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CONTENTS INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS INTO METTER 9 PUMPING 14 IF YOU BUILD IT, THEY WILL COME 18 FROM FARM TO FORK 22 HOW ‘BOUT THIS DAWG! 27 METTER’S MOVERS & SHAKERS 44 MAN OF POWER 48 BAKING METTER BETTER 50 CANDLER’S CASH CROP 52 CANDLER’S KEEPER 57 INNOVATION STARTS HERE 67 FAMILY STYLE FILL UP 72 LITTLE DIAMOND KINGS 74 RIGHT ON TARGET 78 BUILDING A BETTER YOU 83 UNTO THE LEAST OF THESE 98 CANDLER AT A GLANCE 103 CHAMBER MEMBERSHIP DIRECTORY CPE America / Everdigm Clifton’s / Days Inn

Metter Farm Market Kennedy Dekle

Brent Carter, Jaime Riggs, Hannah Mullins, Bill Lindsey, Mandi Cody, Catherine Muse & Kendall Gross

PRODUCTION

STAFF CARVY SNELL Publisher JERRI GOODMAN Editor JAIME RIGGS Executive Director Metter-Candler Chamber of Commerce Editorial and Design Consultant KRISSY EDENFIELD Advertising & Publication Layout Designer Sales Consultant

Brad Jones, D&S Electric

MANDI CARTER Sales Consultant

MaMa E’s Home Bakery

SELBY CODY-VOSS Copy Writer

Tobacco

MATTHEW GAINOUS Copy Writer

Barbara Hunnicutt

SUZANNE TYSON Copy Writer

Innovative Learning Center

FRANK FORTUNE Photographer

Welcome to Metter and Candler County! It has been an honor to serve as the 2015-2016 Chairman of the Metter-Candler Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. It is our mission to strive for the betterment of our community and advancement of each chamber member. This duty would not be possible without our Executive Director, Jaime Riggs, and the entire welcome center staff. The annual production of the Metter-Candler County Magazine serves as a vital tool in showcasing all that our community has to offer. It is my hope that the 2016 publication of the magazine will provide visitors and local residents with an opportunity to learn more about this great community in which we live and work. Many local leaders willingly work on this project each and every year, something that should make us all proud. Without these local businesses and Chamber members this great magazine would not be possible. I hope that you will use this magazine as a guide to planning for your family’s dining, recreation, shopping and health care needs as we all continue to think local and support our MetterCandler County community. It is truly a blessing to live, work and raise a family in Candler County! Sincerely,

Luke Lanier

Cherbe Dekle

Vipers Baseball

4H BB Gun Team Fitness

How Faith Feeds Candler County

Community Statistics, Leadership Information Benefits, Board Leadership, Directory

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SWEET LIFE OF A BEE WHISPERER Kelley Honeybee Farms Chamber Member Designation

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FULL STEAM AHEAD Art Education

This award winning publication was produced by Snell Press, a division of Snell Publications, Inc., in cooperation with the Metter-Candler Chamber of Commerce. For information on custom magazines, brochures, photography, presentation packets, post cards, and other marketing and promotional opportunities, please call or visit our website. All materials furnished or used are to the best of the publisher’s knowledge true and correct. Liability cannot be assumed by the publisher for errors, omissions, or misrepresentation of information supplied by individual advertisers. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express written consent of the publisher; violators will be billed appropriately and prosecuted if necessary.

ON THE COVER

The Clifton family (l-r) Reed, Emily, Wes and Traci enjoy a southern meal on the pond, while daughter Morgan is away cheering for the UGA Bulldogs.

SNELL

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©2016 Snell Press 15 South Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6566 www.mettergraphics.com


Greetings FROM METTER

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ver 50 years ago, the slogan “Everything’s Better in Metter!” was born. And it has stuck around all these years, but not just because it’s a catchy verse. The slogan is also a motto for local residents and businesses. And it is also a mission statement. Hometown spirit and community pride are evident throughout town. A drive along the divided roadways in the Historic Residential District is proof that residents love their hometown. For even more proof -- just attend a Friday night football game. That’s when the whole community comes out to support their Tigers -- and to catch up

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with friends and family! The folks of Metter truly feel that “Everything’s Better!” Here, Southern hospitality is still the first order of business. Metter is unique in this respect. Southern gentility is a way of life, but so is big city living. While some residents may live on acres of lush property, far away from the nearest neighbor, they are still only a few minutes away from all of the offerings of nearby metropolitan communities. Just 20 minutes away is Statesboro, Georgia, and the sprawling Georgia Southern University. In an hour, you can find yourself in beautiful historic Savannah or Coastal Georgia and the Golden Isles. Macon is a

little over an hour westward and in three hours you can be in Atlanta. Situated on I-16, Metterites find themselves with easy access to an abundance of cultural opportunities. And if you prefer time in the Great Outdoors, well, Metter has just what you need, too. Recreational opportunities can be found at George L. Smith State Park, 15 minutes away, and Gordonia-Alatamaha State Park, which is 30 minutes away. Metter is the county seat of Candler County and is nestled in the heart of the South Georgia Magnolia Midlands. But Metter is also so much more! Metter is not just a town -- it’s a way of life, a better way of life!


pumping international business into metter

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etter, Georgia, is not home to those highrise buildings that fill the skyline of major metropolitan areas. But Metter is home to the company that helps make construction of those high rises possible. In 2015, CPE America made Metter the headquarters for its North American base of operations. And from this Metter location, equipment is made that can reach up to 200 feet! CPE (Concrete Pump Engineering) specializes in concrete pumps that are used in construction projects from housing to commercial and industrial. everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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For about 15 years, he owned the parent company, CPE Australia. But Sebastian Falzon, president of CPE America, said the improving economy in the United States led to the decision to locate in America. Then came the process of determining where exactly to locate a base of operations. The decision to move specifically to Metter came through a careful selection process that began in January of 2015. “We needed to be near a port that handles flat racks and containers,” Falzon said. “We also needed to be close to the interstate, but not more than an hour from the port. We wanted to be in a right-to-work state and in a small community. This is a family business, so we want to be good corporate citizens.” Additionally, Georgia’s temperate climate had its own appeal, Falzon said, because northern states are snowed in several months each year. Other sites considered at that time were Charleston, South Carolina; Savannah, Georgia; Jacksonville, Florida; Allendale, South Carolina, and Houston, Texas. The Georgia Ports Authority and Georgia Power, along with the dedicated team from Candler County Industrial Authority, Metter-Candler Chamber of Commerce, the City of Metter, and Candler County helped seal the deal for the local community. “It was through the diligent work of your team here that we selected Metter,” Falzon said.

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Falzon accredited Candler County Industrial Authority Executive Director Hannah Mullins for her involvement in the project. “We give accolades to Hannah for what she has done,” Falzon said. “Hannah proved to me that you are a better community to work with.” And now that the Metter location is firmly established, Falzon said it is time to look to the future. “I think we are at a point of industrial growth in America,” he said. “We are investing heavily here because we believe there is a future. Seventy-five percent of concrete pump operators are within 12 hours of here. Logistically, we are in a good position to reach our customers. We have a vision, and our vision is not to be someone that follows. We want to lead from the front.” CPE America, which is located in the I-16 Industrial Park on Lytell Street, is the authorized distributor of Everdigm

concrete pumps, which also established its first North American presence in Metter at the CPE location in 2016. CPE America sells Everdigm pumps and provides spare parts and service to customers across America for all makes and models of concrete pumps. Everdigm, which is based in South Korea, is an international leader in concrete pumps, hydraulic attachments, tower cranes and more. From the Metter location, they operate as Everdigm America, Inc. and will import assembled pumps from South Korea. CPE America purchases the assembled pumps and mounts them onto trucks to be sold for construction projects nationwide. “We do the manufacturing and importing and CPE America does assembly and sales,” explained Anthony Chang, sales manager for Everdigm America. everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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It was the year 2000 and Sebastian Falzon was semi-retired from working with a major multinational business. Now it was time for a new challenge for Falzon, who wanted to venture into a different field. So, he bought a business that specialized in pumping concrete. Over time, while increasing his business, he went to South Korea to the Everdigm company, from whom he bought the majority of his pumps. “I became the first Everdigm dealer in Australia,” Falzon said. That was around 2002-2003. At that time, he realized he was ready for a new business challenge. He stopped pumping concrete and started investing in the engineering side of the business. He engineered and sold the pumps, and “it was very successful in Australia,” Falzon said. The partnership with Everdigm grew and about 18 months ago, the South Korean based company approached Falzon with the possibility of expanding to the American market. From those discussions, CPE America was born. And for the most part, the venture has paid off remarkably well. “It is as good as, if not better than, we thought it would be” in many areas, Falzon said. “With the economy as it is right now, we are doing as well as we can expect.” There is one problem, Falzon said, and that is finding employees with the correct skill set. “We need truck mechanics and auto electricians,” he said. That’s why CPE America is partnering with the Department of Labor and regional technical colleges to identify prospective talent for the position. “We will train them from the ground up,” he said. But otherwise, Falzon said, “All that we thought Metter would be for us is working fine – it’s spot on! The community is welcoming and we have established our supply chain.” And with the right personnel in place, there is no limit to Falzon’s expectations. “A company can grow when the people grow,” he said.

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IF YOU BUILD IT, THEY WILL COME From a field of dreams to an interstate success

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he I-16 interchange at Exit 104. The single biggest stop between Savannah and Dublin and a favorite destination for motorists who typically plan a break in Metter. And it’s no wonder! With so many nationally-known fast food options and convenience stores, Exit 104 offers drivers a chance to gas up, dine and lodge with easy access to the interstate.

WHEN I-16 OPENED IN THE LATE 1970S, the Metter exit was nothing more than rolling fields with the Jay’s Dairy Park restaurant as the only attraction. Until the early 1980s, that is. Local farmer Ralph Clifton had been renting farmland around the interstate from Emma Trapnell and was daily plowing the fields -- and daily watching the growing traffic on I-16. About that time, a small tract of land (actually about 0.92 acres) came up for sale by Frank Lanier Jr. and Ralph knew he couldn’t pass up the opportunity. “I bought it,” he said, “but I didn’t know what to put here.” 14 |

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GOLDEN LOCATION ARCHES BECKON I-16 TRAVELERS

With no definitive plan and no real retail experience, Ralph decided to take an all-or-nothing approach, and he and wife Melinda dove head-first into the convenience store business, opening Clifton’s in 1984. “We didn’t know what we were doing,” Ralph said, “and we worked a lot of hours.” The business became a family enterprise and daughter Leigh and son Wes, then a student at Metter High School, were called on to do their part as well. In fact, Wes remembers nights at work when only one or two customers would come in. “People (on I-16) would see that one single light and stop,” Wes recalled. “They thought we were in the middle of nowhere,” Ralph added. “They didn’t realize Metter was right down the road.” Over time, the Clifton stop became better known and the customer count showed a steady increase. In the meantime, Ralph knew he was situated in an area full of possibilities and began researching possible expansion opportunities for his family business. Emma Trapnell had land for sale, and Ralph seized the opportunity. Then came time to decide what would most appeal to motorists, and Ralph started thinking of fast food establishments. And, Ralph knew, nothing could attract travelers more than the Golden Arches of a McDonald’s. But getting a McDonald’s to Metter wasn’t as simple as it sounded. Ralph soon learned that one didn’t just “open a McDonald’s” and that priority

was given to current franchise owners over prospective ones. Negotiations began, and in 1989 Findlay Investments of Vidalia opened McDonald’s of Metter on land that the Cliftons own. To this day, McDonald’s, now owned by Griner Investments, continues to lease the property from the Cliftons. Now, motorists could take a slight dip down into the entrance of the Clifton’s store and get gas and food. It was time for Ralph and his family to look into other ventures. One opportunity presented itself not long after son Wes graduated from the University of Georgia and returned to Metter – a motel. The family considered opportunities and went into the lodging business, building a Holiday Inn Express in 1996. For 15 years, Wes served as the main manager of the hotel, but then Holiday Inn Express changed its branding from an exterior corridor design to an interior corridor design. In order to continue with Holiday Inn Express, the Cliftons would have to go back to the drawing board and undergo extensive -- and expensive -- renovations. Instead, the Cliftons opted to rebrand and became part of the Days Inn family five years ago. And in between all this, in 2005, Zaxby’s also found a home on Clifton property, giving travelers and the local community more dining options. Today, the interstate traffic is constant; convenience stores abound and dining opportunities are seemingly endless. But in the middle of all the new businesses at the bustling interstate sits that first business. The Clifton’s convenience store, which has been added to three times, still takes center stage as motorists dip down that small hill to find just about anything and everything a traveler could need.

In the heart of all the busyness of the I-16 Exit 104 interchange is McDonald’s of Metter. The Golden Arches are often a siren’s call for motorists. Owner Kevin Griner takes pride in the role McDonald’s plays in serving families along the interstate -- and families that live right here in the community. The Metter McDonald’s was built in 1989 by then-owner Tom Findlay, who operated the restaurant until Griner purchased it in 2006. Before entering the world of fast-food dining, Griner was in the medical field for 10 years. In 2003, he left that career to become a McDonald’s owner/operator. The Metter location was his first after being approved by the McDonald’s franchise in 2006. He now owns and operates five locations. Each restaurant has a different clientele. Several are “hometown” eateries, where the majority of diners are local folk. Others, like the Metter location, have a dual role -meeting the needs of hurried motorists and being a part of the local community. “A typical ‘hometown’ McDonald’s will see approximately 70 percent of their guests in the drive through,” Griner said. “Metter McDonald’s, being an interstate store and a standard ‘bathroom break,’ will see slightly more than 50 percent of customers inside the store. This requires a balanced approach to our regular ‘hometown’ customers and our diverse travelers.” While satisfying the needs of interstate travelers, Griner also takes seriously the role of McDonald’s as a corporate citizen in the Candler County community. “In my opinion, a ‘community business’ is not that as a result of its customer base. It is as a result of its employees and administrative team. As an owner of a business in Metter, I understand the responsibility to give back. I feel it is the giving back that makes us a ‘community’ business.”

