kaufman directed by Helen A. Nelson In the midst of confusion, Mr. Whiteside's "heart overflows with peace."

THE CAST

Joyce Tew . Barbara路 Lazenby . Ted Killpack . Mildred Allred . Bula Anderson . Rhea Hoq,mts man Jim Killp.ack . Grace Newton . La Vaun Cox . Perry Christensen

Mrs. Ernest Stanley . Miss Preen Richard Stanley . June Stanley . Sarah . Mrs. McCu,tcheon . Mr. Stanley Maggie Cutler . Dr. B-radley . Sheridan Whiteside

Elaine Allred . Lloyd Parry Reed Brown Paul Daniels Perry Olsen Larene Young Reed Brown Gale Brady Robert Anderson . Kendal Ste venson

. Harriet Stanley Bert Jefferson . Professor Met::; Michaelson, prisoner Baker, prison guard . Lorraine Sheldon Westcott . Sandy Beverly Carlton Banjo

Olsen, Daniels, B. Anderson, Christensen, Newton, Parry, Cox, ]. Killpack, E. Allred, Stevenson, Huntsman, T. Killpack, Young, Lazenby, M. Allred, Brady, Brown, Tew, R. A路nderson


K. Peterson, D. Peterson, Briggs, Anderson, Poulson, Cherry, Olsen, Larsen, Christensen, Allred

AMERICAN PASSPORT by Dana Thomas LOWER DIVISION PLAY directed by Helen A. Nelson

THE CAST Reid Jense11

Ed H a11zilton

Betty Cherry, Bonnie Christensen

Louella

Larene Young, Fern Poulson

J udy

Kathryn Peterson, Elaine Allred

Sybil Jennings

Bula Ander son , Halyco11 Larsen

Bertha Hamilton Bill Wilson

. Jacl� Hansen

Aunt fen .

Maxine

Die!�

Ham.'lton

Mrs.

Schwartz

Mr.

Craig

Briggs

Gale Brady Doris Olsen, Delonts Peterson

Adrin Ande1'SOn

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rry

here is 110 truer truth obtainable

By Man than co11�es of ·music"

HANDEL'S ttMESSIAH" directed and presented

by H. A. Dean

by The Snow College Music Department and artists from surrounding communities

rry

ben

shall be brought to pass the saying that zs written:

Death is nuallowed up in vict01')!!"

32


Gilbert and Sullivan's PIRATES OF PENZANCE directed by H.

A. Dean

and presented by the Snow College Music Department

THE CAST

Richard, Pirate Chief . Ruth, Pirate Maid .

. Allan Grent . Larene Youn,�

Samuel, the Lieutenant

Robert Anderson Reed Br01vn

Major General Stanley .

. Wilb· Olsen Perry Christensen

Mable, the Major's Daughter .

Nada Paulson­ Elaine Allred

Edith

Sara Anderson Betty Cherry

Kate

. Barbara Peel Lila Jacluon Letha J orgenson Rebecca Curtis

Isabel Frederick, Pirate Appr, entice

Don Johansen Bruce Irons

Police Sargeant

Earl Ericksen Lloyd Parry

H. A. Dean, Olsen, Ch,ristensen, Ericksen, Green, Irons, Johansen, Brow'n, R. Anderson, Jor,gensen, Cherry, S. Anderson, Young, Paulson, Allred, Peel, Jachson, Curtis.


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The only sports progrmn which could be successfully carried out was basketball, and the teams energetically tried to make it a victorious season. Besides skilled, well­ planned action their playing was characterized by good sportsmanship, fair play, and genuine interest in the games. Basketball is one of the extrovert ways by which a school is judged, and the Snow teams upheld the traditio11. A vote of thanks and appreciation ,goes to Coach Sinmwns and Coach Beck for their fine work with the boys.

The Upper Division tea-m, had the honor of claiming Evan Nielsen, judged best all­ around player at the tournament, as a member. The Lower Division again walked off with the Division Championship. They wavered o11ce and lost a game to Gunnison; otherwise, they chalked up all winning bouts.

