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LAWS NELSON • PORTFOLIO


B ACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE • UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE • KNOXVILLE


LAWS NELSON 1869 L aurel R idge D r . N ashville , TN 37215 S.L aw s .N e l s o n @ g m a i l . c o m 615•804•9936


WERTHAN FACTORY • 01 A NEIGHBORHOOD NURSERY • 02 OFFICE BUILDING FOR LEAP • 03 DOWNTOWN ART HOTEL • 04 DESIGN

NEW NORRIS HOUSE • 05


01 This

project was a group assignment during an off campus summer program in urban design

at the

Nashville Civic Design Center. The

primary goal of the studio in

Nashville

was for

the students to acquire a broad knowledge and critical thinking in urban design theory and practice as an essential component of a professional education in architecture.

The site was north of Germantown at the old Werthan Packing Plant. The production of the plant was moving to a new facility outside of the city, leaving behind a thirteen acre piece of property. With the existing Werthan Lofts on one side of the property and a large park on the other side, the idea of this project was to have mixed use spaces as well as a large outdoor recreational area which would bring the park into the site from across the street. as a gathering place for the greater

Germantown

area.

This

area would be used

By acknowledging the surrounding urban fabric, the design of this project tried to incorporate some of the major things that the Germantown area was missing.

WERTHAN FACTORY NASHVILLE, TN DAVIS • SUMMER 2011


01 The

site connects to the greenway which allows residents to walk or bike to downtown.

The

green space also allows for a termination point that would also be a destination for bicyclists coming from downtown

Nashville. The

perspectives show the available commercial areas on

the ground level along with the residential spaces above with balconies that overlook the open gathering areas.

Street

parking and bike lanes would help to reduce the speed of traffic and

allow for a more pedestrian friendly environment.


01


02 Fourth

and

Gill

is a historic neighborhood north of downtown

Knoxville. Like

many older

neighborhoods closer to urban centers, it has seen a revitalization in recent years. the new residents are young families that have small children. nursery in the

Fourth

and

Gill

This

Many

of

project was a children’s

neighborhood. It was open to children ranging from infants

to five years old and was designed as a place for education and social interaction.

The

site was a surface parking lot at the end of a row of buildings.

A previous structure The design was to be an infill building so the existing buildings.

stood on the property, but had been demolished. parameters were determined by the remaining

The

design of the building was to create an appropriate infill structure, as well as a space for

children.

The idea was to establish a wide range of developmental stages and to have a balance

of interaction and separation of the areas, both indoors and out, between the different age children.

A NEIGHBORHOOD NURSERY KNOXVILLE, TN AMBROZIAK • FALL 2008


02


02 This

model was hand made without the

use of a laser cutter or

CAD

program

and was designed to fit into a larger site model that was constructed by the entire studio.

The building is laid out on

a nine square tartan grid system and is three stories tall.

The

structure shares

a wall with the adjacent building.

In

the rear of the lot the building’s facade

was removed to expose the structure and allow for a play area outside, but within the building.


As

the child grows older, they move to the upper levels so that the older children are in the

upper classrooms while the infants are in the lower ones.

The design of the classroom had to

take into account that the room would have to serve many different purposes such as eating, playing, sleeping and learning.

The

rooms were divided into different sections with a series

of stationary and movable storage bays that were as tall as an average child.

This

allowed

the children to better recognize the division of space, but allow the caregiver to have an unobstructed view of the entire space. In addition to the child size partitions, lower windows were used to allow daylight in and give the children views to the outside.


02


03 During this semester each studio paired with local engineers for both structural integrations, code compliance and LEED credits. Each student had to deal with structure, fire egress, ADA and building code requirements. This project was a multi-use office building in downtown Knoxville. The building was comprised of retail on the bottom level with large office space on the upper four floors. The international building code was used to determine fire rating and egress requirements for the different building types within the structure.

ADA

appropriate bathrooms and egress travel distances

to legal fire exits were required throughout the building, and were overseen by the assigned engineers in each studio.