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ost people will agree that there’s no comparison in taste between canned vegetables and vegetables brought in fresh from the garden or field. Many folks in Candler County grow their own vegetables in family gardens or visit local “You-Pick” fields to harvest fresh tomatoes, peas, and such. Growing a garden and tending it in order to have a bountiful harvest can be a laborious, timeconsuming process, though, and for people who don’t have the time or space to grow their own gardens, Metter Farm Market is the place they go for the freshest produce around. LOCATED ON HIGHWAY 46 just inside the Metter city limits, the Metter Farm Market has been a local favorite “garden” spot for quite a while. Owners Walter and Teila Driggers and their staff work hard to make sure only the freshest produce is available, and they do this by growing most of it themselves. The Driggers family has been growing wholesale produce since the 1970s just over the county line in Tatnall County. In 2006 they began supplying produce to the former owners of the market, John Seigrest and his family. A friendship developed out of the business agreement, and in 2008, Seigrest offered to sell the market to the Driggerses. Teila Driggers says God definitely had a hand in their lives. They’d been praying about opening a market of their own for a while, and although the offer to buy the Metter Farm Market was somewhat of a surprise, it was a definite blessing. Walter and Teila talked and prayed about the opportunity before them and made an offer Seigrest readily accepted. It wasn’t an immediate takeover, though. From October through December 2008, the Driggerses worked at the market to learn how the store had been run. This “on the job training” allowed them to decide what they wanted to change about the store and what they wanted


to keep just as it was. It was a smooth transition from one owner to another, and on January 2, 2009, Walter and Teila opened the doors of the Metter Farm Market as owner/operators. Customers had come to expect the freshest vegetables available, and the Driggerses didn’t want to disappoint them. They take pride in the fact that 75-80 percent of the produce they sell is locally grown, either by them or by their network of growers in town. Although Walter and Teila live in Tatnall County, they consider Metter their community, too. “We don’t live right in Metter, but we’re here as much as we’re at home,” says Teila. “This is kind of our home away from home, so it’s very important to us that we support the community, too.” One way they do this is by supplying several local school systems with fresh fruits and vegetables. Candler, Tattnall, and Emanuel counties purchase much of the produce they serve from Metter Farm Market and Driggers’ Farms. As business owners, the Driggerses make quite a team. Neither are strangers to produce growing. Walter’s family had been in the wholesale produce business for decades, and Teila was raised on a farm herself. Teila also brought to the business years of management experience; she’d been a district manager for Dollar General Stores for over a decade. Their

years of combined experience and time in the store before officially taking over helped guide them in the changes they’d make as owners. They had to restock and decided to continue selling many of the shelf goods, what they call “reduced grocery” items, in addition to top grade produce. One area of expansion has been the addition of a fresh-cut meat market. Driggers’ first task was hiring a meat cutter, and they found one in Mr. Cleon Mosely. Mosely, a retired butcher of 49 years, wasn’t looking for a job but was willing to help Driggers get the meat department going. That “help” lasted two years, until Mr. Mosely passed away in 2013. He trained their full-time butcher and brought in his own recipe for fresh sausage. Before he died, Mosely passed that secret recipe on to Driggers who continues to make it just like Mr. Cleon did. Customers are glad he does, too, because it is delicious! Most of the produce customers see each day at the Metter Farm Market was either in the ground or hanging from a vine that morning right in Candler or Tattnall County. One particular item, however, Driggers still purchases from out of state, and that’s the juicy, delicious apples shipped in from Pennsylvania. Don’t worry about their quality, though. “No more than two days before they

are in our store,” says Walter, “these apples were hanging on a tree in a Pennsylvania orchard.” That’s about as fresh as an apple can get in Metter. One of the most popular summer vegetables Metter Farm Market sells is peas. They’re grown on the family farm and shelled in their facility right behind the market. When Walter and Teila took over the store, they saw room for growth in the pea and butterbean market. They were able to expand the operation with a larger network of growers and newer equipment to shell and clean the produce. Their assembly line operation makes them more efficient, and they are able to keep the peas and beans cool and fresh. When the pea shelling operation is in full swing, workers may process 350-400 bushels a day. For those who may not know it, that’s a LOT of peas! Teila or Walter is on the end of the grading line all day, making sure that only the highest quality produce is available to customers. It’s a tiring job for all of the employees, but as Teila says, “We’ve got a good staff and managers who take ownership in the products we sell.” The Driggerses know that people have come to expect the highest quality fruits and vegetables from Metter Farm Market, and Walter says, “We’ve tried to make our word represent what we sell.” They know everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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that a dissatisfied customer may not always bring an item back, but they probably won’t come back, either, and that’s not a chance the Driggerses are willing to take. They know that a quality product is not just an important thing; it’s the only thing. Some folks may consider Metter Farm Market to be “off the beaten path” in Metter, but its reputation for quality produce at competitive prices draws in customers from all over. “We’re not right in the middle of town,” says Walter, “so we have to make it so folks want to drive the extra mile to get to us.” Their produce may be grown within a 30 mile

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radius of the market, but their customer base stretches much farther. People come from all over, in state and out, to buy the fresh grown goods from Metter Farm Market. Georgia resident and professional golfer Davis Love III, who lives on St. Simons Island, sends his housekeeper to Metter each summer for fresh peas and butterbeans. As a man who knows his “greens,” the green veggies at Metter Farm Market are worth the “drive”! In addition to fresh fruits, vegetables, and meats, Metter Farm Market offers a variety of specialty items throughout the year. One summertime favorite is boiled peanuts. The

Driggerses buy their early season peanuts from growers in Florida, but from mid-June until the end of summer, they’re all locally grown. Customers can buy them raw by the pound or already boiled, hot and ready to eat. The Market also offers fresh fruit baskets year round, but they are most popular at Christmas. Driggers has plans to expand his pecan cracking and shelling business as well. The Driggerses and their staff are always coming up with new recipes with pecans, Walter’s favorite being chocolate covered, of course! To catch Metter Farm Market’s newest snack offering at its freshest, customers have to come on Monday and Friday afternoons. That’s when the pork skins are frying! Pork rind fans can get plain, BBQ, or spicy flavors, and they are all delicious. Don’t come too early, though. Morning dampness and humidity affect the frying skins, and too much moisture makes them fry up small and hard. At $5 a bag, these puffy, delicious rinds aren’t on the shelves long, either. They may not be good for you, but they’re good to you! In the south, summertime just isn’t summertime without fresh, juicy tomatoes, and Metter Farm Market has some of the best available. Each season, Driggers’ Farms produces about 20,000 tomatoes, hand-picked daily for the market. That’s a lot of tomato sandwiches. If you want an onion on that sandwich, the Driggerses can take care of that, too. They don’t grow their own onions, though; they don’t have to. Metter Farm Market gets the sweet Vidalia® onions they sell from their friend and neighbor R.E. Hendrix at Hendrix Produce also here in Metter. Put these fresh fruits and vegetables together with some fresh bread and mayo, and you’ve got a chindripping meal fit for a king. Walter and Teila Driggers know that nothing they do comes from them alone. “Everything is God-based. Without Him, nothing would be in place. God put us here. There’s not a day that goes by that I don’t pray that everyone who walks through our door gets a blessing,” Teila says. For the Driggerses, their livelihood is in the soil, a part of God’s green earth, and they are charged with taking care of what God has blessed them with. It’s a task Walter, Teila, and their staff are more than capable of handling. The business plan of Metter Farm Market is a simple one, says Walter. “We want to provide produce that is fresh, local, wholesome, and at a fair price. If we do that, people will buy it.” Teila tells their employees that a smile is part of their uniforms. That’s what customers get at Metter Farm Market: friendly service and fresh foods. The Driggerses wouldn’t have it any other way.


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t’s not hard to find a University of Georgia fan in Metter. This is Bulldog country. Car tags, window decals, and ball caps all attest to that. Drive down South Lewis Street and you’ll see a UGA flag flying proudly at Mr. Kennedy Dekle’s house. He’s not just another Dawg fan, though. Born and raised in Metter, Georgia, he’ll tell you part of his heart will always be in Athens.

DEKLE FIRST ATTENDED UGA IN 1942 as a 16 yearold freshman pre-med student, and his first quarter as a Bulldog was anything but dull. His high school transcripts were lost somewhere between Metter and Athens. His parents got him enrolled for his classes, but he had no dorm to live in that first quarter, so he lived in the Gilbert Hotel above the original location of The Varsity restaurant. Dekle remembers studying quite a bit, but as he says, “It wasn’t always the books I was studying!” His time at UGA was short-lived, however. In the early ‘40’s when a young man turned 18, he was drafted into the Army. World War II was in full swing, and young men were expected to serve their country overseas. Dekle’s mother had encouraged him to join the Navy, believing that he would always have a clean bed to sleep in, so that’s what he did. He laughs about that now, thinking of his mother’s advice. Dekle says with a chuckle, “I thought about that a lot as I was hunkered down, sleeping in a


foxhole on Okinawa.” There he served as a medic during and after the war until his time in the Navy was up. In 1946 he re-enrolled at the University of Georgia, catching up with his studies and his sweetheart, Ray. She was an education major at Wesleyan College studying math and home economics. She soon transferred to UGA, and the two were married in 1947. Since there wasn’t any available housing on campus at the time, they found a small house to rent on a farm in Bishop, GA, not far outside of Athens. “It wasn’t much more than a sharecropper’s house,” Dekle recalls, “and the rent was $25 a month. It wasn’t much, but we were together.” Later they found a new apartment much closer to campus. The rent was fifty dollars more a month, but the accommodations were much more suitable. Dekle remembers it being “fifty dollars well spent.” Dekle graduated from UGA in 1949 and was ready to attend the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta to fulfill his plans to become a doctor as his grandfather was. Things don’t always happen as planned, though. Dekle went home to work and earn some extra money at his father-in-law’s cotton gin before moving to Augusta. During this time Ray’s father lost one of his hands and was no longer able to run the gin, so he offered to sell it to Dekle. “I’d gotten pretty good at it, and Ray was ready to start a family,” Dekle recalls, “so I stayed. I owned and ran the gin until 2005 when I retired for good.” Kennedy Dekle has always loved sports, especially Bulldog football. “It’s hard to say how it got started,” he says. “I guess I had enough personality, the

(L-R)Larry Munson with Ray and Kennedy Dekle

coaches liked me. I always asked what I could do to help.” During his time as a student, he met and became friends with head football coach Wally Butts, who coached the University of Georgia championship team in 1942. Dekle remembers meeting Coach Butts for the first time. “I was watching a football practice and listening to a track meet broadcast on my radio. We were competing against Georgia Tech, and Coach Butts came up to me and asked me what I was listening to. We listened together for a while, and he invited me to come to practices and help with the team.”

His personality and love not only for the game, but for his Alma Mater, have created friendships that have lasted more than half a century. After moving home to Metter, Dekle and other UGA alumni from Candler and surrounding counties formed a local chapter of The Bulldog Club. They would meet, support, and cheer on their Dawgs on and off of the field. Through the Bulldog Club, Dekle met other great coaches like Vince Dooley, Mark Richt, and local legend Erk Russell, who was a defense coach for UGA before moving to Statesboro. Dooley would often come to the Bulldog Club meetings and speak to members about the team’s outlook for the season. Bulldog Club members got VIP treatment at the home ballgames, too. Dekle remembers club parking passes costing only $10 for the season back in the early days! One lasting friendship that began in the Bulldog Club was with University of Georgia football broadcaster Larry Munson. Munson had commentated on an especially exciting Georgia-Florida game, and Dawg fans were hooked. Dekle decided to ask Munson to speak at a Bulldog Club meeting later that season, so he simply called Munson and introduced himself. Munson accepted the invitation, not knowing at the time that a decades long relationship would form, ending only with his death in 2011 in, where else? Athens, Georgia. Dekle invited Munson to stay at his home after the meeting, and he even got special privileges from Ray to make the stay more enjoyable. “Munson loved good jazz, good scotch, and good cigars,” remembers Dekle. “I asked Ray if she’d let Larry smoke in the house. She said yes as long as I promised to air the place out good!” Over the years they’d spend countless hours listening to classic jazz records and enjoying the memories everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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only two old Dawgs can appreciate. Ken and Ray started buying season tickets to the Georgia games in 1950, and that tradition continues 66 years later. Dekle holds the title as the oldest living season ticket holder at UGA and was honored by the school in 2014. He got to spend the day with the team, coaches, and trainers, touring the facilities and getting the VIP treatment from the newest generations of Bulldogs. He and Ray, who passed away in 2010, attended just about every home game together. As a matter

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of fact, they only missed eight games in 60 seasons of Georgia football. That’s being a true fan if there ever was one. Dekle recalls, “We stayed at the Holiday Inn down the street from the stadium and walked to the games. It was always downhill going to the stadium. Ray called it the ‘death march’ when we’d lose and have to walk back up that hill!” The Dekles’ first season tickets were great seats on the 35 yard line, Georgia home side, of course. However, in 1976 he got a call from the ticket manager with

an offer he later found hard to refuse. The school was adding additional seating and offered Ken and Ray better seats in the new upper deck section. According to Ken, Ray said “go for it,” so they accepted the new seats. These seats turned out to be prime Georgia real estate, and it’s where Dekle has sat at every home game since 1976 – the 50 yard line, Row 10. It doesn’t get much better than that. The first game he and Ray attended to sit in their new section was memorable not only for the game, but also for the half-time show. Dekle remembers, “James Brown performed at the half-time show that day and sang ‘Dooley’s Junkyard Dawgs.’ The young folks in the crowd loved it; some of the older fans, not so much!” James Brown fans, Bulldog fans, or both can still see the video of that spectacular half-time show on Youtube. The Dekle family’s love for Athens and the University of Georgia didn’t stop with Ken and Ray; it became a family tradition. The Dekles’ two daughters, Karen and Cheryl, both graduated from UGA as well. One of his granddaughters broke that tradition when she decided to attend Auburn University, though. “I ain’t over that yet!” Dekle said with a grin. At least she stayed in the SEC. A walk through Kennedy Dekle’s house is a walk rich in memories of family and Georgia Bulldog history. Pictures adorn the walls, bookcases, and tables – pictures of family vacations, the original family cotton gin, and of course, Georgia football games. There’s one of Ken, Ray, and Mark Richt, and then there’s a favorite of the Bulldog mascot, UGA, snapping at an Auburn player on the sidelines. There’s also a special treasure – a collector’s limited edition Georgia Bulldog football autographed by Coach Vince Dooley with the inscription “To my friend Ken Dekle. 1980 #1 Go Dawgs!” There may be many people who have the legendary coach’s autograph, but there probably aren’t nearly as many whom he calls “friend.” He meant it then, and he’d mean it now. That’s at the heart of Georgia football. If you see Kennedy Dekle on the street or at a UGA football game and want to strike up a conversation, don’t just say hello. “How ‘Bout Them Dawgs” will do the trick just fine.


METTER’S

MOVERS

SHAKERS

&

Who are the people behind the titles?

Their tasks are different, but their mission is the same: Make sure everything stays better in Metter! With such a clear goal in mind, they go about their day-to-day business – the business of running a community. Metter and Candler County are guided by these young game-changers – men and women who have dedicated their lives to their community and to ensuring that their hometown is a place families want to live, work and do business for generations to come. Some, like County Administrator Bill Lindsey and City Manager Mandi Cody, are tasked with overseeing the daily operations of their respective entities. Others, like Candler County Industrial Authority Executive Director Hannah Mullins and Metter-Candler Chamber of Commerce CEO/ President Jaime Riggs, are responsible for marketing their community to promote quality growth in the years to come. Then there are the lawyers, City Attorney Brent Carter and County Attorney Kendall Gross, who ensure that the actions taken by their respective governmental bodies follow the requirements of federal and state regulations. And you can’t leave out the bridge-builder, Catherine Muse, who works with each of these entities through the Archway Partnership to help Metter and Candler County chart the course for future successes. But no matter which professional you speak with, or which entity he/ she represents, the dedication and commitment to community is apparent. These are people who believe it is better in Metter and whose goal it is to make sure it stays better in Metter!

