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SCHOOL OF PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURE, NEW DELHI


DECLARATION

This Thesis titled ‘Delhi Architectural Heritage Museum, Indraprastha, New Delhi’ has been carried out by the undersigned in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of degree in Bachelor of Architecture at School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi under the supervision of Ar. Amit Behl and Ar. Kalpana Sethi. The undersigned hereby, declares that the matter embodied in this thesis is original and it has not been submitted to any other institution for the award of any degree or diploma.

Snober Khan A/2234/2010


CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE

This is to certify that thesis entitled Delhi Architectural Heritage Museum has been submitted by Snober Khan carried out during January-May 2015 semester X in the Department of Architecture. On successful completion of the Bachelor of Architecture Course by the candidate, the undersigned hereby, accept the Thesis Report on behalf of the Department, so that it may be placed in the Architecture Library.

Ar. Amit Behl Thesis Guide 2015 Department of Architecture, SPA Delhi

Ar. Kalpana Sethi Thesis Guide 2015 Department of Architecture, SPA Delhi


CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE

This is to certify that thesis entitled Delhi Architectural Heritage Museum has been submitted by Snober Khan carried out during January-May 2015 semester X in the Department of Architecture. On successful completion of the Bachelor of Architecture Course by the candidate, the undersigned hereby, accept the Thesis Report on behalf of the Department, so that it may be placed in the Architecture Library.

Prof. Mandeep Singh Studio Coordinator 2015 Department of Architecture, SPA Delhi


SYNOPSIS

The image of Delhi that persists in the minds of its residents and visitors is that of a city, that is chaotic, overflowing with traffic, confused between wide roads that lead up to tight, narrow lanes, of magnificent ancient palaces surrounded by rickety homes, of open gutter and beautiful gardens, filled with smoke of new age vehicles and the fragrance of the amaltas. But most importantly, the image, is of a city that is full of life and hence, it becomes imperative that the stories hidden within its deep layers of history are unraveled and told to the world.

The by-lanes of khari baoli

Amaltas of Delhi

Domes of Jama Masjid

The vibrancy and charm it possess is beyond description, therefore, one must be able to experience it through a physical model - A museum embodying the multiple ages during which Delhi was ruled by several dynasties and the reason for its unique architectural character.

Most of the cities of Delhi have a special characteristic of its own either in architectural style, urban layout, material or building features. The museum building will serve as an educational tool and yet as a tourist destination promoting its cultural heritage internationally. Chronologically, all cities can be experienced through audio-visual account and display of artifacts, construction material and technologies. Moreover, it will serve as center for public activities such as concerts, temporary exhibitions, conferences, celebration of festivals, etc. functioning throughout the day. Located in the heart of the city and also within the ancient capital of Indraprastha, serves as a perfect site for the purpose of exposing people to Delhi’s history. This site at Bhairon mandir opposite National science center has a strong architectural context - Old fort, a monument of national importance , India Gate and legacy of Lutyens’ Delhi, Crafts Museum by Charles Correa, Science Museum by A. P. Kanvinde and Pragati maidan by Raj Rewal, all symbols of modern architecture in Delhi. The museum building, I propose will be a tribute to the glorious architectural heritage of Delhi. Moreover, an underlying idea basing the museum would also be to discover the Spirit of Delhi which it exhibits today, redefining the architectural value of Delhi.


सारांश दिल्ली की छवि जो ऊसके निवासियों और पर्यटकों के मन बनी है, वह एक ऐसे शहर की है, जो अराजक है, यातायात से अतिप्रवाहित है, तंग, संकरी गलियों में भ्रमित रहकर भव्य प्राचीन महलों से घिरा है, खुले गटर और सुंदर बगीचों से भरपूर, आधुनिक वाहनों के धुएं एवं अमलतास की सुगंधों भरपूर है। लेकिन सबसे महत्वपूर्ण यह छवि, एक ऐसे शहर की है जो जीवन से भरा है और इसलिए यह आवश्यक है, कि इसके इतिहास की गहरी परतों के भीतर छिपी कहानियों का खुलासा करके दुनिया को बताया जाये।

खारी बावली की संकरी गलियों दिल्ली के अमलतास

जामा मस्जिद के गुंबद

दिल्ली की जीवंतता एवं उसका आकर्षण वर्णन से परे है, इसलिए इस शहर को अनुभव करना एक भौतिक मॉडल के द्वारा ही संभव है - एक संग्रहालय जो उन युगों को दर्शाये जिनके दौरान दिल्ली में विभिन्न राजवंशों का शासन था जो की उसकी अनूठी स्थापत्य चरित्र के लिए कारण है। दिल्ली के शहरों में से अधिकांश शहरों की अपनी खुद की खास विशेषतायें

हैं, या तो स्थापत्य शैली में, शहरी लेआउट में, सामग्री में या इमारत सुविधाओं में। संग्रहालय का निर्माण अंतरराष्ट्रीय स्तर पर अपनी सांस्कृतिक विरासत को बढ़ावा देने के साथ साथ एक पर्यटन स्थल एवं एक शैक्षिक उपकरण के रूप में काम आएगा। कालक्रम के अनुसार, सभी शहरों को दृश्यश्रव्य, कलाकृतियों के प्रदर्शन, निर्माण सामग्री एवं प्रौद्योगिकी के द्वारा अनुभव किया जा सकता है। इसके अलावा, यह इमारत दिन भर में सार्वजनिक गतिविधियों का केंद्र रहेगी जैसे संगीत समारोह, अस्थायी प्रदर्शनी, सम्मेलन, त्योहारों के उत्सव आदि। शहर के मध्य और इंद्रप्रस्थ की प्राचीन राजधानी के भीतर स्थित यह स्थल लोगों को दिल्ली के इतिहास से परिचित करने के लिए आदर्श है। राष्ट्रीय विज्ञान केंद्र के सामने भैरों मंदिर मार्ग पे स्थित इस साइट पर मजबूत वास्तु संदर्भ है- पुराना किला, इंडिया गेट और लटयंस दिल्ली की विरासत, चार्ल्स कोरिया द्वारा शिल्प संग्रहालय, एपी कानविंदे द्वारा विज्ञान संग्रहालय और राज रेवाल द्वारा प्रगति मैदान- सभी आधुनिक वास्तुकला के प्रतीक। मेरे द्वारा प्रस्तावित यह संग्रहालय दिल्ली के गौरवशाली वास्तुकला की विरासत के लिए एक श्रद्धांजलि होगा।इसके अलावा, संग्रहालय दिल्ली का वास्तु मूल्य पुनर्परिभाषित करने एवं उसका सार खोजने का प्रयास करेगा।


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to sincerely thank my guides Ar. Amit Behl and Ar. Kalpana Sethi for their excellent guidance throughout the thesis program. I am extremely grateful to them for the constant encouragement and support at every stage. I would also like to express my gratitude towards my Studio coordinators Prof. Mandeep Singh and Prof. Aruna Ramani Grover for successfully conducting a well organised thesis program which helped streamline my approach. Finally, I thank my mother and grandmother for their constant support and encouragement.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Synopsis Acknowledgments

CHAPTER 03

PART I: DESIGN INVESTIGATION CHAPTER 01 Thesis: A Search Introduction

09

Relevance of hypothesis Importance of Museums Objectives

CHAPTER 02 2.1

Reading of Program

40

Scope, functional diagram Area program

Research Research Core

15

Delhi as world Heritage city Museum Architecture and Design Lighting Design in Museums Museums today

2.2 Case Studies Bihar Museum, Patna, Bihar National Museum, New Delhi Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao Jewish Museum, Berlin British Museum, London

CHAPTER 04

Reading of Site

45

Site setting Site Historical significance Site Study: Design constraints/determinants Climate analysis

CHAPTER 05 Design Directives Inferences

54

Swot Analysis Significant architectural features of Delhi cities

PART II: DESIGN TRANSLATION CHAPTER 06 Conceptual Framework

58

CHAPTER 07

Design Evolution

63

CHAPTER 08

Design Final

69

29

Appendix Bibliography


CHAPTER 01: THESIS, A SEARCH

INTRODUCTION The city of Delhi possess a magical charm that instills a peculiar attraction in all human beings who have had the fortune to visit this land. It has been my home for over 15 years now, however there are still numerous monuments, stories, pieces of history which I discover everyday and perhaps, will be a continuous process. During the course of this thesis I have discovered many new secrets about this fascinating city, discoveries that must be shared with the people who belong to Delhi, tourists who come to visit from India and beyond. “Few people, including architects, are aware of the complex ways in which past and present are intertwined in the contemporary architecture of the city, making it a ‘living heritage’”-A.G.K. Menon, INTACH, Delhi Chapter, Convenor. People do not understand the architectural foundations of Delhi which through centuries have led to the formation of the diverse cultural heritage of the city. Hence, there is a need for a physical reference to experience, examine the prolific architectural legacy for people to be aware of its remarkable antiquity. Unique City- Delhi Delhi bears a unique architectural character; nowhere in the world is there

a coexistence of different architectural periods well preserved within each of their boundaries. The city having been ruled by numerous emperors has a history of resilience. “Though it has been burned by invaders time and time again, millennium after millennium, still the city was rebuilt; each time it rose like a phoenix from the fire.” -William Dalrymple, City of Djinns

Thesis, a Search|09


Foundation of the City Favourable geographic conditions of Delhi led to its early developments nested within a triangular patch of land with the river Yamuna on one side and the northern range of Aravalli Hills on the other two. At least seven times, its aura attracted emperors to chose Delhi as their capital of governance, initially for its geographic and strategic importance and later for its spiritual and cultural value as well. Most of the cities of Delhi have a special character of their own either in architectural style, urban layout, material or building features. The fact that most of them are still ‘living cities’ project its outstanding universal value. However, recent developments (private/commercial) have ruined the original integrity of these cities especially the Mughal city of Shahjahanabad.