The project also explored basic LEED credit requirements. The building offers raised floor panels that deliver conditioned air through individual vents, allowing control of the amount of air flow to specific work areas. Additionally operable windows were used to allow for fresh air within the space. The floor plates are long and narrow to allow for better light penetration to the north side of the space, as well as increased ventilation. Sunscreens mounted on the exterior of the building help to block direct sunlight and to reduce glare. The

integration of structure, code and accessibility allowed for a better exploration of the

design process and a more complex design solution.

OFFICE BUILDING FOR LEAP KNOXVILLE, TN MARTELLA • FALL 2010


03 Along

with fulfilling all building codes, parking requirements were also explored.

The

design has parking located in the rear of the property, taking advantage of the alley, with the appropriate amount, size and location of parking spaces. minimum to comply with transportation.

LEED

Parking

spaces were kept to a

credits and to encourage visitors to use alternate forms of


03


03 The

building has cores located on both ends with a central stair and elevator core located

close to the center.

The facade is tied to the layout. The elevator shaft is a vertical break in the The column gird is held throughout the

floor plates that splits the structure into two pieces.

facade and the window openings reflect the layout of the interior between work areas and non-work areas.


03 The

building has a large facade facing the street to hold the urban edge of the adjacent

structures.

A large opening on the ground level helps to draw pedestrians into a landscaped The northwest side of the office area is reserved for closed spaces with solid walls, while the southeast side is more open with glass partitions allowing more natural light. area in the back.


Part of the integration process was to calculate sun angles on both

the winter and summer solstices.

Vertical

solar shades were applied

on the northwest facade to shade the

building

from

are

horizontal

the

western

setting sun in the summertime. solar

There

shades

on

the southeast facade to shade the building from the southern light in the winter when the sun is at a lower angle.


04 This luxury art hotel was part of a project that encompassed thirteen different sights throughout downtown Nashville. All of theses sites were located along the route of the proposed metro bus rapid transit line running from Vanderbilt University across the Cumberland River to east Nashville. The sites were chosen to give each student a unique design and program opportunity. With the individual sites, the students were required to learn about their own specific zoning codes for each of their respectable areas, allowing their own specific setbacks and height requirements. The

structural design of the eleven story building was to frame the downtown skyline view

The

opening is eight stories tall with a large inhabitable truss at the top containing the hotel

which is visible from the large covered walkway of the convention center across the street. restaurant.

The

framed area also allows for sunlight to enter the interior courtyard located

on the roof of the second story, offering hotel guests views from the interior rooms as well.

The

design takes advantage to the three major components of the site, being the bus rapid

transit system, the

Music City Center

and the unobstructed views of downtown

DOWNTOWN ART HOTEL NASHVILLE,TN DAVIS • FALL 2011

Nashville.


04 The

site is across the street from the new

1.2

Music City Center and plan. The ground floor has

million square foot

is specified as a potential hotel location in the center’s master

available retail space wrapping the exterior. It would also offer smaller conference areas that would be available to guests who would not need the space of the

Music City Center.


04 The

building’s proximity to the city’s art center,

to the southwest, provides the opportunity for

the hotel to offer permanent and temporary art exhibits.

The Nashville

northeast of the site.

Ave. South

skyline is visible to the

The

intersection of

Demonbreun St. is a major Music City Center. of downtown Nashville is visible large opening on the facade. and

intersection surrounding the

The

skyline

through the

8th


05 In 1933

Tennessee Valley Authority constructed a model community, Norris, Tennessee, as part of the Norris Dam construction project. A key feature of this New Deal village was the Norris House, a series of homes built as models for modern and efficient living. In light of the 75th anniversary of the Norris Project, an evolving interdisciplinary team of UT students and faculty reinterpreted the Norris paradigm and created a New Norris House - a sustainable home designed for the 21st century. In 2009 the New Norris House was one of six winners nationally of the Environmental Protection Agency’s People Prosperity and the Planet (P3) Competition. It offers a replicable model for contemporary sustainable living that holds the promise of significant benefit across east Tennessee. the

As with the original Norris designs, the New Norris House uses state of the art technologies and techniques. The house incorporates green materials, leverages energy conscious design strategies, and utilizes offsite construction methods. Yet the challenge goes beyond the creation of a model home design. The house design responds to and is reforming community and legal constraints that currently deter sustainable home construction. To accomplish this, students consulted with community residents, researched local codes and worked with local and state government. The project also addressed affordability and “fit” in light of median home prices and the town’s status on the National Register Historic District. Students

thus confronted and resolved not only technological or scientific challenges, but

also legal, social, and aesthetic issues that currently restrict green construction.

