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RCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

SNOBER KHAN UNIVERSITY OF WATERLOO


Snober Khan contact +1(647)-785-4904 snoberkhan.21@gmail.com 79 Wellington St, Cambridge ON Canada


TABLE OF CONTENTS

4

Curriculum Vitae Professional

6 14

Corporate Office Master Planning Competition Academic

20

A Place of Worship

26

The Grand Blues

30

Retruning Wilderness: Center for Environmental Education

34

Delhi Architectural Heritage Museum

40

Transit Oriented Development Personal

46

Graphics

48

Publication


CURRICULUM VITAE

EDUCATION Graduate 2016-18

Undergraduate 2015

Schooling 2009 2007

TECHNICAL SKILLS

University of Waterloo, Cambridge, Canada Master of Architecture

Digital 2D & 3D Revit AutoCAD Adobe Suite: Ps, Id, Ai Google Sketchup Vray Rhino + Rhino Cam

School of Planning and Architecture (SPA), New Delhi, India Bachelor of Architecture (First Class with Distinction) St. Mary’s School, New Delhi Senior School 90.2% (PCM with Fine Arts) C.B.S.E. Board

Manual CNC Laser Cutting

Secondary School 90.8% (with French as additional language) C.B.S.E. Board

WORK EXPERIENCE Architect July 2015 - August 2016

Intern Architect Dec 2013 – July 2014

Intern Architect June 2013

Research Surveyor Dec 2012

Morphogenesis, New Delhi 1- Worked with senior architect on Conceptual design for Master Planning Competition, Bangalore, India 2- Developed Schematic Design, Construction drawings, coordinated with consultants for a high end Corporate Office in Ahmedabad, India ABRD Architects, New Delhi Worked on a variety of projects for conceptual design, correspondence and site monitoring including: South Asian University (Maidan Garhi, New Delhi), SBH Headquarters (Hyderabad), Punj Residence (New Delhi), Two Competition projects- IIT Gandhinagar (Winning) and Michelin Headquarters. Kanvinde Rai Chowdhary, New Delhi Worked on Winning Entry for IIT Kanpur new Research Labs and ongoing projects Dr. Ranjana Mittal (Professor of Achitecture at SPA) 1- Research survey on slums in Khijarabad, New Delhi in December 2012 Title: To Have or Not to have: Socio-environmental inequalities 2- Study, Analysis and documentation of formal and informal markets in New Delhi in December 2012 Curriculum Vitae| Snober Khan


AWARDS

PUBLICATIONS

Fensterbau Frontale India 2015 WON, 1st PRIZE Retrofitting iconic building through sustainable design technologies and facade treatment; Invited and Awarded trip to attend Rosenheim Window and Facade Convention in Rosenheim, Germany

Retrofitting Facade Technologies for Better Efficiency Winning Entry Published in Fensterbau Frontale India Tableaux 9

National Awards for Excellence in Architectural Thesis 2015 Top 10 Finalist Presented Thesis at 10th Annual Award Program of Council of Architecture, New Delhi at Zonal level; Cash Prize Rs. 5000

http://issuu.com/ffi2014/docs/ffi_tab_xi_7dec

Reubens Trophy, NASA (National Association of Students of Archirtecture, India) 2012 Special Mention Work displayed ICON Student Achievement Award, SPA Delhi Work Displayed at Exhibition; Presentation by 10 students of Final year of their work and honourable achievements for representing university at national competitions.

EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

http://issuu.com/ffi2014/docs/ffi_tab_issue_9

Rethinking Window & Facade Systems Conference paper, Fensterbau Frontale India Tableaux 11 Architectural Thesis titled ‘Delhi Architectural Heritage Museum’ published in annual NIASA Thesis Book 2015 by Council of Architecture, India Delhi, An Inclusive City? Seminar conducted and Research paper published at SPA, New Delhi 2014 Historic Gardens in the Contemporary Context Dissertation Published to library, SPA, New Delhi 2013

CERTIFICATION

Organised Student Exhibition at SPA Delhi I-Con 2015; Selected by Head of Department to lead program organisation, design invitations and posters.

Indian Green Building Council Accredited Professional

Attended Seminar ‘Rosenheimer Fenstertage’, Rosenheim, Germany International Convention on Windows, Facade 2015

INTERESTS Sketching, Landscape Painting Reading, Travelling Origami, Yoga Curriculum Vitae| Snober Khan


Professional

CORPORATE OFFICE, Ahmedabad Professional | 6 Morphogenesis


Location Type

Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India Commercial

Site Area Built-up Area

26,040 sqm. (6.4 Acre) 70,310 sqm.

4m

CORPORATE OFFICE Workstation at 900mm height

H

2H

16m Lux levels

750+

Target energy performance for Zydus Office is 40-45kWh.sq.m./yr (70% reduction from GRIHA/LEED Baseline) 200 140

685 620 555

80% reduction in energy consumption from conventional office buildings

490 425 360 295 230

40

165 100

Conventional Office building

GRIHA Base-line Recommendation

Target for Zydus

Energy Performance Index (EPI) on primary energy consumption (kWh/sq.m./yr )

Maximum Daylighting | Glare-free workspaces Floor plate Efficiency : 45,000sqft 65M x 65M

Inference: Floor plate depth may not exceed 16m with a floor to floor height of 4 M Employing efficient lighting fixtures like LEDs can reduce the lighting load on the building by over 70% 16M

42% Daylit

260M

16M 50M x 84M

40M x 105M

30M x 140M 16M x 260M

45% Daylit

130M

50% Daylit

58% Daylit 100% Daylit

Inference: Designing at 45,000sqft, 260M of running length of floorplate is required

16M

130M

65M

Orienting the Floorplates along North-South Axis

Professional | 7


Planning Principles for 45,000sqft Floor plate

1.