1. Indraprastha (1450 BC.) 2. Qila rai pithora (1060 AD) 3. Siri (1304 AD) 4. Tughlaqabad (1321-23 AD) 5. Jahanpanah (AD 132627) 6. Ferozabad (1354 AD) 7. Dilli shershahi (shergarh) (1534) 8. Shahjahanabad (Mid-17th century) 9. New Delhi ( 1920s)

Map of Delhi showing settlements in connections with the river (1901 A.D.)

Thesis, a Search|10


Red fort, Shahjehahanad c. 1650 A.,D.

Ruins of the Fort of Tughlaqabad

The preservation and conservation of the architectural fabric of this traditional human settlement, thus, becomes imperative, which is representative of its diverse cultures. This is a multi-step process which involves the following:

Ferozshah Kotla Tomb and the Iron Pillar

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Thesis, a Search|12


Thesis, a Search|13


Thesis, a Search|14


Research Core|15


Overlay Map: Delhi

Research Core|16


Planning of the two major cities of Delhi, seventeenth century Shahjehanabad and twentieth century New Delhi (Lutyen’s Delhi) have one common feature i.e. of a central axis continuing through the city; between the Red Fort and the Fatehpuri masjid in the former and the Rashtrapati Bhavan and India Gate in the latter.

City layout Plan of Lutyen’s Delhi

Shahjehanabad layout Plan

Map showing the two major heritage zones of Delhi: Colonial New Delhi and Shahjehanabad

Research Core|17


Qutub Minar (Mehrauli)

Ferozshah Kotla, (Ferozabad)

Humayun’s Tomb, (Ferozabad)

Research Core|18


Jama Masjid, Shahjehanabad

The Chandni Chowk from the top of the Lahore Gate of the Fort, the canal depicted running down the middle, by Sita Ram, 1814-15

Research Core|19


Shahjehanabad City map from the illustrated London News. Jan 16, 1858

Research Core|20


Research Core|21


Research Core|22


Research Core|23


Research Core|24


LIGHTING DESIGN IN MUSEUMS Lighting in museums and art galleries plays a key role in a visitor’s ability to both perceive and enjoy the artifacts in a museum and the building in total. Lighting designer’s primary concern is effectively illuminating artwork, but they can be constrained by energy conservation standards which require light levels below 15 foot candles in some exhibit spaces. As an additional concern, they must consider the visual comfort of visitors. In deciding on levels of illumination in galleries, the primary consideration is the light sensitivity of the objects to be displayed. If the objects to be shown are light-sensitive, the two most important factors are the intensity of the light and whether or not ultraviolet (UV) rays are present.

Sensitive collections Including textiles, watercolors, photographs and other papers

Visible light Maximum: 50 lux (5 footcandles)

Less sensitive Maximum: collections 150 lux (15 Including oil paintings, footcandles) wood and leather Least sensitive Maximum: collections 300 lux (30 Including most metal, footcandles) ceramics, stones and glass Detailed account given in appendix I

Ultraviolet radiation is very destructive to all organic materials. However, since UV radiation is found primarily in daylight and in fluorescent lights, we can protect objects on display simply by shielding them from those light sources. Incandescent lighting, which has virtually no UV component, is preferred for gallery spaces. If daylight or fluorescent lights are present in galleries, ultraviolet filters must be used on the windows or lighting fixtures. UV filters usually have little effect on the visible light coming through them. Although it is treated separately in this technical note, lighting is only one of the environmental factors that must be taken into consideration. Temperature and relative humidity are vital factors that interact with lighting concerns.

Ultraviolet (UV) light Ideal: 0-10 microwatts per lumen Maximum: 75 microwatts per lumen Ideal: 0-10 microwatts per lumen Maximum: 75 microwatts per lumen Ideal: 0-10 microwatts per lumen Maximum: 75 microwatts per lumen

Guggenheim, New York Skylight- Natural Artificial Lighting track in exhibition space Light as major light source

While in storage: Museum collections should be exposed to no light at all while in storage. When it is necessary to introduce light levels into the storage area, limit the amount of exposure time as much as possible and filter all UV light.

Research Core|25


MUSEUM DESIGN AND LIGHTING

Research Core|26


The Kimbell Art Museum At the outset of the project, the Kimbell’s first director, Richard Brow, required that the natural light should be an integral part of the museum program. He did not want traditional skylights or clerestory windows in the galleries because of problems typically associated with such solutions.

Kimbell Art Museum, View of light diffuser, or the architect’s “natural lighting fixtures”. Spring 2002, Louis I. Kahn, architect.

At the Kimbell, natural light enters the space through a 2½-foot slit at the apex of Kahn’s distinctive vaulted ceilings. The light strikes a suspended convex, perforated-aluminum “natural light fixture”, in the words of Kahn, that prevents direct light from entering the space. Through this unique design, Kahn avoided many of the pitfalls inherent in a museum gallery where a primary source of illumination is natural light.

Kimbell Art Museum, View of southeast gallery, looking north, with paintings installed, Spring 2002, Louis I. Kahn, architect.

Section of Sky Light in the exhibition halls, Kimbell Art Museum Louis I. Kahn, architect.

Research Core|27


MUSEUMS TODAY Contemporary Museums • Pure materialisation of the architectural positions that inform them • Seismographs of architectural culture • Must respond to highly representative and aesthetic demands, while also fulfilling specific requirements with regard to urban design and functions. The last 20 years have seen great strides in democratisation and coproduction, with fantastic exhibitions and projects led by and initiated by user groups. In publicly funded museums we need to see more of a join up between consultation and engagement and the overall strategic direction of the organisation. Over time, the image of museums has evolved throughout history. Two centuries ago, the French author and politician Alphonse de la Martine (1790 -1860) said that museums were “the cemeteries of the arts”, you can find similar quotes by John Burroughs (1837 –1921) or J.D. Salinger when he writes in his infamous novel The Catcher in the Rye (1951) “…museum was that everything always stayed right where it was. Nobody’d move. … Nobody’d be different. The only thing that would be different would be you.” Contrary to these ideas of immobility associated to museums we can affirm that, no matter how hard the current situation is, museums are experiencing an exciting and vibrant moment.

exciting journey. They have changed from institutions where information was directed in only one way: towards the viewer into institutions that are increasingly creating conversations with the viewer. Visitors are invited to participate, are pulled into the life of the museum, not only as passive spectators, but also as active participants. The Galicia Jewish Museum in Krakow, Poland, is one example of these new dynamic institutions, and has launched a variety of programs for visitors (both Polish and foreign) creating opportunities for them to use the museum space for their own cultural projects like plays, concerts, and temporary exhibitions that contribute to the museum. Through the “Museum Means More”, program the Galicia Jewish Museum held over 200 such events for all age groups. It seems that the future of cultural institutions lies in interaction - and not just through the connections created by increasingly popular modern technologies – but, most of all, by inviting visitors to become involved in the life of the museum – their museum.

The Future of museums is Interaction Museums that exist today are certainly different in many ways than those in the past. Before, museums were institutions of authority that transmitted specific messages down to the public about the past from behind glass display cases, tape, and “do not touch” signs. Gradually, they evolved into places that invite visitors to participate in an interactive and

Research Core|28


CHAPTER 2.2: CASE STUDIES

Museums chosen as case study are as follows: Bihar Museum, Patna, Bihar National Museum, New Delhi Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao Jewish Museum, Berlin British Museum, London

Case Studies|29 Case studies| 17


Bihar Museum, Patna

The sequence of the exhibition spaces provides a chronological narrative of India’s history through an alternating experience of diverse interior and exterior spaces. Given the rich tradition of metal making in India, Corten Steel is featured prominently on the facades, complemented with terracotta and other local materials of Bihar; the building symbolically links the past and the future through its materiality.

Case CaseStudies|30 studies| 18


National Museum, Delhi The museum is situated on the corner of Janpath and Maulana Azad Road. • The museum has 2,00,000 works of art, both of Indian and foreign origin, covering over 5,000 years. • It also houses the National Museum Institute of History of Art, Conservation and Museology established in 1983 and now a Deemed University since 1989, and run Masters and Doctoral level courses in History of Art, Art Conservation and Art restoration. • Apart from the collections of Pre-historic Archaeology, Jewellery,Paintings, Decorative arts, Manuscripts, Central Asian Antiquities, Arms and Armour, etc. ,the Museum today has a separate branches of publication, Hindi, Public Relations, Education, Library, Exhibition cell, Display, Modelling, Photography, Security and Administration. • CONSERVATION LABORATORY: A well equipped conservation laboratory not only provides restoration to all the organic and inorganic art objects but also training facilities to students and deserving professionals, including restoration of oil-paintings in India. • The National Museum Institute of History of Art, Conservation and Museology came into existence in 1983 and now is Deemed to be a University provides various Courses with its campus at National Museum(New Delhi).

Case studies| 19

Case Studies|31


Central court

Trails fro lighting

Permanent gallery

Blower ducts Case studies| 20

Case Studies|32


The British Museum, London The British Museum opened to the public on 15 January 1759 . It was first housed in a seventeenth-century mansion, Montagu House, in Bloomsbury on the site of today's building. Entry was free and given to ‘all studious and curious Persons’. • With the exception of two World Wars, the Museum has remained open ever since. • The core of today’s building, the four main wings of the British Museum, was designed in the nineteenth century. Other important architectural developments include the round Reading Room with its domed ceiling and the Norman Foster designed Great Court which opened in 2000. Quadrangle building • The core of today’s building was designed by the architect Sir Robert Smirke (1780–1867) in 1823. It was a quadrangle with four wings: the north, east, south and west wings. • Smirke designed the building in the Greek Revival style, which emulated classical Greek architecture. Greek features on the building include the columns and pediment at the South entrance. Built on a concrete floor, the frame of the building was made from cast iron and filled in with London stock brick. The public facing sections of the building were covered in a layer of Portland stone.