What do you discuss when hanging out with your best friend at college? Starting your own law firm of course.

A visionary not only believes that the impossible can be done but that it has to be done.

Some people sell cars - She sells a whole community!

By day he leads teams of workers to provide the services you need. At night he leads teams of youth to local, district and state championships.

You know the slogan on our City’s water tanks? At the end of the day her job is to make sure Everything is truly Better in Metter!

Blessed are the peacemakers: for they will be called children of God.

To have a job well done, you have to do your job well.

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METTER CITY ATTORNEY

Brent Carter

A partner in the law firm of CarterFranklin in Metter, Brent Carter has represented Metter Airport Authority for 10 years and Candler County Industrial Authority for eight years. He represents the Town of Pulaski and is the solicitor-elect of the state court and solicitor of Metter Municipal Court. But the City of Metter, which he continues to represent today, was actually his very first client. Carter began representing the city over 10 years ago, when he worked with Jones & Smith.

Serving as the lawyer for the city in which he lives creates unique opportunities, Carter said. “I have a vested interest in the decisions they make and the legal advice I give. That advice affects me personally because what takes place economically or policy-wise impacts my children, my parents, my wife and me.” And representing a council comprised of six elected officials with very different personalities is also a unique experience. “It is so different representing a body of people

who represent a larger body of people,” Carter said. “They are making decisions not for themselves, and I have to keep that in perspective. The advice I give them ultimately is what I feel is best for the city as a corporate body.” Fortunately, Carter said, the body of officials at City Hall has been pretty consistent since he has served as attorney. “I know a lot of their thoughts,” he said. “Sometimes they disagree but we are all trying to make things work.” HOW DID YOU AND JUSTIN FRANKLIN GET INTO A LAW PARTNERSHIP? While attending Metter High School, I was very good friends with Anna Smith, who also attended Mercer University, although in pursuit of a medical career. (Anna was then dating her future husband, fellow MHS alum Justin Franklin, who was also pursuing a legal career. When the trio of friends spent time together, the idea of a law partnership took form and in 2008 the plan was put into motion.) We have an advantage.. People know us, they know our reputation, our families and our values. One of the biggest compliments we receive is when former teachers come to us for legal advice.

did you know? • He and wife Candace have two daughters, Elle and Lola. So for Brent that means a lot of time at Studio South where both girls study dance. • The family attends First Baptist Church of Metter, where Brent teaches Sunday School. They also enjoy golfing, especially Elle. • Brent is a member of the Boys & Girls Club board of directors and Metter Rotary Club and is a past board member of Metter-Candler Chamber of Commerce. • Degrees: BS, Mercer University; JD, Mercer University 28 |

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WHAT MADE YOU WANT TO PRACTICE IN METTER? I never considered working anywhere else! While I was at Mercer everybody else wanted to go to Atlanta. I wished them all good luck but did not want to go myself. I have no regrets. HOW DO YOU USE YOUR EXPERTISE TO GIVE BACK? I am the ex-officio attorney for Guido Evangelistic Association, which is my “favorite job.”


METTER CANDLER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Jaime Riggs

did you know? • Jaime Riggs is also executive director of Classic Main Street Metter and the Downtown Development Authority and operates the regional welcome center for the state as a Southeast Tourism Society Marketing College Certified Travel Marketing Professional. • Her spare time is spent with her husband Ty juggling the schedules of two very active sons, Haden and Jack, who are active on the BB Team, Travel Baseball, Football and Soccer. • The family attends Metter United Methodist Church, where she is involved with the Sturdy Spirit Sunday School Class and Ty is part of the Jericho Road band. • Degrees: BS in Recreation with a minor in Public Relations and Advertising, Georgia Southern University; ASCNT, Ogeechee Technical College; MBA, Ashford University.

She’s not Sarah, Mayberry’s telephone operator from Andy Griffith fame, but like Sarah, Jaime Riggs makes your business her business. She is the driving force that connects local businesses and professionals to help make their jobs easier. As the Executive Director/CEO of MetterCandler Chamber of Commerce, Jaime works to support local businesses and to encourage visitors to stay awhile and explore the community. “We offer the best stop on I-16 for travelers between Macon and Savannah and have been coined the ‘nicest stop’ by visitors,” Jaime said. Most of those travelers, some 15,000 to 18,000 annually, are greeted personally by Jaime and her staff as they come through the Welcome Center.

DID YOU EVER PICTURE YOURSELF WORKING IN A SMALL TOWN LIKE METTER? Traveling across I-16 20 years ago as a college student at Georgia Southern, I would always exit in Metter to drive back to the dorm. I loved the Mayberry look to the South Lewis corridor as it reminded me of home, Pine Mountain, GA. Even before I moved here I would go treasure hunting in downtown antique shops. Never would I have imagined I would have the job of promoting this great little town. WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE YOUNG FEMALE LEADERS? Dress for the job you want … not the job you have! Dress for success. I like to make a statement with my professional wardrobe, often opting for fashion dresses and bold jewelry instead of the status quo business suit. And, of course, I shop local FIRST every time! 30 |

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Jaime has been with the Chamber of Commerce for five years now and, along the way, has acquired many other “hats” she wears. One of her biggest and most notable is the one she wears each spring when she helps the community welcome 15,000 people downtown in one day for Another Bloomin’ Festival. She manages all of her many responsibilities from a picturesque office setting at the historic restored commissary that now serves as the Welcome Center. “I get to work out here in this beautiful building overlooking this serene pond while I welcome people to our town,” she said. For Jaime, her community involvement does not end when she removes her worker “hats” each day. She is a member of Metter Rotary Club, where she is the immediate past president – and was actually the first ever female president – after two terms and is still very involved, especially in the CART program (Coins for Alzheimer’s Research Trust). “This program is important to me because Alzheimer’s has affected mine and my husband’s families,” she said. Jaime also serves as the chairman of Communities In Schools of Candler County, an agency that is particularly near and dear to her heart. As a child she benefited from similar programs in South Columbus. Jaime first came to Metter as CIS director in 2010-11. Now that she sits on the CIS board, she said, her involvement has “come full circle.” She has special pride in the accomplishments of CIS, most notably the 100 percent promotion and graduation rate of CIS program students in the last school year. Jaime has also recently been involved in the inaugural Lynda Brannen Williamson Foundation Leadership Academy, which recently graduated. Now, the class alums are working on their service project -- a complete career makeover/ development day for women. She hopes this program will carry on the tradition of mentoring and giving back to professional young women as Lynda Williamson once did. “I always try to remember our unofficial motto -#wwld,” Jaime said.


CANDLER COUNTY INDUSTRIAL AUTHORITY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Hannah Mullins

did you know? • She serves on the board of Candler County Boys & Girls Club. • She and her family attend El Bethel Church in Twin City because it gives her the same hometown feel as her childhood church. • Degrees: BBA, Kennesaw State; MA, Gonzaga University.

Some people sell cars. Hannah Mullins sells a community – the Candler County community to be exact. As the Industrial Authority Executive Director, Hannah knows that companies looking to grow or expand in the local community are interested in more than just the property onto which they may be locating. They are also looking at the schools, the healthcare facilities, the residential areas and the business district. And it’s her job to show her hometown in its best light. The work has paid off, too. In the two+ years she has been here, Hannah has helped Metter welcome Linzer, CPE America and Everdigm America. All three projects have been special to her. “We helped CPE America locate in a 28-year-old spec building, as well as their Korean pump supplier, Everdigm. Both are the first, and presently the only, U.S. facilities for these companies. Linzer Products came into the old RR Donnelley building (on Highway 46 East) and is the fifth and largest Linzer U.S. facility,” she said. Hannah ensures that every penny spent by the authority is used to create longterm, full-time employment. “That’s what we do. That is our end result – industry recruitment and industry retainage/ expansion. My job is to market the community in a positive light to entice new industry and to support existing industry.” That means this is not an 8-5, MondayFriday office job. In fact, she is rarely in the office. “It takes a lot of travel because I go out and make connections and foster relationship to reap rewards someday.” That also means spending a lot of time in Atlanta, with the Ports Authority and with brokers and consultants.

WHAT IF SHE HAD A MONTH OFF AND UNLIMITED FUNDS? I would book a small, rustic cabin overlooking the Tuckaseigee River in Western North Carolina and hire a personal guide to teach me everything they could in one month about fly fishing as well as how to make my own flies. Admittedly, my schedule and pocketbook have only allowed me to try it once, but I am hooked – pun intended – and literally think about it every day! HER SECRET INDULGENCE My secret indulgence? With kids and a schedule like mine, I didn’t know there was such a thing! As a child, my Granny Johnson and I would go to yard sales and flea markets almost every Saturday morning. It took many trips before I realized the only things I ever spent my money on were unique glasses and bowls -- the puppies and kittens were always free! Now this obsession has evolved into a love for the hunt for unique serving pieces of all shapes and sizes to use for entertaining friends and family. New, antique, wood, glass, metal – it doesn’t matter. I love to take time to scour all the antique stores, thrift stores and gift shops in Metter. Though I do not entertain as much as I did in the past due to our busy schedule, I do hope to make it a regular event in my home again. My hope is to always have a vast collection of pieces to impress with. 32 |

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CANDLER COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR

Bill Lindsey

did you know? • He is president of Metter Rotary Club and chairman-elect of Metter-Candler Chamber of Commerce. He serves on the Recreation Advisory Board and the Concerted Services Board of Directors. • Degrees: BS, Georgia College; MPA, Georgia College & State University • Bill is engaged to be married to Sharri Edenfield, attorney in Statesboro, in March 2017.

WHAT DRIVES YOUR LOVE OF RECREATION SPORTS? In the Spring of 2004, the Baxley paper ran an ad seeking volunteer coaches for the rec department. When I saw the ad in the paper, I simply jumped at the chance. Mutual friends joined in to make it a trio and the rest is history. After having coached for 12 years now, it’s still just as much fun for me as it was the very first year. I suppose you could say I caught the coaching bug. Baseball is currently the only sport I coach, but truthfully football has always been my favorite sport with baseball a very close second. Someday, I’d like to give football a shot if I have the opportunity but I’ve been content to stick with baseball strictly. So far, it’s worked out well for me. AS A NEWLY-ENGAGED MAN, SHARE YOUR IDEA OF A PERFECT DATE.v Sharri (Edenfield) and I both love the beach. A perfect date for us is anywhere tropical where we can spend time in the water and soak up some sun from a crystal blue sky and then cap it off by enjoying a great meal while watching the sun set over the ocean horizon as the tide comes in for the evening. That would be our little corner of paradise. 34 |

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County government is like a multi-faceted diamond. Oh, there’s the parts everybody knows about – the Courthouse officials, the county commissioners, the road crews – these are the faces of Candler County. But there are also the parts that lie below the surface, agencies and entities that most folks do not know fall under the county’s jurisdiction – the recreation department, the ambulance crews and the landfill operators. One person is responsible for overseeing the operations of all facets of the county, the ones that are seen and the ones that are not seen. As the Candler County Administrator, Bill Lindsey recognizes his job is about more than “running the county.” It is also about acting as a liaison with the constitutional officers, overseeing the various departments within the county, interacting with the city government and regional agencies and ensuring that state and federal regulations are followed. That’s no easy task, but it’s one Bill embraces. “I oversee the daily operations of Candler County,” he said. “I see that all services are run as efficiently and cost effectively as possible and I am usually the first point of contact for a citizen who has a problem or a need.” That means Bill oversees seven departments, along with the executive and administrative branches of a county government that operates on a $7 million budget. Bill is a native of neighboring Emanuel County. From his childhood through his first professional job as a planner with the Heart of Georgia-Altamaha Regional Commission that includes Candler County, Bill has had plenty of experience with the local community throughout his life. Through those experiences, he has learned, “All of our government entities work well together. That does not happen in every community. With my regional perspective, I saw that for a lot of communities it was hard to get everyone at the same table. We don’t have that problem here. The people here get along well together. They work together and do what needs to be done.” Sometimes, Bill said, it gets hard to balance following the rules and regulations with the human elements of care and compassion, but, Bill said, “I don’t feel the pressure. I try to follow the Golden Rule. If you just do the right thing, I think you’re fine and you don’t have to worry.” He has also learned a key life lesson through his work experience. “You have to give people a chance to be heard. You have to balance compassion with the law, but everything is not black and white. It is not all straight by the book.”


METTER CITY MANAGER

Mandi Cody

She had a career, but she began to find her calling when she was asked to serve on the Register City Council. After filling an unexpired term and nearing completion of her first full term as a council member, imagine her shock when Mandi Cody was asked by Betsy McGriff, the Mayor of Register – and her very good friend -- NOT to run again. But it was because Betsy had another vision for Mandi – as Register’s city administrator. “I instantly knew what I was supposed to do,” Mandi said. At that time, Mandi had been practicing law in Statesboro, but it didn’t take her any time at all to come to an understanding. “I knew what God had put me on this earth to do.” But it wasn’t all a bed of roses for Mandi. The vision of the Register Mayor and Council at that time was not the community’s vision. Mandi, who was then a new mom, shifted her focus slightly from administration to planning as she became a city planner for Statesboro. After a stint on special assignment to the Statesboro city manager, Mandi found herself sitting as the Director of Planning. In her tenure, the department changed its focus, however, and Mandi became the Director of Planning and Economic Development for the City of Statesboro, a position she held for six years. “I was proud of all we accomplished,” she said. “I loved it there, but …” When the opportunity came to serve as City Manager for Metter, Mandi knew this was where she wanted to be. “Despite the heart strings, it was time for me to move on.” She accepted the position and started work here on May 2, 2016. Mandi is not unfamiliar with small towns, having grown up in Alma, Georgia, before attending Georgia Southern. So Metter was a familiar environment, but one that was full of YOU HAVE A FREE DAY TO SPEND IN METTER WITH YOUR 9-YEAR-OLD DAUGHTER. WHAT WOULD YOU DO? First, we would go to Southern Soy Candles and pick up some candles. Then we would go to the antique shops. Laura Beth is at the age where she wants to redecorate her bedroom, so we would shop for that. She is also learning to cook, so we would spend time in the kitchen. But first we would go to Metter Farm Market, Metter Meats and Bi-Lo for the ingredients we need. Her specialty is desserts, but I’m more of a savory person. I would make the meal and she would help with that and then make her desserts. And, of course, we would go to Guido Gardens. We love the Gardens and visited them even before we moved here. 36 |

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surprises. Her biggest surprise? “The quality of schools here. This is a small town, with limited resources, but there is quality educational opportunities for every age group,” she said. “I was very pleasantly surprised. This is something to be proud of and makes us stronger as a community. It is good for economic development and for people looking to move here. This makes the community very attractive for people raising a family here.” In her time in Metter, Mandi has developed a wish list for her community, and the No. 1 item is “economic health and prosperity” for her hometown. “It won’t happen overnight and it is not an easy process,” she said. “We do not need to be Statesboro or Swainsboro. We need to find our unique place, our unique offerings, our niche and maximize on those things.” That’s why Mandi said quality of life issues are so important to her. She is driven by what makes people want to move into a community and what makes businesses want to locate in a particular place.