Fire staircase

15m

Morphology

2.

Collaborative spaces as a part of circulation

1820m

45m

Collaborative spaces (Meeting rooms, coffee stations, etc.) Cores and services

Efficient floor plate - 45m x 15m -6450 sq.ft

Interconnectivity between departments through collaborative spaces

~60-90 people

Cores and services

Cores and services

Collaborative spaces (Meeting rooms, coffee stations, etc.)

1. North-south office block orientation with west wall occupied by cores/services and collaborative spaces

Cores and Meeting services rooms

2. West Wall articulation to facilitate interaction in between departments by using collaborative spaces such as meeting rooms, coffee stations and storage etc.

Collaborative spaces as a part of circulation

60 - 90 People

60 - 90 People

60 - 90 People

60 - 90 People

3.

Cores and services

Cores and Cores and services services Collaborative spaces (Meeting rooms, coffee stations, etc.)

Cores and services

Cores and Meeting services rooms

3. Staggered articulation of both:  The Office floor plate to optimize the usable daylight area while building character in the built form.  The Spine to maximize the provisioning of meeting & collaborative spaces. 45,000 sqft ideal floor plate Professional | 8


Sustainability: Day Lighting Efficiency Parameters

ECBC Baseline Metrics

Visual Comfort: Efficient Lighting Systems (LEDs)

Design Considerations

% Day-lit living spaces (from available daylight hours)

25%

90%

Efficient Lighting Design (W/sq.ft)

1.1

0.3

Depth of floor plate to ensure 90% daylight

Inferences: Splitting the floorplate into strips of 65M allows for controlled access along with independent operation

3.6 m

1.1 m

4.0 m

16m

Work surface at 900mm height

7.2 m

7.2 m 1.1 W/sq.ft.

Reduction in Lighting Power Density (W/sq.ft)

0.3 W/sq.ft.

Day-lighting Analysis External surface reflectance : 0.60 Inference: Terrace reflectance : 0.80 (Clear Sky condition) Floor plate depth may not exceed 16m with a floor to floor height of 4 :M0.30 Ground reflectance

Daylight analysis of Work Station at 21st June @9am

Employing efficient lighting fixtures like LEDs can reduce the lighting load on the building by over 70% IGBC Guidelines

Maximum LUX Level =4040 LUX Minimum LUX Level = 240 LUX Average LUX Level = 1468 LUX Daylight Percentage = 99.7%

Illuminance levels of a minimum of 110 lux to a maximum of 2100 lux in a clear sky (Uniform sky in radiance) condition on September 21st at 1200

Sep 21st 1200hrs

Second Floor (maximum overshadowing)

Inference Avg. of lux levels of all regularly occupied area >90% of space between 110lux & 52100lux Professional | 9


Sustainability: HVAC Load

Efficiency Parameters

Design Considerations

Orientation : Optimum Orientation for Minimal Solar Exposure

North-South

Robust Envelope Design: Optimal Thermal Properties and Element Proportions

Efficiency Parameters

ECBC Baseline Metrics

Design Considerations

U-value of Walls (W/sq.m.K)

0.44

0.34

U-value of Roofs (W/sq.m.K)

0.26

0.26

U-value of Glass (W/sq.m.K)

3.30

1.04

Max. Window : Wall Ratio (WWR)

60%

≤ 25%

Solar Control: Effective Shading Design Effective SHGC for Glass (Shading)

Resultant Envelope Load*

0.25

0.03 - 0.15

≥ 4.5W/sq.ft.

≤ 1.0W/sq.ft.

*Envelope Load : Design cooling load for HVAC systems

Design Cooling Loads for HVAC Systems

Inference: Cooling Loads on HVAC systems can be reduced by ~80% through efficient design of the building envelope Professional | 10


Design Proposal: Site Planning Service entry Staff entry

50% TRAFFIC Shuttle Bus Route (future)

(500 cars)

Ramps to Basement

Employee / Visitor Loop

Visitor Parking

Guard room Exit

Energy Center

LANDSCAPE BARRIER

OAT Visitor parking

Functional Landscape

Two wheeler parking Visitor & VIP entry & Exit Pedestrian entry

Drop-off

Guard room Ceremonial entry & Exit

Drop-off

Drop-off

Decorative Landscape

Ramps to Basement

Director / VIP Loop

VIP drop off

50% TRAFFIC

Reflecting Pool

(500 cars)

Stepped grass mound Employee Circulation Visitor Circulation

Shrub planting Service road

Director/ VIP Circulation

Vehicular Movement

People Movement

Patterns

Patterns

Green belt

National highway TOP OF WALL 46.05 M

TOP OF WALL 46.05 M TOP OF WALL 44.05 M TOP OF WALL 27.2 M

Side Elevation

Front Elevation

GROUND LVL 1.05 M

Professional | 11


Ty p i c a l F l o o r P l a n

AHU

Handicap Toilet Common Meeting Room Toilets (8 seating)