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A landmark in the history of British museum and one of the most significant projects of Norman Foster, the great court has reclaimed London's most lost spacesand transformed the visitor’s experience ofthe museum giving the city one of its most remarkable public space.

Beneath Its own glass sky the Great Court has created new ways of accessing and enjoying the Museum's collections and has pioneered patterns of social use hitherto unknown within this or any other museum. The Great Court is a new kind of civic space -a cultural - which people are invited to use and enjoy from early in the morning to late at night In a crowded city and a busy Museum it is an oasis.

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Case Studies|34


Weston Hall • The Weston Hall was designed by Sydney Smirke, who took over from his brother, Sir Robert Smirke, in 1845. • The patterns and colours on the ceiling of the Weston Hall were borrowed from classical Greek buildings, which would have been brightly decorated. • The electric lamps in the entrance hall are replicas of the original lighting lamps in the Museum. The Museum wasthe first public building to be electrically lit.

Great Court • Designed by Foster and Partners, the Queen Elizabeth II Great Court transformed the Museum’s inner courtyard into the largest covered public square in Europe. It is a two-acre space enclosed by a spectacular glass roof with the world-famous Reading Room at its centre. Case studies| 23

Case Studies|35


Jewish Museum, Berlin

The Jewish Museum Berlin was originally founded on Oranienburger Straße in 1933. It was closed in 1938 by the Nazi regime. • The aim of the project was a critical construction of the historical city plan, using contemporary architectural means. • The Jewish Museum marks a special point on the map of Berlin. Its located at the intersection of Markgrafenstrasse and Lindenstrasse lies on the edge of Friedrichstadt. • Markgrafenstrasse, paralleling Friedichstrasse, connects the main museum with Gendarmenmarkt, the most important square in the former Royal Residence. • The area exhibits a compelling key of historical buildings and architectural styles consisiting of Karl Schinkel’s Schauspielhaus, LIN or Theater, Carl von Gontard’s two tower structures, and Daniel Libeskind’s Jewish Museum. • The location is an area near the Wall: These designs try to help create a new language for Berlin while responding to the fragmentation and segregation of the area.

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Building Features The Voids represent the central structural element of the New Building. • From the Old Building, a staircase leads down to the basement through a void of bare concrete which joins the two buildings. • Five Voids run vertically through the new building. • Walls of bare concrete: not heated or air-conditioned • Largely without artificial light

The Garden of Exile reached after leaving the second axis. • Forty nine stalea rise ouf of Forty-concrete the square plot. • The whole garden is 12° gradient meant to disorient visitors with a sense of total instability and lack of orientation • Oleaster grows on top of pillars:symbolizing hope.

Structural members are made externally visible within the zinc cladding. • Provides a sheathed building with a tectonic connotation. • Zinc clad monolith remains tectonic and solid • In time the shine of the zinc will dull down to blue-grey. • In Berlin untreated zinc turns a beautiful blue-gray. • Lighting systems tracked within preplanned recesses in ceilings.

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Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao Art Museum Style: Deconstructivism

From its position, at the bank of Nervion River, the museum serves as gateway to the city’s business and historical district and is seamlessly integrated with the urban context. It houses19 galleries that hold both temporary and permanent exhibition

1. Gallery 2. Water garden 3. Cafe/bookstore 4. Loading/docking 5. Entry 6. Storage

7. Atrium 8. Auditorium 9. Parking 10. Retail 11. Retail Storage 12. Crate Storage

1. Gallery 2. conservation 3. open to below

First Floor Plan

1. Gallery 2. Library 3. Bookstore 4. Kitchen 5. open to below

Second Floor Plan

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CASE STUDIES INFORMATION MATRIX National Museum, Delhi

Bihar Museum, Patna

Jewish Museum, Berlin

British museum, London

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao

Reason for selection

To understand the architectural respond to Delhi; issues faced

A museum dedicated to the city of Patna; identity formation

Dedicated to a particular event in history ; reflecting heritage; for its symbolism

Historic museum; to interpret scale and mammoth of design

Museum popular as recreation space; community interaction

Location

India

India

Germany

Great Britain

Spain

Year of Completion

1960

To be completed 2015

1999

1759

1997

Architects

Gwyer committee set up by GOI

Maki and Associates Opolis

Daniel Lebisiknd

Sir Robert Smirke, Foster + partners

Frank Gehry

Ownership

Department of culture, Ministry of HRD, GOI

Patna Department of Art, Culture and Youth (DACY), State of Bihar

Berlin Foundation

Government of Britain

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum Foundation

Site area

30,000 sq.m.

56,250 sq.m.

12,264 sq.m.

56,000 sq.m.

32,500 sq.m.

Ground coverage

25%

33%

33%

55%

Built-up

18,000 qs.m.

25,000 sq.m.

15,000 sq.m

54,000 sq.m.

24,000 sq.m.

F.A.R.

0.6

0.44

1.2

1

0.7

Maximum height

18m

24m

Façade

Corten Steel is featured prominently on the facades, complemented with terracotta and other local materials of Bihar; the building

Reinforced concrete zinc facade

Lighting design has been given foremost importance with natural lighting through skylights

The accesses have slopes between 2.65% (stair) to 3.9% (holocaust tower) Universal friendly design

Comments/ features

Although ramps have been provided at many places, but design still does not qualify as universal

Titanium sheet facade

Self operable lifts on both sides of stairs at entrance

From its position, at the bank of Nervion River, the museum serves as gateway to the city’s business and historical district and is seamlessly integrated with the urban context. It houses19 galleries that hold both temporary and permanent exhibition

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Case Studies|39


AREA PROGRAM S.No.

Area (Sq.m.)

Activity

Lux

Lighting

Entrance and Reception

Activity Period

VIEWS

10 AM TO 10PM

1.

Entry Foyer

100

2.

Ticket office

30

40 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 5PM

3.

Security/checking

20

50 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 10PM

4.

Enquiry area

20

50 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 5PM

5.

Souvenir shop

100

300 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 10PM

Total

60 NATURAL

Special Qualitative Treatment

270

Administration 1.

Director

50

150

NATURAL/ PRIVACY/ NO OFFICE HOURS ARTIFICIAL DISTURBANCE

2.

Secretary

20

150

NATURAL/ PRIVACY/ NO OFFICE HOURS ARTIFICIAL DISTURBANCE

3.

Curator office

30

150

NATURAL/ PRIVACY/ NO OFFICE HOURS ARTIFICIAL DISTURBANCE

4.

Logistics offices

50

150

NATURAL/ PRIVACY/ NO OFFICE HOURS ARTIFICIAL DISTURBANCE

Total

150

Reading of Program|40


Exhibition space 5000

250

NATURAL/ ACOUSTICS/ ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING

10 AM TO 5PM

Display area for architecture competition entries/models

500

250

NATURAL/ ACOUSTICS/ ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING

10 AM TO 5PM

3.

Conservation room for architectural drawings

300

4.

Temporary exhibition

1.

Special Exhibition halls

2.

1000 Total

Activity areas 1. 2.

Children’s activity zone Toddlers play area

ACOUSTICS/ LIGHTING ACOUSTICS/ 250 ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING 250 ARTIFICIAL

10 AM TO 5PM 10 AM TO 5PM

6800

200 50

200 NATURAL 200 NATURAL

SAFETY SAFETY

10 AM TO 5PM 10 AM TO 5PM

VIEWS

10 AM TO 10PM

3.

Cafeteria

80

200 NATURAL

4.

Book shops

80

300 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 10PM

5.

storage

20

100 ARTIFICIAL SECURE

ONLY WHEN NEEDED

150 NATURAL

10 AM TO 5PM

Total

Supporting facilities 1. Library

430

1000 1.1. 1.2. 1.3.

Reading gallery Book stacks Digital zone

1.4.

Coffee/water self-service

LIGHTING

Reading of Program|41


2.

Auditorium/Amphitheatre

500

300

ARTIFICIAL ACOUSTICS/ / NATURAL LIGHTING

DURING EVENTS

3.

Conference halls, Discussion rooms, Meeting rooms

300

150

NATURAL/ ACOUSTICS/ ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING

DURING EVENTS

4.

Banquet halls

1000

200

NATURAL/ LIGHTING ARTIFICIAL

DURING EVENTS

5.

Restaurants/food courts

500

250

NATURAL/ LIGHTING ARTIFICIAL

10 AM TO 10PM

6.

Leaning Center/ workshops

500

200

NATURAL/ LIGHTING ARTIFICIAL

DURING EVENTS

7.

Storage

200 Total SUB-TOTAL

100

SECURE

SECURE

ONLY WHEN NEEDED

4000 11650

Services (6%) 1.

Audio visual/sound control room

2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

AHU rooms Lift rooms Fire control rooms Electric sub station Loading/docking

7.