SCORES UPPER DIVISION Snow

68

Carbon

Snow

38

Weber

Snow

42

Weber

Snow

56

Carbon

39

49

Snow

42

Carbon

44

51

Snow

49

Carbon

30

45

Dixie

26

Tournament Snow

Carbon

76

Snow

Snow

53

Weber

65

54

55

LOWER DIVISION Snow

40

Moroni

11

Snow

57

Moroni

21

Snow

36

G unnison

28

Snow

30

G unnison

35

Snow

49

Manti

29

Snow

51

Manti

34

Snow

57

Wasatch Academy

25

Snow

51

Wasatch Academy

25

Snow

45

North Sanpete

20

Snow

46

North Sanpete

41

34


Toughen up, America!

THE SQUAD EVAN NIELSEN

ROGER NIELSEN

KEITH ANDERSEN

Co-captain, Forward

Co-cai;tain, Fonuard

Forward

CLINTON DRAPER

Gztard CLAIR ROSENBERG

RAY

BLACKHAM Guard

Glen

Goodwin

PAUL NEWTON

Guard CRAIG BLACKHAM

Forward

Guard

Forward, Center

LE DALE BAILEY

BRUCE IRONS

CUMORAH PETERSEN

Center, Forward

Guard

Forward

EARL ERICKSEN

Forward

Andersen, Goodwin, R. Blackham, Coach Simmons, Bailey, C. Blackham, Draper, Newton, Petersen, E. Nielsen, R. Nielsen, Irons, Rosenberg


The Tip-off

THE SQUAD

Lowe1r Division DALE NIELSEN

JUNIOR THORPE

ROGER SONDRUP

Forward

Forward

Center

CLARK MORTENSEN

LA MAR BAILEY

CHARLES NIELSEN

Guard

Guard

Forward

REED BAILEY

JACK ARMSTRONG

DALE LARSEN

Forward

Guard

Guard

PETER THOMPSON

ZANE TAYLOR

Guard

Center

Coach Beck, Thompson, Taylor, L. Bailey,

Sondrup,

Larsen,

D. Nielsen, Mortensen, R. Bailey, C. Nielsen, Thorpe, Armstrong


F IVE BROTHERS

DEATH'S CARESS

I watch them go up the path� Individuals, yet oneMy brothers.

Her silent eyes and fevered cheek U tiered a prayer for eternal sleep.

Full mem'ries of life we share, Pools of hopes and petty fears, Myriad dreams.

The finger of death, so cool and sweet, Brushed her lips and invited sleep.

When I see them togetherFive boys, strong and clean and fine­ My heart thrills.

-Marjorie Anderson

I watch them go up the patb-­ Khaki uniforms, their dress­ God, watch them!

REGRET If I had acted and not just thmtght, Good to the world I might have brought.

-Jean Hulme

SOLILOQUY

-Marjorie A nderson

I stand at my window­ The cool night stirs. Heaven is watching with her lamps burning; Peace reigns.

PRAYER FOR GUIDANCE The stream flows on in broad day-light; It flows on and on into the night And into the morn still on its way.

The night inspires awe; Sky is velvet-intensified with sparkling sequins; Pines are sentineled against ,grey-black space; Earth rests.

Guardian of the flowing stream­ Keeper of the Unknown Power : Lend thy strength to me in that hour When dar kness falls and sorrows come To black-out that which is my sun, So that when light shall disperse remorse, I shall be still on my course.

I ponder-with thanks-for life tonight. I stand at my windowClouds billow; Sunlight fills my universe; Joy overflows. The day is enchanting; Music bursts from everywhere; Life is tranquil, yet abounding in action; Earth, renewed, smiles.

-Donald Crawford

THE BLIND MAN'S PLEA

I am part of life today.

Light Oh, light that hast flown from me Where art thou, oh brightness ? For mine eyes have the gift of Everlasting darkness. The light of day mine eyes have not seen, For I have only the gift of seeing eternal darkness. Cans't not this veil Be lifted from mine eyes to See day and yet have the gift of n�ght? Oh light, Oh light, Where hast thou gone?