AHU

Electrical Room Meeting Rooms

LV

AHU

AHU

AHU

AHU Pantry + Casual Coffee st. Breakout area Service Conference lobby Room (16 seating)

Breakout spaces Common Toilets

F i rst F l o o r P l a n Flexible Meeting Rooms (10/12 Seating)

Toilet / Auditorium Change rooms (317 seating)

Indoor sports

Gymnasium

Office Floor plate

Presentation room

Cafeteria courtyard Below

Office Floor plate

First Floor Deck

Data center UPS

AHU AHU

AHU

AHU

Business center lobby below

AHU

AHU

AHU

AHU

Foyer Space Below

Podium Terrace

Foyer

Reception below

Entrance Lobby Below

Waiting Area Below

LV

AHU

Service lobby Common meeting Room (10 seating)

Business Electrical Center Room Toilets Sculpture court below

Common Toilets

AHU Office Signage/ Notice

Office Signage/ Notice

Professional | 12


Column support for OAT structure

+5200 Top of Energy Centre Ground Floor Road Level

LVL +2700

Energy Centre

Basement1

400mm slab as/ structure

Terrace Cafe

Chiller Plant Room

Basement 2

Section B 300 thk general fill for w/p / slopes

150mm deep reflective pool Tower area

400mm slab as/ structure

Mounds as/ landscape

300 fill for Green cover Light weight fill as/mound profile

Void spaces Ramps LVL +2800

TOW +650

LVL +1200

LVL +1200

LVL +1600

B

Green Cover

LVL +2200

Boundary Wall Earth Fill

LVL +3400 LVL +1500

BASEMENT SLAB

LVL +600

A

Section A

Section A

Sectional Views : OAT

Sectional Views : Ramp under mound Professional | 13


Professional

Garden City Masterplanning , Bangalore Professional | 14 Morphogenesis


GARDEN CITY- MASTER PLANNING Location Type

Bangalore, India Master Planning

Site Area Permissible FAR

82,883 sqm. (20.5 Acre) 2.5

Retail Module: Eco-living office

office

office

office

office

office

Shop 2 Shop 1

Shop 2 Shop 1

9m 12m

Retaining Existing ecology: Conserving water canal passing through site Habitat

+ +97.5

Community

+101.5

+97

+

+102.5

Designed greens

=

Lakes and their network in Bangalore in 1924

Site and its surrounding habitat

Habitat at site

Community Greens: Recreational Spaces along canal green buffer ECO - DISTRICT

eco-urban living environment Professional | 15


Built volume

Existing features Taking setback from natural water stream and the high tension line generates a non-buildable green zone

Creating community Intertwined pedestrian green and built form

Creating community

Creating community

Green buffer

Ideal location for collecting water from site

1.Natural Green Buffer | Rain Water Reservoir

Zone 2 favorable for Tower development as • Linear form of site allows for maximizing tower numbers based on orientation for ventilation • Surrounding context is potentially future high rise development

Green buffer

Eco fingers connecting central green buffer to the tower and villa zones

Water Reservoir ZONE 2TOWERS

ZONE 1- VILLAS

Zone 1 favorable for villa development as • site form allows for maximizing number • Southern development is low rise Cluster

2.

Green buffer

Water Reservoir

Villa setting within green link (entries staggered to avoid South entries)

3. Eco Fingers for Un-restricted Pedestrian access | Peripheral Road network

Zoning- Villa & Tower Parking

Main Entrance

Entry plaza Spill over spaces Commercial Old age home Lowest level collecting water from site Existing water stream Villas Green buffer

Residenti al towers

Club

Master Planning: Concept

HT line

Professional | 16


2BHK TYPE A Master Bedroom (11’-8”x 11’-0”)

Bedroom (10’ x 10’6”) Balcony (8’10”x 4’3”)

Toilet ( 8’0” x 5’1” )

Master Bedroom (12’11 x 13’0”)

23900

Toilet (7’10” x 4’10”) Utility (3’10” x 6’)

3BHK TYPE C

Kitchen (7’10”x 7’5”)

Passage (3’7”)

Passage (3’-7”)

Living &Dinning (11” x 16’-3”) Kitchen (7’10”x 7’5”)

Toilet (5’ 2” x 8’4”)

Utility (6’0” x 3’10”)

Bedroom (10’3” x 11’0”)

Toilet (5’1” x 7’10”)

Foyer (3’11” x 5’1”

Entrance 4’9” Wide Lobby

Living &Dinning ( 18” x 12’6” )

Bedroom (10’3” x 11’0”) Balcony (13’10” x 6’2”)

Entrance

2BHK TYPE B

2 + 3 BHK TOWER

40950

2 BHK TYPE A Unit area = 780 sq.ft.

3 BHK TYPE C Unit area =1050 sq.ft. Design Proposal: Managed Residences | Bedroom Look & Feel (1 BHK)

Balcony ( 9’2”’x 4’5” )

3BHK (lux) TYPE D Master Bedroom 12’4”’x11’3”)

Bedroom ( 10’8”x 10’7” ) Balcony (8’10” ’x 6’5”)

Toilet (8’4” x 5’0”)

Passage (3’7”) Toilet (8’6” x 4’10”)