Kitchen

100 ARTIFICIAL

ARTIFICIAL

150 ARTIFICIAL Total

699

Reading of Program|42


Circulation (25%) Coresstaircase 1. lift toilets lobbies

ARTIFICIAL

Total

SECURE

24X7

2912.5

Parking Parking for 500 cars TOTAL

SITE AREA BUILT-UP F.A.R. ECS REQUIRED

100 ARTIFICIAL

10 AM TO 10PM

15261.5

= 46,500 SQ.M. = 15,300 SQ.M. = 0.32 = 230

Reading of Program|43


BROAD AREA PROGRAM

DETAIL AREA PROGRAM

Entrance and Reception Administration Special Exhibition halls 2%

1%

1%

Display area for architecture competition entries/models Conservation room for architectural drawings Temporary exhibition

1%

19%

22%

28%

Children’s activity zone Toddlers play area

5% 2% 1% 14%

7%

59%

16% 2% 2% 1%

Book shops storage Library

8% 3% 1%

Entrance and Reception Administration Exhibition space Activity areas Supporting facilities Services Circulation

Cafeteria

Auditorium/Amphitheatre

5% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0%

Conference halls, Discussion rooms, Meeting rooms Banquet halls Restaurants/food courts Leaning Center/ workshops Services Circulation Reading of program| 33

Reading of Program|44


CHAPTER 04: READING OF SITE SITE

The site chosen is located in the heart of the capital, at Bhairon Marg with heritage site Purana Qila located adjecent to it. The reason for selection of this site was the fact that it was part of Indraprastha, the first city of Delhi. Thus, an apt location for the architectural museum of Delhi. The site has direct notional axis connecting to the rajpath and India Gate and Rashtrapati Bhavan ahead.

G r e e n Connections with the site context

Road Network

Reading of Site|45


1

PURANA QILA (0KM)

4

BHAIRON TEMPLE (0KM)

7

NATIONAL GALLERY OF MODERN ART(1KM)

2

NATIONAL SCIENCE CENTRE(0KM)

5

ZOOLOGICAL PARK(500M)

8

MILLENIUM DEPOT DTC BUS TERMINAL(1KM)

3

CRAFTS MUSEUM(0KM)

6

NATINAL STADIUM(1KM)

9

INDIA GATE(1.5KM)

OTHER IMPORTANT munoments IN THE PRECINCT HUMAYUN’S TOMB(2.5KM) RASHTRAPATI BHAVAN(3KM) NIZZAMUDDIN RAILWAY STATION(3KM)

CHAPTER 03: READING OF SITE

The site chosen is located in the heart of the capital, at Bhairon Marg with heritage site Purana Qila located adjecent to it. •

The reason for selection of this site was the fact that it was part of Indraprastha, the first city of Delhi. Thus, an apt location for the architectural museum of Delhi. The site has direct notional axis connecting to the rajpath and India Gate and Rashtrapati Bhavan ahead.

3

9

2

6

Reading of site| 26

4

7

1

5

8

Reading of site| 35

Reading of Site|46


The site is divided into two parts by semi-circular road, upper part covering almost 11 acres and lower part about 7 acres.

More than 70% of the upper part of the site is obtained by DTC bus stand. Majorly used during trade fair. Rest of the year used as parking area

There are no built structure on the site except a small PWD office and DTC bus depot office.

The lower part of the site, used as parking is badly maintained and is mostly littered.

There is very good view of the old fort from the inside the site.

Reading of site| 36

Reading of Site|47


Site: Bhairon Marg Area: 76,500 sq.m.

Reading of site| 37

Reading of Site|48


SITE CONTEXT

Reading of site| 38

Reading of Site|49


MASTER PLAN FOR DELHI 2021 According to Master Plan 2021, the site is a part of zone D and sub zone-7 of Delhi. On a broad scale, It is marked as parking/ bus terminal. Zone ‘D’ is located in the south and adjacent to the historical city of Shahjahanabad and extends upto the Ring Road. In the east, it is surrounded by River Yamuna & in the west, by Paharganj, Karol Bagh, rehabilitation colonies (Rajinder Nagar) and Pusa Institute. Rashtrapati Bhawan, Parliament House, Supreme Court, Delhi High Court

and the Central Government Ministries are some of the important land marks of this zone. The zone is unique having a number of historical monuments and tree-studded character. Extract from the Master plan for Delhi 2021

Reading of Site|50


CHOICE OF SITE 1. Central Location- East Accessiblity 2. Part of Indraprastha, the first city of Delhi. 3. direct notional axis connecting to the rajpath and India Gate and Rashtrapati Bhavan ahead.

• • •

The axis created by sir Edwin Lutyen’s, seems to been lost beyond the Dyan chand stadium and must be revived If we consider the urban analogy of Paris, this axis must continue till the river Yamuna and beyond. The chosen site enables this axis to be formed and also links it to the river; as the river front development project comes up it will merge with the site and hence the axis

Reading of program| 40

Reading of Site|51


DESIGN DETERMINANTS: RESPONSE TO HERITAGE Since the site at Bhairon Marg is located within strong historical setting, the new building should respond well to the existing structures and fit perfectly in the setting. The new construction must be balanced with the old existing heritage Direct visual or notional axis At St. peters Basilica, a historical site had additions had additions in terms of buildings along the visual axis of cathedral and thereby forming a huge piazza. The cathedral is directly visible from the piazza and is highlighted. Axis is formed from the entrance to the Basilica. Thus it is a strong visual as well as circulation axis. Building character • The architecture should encourage discovery and learning • It should be welcoming and less imposing as a structure to project a hospitable image to the visitor. • The building doesn’t restrict its functions to exhibition but becomes a multi-purpose space to attract wide variety of visitor which is achieved by an extensive area program catering to people belonging to different economic, cultural, work background

St. Peters Basilica, Rome

In the new addition to the Louvre, the axis is defined by the glass pyramid and museum building lies underground. The pyramid serves as the entry to the museum. The landscaping also continues to follow the axis. The visual axis is limited to the entrance however there is a notional axis following the museum underground. The Louvre, Paris

Focal point The building must act as focal point of convergence of surrounding context. In this case, the site at Bhairon Marg connects the axis of the Rashtrapati Bhavan on the west to the river Yamuna on the east Reading of site| 41

Reading of Site|52


CLIMATE Delhi has a composite climate and is characterised by three seasons: 1. Hot-dry 2. 2. Warm-humid 3. 3. Cool-dry Average temperature of the area is 17.6 degree Celsius During winter, temperature varies between 5.3-25.3 degrees Celsius During summer temperature 13.7-41.5 degree Celsius Autumn, 11.2-36.3 degrees Celsius Rainfall The months of July and August experience the monsoon season. the average annual rainfall is 723.9mm. Maximum rainfall recorded: 413.8mm Wind Direction As per IMD data, the predominant wind direction is NW-SE. Summers experience hot-dust laden winds of around 40km/h. Strong winds also blow during monsoon season. Sun path Delhi experience many months of Direct Sunlight through the summer as well as winter. The detailed impact of geometric layout and shading geometry can be analysed using sun positions techniques on the basis of availability of sunlight at specific times of day/year.

Reading of site| 42

Reading of Site|53


CHAPTER 05: CONCLUSION INFERENCES As inferred from the case studies, the museum must be a multi-purpose space promoting

communtiy interaction

It

must

without boundaries

be

and accessible and welcoming to all groups of society;

Museums prove to be best spaces

children’s learning centers

for

since they provide practical based knowledge and hands-on activities.

it is also necessary to include the right balance of

shops

retail

in the museum complex to ensure better functioning of commerce

conclusion| 43 Directions|54 Design


SWOT ANALYSIS

STRENGTH

WEAKNESS

• • • • •

Well connected to the city though ring road, mathura road, metro nearby Adjacent to public area Presence of heritage Well connected to N.C.R. Located along a major road, easily accessible Presence of cultural buildings in the vicinity

Despite being surrounded by important buildings and national heritage, site is used as a parking ground The only road along the site is very congested and noisy during peak hours Presence of drain at one edge of site

OPPORTUNITY •

• •

The heritage monument and other important buildings provide a good context to the site Site has the potential to attract people from all over the city The present barren land can be converted into a much better place Government plan to shift venue of trade fair

THREATS •

• • •

The heritage law restricts construction and posses height restriction Bhairon temple, attracts a large crowd specially on Sundays Parking load due to exhibitions in pragati maidan Large crowd on exhibition days

Design Directions|55 conclusion| 44


SIGNIFICANT ARCHITECTURAL FEATURES OF DELHI CITIES

BAOLIS AND KUNDS

Architecture is one of the immortal echoes of places that define their story of existence through time. Some of these echoes which define Delhi’s existence through several ages and form the basis of my design of the Museum for Delhi are as follows: FORTS AND ITS WALLS Agrasen ki Baoli, connaught place, New Delhi

Delhi gate - Red Fort

Old-fort

More than their use for safeguarding of citizens, fort walls and forts became symbols of power and rein. Forts were built in almost every city of Delhi starting with Mehrauli, Tughlaqabad fort, Old fort at shergarh, Siri, Ferozshah Kotla and Red Fort.

PILLARS/ TOWERS

Pillar at Rashtrapati Bhavan

Rajaon ki Baoli, Mehrauli, New Delhi

Delhi has a several stepwells (Baolis) built as water reservoirs, gathering spaces and natural cooling systems. Kunds were similar structures found mostly in the Rajasthan and Gujarat and some parts of Delhi. Panna meena ka kund, Jaipur, Rajasthan

HAUZ OR TANKS

Iron Pillar at Mehrauli

Pillars were important architectural features as a symbol of victory and landmark. Such towers in Delhi include the Ashoka pillar at Mehrauli and Ferozshah Kotla, the Qutub Minar and the pillar at Rashtrapati Bhavan.

Hauz or water tank can be seen at several sights in Delhi- the Hauz Khas, Hauz at Purana qila, etc.

