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Course Descriptions and the mass media in the policy-making and electoral processes. This course places special emphasis on how the efforts of the framers of the Constitution to solve what they saw as the political problems of their day continue to shape American national politics in ours. POL 211 International Relations (3 credits) This course offers a broad introduction to the study and practice of international relations, including the roles played by states and nations, non-state actors, national interests, power, morality and international law. This course places special emphasis on realism and idealism as alternative approaches to the study and practice of international relations and on their implications for ongoing efforts to construct a peaceful and prosperous global political system in the aftermath of the Cold War. Global Marker. POL 213 Comparative Politics (3 credits) This course offers a broad, comparative introduction to the structure and function of national political systems, with an emphasis on the structural and functional attributes that distinguish democracies from non-democracies and that distinguish the different types of democracies and nondemocracies from each other. The countries covered may vary from semester to semester. Global Marker. POL 301 The United States as a World Power (3 credits) This course explores the nature and consequences of U.S. foreign policy during the “American Century,” as the twentieth century has come to be called, and into the twenty-first century. The course will examine the development and limitations of U.S. foreign policy options in a period punctuated by two world wars, the Cold War and its aftermath, and the emergence and consolidation of the United States as a global superpower and a regional (neo)colonial power. Global Marker. Prerequisite: POL 211 or permission of the instructor. POL 302 Globalization, Community and Culture (3 credits) This course explores the different meanings of globalization in the past and the present, and examines the role of international organizations in the globalization process. It places special emphasis on examining the effect of contemporary globalization on national economies from alternative viewpoints, and on critically evaluating the implications of globalization for the future of local economies, communities and cultures. Global Marker. Prerequisites: POL 203 or POL 211 or both ECO 201 and ECO 202. POL 305 State and Local Government (3 credits) This course explores the structure and function of state and local governments in the United States, with an emphasis on their roles as partners with the federal government in a system of cooperative federalism. This course places special emphasis on how the peculiar features of the American political system shape the ability of state and local governments to cope with issues of pressing public policy concern, such as educational quality, racial discrimination, poverty, criminal justice, and environmental protection. The issues covered may vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: POL 210.

POL 306 The American Legal Tradition (3 credits) This course offers a broad introduction to the American legal tradition, including the structure and function of the courts, the legal profession, legal education, and the politics of judicial selection. As an introduction to what it means to “think like a lawyer” in the United States, students learn how to write a predictive legal memorandum of the type that firstyear law students learn how to write, in which they analyze a legal issue of concern to hypothetical clients by applying the reasoning and conclusions in selected judicial opinions to the facts of the clients’ case. Prerequisite: POL 210. POL 314 Political Theory (3 credits) This course explores the diversity of conceptions of the individual, the state, politics, and “the good life” that animate contemporary societies and their critics, with an emphasis on the contributions of Western political theorists of both ancient and modern times to contemporary currents of political thought. This course places special emphasis on the social and cultural contexts in which these theorists lived and worked as factors that helped to shape their political ideas. The theorists covered may vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ENG 121, and POL 210 or PHL 210. This course is cross-listed with PHL 314. POL 316 Legal Reasoning and the Judicial Process (3 credits) This course explores the reasoning process used by American courts in resolving legal disputes. It is modeled on a first-year law school course. The readings consist almost exclusively of abbreviated versions of U.S. Supreme Court opinions in constitutional cases. Students will learn how to write brief, formal summaries of these opinions of the type typically prepared by American law students and lawyers, and will be expected to participate actively in the type of in-class Socratic dialogues that are the standard method of instruction in American law schools. Prerequisite: POL 306 or permission of the instructor. POL 319 U.S. Environmental Law and Politics (3 credits) This course explores the content of the most important federal environmental statutes and regulations in the United States, as well as the political and legal processes used to produce and implement them. Students learn how to spot the facts that trigger major requirements of these laws, and to analyze strategies for influencing outcomes in the environmental law-making and law-implementation processes. This course is cross-listed as ENV 319. POL 322 Development and the Environment (3 credits) This course focuses on the political economy of development and the related environmental issues. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to issues of political economy and the environment as they relate to development and globalization. Regional and cultural differences in the process of development will be scrutinized and the relevance of the development experience of one region to other regions will be questioned. This course is cross-listed as ENV 322. Prerequisite: ENV 219 or SCI 219, or permission of the instructor. 155

SNHU Undergraduate Catalog 2009-2010  

Southern New Hampshire University 2009-2010 Undergraduate Catalog