32200 Utility (5’6” x 8’10”’)

3BHK TYPE C

Toilet (7’10” x 5’5”)

Kitchen (8’6” x 7’10”)

Bedroom (11’0” x 10’0” )

Living and Dining (11’9”x 21’3”)

Foyer (4’11” x 5’6” ) Entrance

3 + 3 Luxury BHK TOWER

3BHK (lux) TYPE E 44060

3 BHK LUX TYPE D Unit area = 1250 sq.ft. Professional | 17


Duplex - 3BHK TYPE A

Exclusive Green decks

Duplex 5 Duplex 7 &6 &8

CORE Duplex 3

Duplex 4

Exclusive Gardens

Apartments

Duplex 2

Duplex 1

Tower Villa-Ground floor

Duplex - 3BHK TYPE C

Duplex 5

Duplex 6 CORE

Duplex 8

Exclusive Green decks

Duplex - 3BHK TYPE B

2 + 3 BHK DUPLEX (Lower Level)

Duplex 7

Exclusi ve Garden s

Duplex 4 Duplex 3 &1 &2

Alternate arrangement of tower blocks incorporating microclimate

Tower Villa- Top floor

Duplex - 3BHK TYPE A

Duplex - 3BHK TYPE C

Duplex - 3BHK TYPE B

2 + 3 BHK DUPLEX (Upper Level) Professional | 18


5’-9”

Kitchen (14‘9”x 8’10”)

Servant room (14‘9”x 8’10”)

Corridor (5‘4” wide)

23.25M

Dinning (15‘3”x 11’) Powder room (8‘4”x 5’0”)

Study room (9‘1”x 8’10”)

Drawing room (15‘3”x 17’8”)

Entry lobby (11‘5”x 9’)

Toilet (5’ 4”x 9’2”)

H/4

H/4 VILLA 2

VILLA 1

Dining below

VILLA 1 1,647 sq.ft (buildable zone)

Family lounge (17‘11”x 9’9”)

Toilet (8’10”x 6’3”) Dresser (8’10”x 5’11”)

Deck (9‘8” wide)

Bedroom (12’ 1”x 14’9”)

23.25M

Bedroom (12’ 1”x 14’9”)

23.25M

Toilet (5‘11”x 3’7”)

ADJOINING VILLAS

Toilet (5’ 4”x 9’2”)

VILLA 2

H/2

1,647 sq.ft (buildable zone)

H/2

H

H

12M

H/2

12M

H/2

Plot Area : 12m x 23.25m = 279 sq.m. (3,003 sq.ft.)

Master Bedroom (15‘1”x 12’6”)

12M

Balcony (4‘7” wide)

12M

Unit Area : (G+1) 2600 Sq.ft unit

24’-11”

7 Nos. - 1BHK

2 Nos. - 2BHK

Plot Entrance

11’-6” 3 Nos. - 1BHK

12M

VILLAS

Bedroom (10’0” x 11’6”) Toilet (9’0”x6’7”) Dresser (4’6”x6’11”)

Living and Dining ( 15’1” x 10’6” )

2 Nos. - 2BHK

Kitchen (7’1”x7’1”)

RETIREMENT HOMES

Entrance

Professional | 19


Academic

BAHA’I HOUSE OF WORSHIP Location Type Site Area Built-up Area Project

Cambridge, Canada Institutional 1350 sq.m. 690 sq.m. Term I, University of Waterloo, School of Architecture

A Place of Worship that also functions as the neighbourhood fabric. According a community hub in the downtown Galt to the Bahai faith, it is the century of center of Cambridge, Ontario. light that we are currently observing. Therefore, light played an important part One of the main objectives of the design in development of the architectural parti, was to create an architectural identity in rendering a sacred appeal with the use to associate and distinguish with the of glass facade and perforated patterned Baha’i faith and to a certain extent reflect screens on the outside.

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PLANNING IDEAS

CONCEPT OF FORM

38 M

OUTSIDE TO INDSIDE VIEWS

35 M

Classical Type

Enclosed Gardens

Functions

Classical building type of circle within a square; Meditation hall detached from surrounding functions to preserve sanctity

Landscape as an integral part of the spiritual experience

Separate Entrances for different functional spaces

INNER SANCTUM INDSIDE TO OUTSIDE VIEWS

LIGHT SOURCE

PLANT SELECTION

P1 Serpentine Pavillion, Peter Zumthor: Use of Enclosed Garden

Red Maple The red maple lends a sense of grace and a dash of red to any garden space. White Dogwood Flowering and an ornamental tree.

P2 Building Circulation: Fluidity in movement

Peter Zumthor Serpentine Pavilion

P1

Porosity as a means of welcoming people from diferent backgrounds translated to architecture in the form of vertical columns as opposed to a solid wall. The inner sanctum (meditation space) contained in a transluscent box with the dome as element of surprise hidden inside.

P2

ARCHITECTURAL IDENTITY

DOME WITH NINE SIDED ENTRY Translucent temple in Chile, Hariri Pontarini Architects

POROSITY

Light playing important role adding spiritual value to the place.