-Jean Hulme

MY GIRL She was as lovely as a butter-fly in May, And like the butter-fly, she flitted away. -Donald Crawford

DESPAIR Now I lay me down to sleep, And God-don't bother to wake me.

-Robert C. Anderson

-Maude F rischknecht

L IFE

GOD 'S PARTNER Stalwart and tall he stand5'; Ploughing and tilling the desert sands, Planting life, where once was a barren land, Working for man and working for God.

Life is a sledge hammer; With thunderous blows It forges men of steel, Masterpieces of life.

-Robert C. Anderson

-Donald Crawford

37


VERNA ANDERSON V a'! edictorian Up per Division

MIRIAM FITZGERALD Valedictorian Lo wer Division

38


PERRY CHRISTENSEN

Efficiency Stu d e nt Representati ve Man

JIM KILLPACK Representati ve Man

MARY AUSTIN Representative Lady

39


WANDA PETERSON

Snowonian Pojrular Lady Upper Division

E van Nielsen

S nowonian Pojmlar Man Upper Di vision

SARA ANDERSON

Snowonian Popular Lady Low'er Division

CLARK MORTENSEN

Snou.Jonian Popular Man Lower Division


IRIS GOODWIN

SHIRLEY DEAN

Founders' Day Queen

Lower 路 Division Ball H()stess

ROYAL BAGLEY

ADRIN ANDERSON

Founders' Day King

Lower Division Ball Host

JEAN HULME

Co-ed Queen

LYMAN NELSON

Preference Man

GLENNA DEAN

Snow Carnival Queen


CAROL CRAWFORD J uni01' Prom Lady

CLINTON DRAPER

J u 11ior P m m Man

VERNA ANDERSON Senior Ball Hostess

DAVID PICKETT Senior Ball H c,s t


1942- 1943 HONOR R OLL

Willis Olsen, v ocal ; S!:}irley Dem1, string ; Calvin Tho 7nson, social ser vice ; exte 11tjJore, second place; Halbert Garbe, F. ]. G urney award, che1n istry 4, 5, 6; ex tnn p ore, second place; Doris Olsen, Scribble r short story, first place lower di visio n ; Donald Crawfo rd, Yo ung poetry, hon o rable nzen tio n ; Joyce Tew, Scribbler short sto ry, second jJlace u jJper division ; Gale Brady, strin g ; Grace New ton, dra matic award; Reed B rown, Nelson lnt 1norous reading, first pla::e upper division; infor m al essay, first place, Scribbler sho r t storJ!, seco,n d jJlace upper division ; Elain e Anderson, Sno w drift short story, first place; Robert A ndersen, Phillips extempore, first jJlace lower d i - uision; social ser vice. Robert C. A nderson, Y oung jJoetry, honorable m�en t io n ; Kendal Steve-n so n, Phillips extemport, first place upper divisio-n ; Ji- 1n Killpack, brass ; Lloyd Parr y, dra m atic aw·ard ; Merrill Hennansen, Pli'illijJS ora­ tory, first jJlace upper division ; Perry OLsen, oTa t o ry, second p lace; Perry Christensen, drc mz atic award; Kath'r yn Peterson, oratory, Sey m o u r K. Christe n se n award ; Marjorie A nderson, Young poetry, first place lower divisi011 ; Helen Thorpe, so cial ser vi ce; ]. J. G u r n ey aw,ard, chemistry 1 , 2 , 3 ; Nada Paulson, social service; vo cal; Glenna Dean , w oodwind; Elaine Allred, Nelson humorous reading, second place lower division; vocal; Snowonian !J ales. Pictures N o t A vailable: Elayne Tho mson, America n Legion orato ry, first place ; Richard Ar mstrong, w oodwind; Barbara Lazenby, Nelso n hum 01ro u s reading, ,second place u jJper division ; Betty Cherry, Nelson hu m orous reading, firs t place lower di visio n ; Virginia Cox, H. C. Snell essay, first place; Paul Daniels, H. C. Snell essay, secon d jJlace; Ma rguer/te Humphrey, H. C. S nell essay, secon d place; Vonda Hansen, Banlzns' letter, firs t jJlace; Mr s. ] . W. H u m ph,rey essay, second pla ce.