The New Norris House is registered with the US Green Building Council as part of its LEED for Homes program, and is on track to attain a Platinum Rating. If successful, it will be the 5th LEED for Homes Platinum project in the state of Tennessee.

NEW NORRIS HOUSE NORRIS, TN FRENCH • SPRING 2011


05


The house is situated gently on a slope, mediating the street and the wilderness behind. The house is neither at odds with the site nor part of it, but rather in the in-between. It seeks a sensitive relationship to the site, leveraging the normative quality of the typical form of Norris homes, and a subtle understanding of environmental issues and systems integrated for performance and experience. house

seeks

Through

to

low-tech means, the

minimize

its

environmental

impact and to improve performance, while also improving the quality of life.

Working

with

the industry partner and non-faculty architect, students negotiated resolution of construction details to be compatible with the manufacturing process.

Students

quickly realized that many

drivers in this process concern efficiency and replicable construction techniques.

While

this

sometimes drove the revision of details, there was compromise that included the industry partner’s desire for quick product turnover and technical simplicity, but also satisfied the student’s original design intentions.


05 My

contribution to the project was during the construction

phase.

Once the building was on site and weather tight half of

the studio started work finishing the interior while the other

half worked on constructing the decks, counter tops and cabinets at an offsite workshop. windows, doors and siding

I

I was involved with installing on the exterior. On the interior

was responsible for finishing the drywall and laying the

hardwood flooring, as well as some minor electrical work in the kitchen.


BARN WOOD PAVILION • 01 CONSTRUCTION

SIDING RESTORATION • 02


01 This structure replaced a previous chicken coop, retrofitted to be used as a carport, that stood on the same site. The carport had been damaged by a tree taken down in a storm. The project was an exercise in building fundamentals, as well as the entire design and building process. The site is located on the property of an antebellum farm house with separate buildings remaining from when it was a working dairy farm in the mid

1800’s

to the

1970’s. The

design of the

facade was inspired from one of the oldest of these structures which was the original carriage house that, due to neglect, is beyond repair and will eventually be demolished.

Before work could be done the previous structure had to be demolished and removed from the site. After the site was cleared the design process began with a series of sketches that were discussed with the clients. After the basic layout and design was agreed upon the sketches were digitally rendered in a BIM program and shown again to the clients for a more accurate depiction of the final product. After the drawings were finalized they were taken to a local building materials and services supplier for a materials estimate. The

facade of the structure was constructed with one hundred year old barn wood that was

salvaged from the stalls inside of the dairy barn on the property.

Once

finished the reclaimed

wood and the design helped make the new car port look as if it had been built the same time as the other structures on the property.

BARN WOOD PAVILION MURFREESBORO, TN LNC • FALL 2012


01


The structure is 20’ wide, 30’ long, and 16’ tall allowing for four vehicles to be covered at once.

The

detail drawings were done on

site to better understand the more unique connections in the roof system. site was prepped the in concrete

6’

6”

x

6”

on center.

Once

the

posts were sunk

Using

a rotary

laser mounted on a tripod the posts were cut to the exact height needed to make the roof level.

using

The ribbon joists were then attached 7” lag bolts and bolted through the

posts that had been notched at the top to allow for the joists to sit flush.

After

the

ribbon joists were in place, the ceiling joists

were attached using screws and rafter ties.

The joists were 2” x 10” and spanned the 20’ so that there were no posts supporting

the center allowing for maximum parking efficiency.