“We are very blessed geographically,” she said, stating the interstate access, the airport, the proximity to a major university and technical colleges and to the Ports and Atlanta are all pluses for the local community. “We are primed,” she said. “But once geography and infrastructure requirements are determined by a business, then it becomes a quality of life issue. Businesses go where the quality of life is attractive to their employees.” And as City Manager, her focus will be to ensure that Metter is better – for businesses and for families looking to locate here – and will work closely with City Council as they develop and implement their vision for this community. “My job is to counsel, to give good options, to implement practices and procedures,” she said. “I am failing in my role if I do not give sound counsel and advise them of consequences.” When all is said and done, she said, “The council is the driving force. They set the policy and the vision.”

did you know? • Degrees: BA, Georgia Southern; DJur, Mercer University • Her hometown, Alma, Georgia, is the blueberry capital of the world. • She was the first ever city administrator of Register.


ARCHWAY PARTNERSHIP PROFESSIONAL

Catherine Muse did you know?

Unless you are a culinary master, it’s hard to make a delicious dish without having a recipe to follow. Well, for Metter and Candler County, just call Catherine Muse the master chef. As the Archway Professional for Candler County, Catherine’s primary duty is to pull out all the ingredients for a delightful community menu. To accomplish this, she calls on each and every resource available in the community and pairs those resources up with their counterparts at the University of Georgia to turn dreams and ideas into reality. “Connecting others is something I like to do,” Catherine said. And that’s just what she does each and every day. She is the liaison, the middle man between a community full of dreams and a University that can help make those dreams take shape. “As the Archway Professional, I work closely with an executive committee of local leaders to set priorities around complex locally identified needs and issues. As priorities are identified, I work with the Archway Partnership Athens based team to connect the Candler community with appropriate University of Georgia and other higher education resources.” And she takes special pride in the progress Candler County has made in the three years it has been in the Archway Partnership. “Candler County is a premier Archway community! Okay, maybe I am bias, but Candler is constantly highlighted as a community that utilizes Archway strategically.” She doesn’t just connect through work, though. Catherine is also busy outside of the office making vital connections. “I actively mentor high school seniors and college students. I enjoy forming bonds and support systems with them that allow for those students to excel in their college experience, academically and socially.”

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• She began as Candler’s Archway professional in January 2016. • She has worked as an AmeriCorps Jumpstart Corps member to help promote children’s literacy. • She served as a Graduate Intern for the U.S. Department of Justice Community Relations Service, where she worked to enhance dialogue on race and police community relations. • Degrees: MA, Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies; BA, Emory University.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE HOMETOWN RESTAURANT? My favorite restaurant in Metter is the Soda Fountain at IHS! Their chicken salad is amazing and the service is even better. I like to treat myself on Fridays with a few scoops of ice cream and a cute bracelet or two! IF YOU HAD $1 MILLION, HOW WOULD YOU USE IT IN CANDLER COUNTY? “If someone gave me $1 million for a project in Candler County, I would do two things. As a previous member of the Emory University NAACP Chapter, I would definitely give money to the Metter-Candler NAACP chapter for college scholarships and community-wide programming initiatives. I would also invest in local startups in downtown – especially restaurants and food trucks! I love food and downtown Metter is amazing, so any local person with a great idea would definitely have my support!

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JUDGE, CANDLER COUNTY ATTORNEY

Kendall Gross

He spends most of his day at the bench. Either sitting on it, as a State Court Judge, or standing in front of it as an attorney representing Candler County Commissioners and private clients. Kendall Gross has been the county attorney for seven years. He has been State Court Judge for five years and will be sworn in for a second full term in January 2017. Additionally, as an attorney for over 20 years, his private practice handles personal injury, criminal defense, domestic relations, commercial real estate and probate. While he always knew he wanted to be in law, Kendall never actually envisioned himself as one to practice “government” law. “That happened gradually,” he said, although he is not surprised at the turn his career has taken. “When you start out in law, the lawyer you are at the beginning isn’t the lawyer you are 20 years into it.” The biggest challenge is dealing with a client that is a body of diverse personalities verses working one on one with an individual client. “You have to be mindful of the different personalities involved,” he said. “There is a broad spectrum of legal issues – equipment vs. real estate vs. condemning property vs. employment issues vs. regulatory issues vs. litigation. But with individuals, it is usually a single issue – divorce, assault, DUI. But your legal duties are the same. You have an obligation to represent your client zealously whether it is a county or an individual or a corporation.” WHAT WAS HIS FIRST JOB? Kendall worked in Metter long before he started practicing law here. His first part-time job actually had nothing to do with law. As a high school student, he worked at Rent-a-Movie on North Lewis Street. WHAT IS KENDALL’S FAVORITE COLLEGE TEAM? If you want to know Kendall’s favorite college team, just take a glance at his office. He is a die-hard Dawg fan! He’s a season ticket holder with two Bulldog parking spaces. Unfortunately, he didn’t make any games in 2015, but he always tries to catch his favorite team on TV. SO, WHEN HE’S NOT AT WORK...? Kendall attends Metter United Methodist Church where he recently served as chairman of the staff-parish relations committee and vice-chair of the finance committee. 40 |

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did you know? • He usually works about 80 hours a week, including one or both days of the weekend. • Kendall started practicing law in Metter right after graduation from Mercer when he was hired by local Attorney Matthew Waters. He worked alongside Waters through two partnerships -- Cheney, Waters & McCullough and Cheney, Waters, Gross & Gay. Geographical constraints made these multicommunity partnerships difficult, so the Metter attorneys regrouped as Waters & Gross until Waters’ retirement 15 years ago. • Degrees: BA(Econ) from the University of Georgia; JD, Mercer University. Childhood hometown: Grew up in neighboring Emanuel County, with lots of Candler County family connections.


B

ees. Most people don’t pay them much attention. During the spring when the flowers are blooming, these fuzzy buzzing insects are everywhere, zooming around in search of pollen and occasionally making a stroll through the backyard garden a lively affair. Candler County resident Rhett Kelley pays them attention, though, and for a very sweet reason. Bees are the hardest working employees he has at Kelley Honeybee Farms in Metter.

of a bee whisperer


KELLEY BEGAN RAISING BEES in 2011 on his family’s cattle farm. While raising livestock was the family business, the bees were something that was all his. He started his beekeeping and honey production venture with just two colonies of bees. In the honey production business, a beekeeper with fewer than 25 colonies of bees is called a “Hobby” beekeeper. A person managing more than 25 colonies is called a “Sideline” beekeeper, and a person with 300 or more colonies is referred to as a “Commercial” beekeeper. Kelley is now considered a Sideline beekeeper, with hives on the family farm off of Highway 46 West and in an area off of the Portal-Metter Highway. Being an EMT and soon to be sheriff’s deputy, beekeeping to Kelley is more than just a hobby, or in his case, a sideline. He is fascinated with the hard-working insects. As he points out, “Bees are the only insects that I know of that create a product we eat.” At one point he had a few hives in his backyard so he could watch them work, but his wife and children didn’t share his excitement, so

he moved them to another location. He had hopes of his family being more hands-on with the bees, but so far it’s mostly Rhett tending to the hives. The kids help out some, but understandably, none of them are too fond of getting stung! Honey harvest season is typically at the end of June and first of July each year in this area. Kelley doesn’t move his hives to other parts of the state, or even out of state, as some larger honey producers do, so he has only one harvest time, and it’s a busy time. He also doesn’t buy honey from other producers to sell with his label. “We only sell honey we make. It’s made in our hives and harvested by us,” says Kelley. “We’re like the micro-brewery of honey.” Kelley Honeybee Farms’ honey is allnatural raw honey. It has been strained, but not run through a filtering system, and it is not heat pasteurized. Kelley wants his honey as close to natural as possible, one step away from eating honey straight from the hive. Folks who buy his honey may notice a difference in color from one bottle to another, but that’s just a difference in honey harvest time and pollen source. Early spring honey tends to be lighter colored and will get darker as the season progresses. Light or dark, the rich golden honey is a healthy and delicious treat. Kelley Honeybee Farms honey is a Georgia Grown product and is available at several locations around Candler County.

You can pick up a bottle at Metter Farm Market, Metter Meats, the Metter Welcome Center, and the Wiregrass Chevron in Aline, but you’d better get it while it lasts. Once Kelley’s bees have stopped producing for the season, that’s it until the next summer. Even bees need a break!

A queen bee can lay 2 times her own weight of eggs in 24 hours. It takes 550 bees visiting 2.5 million blossoms to make a single pound of honey. There is but one queen in each colony. A drone, which is a male bee, has no father, but has a grandfather on his mother’s side. There are from 40,000 to 75,000 bees in the average bee colony.

KELLEY HONEYBEE FARMS PRODUCTS

are available at the Metter Welcome Center, Metter Farm Market and other local retailers.

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T

alk about

a “power�ful

man! Brad

Jones is that and more. He is an electrician. He is an entrepreneur. He is a businessman, a family man, a veteran and a county commissioner.

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JONES ATTENDED METTER HIGH SCHOOL in the 1980s. He lived in Excelsior and had a part-time job at Piggly Wiggly. When MHS started the Performing Arts program that flourished from the 1980s into the early 2000s, he stepped out and played the role of “Green Flash” in the group’s production “Lil’ Abner.” He had a lot of fun en route to his much anticipated graduation in 1989. From there, he was unsure of where he wanted to go in the future, so he opted to enlist in the Marine Corps. This was the time of Operations Desert Storm and Desert Shield, so Jones was worried about being deployed to the Middle East like so many of his buddies. He didn’t have to worry, though. His deployment was anything but desert-like as he was sent to a base located 250 miles above the Arctic Circle. With six years of military service and commendations for service in Desert Storm and Desert Shield, one hundred percent of his training was for cold weather. Jones came out of the service and went to work for Pernal Franklin at Ace Hardware. He did whatever came along at Ace, but primarily clerked in the store and made small engine repairs in the store’s shop. While he was working there and later with builder Tommy Rigdon, he attended East Georgia College, pursuing a degree in criminal justice. When he had finished 80 of the 90 credits necessary to receive the Associate’s degree, he called an audible. He withdrew from East Georgia and enrolled at Swainsboro Technical Institute to study to become an electrician. Needless to say, says Jones, Mama was not happy. She had not seen that coming But Jones finished his program of study at Swainsboro Tech, receiving the diploma in Residential and Commercial Wiring, and also received an Associate of Applied Sciences degree from East Georgia College in 1995. In the meantime, he had married a local girl, Lisa McManus, in 1994. With his newly acquired education, Jones went to work at Briggs & Stratton. His shift was from 10 p.m. until 6:30 a.m. He and a friend, Stine Faircloth, decided to start a side business, as Faircloth was working at Wallace Business Forms here in Metter. Together they formed D&S Electric and hired a young man, Howard Porter, to help them out.


“Neither of us quit our regular jobs. I worked D&S in the mornings and Stine worked the afternoons,” he explained. D&S was named for the two. “The ‘D’ is for my first name – David – and ‘S’ for Stine,” explains Jones. “Later the ‘S’ stood for ‘S’on after Reed was born and then for ‘S’ibling after Braliee’s birth. The electricians worked out of a used pickup truck that had belonged to the local vet. “I borrowed the money for that truck from Metter Bank. I told the banker that I promised I would pay him back, even if it meant that I had to cut his grass for the rest of my life,” he said. The truck was paid off without any grass being cut, and the business grew. After a while, the business had grown to the point of Jones feeling secure enough to make it a full-time job. Faircloth was not at that point yet, so Jones

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bought his part of the business. The workload primarily consisted of residential wiring and service calls, mostly in the Candler County area at that time. Jones and Porter continued to work and more employees were added to the business as the workload grew. That was when Jones started doing work with the federal Housing & Urban Development (HUD) program. “Most of that work was within an hour of home,” Jones said. It wasn’t long after the business began to really grow that Jones was connected with Bill Crider and Doug Twyford (now deceased) of Crider Poultry. In 1998, Jones and crew started working predominantly for Crider Poultry – an account he still has to this day. With the growth in employment, and workload, it came time for the now-established business to set up a permanent home. The current building on East Hiawatha Street was constructed in 1999 and has been added on to several times to reach its current size of about 10,000 square feet. Today, D & S Electric employs 13 with a fleet of two service trucks and a pick-up truck. While still maintaining his local accounts and serving clients in the area, Jones has also started sub-contracting through an automation company. Through that arrangement, he and crew have now covered practically all of the

48 mainland states. “We get two to six weeks advance notice and it is all voluntary, based on whoever wants to go,” Jones said. Jones and his employees have deep bonds and several have been with him eight or nine years. “We’re like a family,” he said. “We do a company trip at least once a year and every few years we take a cruise or go to an allinclusive destination in the Caribbean.” Those trips have taken Jones and crew – and their “significant others” as Jones calls them – to such locations as Las Vegas and Mexico. Because the hours can be long and the work, especially in the South Georgia sun, hot and tedious, Jones said that camaraderie is very important. “We want to keep that family atmosphere,” he said. “And we try to go easy on the crew – usually only working six or seven days a week,” he joked. For Jones, the seven-day-a-week quip is actually quite accurate at times. He says he easily works 60-70 hours a week, including weekends, and has been known to go a full 24 hours with little or no break. So what does he do in his spare time? Go into politics, of course! In 2008 Jones decided it was time to enter the political world and tossed in his hat in a bid for the District 2 county commission seat. He won the race and the opportunity to represent the district in which he grew


up. Of his decision, he says, “I felt that it was my time, my duty, to look after Candler County and help to move our community forward.” Being a commissioner is a thankless job, explains Jones. The pay is minimal when compared to the hours that are invested in getting the job done. “It’s worth the headaches,” he says. Almost immediately after being elected, Jones was called on to make a speech at a tree dedication at Metter High School. He stood before the assembled students, faculty, and community members and delivered his talk. Afterwards, a teacher who remembered having him in class, came up and stated, “I didn’t see that coming,” speaking of Jones’ role in local politics and his ability to make a public address. As a commissioner, Jones says that he doesn’t believe in making a decision without hearing both sides of the story. Some say he is the most vocal of the County Commissioners because he speaks his mind and expects others on the Board to do the right thing for Candler County. “There is right and wrong, no gray, in my eyes,” Jones stated. “There is a right and wrong way of doing things, and we need to do whatever we do in the right way.” Jones’s dedication to and knowledge of Candler County is evident in the statistics he is able to state offhand. “Candler County receives $300 thousand dollars a year of what is called ‘L money.’ That’ll pay for about three miles of resurfacing of roads.” To put that in perspective, Candler County has 135 miles of paved roads and 255 miles of dirt roads. “That $300 thousand doesn’t go very far in comparison,” he explains. Candler’s population has grown almost double since his high school days at MHS. “I predict it’ll double or more again in the coming 30 to 40 years. We have to be ready!” he explains. He recalls that back in his grocery bagging days at Piggly Wiggly, he knew by name almost every customer whose groceries he carried out of the store. That’s not the case now though. So how is he helping to get Candler County ready for this growth? Since taking office he has helped change in the structure of the election cycle for county offices. “Theoretically, we could have had a complete new slate of County elected officials in 2016,” he explained. By staggering election years for the Commission, that will never happen. He was a part of moving the Commission into the new County offices, located

across East Hiawatha Street from his office at D&S Electric. That gave the office more room for work and a better facility for Commission meetings. He used his position on the Region 9 District Commission to get the paving of Oak Tree Road moved up in priority on the list of projects to be paid through the extra one cent sales tax to fund road improvements. “The paving of Oak Tree Road project helped with the congestion at the new school,” explained Jones. As Jones sits in his office at D&S surrounded by family pictures – of him and wife Lisa, son Reed, a student at Mercer University, and daughter Braliee, who attends Pinewood Christian Academy -- blue prints, a shadowbox with mementos of his Marine Corps days, and framed diplomas from MHS, East Georgia College and Swainsboro Tech, he is able to look out the front window and survey his domain. He contemplates changes that are happening in Candler County, and he can see what’s coming. Brad Jones wants to make sure Candler County is ready.