Hauz-khas

Fort-top at Hauz Khas

Design Directions|56


The large water tank or reservoir was first built by Allauddin Khilji (r. 1296–1316) (the plaque displayed at the site records this fact) to supply water to the inhabitants of Siri Fort.

COLLONADES

DOMES

Jama Masjid Domes

Tomb at Lodhi Gardens

Developed by Robert Tor Russel as part of Lutyen’s Delhi, Connaught place has influence of the collonial period- collonades at C.P. have become symbolic to Delhi’s architecture.

Safdarjung’s Tomb

Another important feature forming Delhi’s architectural identity is the Dome; most exquisite of all are the triple domes at Jama Masjid.

Design Directions|57


CHAPTER 06: CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK

The connection to the river has always been important for all historical cities of Delhi. The foundation of some of its earliest cities was done in the triangular patch of land guided by the river on one side and the forest ridge on the other two. Hence, the firat concept is framed in order to revive that connection with the river and re-establish the lost axis between two main natural resources of Delhi.

CONCEPTS DETERMINANTS:

1

AXIS-AVENUE

2

RESPONSE TO HERITAGE

3

CONNECTIONS TO YAMUNA

4

ICONIC ARCHITECTURE

5

LAYERS OF CULTURAL HERITAGE

6

GATEWAY TO THE CITY

7

PUBLIC REALM

8

MERGING WITH THE CONTEXT- PURANA QILA AS BACKDROP

9

MULTI-CULTURED

11

CONTINUITY OF MOVEMENT

12 RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE VIEWER AND EXHIBIT

10 INTERSECTING ARCHITECTURAL STYLES

Conceptual Framework|58


DELHI AXIS BETWEEN THE RIDGE AND THE RIVER CONNECTED BY RASHTRAPATI BHAVAN THROUGH RAJPATH TO INDIA GATE While justifying the revival of the lost axis of Delhi which follows from the Rashtrapati bhavan, rajpath, India Gate and gets lost somewhere after the Dhyan Chand stadium, one can take the analogy from the grand axis route of the city of Paris. The city axis of Paris continues from the Louvre

museum, through the garden of Tuilleries goes beyond the river Siene and to the next city. Similar, connection may be achieved in Delhi by connecting its axis to the river Yamuna and beyond.

PARIS CITY AXIS CONTINUING BEYOND THE CITY

Conceptual Framework|59


VARIED VISUAL EXPERIENCE

Conceptual Framework|60


SECTION THROUGH THE PUBLIC PLAZA A central plaza is provided on the site which connects the surrounding functions and helps in maximizing views towards the Old fort and the fort wall. It is developed as a Baoli or stepped well which is essential part of Delhi’s Architectural heritage and is then further connected to a Bazaar street typical of Delhi’s cultural heritage

Conceptual Framework|61


The New Delhi axis that is continued on the site is treated symbolically. First, a water channel is created at the center of the approach road to the museum resembling the heritage of Shahjehanabad’s moonlight square. This channel visually and physically leads up to a tower reflecting the water symbolising continuity of architectural heritage. Hence, the

entrance and approach to the museum perfectly blends two most profound heritage sites of Delhi - Shahjehanabad and Lutyen’s Delhi. The water channel further extends ahead of the tower into an open garden symbolic of the culmination of axis from the forest ridge to the river. This transition is rather sudden which gives a feeling of grandeur to the entire experience and helps one realise the importance of open spaces in Delhi and the connection with the river. This experience can also be related to the sudden change of narrow and wide roads of Delhi.

entrance to museum

visual axis toward the garden

axis of culmination water channel in visual continuity with the tower

Conceptual Framework|62


CHAPTER 07: DESIGN EVOLUTION

The design and planning of the Museum complex was developed in four stages as illustrated in the following pages. Initial concept ideas were used to create the first design development, thereafter, the strengths and weaknesses of each development stage was compared with the previous one which finally lead to the end product.

Evolution of form: 1

2

3

4

Design Evolution|63


STAGE I

Museum building

Supporting functions

STRENGTH • Iconic form fit for museum typology. • Building treated as culmination of the New Delhi axis from Rashtrapati bhavan. • Reference to Chandni Chowk moonlight square- approach to the museum building; connection with heritage of Delhi WEAKNESS • Surrounding buildings with ancillary functions not in regular form. • Main building dominates the form. • Bhairon Mandir in close proximity is addressed. OPPORTUNITY • Approach axis aligned with Lutyen’s Delhi axis for visual connection. • Sunken court can be used for public functions with Old Fort as the backdrop. THREAT • Traffic congestion at Bhairon road as it merges with Ring road. • Security issue as site is kept porous from all sides.

Design Evolution|64


Entrance to the museum building must be grand and awe-inspiring. Its access is imagined as long path with a water channel in its center leading up to an open plaza. Permanent Exhibitions of cities is staggered on several levels and each one faces the direction from the site in which it exists in Delhi. As the halls provide information about the distance and location of each ruling city, one gets a notion of being surrounded by architectural heritage.

Floor-wise layout of cities

View from approach axis to the Museum

While passing through the ring road, one gets a spectacular view of the Humayun’s tomb from the flyover. Keeping that in mind a viewing deck is imagined at the top of the museum building with views of surrounding context which forms an integral part of Delhi’s heritage.

Design Evolution|65


STAGE II

STRENGTH Museum building

Supporting functions

Connections

• Porous site; connection stronger with public buildings on opposite road. • Better function/access of ancillary buildings. • Attempt is made to address Bhairon Mandir as part of site. WEAKNESS • Entire building form not cohesion. • Attempt to connect Old fort Axis with the site not successful. • Symbolism too direct with each side of heptagon signifying seven cities. OPPORTUNITY • Supporting functions for museum will help the building to be active 24x7. • Complementary functions of the complex make connections with the surroundings stronger THREAT • Underground subway gets load of structure on top.

Design Evolution|66


STAGE III STRENGTH

Museum building

Supporting functions

• Symbolism made stronger with the axis culminating into river; as the New Delhi axis is continued beyond the building. • Tower with viewing deck on top visible from distance. • Complex of structures symbolise each ruling city of Delhi which enclose a plaza with the viewing tower in the center. WEAKNESS • Building form becomes too fragmented; hence connectivity is weakened through-out the site. • Support functions don’t mingle with the over all form OPPORTUNITY • Approach to the museum and its culmination into a garden gives a monumental feel to the building; possibility of it becoming a new icon for the architecture of Delhiallowing people to be aware of the story of its origin • Viewing deck at the top of the tower allows for direct visual connection with the surrounding context- Pragati maidan, India Gate up to Rashtrapati Bhavan. THREAT • Central plaza to large to be open to sky without shadingnot suitable for Delhi climate;

Design Evolution|67


STAGE IV STRENGTH

Supporting functions

Museum building

• Symbolism from stage-3 taken forward; axis leading to narrow lane suddenly opens into a wide space-the river garden; symbolising the planned v/s unplanned developments in Delhi and its history of being founded near the river. • Three intersecting axes merge on the site- New Delhi axis, Old Fort axis and Public axis (from pragati maidan) • Ancillary buildings have vehicular access without interfering with the museum building yet being connected to it. WEAKNESS • Entry to Bhairon mandir is filtered and gated. • Separate parking required for support functions such as banquet halls, auditoriums, etc. OPPORTUNITY • Owing to planning of the complex, it can become a public hub with food joints and bazaar streets as popular destinations- fulfilling the ever increasing demand for new eating/hanging out places of Delhiites. • Viewing deck feature will attract a wide range of audience for the museum. THREAT • Increase of traffic in the future may lead to higher congestion on the main road.

Design Evolution|68


CHAPTER 08: DESIGN FINAL

The final design comprises of concepts from initial design that evolved through analysis of site and derivatives of research. The program includes a four storey museum building, connected with support functions such as auditorium, conference/ meeting rooms and banquet halls through a public plaza. The cafeteria on the ground floor of the museum block spills out into the food/ bazaar street and the public plaza. Also, the fort wall and Qila-E-Kuhna mosque acts as a backdrop for cultural activities in the open air theatre. The Design features elements that are representative and symbolic of Delhi and its heritage, for example, the tower with a viewing deck on top, central water channel, public plaza developed as a baoli, round about water feature as a Hauz, dome for skylight to underground parking and the Delhi axis continuing from the ridge to the river.

Design Final|69


Design Final|70


Design Final|71


Design Final|72


Design Final|73


Design Final|74


Design Final|75


Design Final|76


Design Final|77


Design Final|78


Model Context

1:3000

Design Final|79


Model 1:500

Design Final|80


Design Final|81


AREA PROGRAM S.No.

AREA PROGRAM Area  (Sq.m.)

Activity

Lux

Lighting

Entrance and Reception

Activity Period

VIEWS

10 AM TO 10PM

1.      

Entry Foyer

100

2.      

Ticket office

30

40 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 5PM

3.      

Security/checking

20

50 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 10PM

4.      

Enquiry area

20

50 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 5PM

5.      

Souvenir shop

100

300 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 10PM

Total

60 NATURAL

Special Qualitative  Treatment

270

Administration 1.      

Director

50

150

NATURAL/ PRIVACY/ NO  OFFICE HOURS ARTIFICIAL DISTURBANCE

2.      

Secretary

20

150

NATURAL/ PRIVACY/ NO  OFFICE HOURS ARTIFICIAL DISTURBANCE

3.      

Curator office

30

150

NATURAL/ PRIVACY/ NO  OFFICE HOURS ARTIFICIAL DISTURBANCE

4.      