Lotus Temple in New Delhi, India, Fariborz Sahba Academic| 21


THE PROGRAM

BLAIR ROAD

Private Residence

Private Residence

GRAND RIVER

A co xis c rn om er an plim d th enti GRAND AVENUE e Ch ng ur the ch

Trinity Anglican Church

Sanctum/ Meditation Hall Gathering space/meditation; Conceived as a quite hall with opportunities for personal meditation as well as group prayers; occasionally be used for lectures/seminars; capacity 5080ppl Library Minimal library space; for people to know more about the Baha’i faith Youth Center Fundraising/ charity events; service group meetings

social

Kitchen/Canteen Occasional food distribution/serving by public volunteers

REAR STREET

SITE PLAN

Discussion Rooms People from the Bahá’í community to combine insights from the Bahá’í teachings with knowledge from other fields of endeavour to effect constructive social change. Exhibition Space To welcome and attract people to the place as an object of interest; And promote local artists Academic| 22


WORSHIP 1. TEMPLE FORECOURT 2. ENTRANCE VESTIBULE 3. MEDITATION HALL 4. GATHERING SPACE/ EXHIBITION 5. REFLECTIVE POOL

LIBRARY 6. LIBRARY ENTRANCE 7. RECEPTION 8. BOOK SHELVES & FORMAL READING 9. INFORMAL READING 10. DIGITAL AREA 11. OUTDOOR READING (SPRING & SUMMER GARDEN)

SECTION A

7

B

6 11 1

8 10

5

2

9

29 3

A

4

28

25

SECTION B

24 17

14

23

13

16

YOUTH CENTRE 12. ENTRANCE 13. RECEPTION DESK 14. MEETING FORMAL 15. MEETING INFORMAL 16. DIGITAL SPACE 17.ENCLOSED GARDEN/ CONTEMPLATION AREA

12

15

18 14

26

21 27

22

CAFETERIA 18. ENTRANCE 19. SEATING 20. COUNTER 21. KITCHEN 22. RECYCLING AREA 23. OUTDOOR EATING 24. STEPPED COURT/SEATING

20

19

SOUTH ELEVATION

OTHER 25. STAFF OFFICE 26. WOMEN TOILET 27. MEN TOILET 28. ACCESSIBLE TOILET 29. MECHANICAL ROOM

WEST ELEVATION Academic| 23


V1

D1

V2 Academic| 24


The architecture of the Bahá'í House of Worship reflects the simplicity, freshness and clarity of the Bahá'í Revelation while also conveying respect for all world religions. All of the Bahá'í Houses of Worship have a dome that symbolizes unity of the diverse world religions. It is a place for all to come together and worship their faith in the spirit of unity.

D1: Detail Section through Curtain wall of Worship Hall; Cable Net connections as a choice for ‘light’ weight structural systems

V3

V1: Gathering Space around the Meditation Hall V2: Meditation Hall informal seating with carpet and cushions V3: Enclosed garden or Contemplation area accessed from Community Hub and connecting vestibules from the Meditation Hall. V4: Entrance to Meditation; Night view V4 Academic| 25


Academic

THE GRAND BLUES Location Type Site Area Built-up Area Project

Kitchener, ON, Canada Hospitality Restaurant 750 sq.m. 2100 sq.m. TRD II, University of Waterloo, School of Architecture

Redevelopment of the site and Former Legion Building in Downtown Kitchener has been visualized as a new social hub in the heart of the city’s tech cluster with a focus on special events, food and local art. It covers a total area of approximately 22,500 sf (2100 sqm) including a restaurant, multi-functional banquet/ seminar hall and an art gallery. With existing and upcoming innovation centers in the downtown core of Kitchener, “The Grand Blues” on 48 Ontario street is imagined as a breakout

zone and socializing spot for the local and tech community. Careful attention is laid to create a place that maintains a fine balance between sophistication and tranquility; a place that is refined but where you can also unwind and relax. The new building program serves as a support facility for the rising startup culture, acting as a hub for sharing ideas, as well as a place of recreation and interaction.

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RETURNING WILDERNESS: CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION Location Type Site Area Built-up Area Project

The word wilderness has several definitions: a large area of wild land, a wasteland, a space of sea or air, a place of danger and difficulty and yet the most intriguing to me is a place of abundance. The Leslie Spit, Toronto befits this definition having found an abundance of ecological diversity. It exists as a unique

Leslie Street Spit, Toronto Canada Institutional 30,000 sq.m. 1,125 sq.m. TRD II, University of Waterloo, School of Architecture

form wilderness in the city that confines treasures of nature. Its potential as an educational tool is only partly recognised. It can be served as an informative playground for children to discover their environment in its most natural form.

Materials that constitute the Leslie spit

RUBBLE-STORM DEBRIS

REBAR AND CONCRETE

COARSE/ FINE AGED RUBBLE

SAND/ SOIL

Vegetation Species BASELANDS

PARK ENTRANCE

Outer Harbour Marina

Bird Species that made Leslie Spit their home after natural succession

HERRING_GULL

DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT

BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON

OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL CLASSROOM

GREAT-EGRET

BIRD RESEARCH STATION Aquatic Park Sailing Club

Existing Vegetation Types

Cell 1 Peninsula C EMBAYMENT C

ENDIKEMENT

Cell 2

EMBAYMENT B

MEADOW

FORESTS, WOODLANDS AND THICKETS

WETLANDS

AQUATIC

Cell 3 Triangle Pond

EMBAYMENT A

East Cove

THE FLATS

Peninsula A

Goldfish Pond TOPLANDS

CYCLISTS

YOUNG ADULTS

ELDERLY

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Education Centre Propsed Adventure Centre (Lake Ontario Park Master Plan 2008) Existing Visitor Center Tree House Overhead Walkway Waterway Portage Marsh Ground level Pathway Trails for pedestrians

9. 10.