Baking METTER

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BETTER

f you’re craving some delightful goodies that take you back to family get-togethers, MaMa E’s Home Bakery makes just the treats for you, and they taste just like the ones Grandma used to make! Her bakery offers some of the best light and crispy cheese straws, delectable fudge, irresistible cornflake peanut butter cookies and divinity candy that’s, well, divine!

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WITH A FLASH TO THE PAST, “MaMa E” knows how to use the “old-timey” method of making homemade baked goods and treats to fill the mouths of many with nostalgia. And for some, they get to try good ol’ fashioned treats for the first time! MaMa E’s Home Bakery is a business that’s all about family—from giving owner Marie Motes the push to go for her dream to naming the business and helping her out in the kitchen when it’s needed. After retiring in 2012, Marie “MaMa E” Motes decided to chase her lifelong dream of opening her very own bakery. With the support of her closest friends, coworkers and family, she began her business, running it out of her home, where everything she makes has a little heart in it. When Marie began thinking of names for her new business, her friends and coworkers gave her idea after idea, but none of them quite seemed to fit until her former boss suggested “MaMa E’s,” a nickname given to her by her first grandchild. “Your first grandchild names you, and he was supposed to call me ‘MaMa Marie,’ but he couldn’t say it, so he cut it short to ‘MaMa E,’” she said. From there, the name stuck with her grandchildren and became the name and logo for all the delicious treats she has to offer. Once her long sought dream became a reality, Marie set a goal for her business: to make something out of it. And her new goal is for her business to grow and last and to possibly pass on to her family. “My goal is to get it big enough to sell it one day, or for my children or grandchildren to want to take it over,” she said. “MaMa E’s” homemade goodies can be found in several stores around the area, like JoMax BBQ, the Metter-Candler Welcome Center and Bevricks Char House Grille. A little further from Metter, her products can be found in Statesboro, GA, at Food World on Fair Road, Heavenly Ham and Ellis Meat Market. Stores aren’t the only place to find these rare treats. They can also be purchased online at MaMa E’s website, www.mamaesbakery.com, where customers can have MaMa E’s goodies shipped directly to their homes. Marie and her helpers also travel all across Georgia to festivals, where they give out samplers and meet new and exciting people. “It’s fun to share our foods and tell people how we make them,” says Marie. “You meet a lot of nice people. You get to tell them about your hometown, and you usually meet someone who knows somebody from Metter, and they say, ‘Everything’s Better in Metter!’” she said. Each treat is sealed in air-tight packaging to ensure that it will stay fresh until the very last piece is gone. The cheese straws come in four different sizes: a bag, a 7-ounce box, a 12-ounce box, and a 20-ounce box. In each divinity candy box are 12 pieces, and the fudge and cornflake peanut butter cookies both come with 30 pieces. With her helpers, Marie said they can make quite a bit of product in a short amount of time, and that has allowed her business to keep growing each and every year. Her husband, Sherrill Motes, also helps her bake. “He can do just about anything I can do now,” Marie said.


For more information about MaMa E’s Home Bakery, visit their Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MaMaEsBakery or their website at www.mamaesbakery.com. The bakery can also be reached at (912) 531-3269 or through email at mamaesbakery@yahoo.com.


“FOR YEARS, TOBACCO ALWAYS PROPPED FARMING UP,” said Howell. “Looking back 50, 60 or even 70 years ago, if farmers had a bad year with their other crops, tobacco would prop them up and get them through.” And today, Howell remains passionate about the crop that has been an integral part of his life. From an early age, Howell said he was surrounded by tobacco, working the fields of his uncle’s farm for spending money. Throughout the years, he realized that growing tobacco was his dream and the challenge of the crop drove him. That’s why he chose to stay in the market even though most others took the buyout offer. “After the tobacco buyout, tobacco took a down slide,” he said, “but I chose to stay in it and suffered through the bad years.” Through those lower profit years, Howell worked to keep the crop going while incorporating new technology and new machinery to make the workload easier and more profitable. Now that there is a regrowth in the tobacco market, Howell said his additions have made all the difference and given him the edge he needs. “When the decline hit, there was very little profit margin, and it is a very labor intensive crop. Over the years, I’ve mechanized to cut down some of the growing costs, and now that tobacco is doing well again, the profit shows,” he said. “Mechanizing has allowed me to deliver a better product and I can be more timely with my harvests.” Howell got into the tobacco business in 2001. He and DeLoach maintain a total of 3800 acres, growing soybeans, corn, wheat and peanuts. But their main crop has always been tobacco. “There’s a lot of work involved, but it’s a crop you will very seldom lose money on,” Howell said. With almost 500 acres dedicated to tobacco, Howell said he is happy with what he produces now. He currently has four contracts, totaling his yearly products to 1 million pounds per year. “I’m at a point where I’m comfortable where I’m at,” he said. “I know I can maintain and handle what I’ve got and do rotations as needed.” Now with a comfortable production level and state-of-the-art technology to aid in the process, Howell sees a long future working with the crop he loves. “It’s my heart and soul,” he said. “I’ve done it for so many years, I wouldn’t know what to do if I didn’t grow it.”

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obacco once covered the countryside, especially in southeast Georgia.That was before the Tobacco Buyout of February 2005. As a result of the $10 billion federal program, more than half of Georgia’s tobacco growers called it quits. But not Candler County Farmer Brian Howell. Howell and partner Charles DeLoach of Soggy Bottom Farms in Candler County never gave up on farming tobacco.

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TOBACCO PRODUCTION IN CANDLER COUNTY Tobacco is transplanted in mid to late March and on into April. Then it is fertilized and sprayed for insects, funguses and sometimes bacteria, just like any other crop. Later in the season, the plants are sprayed for sucker control, which is to keep the plant from flowering out. This process makes the plant put on more leaf material, which is what is harvested to sale. The leaves are usually harvested three to four times depending on the plants and the growing season. After each harvest, the leaves are placed in bins then put into tobacco barns to dry. The barns are heated with propane heaters to dry the leaves down to as close to 0 percent moisture as possible to pull all the moisture out of the stems of the leaves. After that is reached, they slowly add back moisture just enough to make the

leaves pliable by basically steaming the leaves. This allows the leaves to be bailed into squares without the leaves crumbling and falling apart for shipping. This process is done after each harvest, three or four times each growing season -- and even more if it’s a really good year! Howell is one of three main tobacco farmers in Candler County, along with Ray Odum and the Holland brothers, reports Extension Agent Chris Earls. The crop covered 402 acres in 2013, 533 in 2014 and 318 in 2015, with yields of $1.5 million in 2013 and 2015 and $2.6 million in 2014. Before the tobacco buyout, Earls said that tobacco was grown throughout the county. “Back then, cotton, peanuts and tobacco were probably the main crops,” he said, “with soybeans and corn thrown into the rotation to mix things up.”

Today, tobacco acres are determined by contract. “A company will give you a contract for so many pounds and you plant enough acres to cover your contract,” Earls said. These contracts are usually for 3-5 years, and typically are renewed if the producer meets his quota like he is supposed to. “The other thing about these contracts,” Earls said, “is they have quality control attached to them as well. They check for chemical residues and such. If your tobacco comes back positive, they usually warn you the first time, but after that, they send your tobacco back, and if it keeps happening, they will eventually cut your contract.”

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Candler’s Keeper

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here are those people who complain that “somebody ought to do something,” and then there are those people who do it. Candler County’s Barbara Hunnicutt is one of those people who “does something” when a problem presents itself.

MRS. HUNNICUTT, a native of McIntosh County, first came to Metter as a student teacher in 1958. She foresaw a future as a home economics teacher; however, life had different plans for this dynamo. Instead of home economics, she was hired to teach elementary education. Being one who was always determined to know as much as she could learn about a subject, she continued her education at Georgia Southern, studying how to teach remedial reading, eventually earning the Master’s and Specialist degrees and becoming a Reading Specialist. All of this happened while she was creating a family with husband Lanier “Eenie” Hunnicutt. The couple raised three children: son, Len, and daughters, Holly and Ginger. According to Mrs. Hunnicutt, “Somewhere along the way, I got into science and couldn’t get out of that!” Teaching science to elementary students in the 1970s and 80s, she became passionate about two things: gardening of all types and recycling. Having students in a primarily rural community who did not understand where their food came from along with watching the amount of paper and aluminum cans that were going into trash bins led to the creation of Metter Elementary School’s Outdoor Classroom. “This was a collaboration between all of the teachers; the principals, Miss Charlotte (Coursey) and Miss Janice (Waters); the Board of Education and the community,” insists Hunnicutt. Even so, she was the one who spearheaded the project. Through purposefully educating the community’s children who took the lessons home to their parents, the amount of trash recycled through the Outdoor Classroom’s projects grew from a first year 400-pound total to the all-time high of 3 tons of paper and cans being recycled in 1996! Those children who first learned about recycling in Mrs. Hunnicutt’s Outdoor Classroom are parents of Metter Elementary School’s current students. Many of those parents have become lifelong recyclers. In addition to recycling, the Outdoor Classroom focused on gardening of all types. Mrs. Hunnicutt and her students worked at beautifying the campus of the school at its previous location on East Lillian Street. Remnants of the Classroom’s projects can be seen on the grounds of the building that was once an elementary school as there are plants, shrubs, and even rose bushes still growing around the campus. Another vestige of the Outdoor Classroom that stands on the old school grounds is the pavilion on the east side of the parking lot. For the pavilion Mrs. Hunnicutt led fundraisers and collected donations to purchase a strip of land that the Rhoney family was selling. It was the site of a local sawmill that had been closed for many years. Through a matching fund grant from the Georgia Forestry Commission’s Program for Community and


Sustainable Forestry, $5000 was awarded and matched with local donations to build the pavilion on the existing foundation of the sawmill’s office. The pavilion was used for the study of science as well as for special events such as Arbor Day programs, picnics, and the school’s annual Heritage Day celebration held each year prior to Thanksgiving. Paths were cut through the area providing places for children to study the flora and fauna of the area. Eventually, heavy-duty picnic tables and even a grill were added so that the area could be more useful to teachers and their students. After many years, Mrs. Hunnicutt retired from teaching, but she didn’t stop solving problems. She got more involved with one of her passions, the Metter Garden Club. Having been a member for many years, she had not been able to be as involved as she would have liked while busily teaching recycling and science at Metter Elementary School. She served as president of the group for several years and is now the Civic Improvement Chair of the club. In that role, she has spearheaded projects such as planting flowers in the city park, beautifying the Welcome Center at Highway 121 and I-16, and caring for the flower beds at the Southeastern Technical College’s Candler County Adult Learning Center. Presently, she is involved in the planning for a new Outdoor Classroom at the new Pre-K through 8th grade school facility on Highway 129 South of Metter. In addition to the Garden Club, Mrs. Hunnicutt has jumped into the Candler County Historical Society. Once again raising funds for special projects, she has helped secure grants and donations to create the Candler County History Museum, located in the old two-story Metter High School building on the corner of West Vertia and College Streets in Metter. At the present time, the first floor of the museum is completely heated and air conditioned; however, the upstairs is almost uninhabitable because of the extreme

heat of the summer months and the cold of the winter. Whether cutting tickets for a McDonald’s Pancake Supper or writing grants for other fund sources, Barbara Hunnicutt is in action, so there is no doubt the project will be completed. A few years ago, Mrs. Hunnicutt took on another project based on the “somebody ought to do something” philosophy. In 2009, she experienced a major health crisis when she became very ill. Over the course of being diagnosed and treated, she recognized that there was a need for more physicians in the community, so she created the Candler County Physicians Scholarship Fund to honor the physicians who currently treat local residents as well as to memorialize the doctors who have served the community since the founding of Candler County. “Georgia is facing a shortage of health care workers such as dentists and doctors and rural residents are losing access to medical and dental care,” explains Hunnicutt. This is a by-product of the ever-increasing expense of attending medical or dental school, she explains. The scholarship, two given annually, is awarded with “no strings attached.” However, it is hoped that the gift of the scholarship will encourage the recipients to return to a rural community, perhaps even

Metter, to practice medicine. The group dedicated to raising funds for the Candler County Physicians Scholarship fund has worked closely with the Georgia Health Sciences Foundation to provide many different ways for individuals, families, businesses and other groups to give, whether it be a major gift ($5000 and over), or through deferred gifts, annual gifts, or any other type of contribution. They also are constantly busy raising funds through traditional fundraisers such as spaghetti suppers and selling Papa Buck’s cards. Mrs. Hunnicutt explained the amount of money needed to fund the annual budget for the scholarships by saying, “If one thousand people would give just $25 each, we would raise $25,000!” That seems like a small amount to give to be able to ensure proper healthcare for the community, she explains. How Mrs. Hunnicutt juggles all of the pancake supper tickets, Papa Buck’s cards, grant applications, Historical Society meetings, garden club projects, and family obligations is a mystery even to those who know her best. They just make sure they never say, “Somebody ought to do something,” in her presence because they know that will lead to her figuring out a way to “just do it.”