HONOR ROLL Norma Peterson, scholarship; Rachel Tho-m-pson, scholarship; Larene Yo-ung, scholarship; Fern Poulson, scholarship; Winona G rea ves, scholarship; Miriam, Fitzgerald, scholarship ; Mrs. J. W. Humphrey essay, first place; Bankers' letter, second place ; Ma�tde Frischlmeci:J't, scholarship; Scribbler short story, first place upjJer division; StJJowdrift short story, second place; Young poetry, honorable me-n ­ tion ujJper division; all-aro·und writer's award; V erna Anderson, scholarship; Mildred Allred, scholar­ shijJ; Jean Hulme, scholarship; Young poetry, fir st jJlace upjJer division; H. A. Dean music proficiency award; Zella Anderson, scholarship; infonnal essay, second place; Arcilee Allred, sc holarship'. Clair Rosenber,g, basketball; Clinton Dra·per, basket ball; football ; Zane Taylor, basketball; Phillips ex­ tempore, first place lower division; Earl Ericksen, baslutball; Glen Goodwin, basketball; Royal Bagley, football; ne-w s service award; Evan Nielsen, b asl�etball; Paul Newton, basketball; Frank Neilson, football; Clair Sorensen, football; Roger Nie lsen, baslcetball; football; Simmons award; Roger Sondrup, basketball; LaMar Bailey, baslutball; Beck award; Clark Mortensen, basketball; Dale Nielsen, basketball; Charles Nielsen, baslutball; Jack A rmstrong, basketball; brass. Pictures Not Available: Donald Frischknecht, foot ball; Eric Schloer, football; Allan G reen, football; Elmer Fillis, football; Jzmior Thorpe, basketba ll; LeDale Bailey, basl�etball ; Bruce Irons, basketball; foo,t ball; Ray Blad�ham, basketball; football; C u 11wrah Petersen, baslutball; Blaine Christensen, foot­ ball; Boyd Olsen, football; Cra·lg BlacldJam, bas lutball.


((CAMPERS" A streamlined play not censored by Miss Phillips, directed by Miss Nelson, or photographed by Mr. Gurney Setting: Snow College. Time: The Good old Days. Plot: None. Characters :

Intentionally Resembling You.

Carol looks Jim-ward, But Kendal loolu Heaven-ward.

Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hide足 Oughtn't Perry go and hide?

]. S. C. haunts the college In order to give us knowledge.

These two, so it seems, Are locked up in drea11ts.

In a land of the free, This is wh,at you see.

This is a view of a pair Tryin,g to become more fair.

Food is the reigning power Around the dinner hour.


We called for Dot And look what we got.

Mary thinlu-is't wise or dumb To dive off the cliff after my gwn. isn 't very shockingNot a bit abo ve her stocking.

Just to remind the batching miss足 Did Clint consent to jJose for this ?

It

This is smnethiiJg at the dorm Called masculine fo1'1n .

Ward sets the jJace And enters the aviati01't race.

Is it because he's camera shy That Clair is just about to fly?

4(


Perhaps it's j ust an act, But they surely have a knack

Is there a n artist between the coasts To whom we'd rather drink our toasts?

Here he and she, as you know, Make one shadow on the snow.

Between h�er hours on English clause s , rr Ginn " has refreshing pa uses. y

Wonder if we wo�tld be hajJpy If we still wore clothes so sappy.

Today most 1naids don't get one, But see what Bernice has done.

''This is how long it was-" But we don't belie ve Ken t, 'cause-

47


He's P'ictured here with a pretty fan­ Tbe guy who's really popular 11-wn. He has given school a bow, For he's in the army now. This is not a beauty contest­ Just co-eds at their best.

Oh, but it does us good, To see Royal cho·pjJing wood.

Without a stare we cannot pass, When Merna's in a skirt of grass

This twosom,e on the fence, From their classes journeyed 1-xnce.

About her ,gante we are not sure, But we know she has allure.