Ridge and Trough Forest Parking & Gateway to Tommy Thompson Park

Peninsula B

Locals visiting Tommy Thompson Park

PHOTOGRAPHERS

SITE PROGRAM

SUNKEN WOODS

Endikment tip

Lighthouse Point

0

100

200M

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Academic

DELHI HERITAGE MUSEUM Location Type Site Area Built-up Area Project

Indraprastha, New Delhi Institutional 46,000 sqm. 19,600 sqm. Semester X, Final Year Thesis SPA Delhi

The image of Delhi that persists in the minds of its residents and visitors is that of a city, that is chaotic, overflowing with traffic, has magnificent ancient palaces surrounded by rickety homes, with roads filled with smoke of new age vehicles and street lined by fragrance of the amaltas. The vibrancy and the charm it possess is beyond description, therefore, one must be able to experience it through a physical model - A museum embodying the multiple ages during which Delhi was ruled by several dynasties and the reason for its unique architectural character. The museum building will serve as an educational tool and yet as a tourist destination promoting its cultural and architectural heritage internationally. Chronologically, all cities can be experienced through audio-visual account and display of artifacts, construction material and technologies. Moreover, it will serve as center for public activities such as concerts, temporary exhibitions, conferences, celebration of festivals, etc. functioning throughout the day.

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REVIVAL OF AXIS - CONNECTION TO RIVER

Nine Historical cities of Delhi

The connection to the river has always been important for all historical cities of Delhi. The foundation of some of its earliest cities was done in the triangular patch of land guided by the river on one side and the forest ridge on the other two. Hence, the first concept is framed in order to revive that connection with the river and re-establish the lost axis between two main natural resources of Delhi.

PARIS AXIS CONTINUING BETWEEN LOUVRE MUSEUM TO THE RIVER SIENE AND BEYOND

DELHI AXIS BETWEEN THE RIDGE AND THE RIVER CONNECTED BY RASHTRAPATI BHAVAN THROUGH RAJPATH TO INDIA GATE

SITE

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entrance to museum

axis of culmination

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The New Delhi axis that is continued on the site is treated symbolically. First, a water channel is created at the center of the approach road to the museum resembling the heritage of Shahjehanabad’s moonlight square. This channel visually and physically leads up to a tower reflecting the water symbolising continuity of architectural heritage. Hence, the entrance and approach to the museum perfectly blends two most profound heritage sites of Delhi - Shahjehanabad and Lutyen’s Delhi.

visual axis toward the garden

water channel in visual continuity with the tower Academic| 38


Model 1:500

Context Model 1:3000

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Academic

TRANSIT ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT Location Type Site Area Project

ISBT Sarai Kale Khan, New Delhi Urban Design 3,75,000 sqm. (92 Acres) Semester IX, Final Year SPA Delhi

The entire site is envisaged as a wholesome working entity consisting of multiple transport hubs such as Railway station, Bus depot, ISBT, Metro as well as commercial activities; emphasis is laid on movement of people facilitated through a network of pedestrian pathway on level 1(above ground level) and also through green walkways that connect the whole site.

All cores or intersection points are developed as multiple biospheres of varied dimensionsconsisting of a diversity of flora and fauna Academic| 40


Ring d Roa

Nizamuddin Railway Station Sarai Kale Khan Bus Terminal Urban Village Settlement

Housing development

1

Retaining the LAL DORA urban village community of Sarai Kale Khan.

BUILT FORM

2

Working on a grid; dividing the site into an intergrated grid network

VEHICULAR MOVEMENT

3

Concourse level above ground connects all portions of the site

PEDESTRIAN MOVEMENT

4

De-congesting main road by creating multiple internal access roads

OPEN SPACE-NATURAL SYSTEM Academic| 41


The concourse acts as a gestalt of connecting routes on the site 1. A pedestrian pathway that covers each corner of the site creating easy access for people 2. Connectes major services like local bus terminal, auto stand, etc as well as commercial, recreational activities

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

CONCOURSE LEVEL PLAN Academic| 42


Academic| 43


Academic| 44


Model 1: 1000

Railway Station Part Model 1:200

Academic| 45


Personal

SOME URBANSCAPE RENDERINGS

Watercolour on paper (11”X17”)

Watercolour on paper (11”X17”) Personal| 46


SOME LANDSCAPE RENDERINGS

Watercolour on paper (11”X17”) Watercolour and Ink on paper (11”X17”)

Watercolour on paper (11”X17”)

Pencil on paper (11”X17”)

Pencil on paper (11”X17”) Personal| 47


PUBLICATION + COMPETITION

Personal

http://issuu.com/ffi2014/docs/ffi_tab_issue_9 ; Page 4

Awarded at FFI convention at BIEC, Bangalore by Prof. Dr. P. C. Jain

Won First price in FENTERBAU FRONTALE INDIA competition on Retrofitting building technologies. The entry was published in the Fensterbau Tableaux IX. The project presented several retrofitting strategies for Vikas Minar, a 1970s’ iconic building in Delhi to help reduce its energy consumption by atleast 50%. Strategies including enhancement of daylight, facade treatment, power generation and water management. The process resulted in a 58% reduction in total energy consumption of the building. FFI presented me with an opportunity to attend the Rosenheim STRATEGY 2 Daylighting