01


The ridge beam was assembled in sections with support posts made from doubled 2” x 4” lumber and attached to the face of the ceiling joists. Once the angles for the rafters were calculated one was made that was used as the template for the others. To avoid excess waste the entire length of the rafter was used by only cutting the angles off the ends. A purlin system was used to attach the metal Galvalume® roof panels.


01 Once

the barn wood was removed from

the stalls it was de-nailed and had the rotten ends cut off.

The prepped wood was

laid out then sanded and scrubbed with soap and water.

After

it had dried, all of

the reclaimed wood had two coats of a natural oil based sealer applied and then

a semi-gloss spar varnish rolled on last.

The

sealer and varnish brought out the

original tones in the old wood, as well as highlighting the unique saw marks.


02 The

siding on this house was in need of repair from years of not being in direct sunlight.

later addition had caused the area around the window be shaded.

A

This caused the siding and The project originally required replacing only a few boards but the more removed the more apparent the damage was.

window frame to rot. siding that was

By

the end of demolition ten feet of the siding had been removed.

window and level with the roof line of the addition.

This area was above the The slats on the old part of the structure

were five quarter board and had to be replaced with the same size to match the existing exterior.

MiraTEC

trim was used to replace the rotten boards to help prevent the area from

needing future repairs.

Once the siding was replaced the ends were sealed with calk and flashing was installed above the window frame and on the window sill. Finally the entire area was scraped primed and then painted. With the extra steps that were taken the repaired area should last in this shaded space.

SIDING RESTORATION MURFREESBORO, TN LNC • SPRING 2012


02 Once

all of the damaged siding was

removed the wall cavities were vacuumed while they were exposed.

The

trim was

removed from around the gutters and the gutters were reattached.

An

area

of the sheathing in the corner of the building had to be cut out and replaced with new

OSB. The

window trim was

also rotten on the bottom and had to be repaired.

The

trim was replaced with

pressure treated lumber.

Debris

from the

gutters, that had overflowed and washed

into the eaves space, was removed and cleaned out.

The MiraTEC

siding was

installed from the bottom up and was fitted under an existing board.

Careful

attention was taken to make sure that all of the boards were level and spaced the same distance from one another, in

order to match the rest of the exterior.

The

ends of the replacement siding were

primed and painted to prevent the boards from wicking.


EDUCATION UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE: COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN Bachelor of Architecture Cumulative GPA: 3.2 Design GPA: 3.7

DECEMBER — 2011

CERTIFICATES AND AFFILIATIONS LEED Green Associate Construction Specifications Institute National Trust for Historic Preservation Member of Greater Nashville Area Realtors® LICENSES BC-A Residential Contractor BC-b Small Commercial Contractor Real Estate Agent: Affiliate Broker EXPERIENCE VILLAGE REAL ESTATE SERVICES: NASHVILLE, TN Proficient in the use of all current TAR contracts Adept at RealTracs online MLS service Represented clients as a Designated Agent for the Buyer NASHVILLE CIVIC DESIGN CENTER: NASHVILLE, TN Participated in an off-campus design studio at Nashville Civic Design Center Focused on urban planning and downtown redevelopment Presented an adaptive reuse project of a factory Attended the Power of Ten Summit NEW NORRIS HOUSE: NORRIS, TN Constructed LEED for Home Certified Platinum house Installed drywall, windows, doors, siding, and hardwood flooring Studied sustainable building methods Received Faculty Letter of Excellence for participation LAWS NELSON CONSTRUCTION: NASHVILLE, TN Licensed Residential Contractor Licensed Small Commercial Contractor Established small business: Laws Nelson Construction NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORICAL PLACES: WALTER HILL, TN Assisted MTSU Center for Historical Preservation in research Achieved approval of the Searcy-Matthews-Tarpley Farm

SPRING — 2012

SUMMER — 2011

SPRING — 2011

WINTER — 2011

2010 — 2011


LAWS NELSON 1869 L aurel R idge D r . N ashville , TN 37215 S.L aw s .N e l s o n @ g m a i l . c o m 615•804•9936


Laws Nelson • Portfolio  

Portfolio of undergraduate work at the University of Tennessee College of Architecture and Design

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