With what she is learning to do, She'll be in an army too.

Director of the campus funtes is he, Using as example, the industrious bee.


Here is a sho t Of two who got caught.

Here is a pair you seldom, see, The hat and Evan-how cam,e it to be?

These are Keith and McKay. Is it he makes her gay?

Helen in her illness, Had them relieve the stillness.

They don't seent to mind Interruptions of this kind.

Allan Green-not Allan-a-Dale, Made famous in that Robin Hood tale.

By the Ford are Dan and Ted, Going on business, so they said.

This is a jitney of fame; Patience is its name.

��Monroe" takes a restful pose After another quiet doze.


He's a Calvin fro1n Manti, In our estimation high.

Toward this winter scene, Will o u r affections always lean. Do not look at this askance; It's conservation, not neglectance.

Wanda on the court Is ready for some sport.

r r Bud shows the modern way to add " Those ration points-not bad.

Perhaps there was a fire, And Ernell's need for snow was dire.

Is sh·e being quite rrresistful" That Albert must look so wistful? When these two are tired of books, They turn on come-hither " looks. rr

Located in a fa-ntiliar place, Lloyd dons a thoughtful face.

H.ere's a goodly crowd, Who of their nonsense are quite proud.

50

The sales roll in; So Merrin.'·.:c�n grin.


When they both loolud so cute, The cameraman had to shoot.

If they would only tell us too, We would laugh as they do. The hamnter and saw In the shop are law.

They have chosen the kitcl:1en sink; Of healthful menu they think.

The fi,gure on the cantjnts lawn Ap,pears to be quite wan.

The girl at the typewriter Is a different kind of fighter. Isn't it to be feared That each is exaggerating his beard ?

If you wish work to be fun, Just watch Mildred to see how it's done. 51


FA,CTUAL HISTO,R ICAL CALENDAR O·F THE SCHOOL YEAR 1942 -43

Where Were You On - - - ? I was being beguiled by the whispers of Kendal and Shirley. The mat and I were ,going out of the door together. I was briskly escaping from the brooms wielded by the feminine sweepen . I was home trying to tabula.te in my diary who-has-whose on the third finger, left hand.

The fire engine and I were in the crowd in front of the Erickson flat, hopi:ng for a; glimpse of the cigar-smoking, fire-bug hatchers.

I wasn't dodging the draft, I was dodging last hour's professor. I was sitting in the gutter, whither I had wandered while watching the cou.ple acroH the street.

I

( if I am Miss Phillips ) was declaring possession of the ice in front of George Beal' �.

I wa5' eating praises to Miss Jacobsen. I was muddling through registration-for the sixth time. I was listening with awe to Luther King-or Percy Grainger-or the Belgian Piano String

Quartet-or I was sprinting across the footlights to P·i rouette with Miss Marmein.

I wa.s watching Perry C.'s signature take shape. I ( if I am Evan and his gang) was traveling around Saturday forenoon sin,ging rrlt'5 morning, it's morning," with startling effects.

The H;arvest of my apple-polishing was failing down upon me.

I just w·a sn't there.

We

are

proud

of

Snow

College

and

its

Students, and we congratulate the Graduates of 1 943. We also think

cf

the Snow College

boys in the Service who would have been

The

S no1vonian

Staff asks

you

graduates this year if they had not heeded

to

their country's call.

P·atronize the advertisers who bel ped to pay for this yearbook.

Best of luck to all of you.

At their places of business they are ·

always ready and willi-ng to serve you.

EPHRAIM MARKET Your I. G. A. Store

52


I> A R A G O � IJ R I � T I � G C O � I>A � Y

1 22 WEST SECOND SOUTH STREET SALT LAKE CITY. UTAH

n Let us be the guardian of your clothes. "

SER VICE - SAFE T Y - SECURIT Y To our patrons

SERVICE CLEANERS

For over fifty years

Manti,

MANTI CITY BANK Ca p i t a l

·· ···

Stock . . .

S u r p l u s a n d u n d ivi d ed

p rofits

. .

..

..

.... ..

.. ..

.

. . . .