Source: Google Maps

View from ITO Flyover

Energy Consumption per month Lighting

45% 55%

View from East Flyway

Other

500

1

Total energy consumption in the building =99216 KWH/month Hence, lighting consumes more than half of the total energy expenditure in the building. Therefore,

7

6

5

4

3

9000

Most important retrofitting area identified is LIGHTING

900 4400 961 1564.948 1859.264 4605.260

sq. m sq. m sq. m sq. m sq. m sq. m

Switching to LEDs

RAMP

OCCUPANCY 40-50 per floor Total no. of employees 1380 No. of cars-250-300

ENTRY

SCOOTER PARKING

CAR PARKING

Present lighting consumption: For 5 working days/week + Gazetted holidays (253 days/year)

VIKAS MINAR, IP ESTATE, NEW DELHI

WATTAGE

Fluorescent tubelight CFL (6500) LED

No. of lamps less required=672 Wattage of 672 lamps= 26880 watt

STRATEGY 1:

LIFE (hours)

BRIGHTNESS/ EACH LAMP (lumens)

LAMP EFFICACY

1X28

20,000

2050

73.2 lm/watt

4X14

10,000

3200

57.14 lm/watt

4X10

50,000

3200

80 lm/watt

Total brightness produced by 6700 lamps (Fluorescent tubelight + CFL)

+

Energy saved = 6800.64 KWH/year

Total wattage consumed (6700 lamps) = 369.6 KW Total wattage after replacing with LED (5000 lamps) = 200 KW Annual energy consumption after replacing = 354,200 KWH = 28,766 KWH/month Energy saved = 3,00,361.6 KWH (45% of existing consumption) New Lighting bill = ₹ 2,01,362 Savings = ₹ 1,80,465 (only by using LEDs) 1/5

Providing occupancy sensor in lighting devices can help reduce wastage of energy wherever not required; depending upon the occupancy of the room

Lighting Energy savings

500000

300000

654561.6

200000

347400

100000 0

ECOTECT model for typical office in Vikas Minar (35ft X 24ft X 10ft) Sill height= 3ft, room glazing= 7ft Shows the contours of the Daylight Factor for a glazing without Light shelf.

VIKAS MINAR, IP ESTATE, NEW DELHI

STRATEGY 1: Since, Delhi is a cooling dominated region, we choose low-solar-gain lowe glass with high visible light transmittance and low solar heat gain

600000

400000

FAÇADE TREATMENT

Use of Low-E Glass

700000

Initial Energy consumption

N Building planVikas Minar

For south and west façade:

Energy consumption after retrofitting

Source:

Double-Glazed with Low-Solar-Gain Low-E Glass with argon gas fill

For north and east façade:

Double-Glazed with Moderate-Solar-Gain Low-E Glass

http://www.elcomaindia.com/Daylighting_PoorvaKeskar.pdf http://www.tlc-direct.co.uk/Technical/Lighting/L1_Regs/Lumen_Complies.htm

Preferred lighting levels in an office

Providing reflective light shelf to improve lighting level in the room

= 3,86,050 lm/watt

Retrofitting strategies

10W T5 Clear Tube LED - Cool White (120°)

After introducing daylighting strategies, we conclude:

Replacing by LEDs, Therefore, No. of LED lights required = 5000 (3,86,050/80 lm/watt)

LIGHTING Considering: All units switched on 7 hrs./day

LAMP TYPE

3000

1. 800lux (0.5m) 2. 640lux (1.5m) 3. 480lux (2m) 4. 320lux (3m) 5. 240 (4m) 6. 160 (6m) 7. 0 (9m) (lux= lumens/sq.m.)

Calculations

BUILDING AREA Typical Floor Area: Basement Area: Roof Area: Exterior Wall Area: Column Area: Glazing Area:

2

Illuminance inside building (calculations from ECOTECT software):

KWH/year

Lighting bill

=644644 KWH/year =654561.6 KWH/year =54546.8 KWH/month = ₹ 3,81,827

STRATEGY 3:

Occupancy sensor in switches

Typical section of room in Vikas Minar showing sunlight penetration (sun angle=45⁰)

=9917.6 KWH/year

2100

200 Fluorescent tubelight (1x28 watt) + 6500 Energy saving CFL tubelight (4x14 watt) Total lighting consumption

900

RETROFITTING PROJECT – VIKAS MINAR, NEW DELHI

Area Filing and copying Writing, typing reading data processing Technical Drawing CAD work Stations Conference and meeting rooms Reception desk Archives

shows the contours of the Daylight Factor for the room with the reflective light shelf.

Lux Level 300

500 750 500 500 300 200

Average external illumination = 8000lux At 0.5m illuminance inside = 800lux (DF=10.0)

Retrofitting strategies

2/5

This type of low-E product reduces heat loss in winter and substantially reduces solar heat gain both in winter and in summer. Thus, low-solar-gain low-E glazings are ideal for buildings located in coolingdominated climates.