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CANDLER COUNTY is a strong supporter of its school system. That is evident in the multiple interactions between the school and the professional community, through such opportunities as the new pilot program, the Gifted Career Exploration Internship. It is also obvious in the annual Eight Days for Education event, sponsored by the Candler County Foundation for Public Education, which raised $30,000 last year alone to provide opportunities for students outside of the traditional classroom setting. The Athletic Boosters also enjoy huge community support, raising an estimated $90,000 this year in cash and in-kind contributions for Metter High and

Stillmore, Georgia, houses 200 students in grades K3 through 12. And educational opportunities do not end on graduation day! Post-secondary offerings abound right here in Metter and in nearby communities. Candler County is centrally located within 30 minutes of Georgia Southern University and Ogeechee Technical College in Statesboro, East Georgia State College in Swainsboro and Statesboro and Southeastern Technical College in Swainsboro and Vidalia. Right here in Metter, Guido Bible Institute is a ministry-focused four-year Christian college located on the campus of the Guido Evangelistic Association.

CANDLER COUNTY SCHOOL SYSTEM

DAVID EMANUEL ACADEMY

GEORGIA SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

SOUTHEASTERN TECHNICAL COLLEGE

metter.org

deaeagles.com

georgiasouthern.edu

southeasterntech.edu

Metter 912.685.5713

OGEECHEE TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Statesboro 912.681.5500

ogeecheetech.edu

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Middle School athletic programs. Candler County School System serves students from preK through 12th grade at one large campus on Hwy. 129 South, where state of the art technological and innovative programs are provided. All across the grade spectrum, students are exposed to STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) programs, including robotics and videography/filmography. Through the CTAE (Career, Technical Agriculture Education) education path, students get hands-on experiences in career fields specifically suited for them. For families who prefer a private school setting, David Emanuel Academy in nearby

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Stillmore 912.685.2456

Statesboro 912.478.4636

EAST GEORGIA STATE COLLEGE

Swainsboro | Statesboro 478.289.2000 ega.edu

Vidalia | Swainsboro 912.538.3100

GUIDO BIBLE INSTITUTE

Metter 912.685.2222

thesoweronline.com


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INNOVATION STARTS HERE

he three R’s of education – Reading, ‘Riting, and ‘Rithmetic – are the foundations of learning. They are to the mind what healthy eating habits are to the body. In our rapidly evolving society, these standards of curriculum are now the foundation for much greater educational programs, and schools across the nation are constantly challenged to evolve and integrate these fundamentals with new and innovative learning opportunities. Candler County Schools have risen to this challenge by choosing to adopt a Charter System status, and by doing so, have set the stage for educational growth that will have a positive impact on the community, the state, and most importantly, the students who attend Metter schools. everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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IN 2015 THE GEORGIA STATE BOARD of Education ruled that each school district would choose a certain system identification, as either a Charter system, an IE² system, or a Status Quo system. The Candler County Board of Education chose the Charter system status, which allows for greater flexibility in designing and offering expanded areas of curriculum. The Charter also allows the school system to earn additional monies for each child enrolled in the school district. In Candler County, those funds are earmarked for providing personnel and programs in areas of innovation that will benefit students, exposing them to new and different career options. One stipulation of the Charter agreement attractive to Candler County school board members was that each school in the system forms a School Governance Team. The purpose of these teams - comprised of parents, community leaders, and selected school staff - is to focus on personnel, finances, and curriculum offerings at each school. They also provide insights to principals, School Superintendent Bubba Longgrear, and school board members. Prior to implementing the Charter system, county school board members held a strategic planning workshop. Their goal focus was to enhance opportunities in fine arts, CTAE (Career, Technical, Agricultural Education), and Acceleration opportunities in AP (Advanced Placement), Pre-AP, and honors classes. These goals fit perfectly with Candler County’s Charter System goal, which is 58 |

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flexibility, not being bound by state rules that might limit the system from providing students with educational opportunities outside of standard curriculum development. One key component of the Charter system’s success is in the personnel hired by each school to lead new and challenging classes. According to Longgrear, “We want to be the most innovative Charter system in the state. Our main focus area is hiring personnel, some of whom may not be highly qualified in a traditional education background but are highly qualified in their field.” These instructors may not have planned to be teachers, but they have made great ones and lead the way in trade elective offerings including business, computer applications and repair, welding, ag mechanics, video production, and AP programs. One such instructor is Allen Lanier, who teaches a computer repair class at Metter High School. His students learn more than basic computer applications; they get hands-on experience building and repairing computers. Another dynamic teacher is Tony Lescak, a SCAD (Savannah College of Art and Design) graduate who leads a video production class. His students use state-of-the-art equipment to produce quality videos, including a daily morning news broadcast. Visitors to the school’s website can view these videos at www. metter.org/video-production-program-82c2dd41. It’s no surprise that, as Candler County is a predominantly agriculture-based community, Metter High’s ag programs are very popular. Robbie Dollar is the internship director and head of the ag cohort at the high school. The program, funded through the Charter, allows students to get real life, hands-on learning at businesses like Growers Supply and West Farms while enhancing their exposure and better preparing them for post-secondary programs at technical colleges and universities throughout the state. While offering career-oriented electives is an integral part of the Charter curriculum, school leaders recognize the importance of developing well-rounded students by offering


a variety of fine arts programs from kindergarten through a student’s senior year. Fine arts courses are available for all students, allowing them to explore areas of interest in art, music, and drama. Of course, the classes are only as good as the teachers who lead them, and the talented instructors at Metter Elementary, Middle, and High School have left little room for improvement. Jodie Kemp, K-5 art teacher, introduces children to the basics of drawing, painting, and sculpting. In the middle school, art teacher Kelly Brockway further develops her students in these areas. Once a student reaches the high school level, he or she can choose to take additional arts classes with Laura Huffmaster. Another area of fine arts students can explore is music, and with elementary and intermediate school music teacher Charles Van Deursen as their instructor, it’s no small wonder that last year over 100 students tried out for the sixth grade band. His energetic enthusiasm for music captures children’s attention and exposes talents they may not have known existed. When these students move on to the middle and high school, they become protégés of Toney Golden and Vic Fordham, who lead the concert and marching bands. If students’ talents lie less with instruments and more with their own voices, Alton West’s classes in chorus and drama are fun periods of the day. Art, drama, music – these courses were in danger of falling by the wayside in many schools, but they are alive and well in Candler County, and students are all the better for it. A Metter student’s career development begins without him or her really knowing it. It starts in kindergarten, with faculty and staff infusing academic lessons with the core components of business leader Sean Covey’s The Seven Habits of Happy Kids. Soft skill development such as speaking, writing, and interpersonal skills take place in classes each morning. Throughout the school year, students cycle through five Connections: Careers, Physical Education, Art, Music, and Computers. Each student attends two Connections classes a day. When students reach the middle school, they further explore these areas and are even able to job shadow, seeing these career areas in action. By students’ freshman year, they are really able to explore career pathways leading to internships with local businesses. Not only is this a wonderful opportunity for the students, but it is having a positive impact on the community by strengthening school/ community relationships. After all, today’s students are tomorrow’s leaders and the

future of the community. When Candler County school and community leaders first adopted the Charter status, they saw an opportunity, a chance to break away from traditional educational mindsets. As Longgrear states, “For so long we as educators have been guilty of thinking that the ‘right’ way is the way we’ve been doing it. Now the Charter gives us that pass to get out of that way of thinking.” The question that leads each decision is this – What’s best for the kids? The answer is, Let’s try it and see. If it fails, we’re all the better

for trying. Longgrear sums up the Charter impact on Metter schools simply: “We want to use our Charter to create a flexible system for students where they can enhance their individual talents and interests, and ensure those students have an advantage because they were part of the Candler County School System. As a result, the community will benefit, the region will benefit, the families will benefit.” With the positive impact Candler County’s Charter system has had so far, the future looks very bright, very bright indeed.

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FULL STE M AHEAD

andler County Schools are picking up STEAM! Most schools are highlighting STEM programs which feature Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. The schools in Metter have added the important element of the ARTS. STEAM is Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts, and Mathematics. In a time when many school systems are eliminating fine arts programs due to budget constraints, the schools in Metter, Georgia, are ensuring that each child from kindergarten through high school graduation has the opportunity to explore art and music.

ACCORDING TO DR. CADEISHA COOPER, assistant superintendent of Candler County Schools, “We are working diligently to make sure that our students are prepared for a competitive job market.” She points out that the inclusion of arts in education is a key to creativity, leading to the growth of innovation, which is necessary to create new industries in the future. “This is a win-win scenario because new industries, with the jobs they bring to our community, are the basis of our future economic well-being,” explains Dr. Cooper. Art instruction for Candler County students starts early. Jodie Kemp, kindergarten through fifth grade art teacher, works with each child at least once per week through Metter Elementary School and Metter 60 |

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Intermediate School Connections classes. All 961 students in MES and MIS visit the art classroom on a rotation basis. By the end of each school year, each child in those grades has spent about 36 hours in Kemp’s art class. To create interest, projects are thematic and each young artist is able to experience success. At the end of the school year, student projects are put up for sale in a silent art auction. Parents and others are able to “donate” to the art program while taking home the masterpieces created by these “little Rembrandts.” Art instruction continues into Metter Middle School, where teacher Kelly Brockway builds on Kemp’s elementary instruction. Middle school art classes are filled each year as students choose their Connections classes, which means not every middle school student takes art. Those who choose art classes are generally more interested in the subject and may have experienced success in their earlier study of art. Approximately one-third of all Metter Middle School students are enrolled in art each year. In 2015-2016, that was 112 of the pre-teens focusing on developing skills as artists through their art classes. After middle school, students are able to choose art as an elective class at Metter High School. Art teacher Laura Huffmaster, a graduate of the Art Institute of Atlanta, wants to see her students find success that many of them thought that they were unable to achieve, so she regularly puts the work of her 51 students out in public in the form of exhibits and as entries in art contests.


Each year, MHS art student work is displayed at the Statesboro Kiwanis Ogeechee Fair’s Fine Arts exhibit. Works are entered in mediums such as color pencil drawings and mixed media projects. Students who place win ribbons and cash prizes, in addition to gaining confidence in their abilities as artists. Advanced students display their work in Georgia Southern University’s School of Education in a project designed to promote art education. Being chosen to exhibit is an honor that earns the student artist notoriety among students from other schools in the area. Contests also help student artists to develop their skills and confidence. Contests such as the Nutrition Advisory Council Art Contest and the Farm Bureau Insurance Calendar Contest have had Metter art students earning accolades, cash prizes, and an audience for their work through state-wide publications. Perhaps the most unique and special reward was the prize for the Fluttering Through Plains Art Contest. The winners of this state-wide art contest were honored to be presented their awards by none-other-than Georgia’s home-grown President, Jimmy Carter. Lizbeth Ventura from MHS was the 2015 third place winner! The culmination of the academic year’s art instruction is the Fine Arts Night Exhibit held annually to highlight the artwork of all MHS art students. The work of students of all ability levels ranging from those with special needs to the academically gifted are displayed all together as each student shows his or her success to the public. STORY CONTINUES PAGE 63 everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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n addition to art instruction, the Candler County Schools has invested in music programs. Mr. Charles VanDeursen, music teacher for kindergarten through fifth grade, instructs the same 961 students as their art teacher. Music and art classes are alternated with physical education, keyboarding, and careers. In the music classroom, there is a great emphasis on rhythm and basic elements of music. Van Deursen says, “Students in my class play baritone ukeleles, guitars, bass, steel drums, xylophones, metalophones, conga drums, bongos, tubanos, keyboards, and other various small rhythm instruments.” With the number of students and the many instruments being played, the music classroom is often a cacophony of sound as the students don’t just study music, they play music!

One of VanDeursen’s most innovative and popular techniques for teaching music is the “Borrow a Ukelele” program. Students in music class are allowed to “check out” a ukulele, much like checking out a library book. Each student gets to keep the instrument for one week so that he or she can practice and experiment with the instrument at home. Many parents express that they are glad to be able to hear their child playing a musical instrument. In the 2015-2016 school year, ukuleles were sent home with almost 500 students. In the midst of teaching children rhythms using the various instruments in the classroom, VanDeursen teaches the children songs ranging from the traditional folk songs to tunes that help them learn academic subjects. Those students who discover the beauty of their own voices have the opportunity to take part in an afterschool chorus program in which they practice for an hour after school one day each week. There is also an afterschool rhythm band. Upon completing fifth grade and heading to Metter Middle School, music instruction moves into the realm of band. Middle school band begins with a music aptitude test from which Band Director Toney Golden determines which students might have musical talent. Starting the year with determination of which instrument is best for each student, sixth grade band students show growth very quickly. By Christmas, the sixth grade band is ready to perform for proud parents, grandparents, and friends who are amazed that their child is a part of this musical experience. Band classes continue through seventh and eighth grade bands. In all, Metter Middle School has 118 students enrolled in band classes and learning to play instruments. In addition to music study through band, students in grades 6 through 8 have the opportunity to continue their vocal music experience through the Metter Middle School Chorus. Following middle school, band classes continue to be offered to students at Metter High School. A highlight of high school music instruction is marching band. The Metter High School Marching Tiger Pride performs at all MHS football games. They cheer on the Tigers

as well as entertain the spectators through the half-time show and playing tunes and drum cadences throughout the game. The marching band also participates in the MHS Homecoming Parade, the Metter Christmas parade, and the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade. Because band is about more than just entertaining crowds, the Tiger Pride attends marching festivals each fall. During the festivals, the band performs a version of their half-time show and is judged by professional musicians in areas ranging from individual sections, such as flag team and drum line, to the entire band. In recent years, the Metter band has earned all Superior and Excellent ratings, proof of the hard work and talent of the students and their director. After marching season, musicians are able to participate in Concert Band. This group performs more serious music and the students work to perfect the musicality of their performance without the distraction of marching. The Concert Band performs at programs throughout the year ranging from the outdoor Veterans Day program to the Fine Arts Night that culminates the school year. The proof of the success of Concert Band is determined at concert festivals during which the Concert Band is judged. The high school Concert Band regularly earns Superior ratings. MHS also offers Chorus as an elective class for those interested in vocal music. Director Alton West, himself a product of the Candler County Schools, works with these teenagers to perfect their vocal techniques. The group regularly performs for events in the community. As a part of their exposure to music beyond that which they listen to on their I-Pods and radios, West takes his chorus students on field trips to see musical theater performances. He has even taken members of the MHS Chorus to New York City where Metter students experienced a Broadway musical. According to the New Harris Poll, 93% of Americans believe that the arts are vital to providing a well-rounded education. A well-rounded education leads to adults who are able to learn and succeed in the classroom and in life. To this, Candler County Schools say, “Full STEAM ahead!”

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southern cuisine...