.. . . .

.

Utah

Phone

14

D . W. A nderson Drug Co. P H A R M AC I STS O F R E L I A B I L I TY

Ehpraim

Kemmerer

Moroni

$50,000

. . . . . . . . . $80,000

Gephart Stores Co. A Complete Stock of

Dry Go ods

PHONE

53

53

EPHRAIM,

UTAH


Compliments of . . .

THE

PARACHUTE OF

COMPANY

UTAH

Manti, Utah

DREAMLAND

THE BANK of EPHRAIM

HALL

ttThe People's B,ank"

EPHRAIM

ACCOUNTS RESPECTFULLY INVITED

Member

Fed e r a l

Reserve

Syste m

and

the

Snow College's Dance Home

Fed e r a l De posit I n s u ra n ce Corporation

54


PROGRESS MARKET Compliments of

BUY I N DEPENDENT

MORONI WARDS'_

You r Red and White Store PHONE 69

HALL DANCE

EPHRAIM, UTAH

CENTER of

COMPLIMENTS

CENTRAL UTAH

of

Magic Chemical Company

Utah

Moroni

SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH

EDVIN JENSEN PLU M B I N G ,

A I R C O N D I TI O N I N G , S H E ET M ETAL WO R K

PHONE 140 " W h e re the

H EATI N G

Ephraim, Desire

to P l e a s e

is

Utah

WHITE ROSE FLOUR

Para m o u nt"

HIGHEST QUALITY FEEDS STEAM ROLLED GRAINS PELLET FEEDS

Steven's Coffee Shop Clean, Quality Food Popularly Priced MAYO Phone

2-W

and

EVA,

Pro p ri etors Ephraim,

H E R M A NS EN ' S

Utah

Roller Mills & Elevator EPHRAIM MILLING &

GUNNISON, UTAH

ELEVATOR COMPANY Mil-'e rs of High Grade F lour EPHRAIM

UTAH

55


CONGRA TULATIONS to the 1943 Sno"\Vonian

from

MT.

PLERSRNT

CITY

Compliments of

CHRISTIANSEN

.

.

J. C. Penney Co.

FURNITURE

Mt. Pleasant, Utah

COMPANY

" W h ere Savi,ngs A re Greatest"

Dealers in Distinctive

FURNITURE and HOUSEHOLD FURNISHINGS

Dealers in . . .

GENERAL 1\tiERCHANDISE

Moroni

STO R ES I N Ephraim

-

Richfield

-

Salt

Lake

Co.-operative

Mercantile Institution

City

Organized 1 867 MORONI

56

UTAH


AFTER COLLEGE - - -

Reliable Merchandise

When memories of those happy

Reasonably Priced

days build in you a desire for news of the Good Old College Town, satisfy that longing by

Courteously Presented

subscribing to

ALWAYS

THE EPHRAIM ENTERPRISE A

weekly

CHRISTENSEN'S AND COMPANY

newspaper that tries to

maintain

standards

and ·news

content

of

editorial

worthy of

EPHRAIM, UTAH

the

home of Snow College.

WASATCH SERVICE Sells

JENSE N ' S

for Less

GAS, OILS and GATES TIRES Service and Quality Our Motto Lloyd

FRUITS - GROCERIES - DRY GOODS

L.

Scow,

Mgr.

E p h ra i m ,

Utah

NOTIONS - SHOES GA I L J E N S E N

P E RCY C. E L I AS O N

B est Wishes for a Prosperous

Manti, Utah

Future to All Graduates Compliments o f

See Me A bout Your Sig h t and Perfect Fitting Glas ses - - -

TOWNE THEATER

DR. E . G. MILLS O ptometrist Mt.

Pleasant,

Utah

COMPLIMENTS

Compliments of

of

MAIN

l-.RANZ 5 & 10 STORE Mt.

.

CAFE to

SNOW COLLEGE

Pleasant, Utah

57


THE

CITY

OF MANTI

Extends its warmest congratulations to

SNOW COLLEGE You r interests are ours, and our latch string is yours.