VIKAS MINAR, IP ESTATE, NEW DELHI

Personal| 48

These windows are often referred to as spectrally selective low-E glass due to thei ability to reduce solar heat gain while retaining high visible transmittance. Such coatings reduce heat loss and let in a reduced amount of solar gain making them suitable for climates with both heating an cooling concerns.


http://issuu.com/ffi2014/docs/ffi_tab_xi_7dec ; Page 15

Window and Facade Conference in Germany. The conference paper authored by me featured in the Fensterbau Frontale India tableau XI. Speakers from IFT, Rosenheim, Germany and University of Applied Scinces, Munich presented new technologies for sustainability including solar shading, insulation glass and intelligent construction practices and detailing. STRATEGY 2

Shading louvers with PV panels

• •

No of pieces required per floor =32 Total no. of pieces required = 672 Therefore, total installation cost = ₹ 3,36,000

BENEFIT: lifetime of heating/cooling cost saving

1 On the south, east

and west elevation

2

are installed.

2

By installing low-e glass windows 12% of cooling energy consumption can be reduced

North elevation comprises perforated metal louvers

Average cooling load= 32,015 kwh/month (8 cooling month in the year)

Vertical Photo-voltaic shading louver + green wall

1 louver = 300 X 2100 mm Area = 0.63 sq. m.

Energy saved = 3841.8 KWH/month = 30,734.4 KWH/year Vertical Photo-voltaic shading louver http://www.efficientwindows.org/lowe.cfm http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/low-e-glass.html http://www.efficientwindows.org/energycosts.cfm

Fig. 1

3/5

VIKAS MINAR, IP ESTATE, NEW DELHI

1000 watt/m2 at 20% efficiency Area of 1 panel = 0.63 m² Energy produced by 1 panel Energy produced by 1566 panels

= 0.63 X 1000 X 0.2 for 5 (hr) = 630 watt/day = 986.58 KWH/ day

Taking 300 sunny days in a year in Delhi, Total energy produced = 2,95,974 KWH/year Annual energy consumption by building = 11,90,616 KWH Therefore, 24% energy consumed can be produced by renewable sources.

Energy calculations:

Total cooling loads = 2,56,125 KWH/year Solar shading Reduces 21% of the cooling load Energy saved = 53,786.25 KWH/ year

WASTE MANAGEMENT

RAIN WATER HARVESTING

Green wall Saves 0.32 KWH/sq.m. of energy for cooling Energy saved = 7360 KWH/ year

Average annual rainfall in Delhi = 611 mm (24 inches). Roof area = 900 sq. m. Ground area = 3500 sq. m. Maximum water that can be harvested : From Roof = 3,50,000 litres From runoff = 12,83,100 litres Total water harvested = 1,633 KL/ annum

Total Energy Saved = 93.880.65 KWH/year

20 % efficiency ; 1000 watt/m2

Number of occupants = 1380 Greywater (from wash basin, other taps)

= 27.6 KL/day = 6982.8 KL/year

Solar tracking PV shading louvers

Low=e glass windows Energy saved = 30,734.4 KWH/year

Total number of louvers on 3 sides = 1566

ir

Retrofitting strategies

Building view southeast Shadow at 3:00 pm (June 15)

DIRECTING WASTE WATER TO IRRIGATE GREEN WALL

POWER GENERATION SOLAR POWER

Overall depth = 195mm Saturated weight = 35.5 kg/m2 Air gap (green façade/ existing structure = 100mm Rain harvesting tank at surface Water circulation through main electricity supply • 1 tonne CO₂ saving/ 22m2 (Rainwater harvesting system)

PV vertical louvers

South and east façade: 27% heat reduction North and west façade: 39% heat reduction

STRATEGY 3

On the 4 sides of the building (fig. 1)

Reduce solar heat gain Lower air conditioning costs Lessen glare whilst maximising the use of natural daylight.

PV solar louvers- photovoltaic cells integrated between two sheets of safety glass

Energy savings by introducing low-e glass windows :

Green wall

BENEFITS

1 Low-e glass Size = 2100 X 3000 Cost = ₹ 500 per piece

n

a m nd

Conference at KUKO-Kultur+Kongress Zentrum Rosenheim organised by IFT Rosenheim

Annual Water consumption of Vikas Minar = 12,134 KL

http://www.shadinglouvres.com/projects/battery-park/

Greywater from wash basins in the building can be directed through pipes irrigating the green wall on every floor as well as surrounding vegetation on ground floor.

FINAL ENERGY CALCULATIONS: Total energy consumption of = 11,90,616 KWH/year DDA Vikas Minar Total Energy saved = 4,01,042.89 KWH/year New energy requirement = 4,93,599.11 KWH/year Therefore, 58.5% energy reduction has been made possible Final EPI = 24.44 Annual Energy consumption 1400000 1200000

1000000 800000 600000

1190616

58% 493599.11

400000

Annual Energy consumption

200000 0

Original total energy Energy consumption consumption after retrofitting

SOURCE : www.rainwaterharvesting.org/Urban/Practices-and-practitioners.htm http://www.yourhome.gov.au/technical/fs74.html

Retrofitting strategies

4/5

VIKAS MINAR, IP ESTATE, NEW DELHI

Retrofitting strategies

5/5

Personal| 49


Fin. Thank you for reading Snober Khan +1(647)-785-4904 snoberkhan.21@gmail.com

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