If you are from the South, it is comfort food. If you are just visiting, it is a CULINARY DELIGHT... And Metterites take their Southern cuisine seriously. That’s obvious to anyone who drives through town with their windows down. Just try to ignore all the tempting, aromatic smells — fried chicken ... barbecue ... sizzling steaks ... fiery fajitas! And that’s just a brief listing of what can be found right here in Metter, Georgia -- much of which is located right along the interstate. Grab a Scooby Snack from Papa Buck’s BBQ or fresh country-style cooking at JoMax BBQ. For a full array of Mexican favorites, stop in at El Mariachi. At Bevricks Char House Grille, the menu is varied and includes everything from steaks hot off the grill to shrimp and grits. Or, for deli-style sandwiches and soups, make a stop downtown at IHS Pharmacy & Gifts. Metter Meats, located downtown, is a favorite for its low country boil and hot wings dinners. And as always, for dining on the go, such well-known stops as Burger King, Zaxby’s and McDonald’s have menu items to please the entire family. No matter where your taste buds lead, you will find a smiling face and a tempting menu! BEVRICKS CHAR HOUSE GRILLE 1055 Fortner Road 912.685.4110 bevricks.com BURGER KING 1065 South Lewis Street 912.685.2395 EL MARIACHI 1140 South Lewis Street 912.685.5000 elmariachi-barandgrill.com JOMAX BAR-B-Q 1120 South Lewis Street 912.685.3636 MCDONALD’S 1215 South Lewis Street 912.685.4663 mcdonalds.com METTER MEATS 30 North West Broad Street 912.685.7082 PAPA BUCK’S BBQ 1085 South Lewis Street 912.685.4421 papabucks.com PAUL’S POND HOUSE 1320 Crabby Lane 912.685.3400 THE SODA FOUNTAIN AT IHS PHARMACY & GIFTS 150 South Leroy Street 912.685.2803 ihsrx.com ZAXBY’S 1235 South Lewis Street 912.685.4361 zaxbys.com


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herbe Dekle has been the main breakfast and lunch cook at the Jet, located on the corner of Southwest Broad and South College Streets, for 22 years. Her success as a culinary icon is evidenced by the parking lot that is so full that cars are often parked alongside the building blocking traffic on South College Street.

WHEN CHERBE DEKLE WAS A YOUNG GIRL, she went into her mother’s kitchen to learn to cook. The grease popped as she attempted to fry an egg for the first time. The young chef screamed and ran from the room as her mother said, “Get out of my kitchen!” Now Cherbe is back in the kitchen for good! And people line up to enjoy her breakfast and lunch fare on a daily basis at Metter’s Jet #35. According to Cherbe, the only time the Jet is quiet and calm is from her 4:30 a.m. arrival until her first customer shows up. “That’s my ‘me-time’ so that I can get myself ready for my customers,” she says. It is during these quiet moments that she murmurs her daily prayer, “Lord, let it be whatever you have it to be.” Being late is not an option, so six days a week, she is in place promptly and is ready to greet her customers with a smile, a laugh and kind word. The first customer of the day arrives at 4:55 a.m., and Cherbe is always ready. After that first customer, the line is steady until 6 a.m. After six, when Cherbe’s co-workers Barbara Wilkins and Gussie Smith arrive, the Jet becomes busy, often with the line reaching from the kitchen in the back of the store all the way to the store’s double doors. Three days a week, Barbara assists Cherbe by manning the stove as Cherbe takes orders, prepares breakfast items and serves customers. On the days that Barbara is not working, Gussie takes over the role played by Barbara. Six days a week, this routine goes on without a hitch. To get an idea of how many customers frequent the Jet on a daily basis, Cherbe explains that the store goes through a case of eggs each day. Although she won’t share the “secret recipe,” Cherbe’s biscuit output is between 150 and 200 of the flakey delights per day. “Then there are the days when we have large orders on top of our in-store customers,” she exclaims. Sometimes local businesses or individuals will make a bulk order of biscuits, enough to serve their entire staff or even customers. This can be an extra 20 or more biscuits on those days. The biscuits are a big enough draw that Cherbe says some customers will turn around and walk out if they hear that there are no more biscuits that day. “I like my customers,” says Cherbe. “I try to brighten their day. I enjoy my customers and they enjoy me.” This joy at work is evidenced by

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the laughter shared between Cherbe and Barbara as they tease each other while working together. Cherbe says that she is the one in charge of the kitchen. That means that she takes all of the orders and does all of the serving while her assistant mans the stove. Sometimes when the line is especially long, she will catch the eye of a regular customer as a way of asking, “Your regular?” A nod tells Cherbe to go ahead and prepare that customer’s usual order. Even with all of the regulars at the Jet, Cherbe knows what her repeat customers want. She multi-tasks and gets those orders done while working on orders for others who are waiting in line. When asked what the most popular breakfast items are, Cherbe and Barbara say simultaneously, “Bacon and more bacon!” expressing the current trend in the food industry. She also says that the breakfast steak

is often ordered as is an unconventional breakfast entrée – salmon patties. “They order salmon patties with grits and eggs, and salmon patties on biscuits,” she explains. From 4:55 a.m. until 10 a.m., the line for breakfast is steady. In the earlier hours of her shift, Cherbe sees mostly local people who grab a to-go breakfast as they head out of town to work. Those coming in mid-shift are usually people who work in local businesses. Toward the end of the breakfast hours, customers are folks who have been at work for a couple of hours but who are taking their morning break. By the time breakfast is over, Cherbe is already preparing the foods on the day’s lunch menu. Favorite entrees with her lunch customers are fried and baked chicken and pork chops. Of course, there are vegetables and side dishes as well. Each day, Cherbe prepares greens (turnips, not collards), macaroni and cheese, and corn. Barbara says, “And that flat corn bread! You can’t forget that.” Cherbe agrees that her cornbread is a hit with the lunch crowd. She notes a different clientele comes in for lunch than breakfast. Lunch is almost entirely made up of locals who work in town. “They know the menus by the day of the week, so some people only come on pork chop day,” she explains. Of course, Southern fried chicken is available every day. The lunch period begins at 11 a.m. and lasts until the final customer is served, usually around 1 p.m. or a little later. Next comes cleaning up and getting ready for the next day. Cherbe does all of the ordering to insure that the right ingredients are in place, and she prepares the kitchen for the next day’s early arrival. She says, “I am ‘Happy go-Cherbe!’ when I am at work. My customers hype me up and I do my work to the best of my ability. I like things done accurately and I don’t want to see anyone waiting.” And that work ethic has paid off for over two decades. Cherbe has had opportunities to leave Jet 35, but she chooses to stay. She says Jet gave her a chance when she was a novice cook with only a couple of years experience working in the kitchen at a local nursing home. “At Jet 35, we look out for each other and we are like family.” Speaking of family, when Cherbe’s shift ends at 2:30 p.m., she heads home to her own family. She and her husband, Wedgley Holloway, have three children – Whitney Holloway, Dexter Holloway and Wesley Holloway. Cherbe’s home time is devoted to her family, so she fires up the stove at home and cooks for those she loves most – every day except Friday. So, on Monday through Saturday mornings, Cherbe’s car, complete with customized “Cherbe” license plate, is parked on the edge of South College Street next to the Jet. When it’s there, hungry Metterites know that they can stop in for a good meal and a good laugh. Whether you’re a regular customer or a first-timer, Cherbe will fill your order.


GREAT OUTDOORS, GET OUTSIDE

BEAVER CREEK PLANTATION 3698 Highway 80 East Twin City, Georgia 478.763.2920 beavercreekplantation.com MILL POND KAYAK 313 Fifth Avenue Twin City, Georgia 478.299.6616 millpondkayak.com

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WILLOW LAKE GOLF CLUB 550 West Willow Lake Drive Metter, Georgia 912.685.2724 willowlakegolfclub.com

BEAVER RUN RV PARK 22321 Excelsior Church Road Metter, Georgia 912.685.2594 beaverrunrvpark.com MOSLEY’S ANIMAL EXIT FARM I-16, Exit 98 (Highway 57) Metter, Georgia 912.685.5577


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f you love the Great Outdoors, there’s no better place to be than right here in Metter, Georgia. Whether it’s a day hunting in the woods or sinking a lure at a local pond, a few hours on the links or an afternoon at Metter-Candler Recreation Department, the opportunities are limitless for you to enjoy all things outdoors. For many in the community, at least part of the year is spent at the recreation department where youth league softball and baseball are enjoyed each spring and football, cheerleading and soccer take place in the fall. Parents, grandparents, aunts, uncles and friends gather with folding chairs in tow to cheer on their favorite athletes and often stay long after the last out or the final buzzer to catch up with friends they have run into. More than 600 youth and volunteer coaches are involved in recreation department programs, where life skills such as teamwork, dedication and discipline are valued even more than having the winning score. For the golf lover, a day at Willow Lake is too tempting to resist, especially now with the new driving range open and ready for business. Golfers can enjoy the challenge of the 18-hole course and even take part in one or more of the tournaments held each year at the course, including the Dan L. Lanier Tournament, the Dan J. Parrish Tournament and charitable fundraising tournaments, such as Candler Cares and the Tiger Athletics Night Golf event. For a less organized approach to outdoor fun, hiking, fishing, canoeing, boating and other opportunities, a ten-minute drive will find you in nearby Twin City at George L. Smith State Park. Or within 30 minutes, you can be in Reidsville at Gordonia-Alatamaha State Park. No matter what your sport may be, Metter and Candler County are ready to provide you with numerous activities to enjoy the great outdoors.

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little DIAMOND

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KINGS

ipers are dangerous creatures. Grassy fields are their natural habitats, although they can often be found sliding around in the red Georgia clay. Vipers are travelers, moving from field to field, striking fear into the hearts of all who face them. Easily recognized by their colors, red and black, they’re fast, determined, focused, and deadly…especially with a baseball bat.

VIPERS BASEBALL WAS BORN IN METTER in the fall of 2011. Coaches Scott Glanton, Bubba Longgrear, and Ryan Hadden wanted to do something to keep kids playing baseball after summer recreation All-Star tournaments had ended. They knew they had a talented group of boys who, with further development, could not only be competitive, but win state championships in GRPA recreation ball. Longgrear began a search and found a fall travel league in Glennville. They played every Saturday, and with hard work, the team saw progress. By the next spring, Vipers placed third in the state. The travel team played tournaments from Statesboro to Waycross, getting better and better with each game. In 2013 the Metter/Candler All-Star 8U and 10U teams, comprised mainly of Viper players, did what they set out to do. They won the state GRPA championship. Goal reached. As the teams developed, so did the organization itself. Coaches Glanton, Longgrear, and Hadden wanted to establish an identity for the teams separate from the Candler County Recreation Department and the Metter Tigers organization. They wanted to be self-funded, raising their own money through ticket sales and sponsorships from local businesses. They have not been disappointed with the local support the team has received through the years, either. “People have been good to us, to the Vipers. Parents, the rec department…businesses that support and sponsor us,” says Coach Glanton. That shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone, though. It’s simply what people in Metter do, and that’s a great thing.


Viper is a multi-team organization, competing at the 8U (8 and under), 10U, and 12U levels. There are no tryouts. Viper coaches watch teams closely during rec ball season and contact parents of the players they think would be an asset to the organization. Although players at all age levels are recruited to play on the Viper teams, the best development happens when they start early, as “diamonds in the rough,” so to speak, on the Viper 8U squad. The current Viper 8 and under coaching team, led by head coach Jordy Carter, keeps a sharp eye out for talented seven and eight-yearold players during rec ball season. Raw skill isn’t enough to be chosen as a Viper, though. “Not every player selected for Viper is a superstar,” says Carter. “We want kids who are willing to work and learn the basics to make a baseball player.” Carter says Viper coaches look for kids and parents who will be committed to the time and effort it takes to play on a travel baseball team. At the 8U level, every year the team is basically starting from scratch, and the lessons begin immediately. “We’re about having fun, learning the game, and putting in the work,” states Coach Carter. The first lesson is the one that hopefully lasts a lifetime: learning the importance of a team and building relationships through team sports. A great lesson taught through a great game. Once a player becomes a Viper, he begins a journey of development that hopefully takes him much farther than around the bases. Practice is paramount. The schedule is organized to keep players engaged and moving. All good teams do this, so what makes Viper players different from other travel organizations? The answer is simple: unity. Viper coaches at every level have tried and have been successful at building teams from players right here in Candler County. These boys play together at every practice, at every game. More than camaraderie is fostered; discipline, sportsmanship, and a positive attitude are instilled in each player. As Coach Longgrear states, “Work hard and good things happen. That’s the lesson we want to teach.” These aren’t just baseball lessons; they’re life lessons. One such player who has learned these lessons is 12 year old Viper Antoine DeLoach. First recruited by coaches Glanton and Longgrear, he’s come up through the Viper ranks, playing on the team since he was 8. This is his last season as a Viper, but he’s got nothing but good memories and valuable lessons to take with him as he moves forward as a baseball player. When asked what the best part of being a Viper has been to him, DeLoach replied, “The coaching and the way we have fun.” He’s a natural player, according to his coaches, comfortable in any position. He likes center field the best, though. That’s where the action is, and that’s where he wants to be. He doesn’t hesitate when asked what has been the most important lesson is he’s learned as a Viper, and it’s got nothing to do with being a center fielder. “Having a good attitude is the most important thing,” Antoine says with a smile. That’s a lesson that applies on and off of the field. At the end of the day, the boys may be dirty and exhausted, but ask any of them if they’re ready for another game, dollars to doughnuts, the answer would be, “Put me in coach; I’m ready to play.”