Logistics offices

50

150

NATURAL/ PRIVACY/ NO  OFFICE HOURS ARTIFICIAL DISTURBANCE

Total

150

Design Final|82


Exhibition space 7000

250

NATURAL/ ACOUSTICS/ ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING

10 AM TO 5PM

Display area for architecture competition  entries/models

500

250

NATURAL/ ACOUSTICS/ ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING

10 AM TO 5PM

3.      

Conservation room for architectural drawings

300

250 ARTIFICIAL

4.      

Temporary exhibition 

1.      

Special Exhibition halls

2.      

1400 Total

Activity areas 1.       2.      

Children’s activity zone Toddlers play area

ACOUSTICS/ LIGHTING ACOUSTICS/  250 ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING

10 AM TO 5PM 10 AM TO 5PM

9200

200 50

200 NATURAL 200 NATURAL

SAFETY SAFETY

10 AM TO 5PM 10 AM TO 5PM

VIEWS

10 AM TO 10PM

3.      

Cafeteria

80

200 NATURAL

4.      

Book shops

80

300 ARTIFICIAL ACCESSIBILTY

10 AM TO 10PM

5.      

storage

20

100 ARTIFICIAL SECURE

ONLY WHEN  NEEDED

150 NATURAL

10 AM TO 5PM

Total

Supporting facilities 1.       Library 

430

1300

LIGHTING

1.1.                     Reading gallery 1.2.                     Book stacks 1.3.                     Digital zone 1.4.                     Coffee/water self‐service

Design Final|83


2.      

Auditorium/Amphitheatre

600

300

ARTIFICIAL ACOUSTICS/ / NATURAL LIGHTING

DURING EVENTS

3.      

Conference halls, Discussion rooms, Meeting  rooms

300

150

NATURAL/ ACOUSTICS/ ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING

DURING EVENTS

4.      

Banquet halls 

1200

200

NATURAL/ LIGHTING ARTIFICIAL

DURING EVENTS

5.      

Restaurants/food courts

500

250

NATURAL/ LIGHTING ARTIFICIAL

10 AM TO 10PM

6.      

Leaning Center/ workshops

700

200

NATURAL/ LIGHTING ARTIFICIAL

DURING EVENTS

7.      

Storage

300 Total SUB‐TOTAL

100

SECURE

SECURE

ONLY WHEN  NEEDED

4900 14950

Services 1.      

Audio visual/sound control room

2.       3.       4.       5.       6.      

AHU rooms Lift rooms Fire control rooms Electric sub station Loading/docking

7.      

Kitchen

100 ARTIFICIAL

ARTIFICIAL

150 ARTIFICIAL Total

897

Design Final|84


Circulation

1.      

Cores‐ staircase lift toilets  lobbies

ARTIFICIAL

Total

SECURE

24X7

3737.5

Parking Parking for 500 cars TOTAL

SITE AREA BUILT-UP GROUND COVER F.A.R. PARKING

100 ARTIFICIAL

10 AM TO 10PM

19584.5

= 46,500 SQ.M. = 19,600 SQ.M. = 18% = 0.42 = 302 ECS (REQUIRED 294 ECS) 1360 ECS (EXISTING, ITPO)

Design Final|85


APPENDIX I

South East Conservation & Restoration

Lighting Design Requirements For Museums

Bark

20 ± 2°C

200

80

6 months

Yes

Hygroscopic ­ will crack, warp etc in fluctuating RH.

Yes

Bitumen

20 ± 2°C

6 months

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 200 10% 45 ­ 65% 200

80

Bone

80

6 months

Recommended environmental conditions for museum objects

Bone china

10­30°C

20 ­ 60% 300

200

unrestricted

Introduction

Brick

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% <35%

300

unrestricted unrestricted

200

80

6 months

*Yes

200

80

6 months

Yes

Beads are constructed from many different materials and should be assessed on a case by case basis. Prone to dust and dirt accumulation. Can creep prior to drying (20 yrs) and cracks on drying. Hygroscopic ­ will crack, warp etc in fluctuating RH. Prone to staining. Repair materials (adhesives, fillers, paint etc) may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. Repair materials (adhesives, fillers, paint etc) may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. Hygroscopic ­ will crack, warp etc in fluctuating RH. * Mature wood is resistant to insect attack. Tends to embrittle with age.

200

80

6 months

Yes

Collects dust easily.

50

30

3 months

Yes

300

unrestricted unrestricted

Discolours and embrittles with age. Most cardboard made post 1850 is inherently acidic. May have a soft graphitised section which is prone to physical damage. Protective coating system may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. Prone to drying (crazing) in RH below that recommended. Wax coating will minimise drying. Discolours and embrittles with age Hygroscopic ­ will crack, warp etc in fluctuating RH. * Mature wood is resistant to insect attack. Repair materials (adhesives, fillers, paint etc) may require lower light levels and restricted display periods.

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Table 3 is a list of recommended environmental conditions for the storage, display and transport of museum objects. Though it may be difficult for a museum to achieve these 'ideal' standards, the best possible conditions within the limitations should prevail. In all cases, the emphasis should be on achieving stable levels of temperature and relative humidity (RH), minimum light levels and elimination of all UV light. In some instances the maximum light level of 300 lux is reasonably low for the material, however it is rarely necessary to exceed this.

Beadwork

10% 50 ± 10%

Camphorwood 20 ± 2°C

Yes

Cane

20 ± 2°C

The table is organised by materials (ie wood, clay, metal etc) rather than object type (ie machinery, clothing, book). When using the table in relation to objects made from two or more materials, the recom¬mendations for each material should be checked and the narrowest range of temperature and RH, lowest level of lux and mw/lumen and the shortest display period should be taken as the 'ideal' conditions for the whole object.

Canvas

20 ± 2°C

Cardboard

20 ± 2°C

For example, if you have you have a metal bicycle with a leather seat, rubber tyres and some plastic components, you would assess the categories in Table 1. In comparing the requirements of each material, you will see that the plastic and rubber components have the narrowest range of tolerance in all categories and hence will dictate the environmental conditions.

Cast iron

20 ± 2°C

Casein

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10%

200

80

6 months

Yes

Cedar (Australian) Ceramic (not specified elsewhere) Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate films

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 5% 200

80

6 months

*Yes

10­30°C

20 ­ 60% 300

200

unrestricted

<15°C

22 ­ 35% Nil

Nil

Nil

Yes

< 40%

50

30

3 months

Yes

50 ± 10% < 40%

50

30

3 months

300

200

unrestricted

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10%

300

unrestricted unrestricted

200

80

300

unrestricted unrestricted

Leather

20 ± 2°C

Metals (not specified elsewhere) Plastic (not specified elsewhere) Rubber (soft)

20 ± 2°C

Table 1 Relative humidity Max light Max UV (RH) (lux) wm/lumen 50 ± 10% 50 (dyed) 30 (dyed) 200 (undyed) 80 (undyed) < 35% 300 unrestricted

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10%

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10%

Material

Temperature

50 (display) Nil in storage 50 (display) Nil in storage

30 (display) Nil in storage 30 (display) Nil in storage

Max display period per 12 months 3 months 6 months unrestricted 3 months 3 months

Another example is a painting that may be painted in oil on a gessoed canvas, stretched on a wooden strainer/stretcher with a composition gesso and gilt frame. When assessing the painting by comparing the requirements of each material (Table 2), it will be clear that most of the components have a similar but inconsistent range of tolerance. The lowest tolerance in each section should form the ideal environmental conditions for the whole object. Material Canvas Composition (Compo; as used on frame mouldings) Gesso Gold (include leaf & gilt) Oil paint Wood (not specified elsewhere) Material

Acrylic paint

Temperature Relative humidity (RH)

20 ± 2°C

Acrylic plastics 20 ± 2°C (ie perspex) Alabaster 20 ± 2°C Amber

20 ± 2°C

Bakelite and Catalin Baleen

20 ± 2°C 20 ± 2°C

Bamboo

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ±

Table 2 Temperature Relative humidity Max light Max UV (RH) (lux) wm/lumen 20 ± 2°C 50 ± 10% 50 30 20 ± 2°C 50 ± 10% 200 80

Max display period per 12 months 3 months 6 months

20 ± 2°C 20 ± 2°C 20 ± 2°C 20 ± 2°C

6 months unrestricted 6 months 6 months

50 ± 10% < 35% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 5%

200 300 200 200

80 unrestricted 80 80

300

Table 3 Max UV Max Prone Other Considerations wm/lumen display to period per insect 12 months &/or mould attack 80 6 months If paint is thin, treat as if watercolour. Paint embrittles with age. 200 9 months Certain chemicals may cause crazing.

300

unrestricted unrestricted

300

200

unrestricted

200

80

6 months

50

30

3 months

Yes

200

80

6 months

Yes

Max light (lux)

200

Soluble in weak acids and prone to attack by organic acid vapours. Brittle: cracks or breaks easily. Soluble in many organic solvents. Discolours with age.

<20°C Cellulose acetate and cellulose nitrate objects Charcoal (on a 20 ± 2°C substrate) Clay 10­ 30°C

Coal

20 ± 2°C

Composition 20 ± 2°C (Compo; as used on frame mouldings) Copper (brass 20 ± 2°C & bronze) Coral

20 ± 2°C

Cork

20 ± 2°C

Crayon (on a substrate) Crystal

20 ± 2°C

Earthenware

20 ± 2°C

Enamel

20 ± 2°C

20 ± 2°C

< 35%

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10%

May disintegrate in water. May contain carbonates which are soluble in weak acids. Repair materials (adhesives, fillers, paint etc) may require lower light levels and restricted display periods.