58


VALLEY BUILDERS' SUPPLY

"REAL WORK IS DONE BY PEOPLE YOU NEVER HEARD OF."

rr

Are you one of them?

Gunnison,

Builders' Headquarters"

Utah

Mt. Pleasant, Utah

UTAH-IDAHO SCHOOL SUPPLY COMPANY 155 South State

Compliments of

Breinholt Sisters

Salt Lake City

rrEverything for Office and Schools"

Ladies' Apparel EPHRAIM

UTAH

PEP SERVICE STATION B.

PHONE

E.

SPENCER'S

TTTC K E R, Mgr.

57

EPHRAIM, UTAH

SINCLAIR SERVICE

Car Conservation Headquarters

We Aim to Please

Pep 88 Gasoline

Vico Motor Oil

We R e l l

ERICKSON GARAGE

GOODYEAR

STORAGE - PARTS - REPAIRS EVAN

E R T C K S ON,

TIRES-WILLARD BATTERIE.fi)

SINCLAIR PRODUCTS

Proprietor

Ephraim, Utah

Ephraim,

Utah

WE BELIEVE IN SNOW COLLEGE

For

the

Best

Shorthorn

in the Mid\Vest - SEE -

BROTHERS

PHILLIPS

Springville, Utah

Our breeding stock comes from the finest herds 1n Canada and the United States.

OUR MOTTO :

Greatest Weight on Shortest Legs

59


A TOAST IN APPRECIA TIO'N

To the constant fidelity, service, and inspiration of Snow College ; To her n�agnificen t soul; T o you, our classnt-ates, faculty, and friends; And to the hope of future years, We toast your sincerity and friendship, We cherish your 1nen� ory.

rr up the trail tbe en�blen� rrs" is shining,

Shining 'neath the clear blue sky ; Friends are n�ost dear; Clouds soon disappear; Hope is ever run ning high."

THE SEN IORS 1 942-43

00


0 1 1

n o w

e

Greets its friends everywhere. It stands ready today, a's always, to serve thenďż˝ both individually and collectively.

In these troubled days, it hopes to help preserve those great prin­ ciples which are the strength of men and nations and the safeguard of the peace to come.

Next year there will be additional opportunities at your school. Vocational agriculture and other terminal fields are being added .

The

enriched curriculum is geared for national needs, for t raining for the professions, and for immediate entry into industry.

As often as possible, return to your Alma Mater. Write a note now and then to tell your school where you are.

ONCE A SNOW STUDENT ALWAYS A SNOW BOO<STER

61


THE

CITY

OF EPHRAIM

Extends an Invitation to High School ,G raduates to En roll at

SNOW In

the

field

COLLEGE

learning

of

SNOW

has

established

a

Reputation that any institution could well be proud of. Fifty-four

years

of

continuous

service

to

knowledge

seekers of Central and Southern Utah has proven that SNOW COLLEGE deserves the whole-hearted support of of all citizens of this section of Utah.

Investigate and Enroll at

S N O W THE

CITY

C O L L E G E OF EPHRAIM 62


� n, �n o w [ o l l e � e On, S now College, On Snow College, Wave our colors high ; W!Jere e'er the Gold; 1i"here e'er the White You'll find us there to fightRah! Rah ! Rah! Tales of glory, deeds of valor, Won with truth and n�ight ; W e have the na1ne, y o u have the fan�e So fight, boys, fight.

Hail, Snow College ; Hail, Sno1u College, Sch·ool 1ue love so well. We're ever ready, staunch a1�d true ; That's why we fight for youYo !

Ho!

Snow.

E11er o1uuard, ever up-ward, Always carry o n ; Your standards high, your vision tru e ; A.. ll Hail! Sno-w, Hail!

63


TOWARD

PEACE

With a firm faith in the future and in the inherited wisdom of man, the s tudents of 1 942-43 accep t a future of uncer足 tainties and disorders, believing implicity in a victory {or right and the es tablishment of a jus t peace ; bringing a better social order {or individuals and nations.

Ideas, not bombs, must be the ruling power of men.

' 'IT CAN BE DONE" "

()4



1943