6 months

200

80

6 months

200

80

6 months

50

30

3 months

300

unrestricted unrestricted

300

200

unrestricted

300

200

9 months

Dangerous materials, mav ignite in temperatures above those recommended. Must be stored separately in a ventilated area as materials give off acidic vapours. No display, minimum illumination for the purpose of reproduction. CONTACT NATIONAL FILM & SOUND ARCHIVE. Must be stored separately in a ventilated area as materials give off acidic vapours. Soluble in most solvents.

Embrittles and cracks with age.

Prone to attack from atmospheric pollutants (hydrogen sulphide, sulphur dioxide & sulphuric acid) >15% RH. Protective coating system may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. Soluble in weak acids and prone to attack by organic acid vapours. Dyed colours are very prone to fading Yes

May contain carbonates which are soluble in weak acids. Repair materials (adhesives, fillers, paint etc) may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. High­temperature sensitive: glass and metal expand differently, if heated damage may occur.


Feathers

20 ± 2°C

Fibreglass

20 ± 2°C

Flax

20 ± 2°C

Fur

20 ± 2°C

Gesso

20 ± 2°C

Glass

20 ± 2°C

Glue (animal) 20 ± 2°C Gold (include 20 ± 2°C leaf & gilt) Gouache 20 ± 2°C Hair

20 ± 2°C

Horn

20 ± 2°C

Horsehair

20 ± 2°C

Ink

20± 2°C

Iron (alloys)

2Q± 2°C

Ivory

20 ± 2°C

Lacquer (Oriental) Lead

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10%

50

30

3 months

200

80

6 months

50

30

3 months

Yes

50

30

3 months

Yes

200

80

6 months

300

unrestricted unrestricted

50 ± 5% 200 < 35% 300

80 200

6 months Yes unrestricted

50 ± 5% 50

30

3 months

Yes

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10%

50

30

3 months

Yes

200

80

6 months

Yes

50

30

3 months

Yes

50

30

3 months

300

unrestricted unrestricted

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% < 35%

80

6 months

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 200 10% 50 ± 5% 50

30

3 months

20 ± 2°C

< 35%

300

unrestricted unrestricted

Leather

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10%

Linoleum

20 ± 2°C

Marble

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 20 ± 10%

50 30 (dyed) (dyed) 80 200 (undyed) (undyed) 200 80

Magnetic tape 5 ± 4°C (audio and video) Masonite

20 ± 2°C

Metals (not specified elsewhere) Micro forms (fiche and films)

20 ± 2°C

Mica

20 ± 2°C

Mother­of­ pearl Nylon (Polyamide) Oak

<20 °C

20 ± 2°C 20 ± 2°C

20 ± 2°C

Yes

50 ± 10% < 35%

300

Yes

3 months 6 Yes months

unrestricted unrestricted

50 ± 10%

50

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10%

300 200

50 (display) Nil in storage 50 ± 5% 200

30

200 80

6 months

80

6 months

Yes

20 ± 2°C

Pastel

20 ± 2°C 20 ± 2°C

Photographs

<20°C

Soft metal, prone to physical damage.

Plaster

20± 2°C

Hydrogen sulfide (from atmospheric pollution) causes darkening of lead white. Very susceptible to water damage ­ colour and surface changes.

Plastic (not specified elsewhere)

20 ± 2°C

Plywood

20 ± 2°C

Hygroscopic ­ will crack, warp etc in fluctuating RH. Thermoplastic ­ can be reshaped under application of heat and pressure.

Protective coating system may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. Hygroscopic ­ will crack, warp etc in fluctuating RH. Prone to staining. Substrate can be hygroscopic ­ will crack, warp etc in fluctuating RH. Prone to attack from organic acid vapours. Wax coating provides protection from acid attack. Oil dressed can sweat if it gets too warm. Vegetable tanned leather is prone to red rot. Hardens with age.

Soluble in weak acids and prone to attack by organic acid vapours. Exposure to light can cause discolouration

30 (display) 3 months Nil in storage

Paint

Pearl

May give off formaldehyde which can attack other materials. Protective coating system may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. May be stored with vapour­phase corrosion inhibitors.

use copies only, no use of master permitted unrestricted

20 ± 2°C

May be soluble in weak acids and prone to attack by organic acid vapours. May weaken in high RH. Embrittles and cracks with age. May delaminate from substrate. Low­silica and high­alkali glasses deteriorate in high RH. Repair materials (adhesives, fillers, paint etc) may require lower light levels and restricted display periods.

Soluble in weak acids and prone to attack by organic acid vapours. Acclimatise tape prior to playback. For tapes in frequent use, the recommended storage conditions are 1 5 ± 2°C and a maximum of 40 % RH.

unrestricted unrestricted

Oil paint

Paper and 20 ± 2°C works on paper Papier­mache 20 ± 2°C

6 months

50 30 (display) use copies (display) Nil in only, no Nil in storage use of storage master permitted 300 200 9 months 300

Must be careful not to detach combs from each other when handling. May discolour and embrittle with age.

Hygroscopic ­ will crack, warp etc in fluctuating RH. May give off organic acid vapours which can attack other materials.

Polyethylene 20 ± 2°C and polypropylene Polystyrene

20 ± 2°C

Polyvinyl Chloride (PVC)

20 ± 2°C

Porcelain

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10%

200

80

6 months

Embrittles with age.

200

80

6 months

Embrittles with age.

50

30

3 months

Yes

50

30

3 months

Yes

50

30

3 months

300

200

6 months

Yes

50

30

3 months

Yes

300

200

unrestricted

50 30 (display) 3 months (display), Nil in Nil in storage storage 50 ± 5% 200 80 6 months

50 ± 10%

50 (display) Nil in storage 50 ± 50 10% (display) Nil in storage 50 ± 50 10% (display) Nil in storage 20 ­ 60% 300

Yes

30 (display) 3 months Nil in storage

Rubber (soft) 20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10%

Seaweed

20 ± 2°C

Seeds

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10% 50 ± 10%

Shell

20 ± 2°C

Shellac

20 ± 2°C

Silver

20 ± 2°C

50 (display) Nil in storage 50 (display) Nil in storage 50 200

Hygroscopic ­ will crack, warp etc in fluctuating RH. May give off formaldehyde which can attack other materials. Prolonged exposure to light causes discolouration and embrittlement. Water resistant. Prolonged exposure to light causes discolouration and embrittlement. Soluble in many solvents: liquids and vapours.

30 (display) 3 months Nil in storage

Store separately in a well ventilated area as PVC may give off hydrogen chloride which can attack other materials and catalyse further deterioration.

200

30 (display) 3 months Nil in storage

Repair materials (adhesives, fillers, paint etc) may require lower light levels and restricted display periods Rope may be constructed from many different fibres (organic and synthetic) and should be assessed on a case by case basis. Store separately in a ventilated area as oxidised material gives off acidic vapours. Contact with metals (especially copper) accelerates oxidation.

30 (display) 3 months Nil in storage

Loses flexibility and embrittles with age. Prone to attack by ozone. Oxygen­free or low oxygen storage recommended.

unrestricted Yes

50 ± 10%

Do not touch surface as pastels are generally friable (powdery). Binder will become more fragile with age. Long term storage can lead to loss of lustre. Soluble in weak acids and prone to attack by organic acid vapours. Dulled by salt water. Will fade and discolour with age. Very cold and dry storage preferred. Soluble in weak acids and prone to attack by organic acid vapours. May weaken in high RH. Exposure to light can cause discolouration. Plasticisers can migrate to the surface and contaminate other materials.

30 (display) 3 months Nil in storage

Rope Rubber (incl. 20 ± 2°C Vulcanite and Ebonite)

Tends to discolour and embrittle with age. Will cockle (ripple and distort) in high RH.

30

3 months

Yes

80

6 months

Yes

200

80

6 months

200

80

6 months

< 35%

300

unrestricted unrestricted

50 ± 10% < 35%

200

80

300

unrestricted unrestricted

Spermaceti

20 ± 2°C

Steel

20 ± 2°C

6 months

Stone

20 ± 2°C

50 ± 10%

300

unrestricted unrestricted

Stoneware

20 ± 2°C

20 ­ 60% 300

unrestricted unrestricted

Soluble in weak acids and may be affected by organic acid vapours. Prolonged light exposure causes darkening. Tends to be brittle and damages easily. Distorts in temperatures > 30 °C. Hydrogen sulphide (from atmospheric pollution) causes tarnish > 15 % RH. Protective coating system may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. Protective coating system may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. Some sandstone is alkaline and hence prone to organic acid attack. Repair materials (adhesives, fillers, paint etc) may require lower light levels and restricted display periods. May contain carbonates which are soluble in weak acids. Repair materials (adhesives, fillers, paint etc) may require lower light levels and restricted display periods.


APPENDIX II

News paper Articles

CITIES » DELHI

NEW DELHI, January 19, 2014

Delhi a step closer to earning World Heritage City status MADHUR TANKHA

The Ministry would have to highlight the heritage behind each site and explain that all the proposed sites are being maintained as per the international standards for Delhi to get this coveted tag. According to a senior UNESCO official, the Ministry has to explain why each site is of unique outstanding value. “The Ministry of Culture would have to send Delhi as India’s nomination for the title of World Heritage City by this month end for the UNESCO to decide whether all the sites are being maintained and the city can be given this status. The nomination dossier for Delhi was prepared by the team of experts but it is yet to be submitted officially to the UNESCO,” the official told The Hindu. Noting that the Ministry of Culture is currently examining which nomination dossier to be submitted officially to Paris this year, the UNESCO official said it would have to explain how these sites are different from others. The proposal “Delhi: A Heritage City” was submitted by the Union Government to the UNESCO’s World Heritage Centre in 2012. It is now part of the tentative list. The dossier is currently with the Archaeological Survey of India, which works under the jurisdiction of the Union Ministry of Culture. It was meticulously prepared by the Indian National Trust for Art and Culture Heritage. According to INTACH Delhi Chapter convenor A.G.K. Menon, under whose supervision the dossier has been completed, it was a challenging task. “For the past three years, we have been working on preparing the dossier. A big team of researchers have been working. As far as conservation of sites is concerned, INTACH along with the Government has been maintaining sites at Shahjahanabad. Delhi has so many sites but the problem is how to preserve them.”

The Hindu The Humayun’s Tomb is one of the World Heritage Sites in Delhi. Photo: V.V. Krishnan

Ministry of Culture to send a full-fledged dossier to the UNESCO by January-end Delhi’s quest for earning the prestigious tag of a World Heritage City begins with the Ministry of Culture sending a full-fledged dossier to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) by January-end.

Apart from the three World Heritage Sites — the Humayun’s Tomb, the Red Fort and the Qutab Minar — Lutyen’s Zone has the iconic India Gate, Parliament, Hyderabad House, North Block and South Block. Delhi Urban Development Minister Manish Sisodia speaking to The Hindu said: “As Minister of Urban Development, I think that if Delhi got listed it will be a matter of pride. Even if Mumbai gets listed it will be a matter of pride for me as an Indian.”


He said the dossier has been meticulously prepared and runs into several pages and "also has many annexures attached to it", detailing the sites. On the composition of the team, he said, while nothing has been made official from their (UNESCO) side about its composition, "I'm sure they will send people who understand India, its ethos, and its cultural and economic context."

1/12/2015

UNESCO to examine Delhi's bid for World Heritage City in Sept

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After evaluation of the sites here, the UNESCO will then eventually decide on "inscribing" the city in the World Heritage List, the announcement for which would be made in June 2015.

Monday 12 January 2015 News updated at 12:15 PM IST Home

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"Indian cities cannot be compared with their European counterparts. So, for Delhi's Archives | Jobs Shahjahanabad, which is ancient and yet a living city, an organic city, economic In Bengaluru constraints do impinge upon the conditions of such places. But, I still have positive Partially cloudy vibes about it and we hope for the best," he added.

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You are here: Home » You may also like » UNESCO to examine Delhi's bid for World Heritage City in Sept

UNESCO to examine Delhi's bid for World Heritage City in Sept New Delhi, Jun 29, 2014, (PTI)

A team from UNESCO will be visiting the national capital sometime during September to examine the city's heritage sites, which are part of a dossier sent by India to the world body in pursuance of Delhi's bid for a World Heritage tag. Delhi Chapter of Indian National Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH) had prepared the "voluminous" dossier on behalf of the Delhi government, which was eventually submitted to UNESCO by the Union Culture Ministry in January. The two areas listed in the nomination dossier are -- Shahjahanabad in old Delhi which has the Mughal-era heritage and Lutyens' Bungalow Zone (LBZ) in New Delhi, part of the new imperial capital designed by Sir Edwin Landseer Lutyens and Sir Herbert Baker after the 1911 Delhi Durbar. "We are constantly in correspondence with the UNESCO regarding this and so far what we have got to know is that a team from their side would be visiting sometime in September to evaluate the sites that have been nominated in our dossier," Convener, INTACH Delhi Chapter A G K Menon told PTI. "The visit is likely to be of two to three days during which the team will evaluate the heritage sites to ascertain the claims made in the dossier," Menon said.

Opinion

But, Menon who claims, "tag or no tag", the process of nomination itself has "immensely benefited Delhi already".

nomination itself has accrued benefit to the city, which is an eclectic mix of so many layers of histories. And, so whether it is tourism or projects, it has helped Videostremendously," he said.

The visit also will come in the backdrop of Gujarat's 11th century stepwell 'Rani Ki Vav' and Himachal Pradesh's Great Himalayan National Park (GHNP) having been accorded the coveted tag earlier this month. "I think both our nominations -- Rani Ki Vav (cultural site) and GHNP (natural site) from last year, which have been accepted for inscription, will be a great morale booster India," Menon Bipasha Basuforand Teasersaid. Daboo Ratnani

2015 Calendar Sonam Kapoor at CCL... But, the UNESCO nomination is "not an end in itself", as the ultimate purpose is to

effect "heritage-oriented" policies, and the onus for which lies on the government, he said.

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But, yes, if Delhi gets the nod, it will also provide a "huge impetus" other cities 1/12/2015 UNESCO to to examine Delhi's bid for World Heritage City in Sept

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to go for the same, cities like Varanasi.

But, former ASI Delhi Circle chief K rues not having a single Police stops birthday Chitra Santhe: artKforMuhammed, all http://www.deccanherald.com/content/416643/unesco-examine-delhi039s-bid-world.html in India, and blames it on lack of heritage-protection policies or partyheritage of Farah city Khan... policies detrimental to existing heritage fabric of a city. Subscribe - Deccan Herald's YouTube channel

"Even a small country like Nepal has three world heritage cities including Kathmandu. We may have sent Delhi's name for the coveted tag, but what is the more videos status of heritage in the national capital," he asked.

Most Popular Stories now In the tentative dossier prepared about two years ago, four zones had been nominated, but Menon said, "judging their conditions, we removed Nizamuddin and Emailed Viewed Mehrauli from our list. Also, we took out Connaught Place from the Lutyen's Bungalow Zone list, to not risk our bid, as the market place's character has been Sakshi stokes another controversy, asks commercialised."

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He said the dossier has been meticulously prepared and runs into several pages and "also has many annexures attached to it", detailing the sites.

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On the composition of the team, he said, while nothing has been made official from their (UNESCO) side about its composition, "I'm sure they will send people who understand India, its ethos, and its cultural and economic context."

BSP leader Yakoob Qureshi offers to pay Rs 51 crore Charlie we Hebdo attackersa seminar on management of world heritage cities, and "IntoAugust, are holding

"Indian cities cannot be compared with their European counterparts. So, for Delhi's Shahjahanabad, which is ancient and yet a living city, an organic city, economic constraints do impinge upon the conditions of such places. But, I still have positive vibes about it and we hope for the best," he added.

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an official. Ahmedabad, which was also in the race, hit a roadblock. The expert committee did not clear Ahmedabad's dossier as it was incomplete in some sections though the documentation work was termed excellent, said sources. The committee said Ahmedabad's proposal could be submitted to Delhi, Mumbai in race for Unesco heritage city tag - The TimesUnesco of Indiaafter finishing the incomplete sections as a third priority, if a third dossier is accepted. "The final call will be taken by the ministry by January 31, 2014 based on recommendations by The Times of India Delhi the expert committee," said Dr BR Mani, additional director general, ASI.

1/12/2015

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RELAT ED KEYWORDS: Unesco's-World-Heritage-Status | Unesco-Heritage-City | Rann-OfKutch-In-Gujarat | British-Colonial-Rule

Delhi, Mumbai in race for Unesco heritage city tag Richi Verma, TN N | Oct 12, 2013, 11.45PM IST

AGK Menon, convener of Intach Delhi Chapter which prepared Delhi's dossier said Delhi had a fairly good chance of making the final cut. India can nominate one entry both in cultural and natural sites for world heritage status. In the natural category, Little Rann of Kutch in Gujarat is being considered for nomination, while in the cultural category either Delhi or Mumbai will be nominated. However, if no nomination is made in the natural category then dossiers for both the cities can be sent in the cultural category, said Mani. Stay updated on the go with The Times of India’s mobile apps. Click here to download it for your device.

NEW DELHI: It's a war between Delhi and Mumbai. After months of speculation, the apex world heritage expert committee established by the culture ministry has green-lighted the final dossiers for Mumbai and Delhi earlier this week. Both cities are pitching for Unesco's world heritage status. The dossiers have been sent to Unesco headquarters for a completion check and are expected back in the next few weeks. Once they get the clearance, the ministry will decide which should be India's official nomination in cultural category to be submitted by January 2014 Both cities have launched an extensive campaign to push for the coveted status. Mumbai's nomination — the Victorian and Art Deco ensemble along with the Oval Maidan precinct — comprises buildings belonging to two centuries and architectural styles — the 19th century Victorian Neo Gothic architecture and 20th century's Art Deco. Delhi's nomination — Shahjanabad and Lutyens Building zone — on the other hand, highlights the contrasting lifestyles of two different regimes. Experts say that both dossiers have equal chances of making the final cut. "Delhi's dossier was presented on July 29 and the expert committee recommended few changes through a detailed appraisal note on August 17 which were given to Intach for revisions. The updated dossier was submitted on September 17 and incorporates few of the recommendations ," said a source. "In Mumbai's dossier, the proposed precinct extends from the Bombay gothic buildings lining one side of the ground to the other side that stretches till Marine Drive, in between which lies the largest conglomeration of Art Deco buildings in the world after Miami. Delhi's 'imperial cities' dossier shows difference in architecture, lifestyle and nature of two contradictory time periods in Delhi, one which was under the Mughal empire and the second under British colonial rule," said an official. Ahmedabad, which was also in the race, hit a roadblock. The expert committee did not clear Ahmedabad's dossier as it was incomplete in some sections though the documentation work was termed excellent, said sources. The committee said Ahmedabad's proposal could be submitted to Unesco after finishing the incomplete sections as a third priority, if a third dossier is accepted. "The final call will be taken by the ministry by January 31, 2014 based on recommendations by the expert committee," said Dr BR Mani, additional director general, ASI. AGK Menon, convener of Intach Delhi Chapter which prepared Delhi's dossier said Delhi had a fairly good chance of making the final cut.

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BIBLIOGRAPHY

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