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IN THE LATE 1980s, a young county agent was assigned to the Candler County Extension Office. In addition to his duties helping farmers to get the most yield from their land and assisting them with problems that ranged from pest control to fertilizers, that agent, Brad Phillips, introduced some Candler County youngsters to the sport of target shooting. At the time, target sports were sponsored by the Jaycee organization. Very quickly, these boys and girls rose through the ranks of district and state shooters and even placed at the national level. When people talk about the early days of shooting sports in Candler County, some of the names that are mentioned are “the Attebery boys,” “a Mills girl,” and there is even a rumor of a former nationally-ranked shooter who is now a pretty high ranking law enforcement agent. After years of coaching shooters and helping farmers, Phillips retired and another Extension agent moved into Phillips’ position. This agent had grown up in Metter as an active 4-H’er and came back home with a wife and two girls. That agent was David Spaid. By then, the shooting sports program had moved into the realm of 4-H as Project SAFE. Spaid picked up the team and led it for many years with his two daughters, Jessica and Brittney, competing and showing their talents in the same way that the first Candler County shooters had done years before. In time, Spaid, too, retired. Again, a young agent was hired to assist Candler County’s farmers through the Extension office. This young man, Chris Earls, had much interest in shooting sports because he had attended the University of Georgia at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College on a shotgun scholarship. Under the leadership of these Extension agents, shooting sports has become a bedrock of the Candler County 4-H program. How do these youngsters, some as young as nine-years-old, develop into competitive shooters? It’s a family affair. Each fall, Candler County’s 4-H Agent, Angie Daughtry, gets the word out through the 4-H Cloverleaf Green Sheet publication that it’s time to sign up for the BB team. Open to children in fourth through eighth grades,

right on target

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n the early days of television, there was a western show called “Have Gun Will Travel.” Since the 1980s, Candler County 4-H’ers have had the same slogan as a theme. They have spent countless hours practicing their riflery skills, studying gun safety, and travelling literally thousands of miles demonstrating their prowess.


boys and girls take the news home to their parents and ask to join the BB team. Some of them are interested because they come from families where hunting is a way of life. Others want to join because a friend is on the team. A few want to sign up because they sign up for anything that 4-H offers. For whatever reason, the fall orientation meeting held at the Cooperative Extension office is usually standing room only. Parents listen as Team Coaches explain the program and have shooters from previous years demonstrate some of the things that members of the team have to do on a regular basis. As the kids’ eyes brighten at the sight of the youngsters handling their personalized guns with comfort and ease, some of the parents become nervous as they learn that each child has to be coached by an adult, usually a parent. “I thought this was one of those things that I would drop him (or her) off at practice and pick him (or her) up an hour or so later,” runs through the minds of parents. The emphasis on gun safety is evident from the beginning of the meeting. In the orientation meeting, prospective team members are told about the Daisy 499B, the only gun that can be used in NRA and 4-H shooting events. Fees and expectations are explained. Finally, deadlines for official sign-up are given and the meeting is adjourned to the sounds of parents and kids discussing whether or not BB team is the thing for them. Guns are ordered and registered team members are contacted with the date of the first team meeting. That meeting, which takes place at the indoor BB range located in an old metal building that used to be the high school weight room in the parking lot of the recreation department football field, is a time of both laughing and joking as well as nerves and jitters. First of all, team coaches explain the regular schedule for practices. Half of the shooters head to the classroom to begin preparation for the written test portion of BB competition. They are introduced to the 200 question true-false test that will quiz them over the SAFE program. They begin being drilled on the meaning of Project SAFE – Shooting Awareness Fun and Education. They are taught the dimensions of the shooting range and the basics of gun safety. This procedure will be repeated at each practice throughout the entire shooting season. As half of the shooters are in the classroom

studying, the other half are in the larger room of the building – the shooting range. They are each given a shooting mat, a kneeling roll, a ramrod, and a small bag of high quality graded BBs. The room’s floor is lined off into lanes measuring four feet wide and five meters long. (Ask a shooter and he or she will tell you that the five meters equals 16 feet, 4 ¾ inches. Yes, it is a test question.) The shooters and their individual coaches prepare for the first relay –

the prone position. The youngsters roll out their shooting mats, lie on their stomachs, and begin eying the targets posted at the end of each lane. Everyone on the range wears safety glasses, some shooters with one lens blackened with electrical tape. The chief range officer makes his call, “Is the line ready? The line is ready. Commence firing!” Each shooter’s coach takes a BB from his or her bag, loads the Daisy 449B by dropping

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the silver ball into the gun’s barrel, jams the ramrod down the barrel and passes the gun to the shooter. The shooters take their time and eventually fire. Then the gun is returned to the line coach to be reloaded so that the relay can continue. This is repeated until ten targets have been shot from the prone position. Upon finishing the tenth target, no shooters or coaches move until the chief range officer calls, “Cease fire.” Following the directions of the chief range officer, each coach moves downrange, removes the used target and affixes another target to the shooter box. Targets are given to a parent volunteer who scores the targets using the computerized Orion program. This is a great improvement over the early days, when targets had to be scored by hand and scores were often open to 76 |

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judges’ interpretation. The same basic procedure is followed for the standing position, the seated position and the kneeling position. In all, the shooting takes 10 minutes per position. Each shooter has his or her favorite position. Some are most comfortable shooting from the prone position because it offers the greatest stability. Others like to shoot standing up because that is most natural to them. A few favor the seated position; however, very few like to shoot from the kneeling position. As the season progresses, the movement between the line coach and shooter becomes almost a symbiotic relationship in which the two communicate with looks and motions and no need for words. After shooting all four positions, the

shooters in the first session change places with those who have been studying the written portion of the competition. After having concentrated so intensely on the target line, the shooters are sore and tense while the ones who have been studying are almost brain dead and are looking forward to the physical challenge of shooting. When the season begins, the whole process of shooting four positions takes over an hour because of technical difficulties, clarifications of what to do, and problems with equipment. By the time the shooters have been practicing for a couple of months, the shooters themselves have begun to understand what is working for them and what is not. The coaches, often not very experienced with guns themselves, have learned to hone in on gun adjustments ranging from adjusting sites to replacing barrels and weighting gunstocks. In early February, the shooters have been practicing for almost two months when it is time for the first meet of the year. Those who have been on the team before understand that the first match is usually rough. It is a VFW match held each year in Douglas, Georgia. Plans are made for travel to the match and the team coaches explain how the 4-H trailer will need to be packed to insure that all necessary items are on hand on the big day. This is an indoor match held inside a school because the weather is cold and usually rainy. At the VFW match, nerves are at a high level. The team gathers in the hallway and receives their instructions for the day. Some of the shooters take the test first while others begin their shooting. As the kids wait their turn on the range, they play video games, talk, and nibble on the healthy snacks their coaches bring along. There is no chocolate, no soda, and no running around. All of those are things that raise the heart rate and have ill effects on the sport of shooting. It is a long day that ends with an awards ceremony. Individual medals are awarded for those shooting the highest scores in each position as well as overall. Team trophies are also given for third, second, and first place. Pictures are taken before everyone hits the road back to Metter. It’s been a long day, about 10 hours from start to finish, not counting the hours spent in the car travelling to and from the match. A practice the next week, everyone is back at it preparing for the District 4-H meet. That will be an outdoor match. The head coaches warn everyone that the weather will affect the way the BBs fly. By the middle of March, it’s time to hit the road again. Off to District the Candler County BB team heads. Usually held in Toombs County, shooting happens – rain


or shine. The day usually starts off pretty cold with everyone wrapped up in blankets as they await their turn to go to the starting line. By the end of the event, the temperature is most always at a comfortable level for spending a nice spring day outside. At the end of the District meet, Candler County 4-H BB team members know if they have made it to the State BB Meet, held annually at Rock Eagle 4-H Center near Eatonton, Georgia. Shooters can get an invitation to the State Meet by their team earning enough points to qualify or they can qualify as individual shooters. For those who do not make the cut for the State Meet, their season is over. Everyone else is back in the practice facility the next week preparing for another day of shooting competition. The State Meet is held each year in April. Like District, it is an outdoor shooting match starting very early in the morning. Most participants arrive before first light in order to set up the team area and to get ready for a day of competitive shooting. Even in April, the morning temperature is cold and wet. Tents and camp chairs are set up and coolers and bags of snacks are unloaded. The event begins with the pledges – American flag and 4-H – “I pledge my hands to …” Shooting begins and lasts throughout the day with literally hundreds of young people and their coaches going step by step through the process – testing, prone, standing, sitting, kneeling. Finally, the match is over, but the day’s activities are not. At about 9 p.m., the shooters, who have been up since well before daylight, gather in the large auditorium at Rock Eagle to receive the results of the day’s event. Award are given for those who score 100 on the test. Each year, several children from Candler County receive certificates for this honor because they have been prepared for the test since the first night of practice. Then the big awards are given. Individual medals for each position are awarded. Finally, the team awards are announced. Walking away with a place in the Top Ten of the State gives local shooters a vote of confidence when they realize that there were over 100 teams competing. At that point, the official season for 4-H BB in Candler County is over; however, there is more competition for those shooters who decide to participate in the Georgia Games. Those who want to attend the Georgia Games continue practice for a couple more weeks. The trailer is packed once again for a trip to another competition. Another day of shooting, this time against individuals of the same age. More medals and more awards!

It seems that the time for traveling to meets would be over; however, there is more to come. Those shooters and teams who received invitations spend the first half of their summer preparing for the Daisy National BB Championships held each summer around July 4th in Rogers, Arkansas, the home of the Daisy BB Gun factory. For the past several summers, Candler County 4-H’er’s have enjoyed spending their Fourth of July at this event. Occasionally, a couple of the shooters are invited to the State Games of America, an Olympic-style competition held bi-annually at different locations across the country. In the 2015 State Games of America competition held in Lincoln, Nebraska, Candler County’s BB team member Katie Waters was chosen to carry the Georgia flag in the opening ceremonies that simulate that of the Olympics. At that competition against shooters of the same age, Katie won a gold medal in prone shooting and a silver in four position competition. The young shooters who travel throughout the state of Georgia and those who travel throughout the United States credit the 4-H Project SAFE with teaching them a lot about gun safety, teamwork, and geography. Being kids, they already knew how to have fun!

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hysical activity is an important facet to living a healthy life. But being physically active takes time and can be expensive depending on a person’s choice of activity and interest. Big gyms can be crowded and somewhat intimidating for some, and heavily advertised exercise programs such as P-90X and Crossfit may be more of a challenge than beginners are ready for. What options are there for folks in Candler County who are pursuing a lifestyle of better health and overall well-being? Well, it depends on whether you prefer to work at your own pace or with a group of like-minded individuals.

BetterLiving

Therapy and Fitness North Williams Street 912.685.4331

BetterLiving Therapy and Fitness offers a 24-hour fitness facility in addition to providing post-operative physical therapy. Owner and physical therapist Penny Moore is well known by local athletes, and those who think they are athletes, as one tough therapist whose first priority is her patients’ recovery and orthopedic rehabilitation. When BetterLiving opened its fitness facility to the public in 2003, it was the only one of its kind in Metter. It was started because Moore saw firsthand that patients needed to begin, maintain, and progress their wellness after they’d reached therapy discharge level. “We have very active clients,” Moore says. “Most fitness members are former patients, our ‘wounded warrior’ patients who want to continue their wellness program.” Members who visit the gym during BetterLiving’s normal operating hours are able to use available equipment and receive help and guidance from Moore’s trained staff of physical therapy assistants. All of the exercise equipment, which includes treadmills, stationary bicycles, and weight machines, is also used for patient rehabilitation.

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| Chamber Community Magazine

24 Seven Family Fitness and Tanning Center North Broad Street 912.685.2474

24 Seven Family Fitness and Tanning Center is Metter’s newest fitness facility. Recently celebrating its second year of operation, the gym and tanning facility are part of a 14 location southeast Georgia franchise. Owner Sy Jones recognized an opportunity to offer complete gym services to Metter residents who would otherwise have to travel to Statesboro and beyond. Joining 24 Seven has its privileges. Members have 24 hour access to the Metter location as well as access to the other 24 Seven gyms in southeast Georgia. Zumba and yoga classes are also included with membership, as well as unlimited access to the tanning beds. The gym includes a Kid’s Corner with free Wi-Fi where children can play while Mom or Dad works out with the large selection of fitness equipment. Security cameras offer protection for members who visit the gym after normal business hours. Special membership packages are available for city, county, and board of education employees.

Nancy Wright Yoga 912.682.3594

If you’re looking to achieve better health through more than physical activity, consider attending Metter resident Nancy Wright’s weekly yoga classes. Wright, who considers herself a yoga practitioner, not a teacher, leads a class each Monday afternoon in Metter. When school is in session, the hour-long class is held at 4:30 p.m. in the Tom Bigwood community room at Metter Intermediate School. During the summer months, sessions take place in the Metter United Methodist Church social hall. The classes focus on bending, balance, stretching, and relaxation – centering the mind, body, and spirit. It might not surprise anyone to know that most of her “students” at MIS are teachers at the school. After a day of educating young minds and focusing young spirits, who would benefit more from the techniques Nancy leads the class through! Wright fully believes in the power of yoga to prepare and heal the body. She has had both knees and one hip replaced and credits yoga with healing and continued therapeutic benefits. No special equipment is needed to participate in the yoga classes. Just wear comfortable clothes. Classes are open to the community.


Candler County

Rehab and Wellness Center Cedar Street | 912.685.3213

Scottie Davis Group Fitness 912.362.0851

FIT

IS NOT A DESTINATION

IT’S A

WAY OF

LIFE

If you’re more into working out with others, Scottie Davis’s exercise group may be what you’re looking for. Davis, owner of Davis Marketing Company, is an Excelsior resident who also leads a small fitness group in Metter on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays. You’d better be an early riser, though, because the group meets at Studio South at 5:15 a.m.! Davis doesn’t consider herself an instructor leading a class in the traditional sense. To her, it’s more of a group effort to reduce stress and hang out with friends. Their goal is to support each other while promoting a healthy lifestyle. Often called “the drill instructor” by sweaty, exhausted participants, Davis believes that greater success is achieved working as a team, and as a team, the group works through various cardio routines and Hi-Lo circuit training. But always be prepared because, as Davis says, “No two classes are ever the same.” In addition to sharing the burn of a hard workout, the group also shares healthy eating tips and recipes. Davis, herself a juvenile diabetic, knows that smart eating choices are a big part of a healthier lifestyle, and diets geared only towards losing weight don’t necessarily guarantee good health. As Scottie says, “We’d rather be strong and healthy than considered skinny.” The class welcomes anyone who’s willing to put in the “sweat equity” to achieve his or her personal fitness and health goals.

The Candler County Rehab and Wellness Center, located across from Candler County Hospital, is an auxiliary service of the hospital and offers outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy services as part of a total wellness facility. The center also offers spa services including facials and massages by appointment. The center’s certified staff members pride themselves on being focused on the total health and wellbeing of each individual during their time as outpatients and as posttherapy clients. They are therapy-minded, helping clients transition from the role of patient to gym member by facilitating exercise programs appropriate for post-therapy physical fitness. Many clients have traveled the full circle of health and wellbeing, beginning as hospital in-patients, advancing to the swingbed program, graduating to outpatients, and finally becoming members of the wellness center. Members of the wellness center have 24/7 access to the gym facility. Affordable membership rates are available for everyone. One unique aspect of the Candler County Rehab and Wellness Center is its connection to Candler County Hospital’s Swingbed program which is designed for hospitalized patients who aren’t quite ready to return to their normal living arrangements. Swingbed is family/patient oriented, focusing on whole wellness, particularly the mental aspect of rehab and recovery. Able swingbed patients can take leaves of absence from the hospital to attend to personal activities at home. This type of therapy and rehabilitation is not simply individualized for patients’ needs but personalized for their complete recovery.

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Golfing is better...

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ep. Everything is better in Metter. Even golfing. Especially now, with the addition of a new driving range and practice facility to help even the most skilled golfers improve their game. The Gregg R. Wolff Practice Facility is now open and ready for business. And what a business it has been! Construction began on the facility in 2015 and included 15 hitting stations, several lighted for those wanting to hit a few balls in the evenings. The facility, which was constructed on the old 9th green, also features a short game area for working on short shots. The decision to give up the 9th hole was especially tough, though. “A lot of championships have been won on that particular hole,” Wolff said. The loss was made easier, however, because Clyde Johnston, a leading golf course architect, was brought in to design the new No. 9. Johnston, of Clyde Johnston Designs Inc. of Hilton Head, South Carolina, has years of experience in golf course design and recently oversaw the renovations of The Landings Club in Savannah. Despite the heartache of losing a favorite hole on the course, the benefits have been

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worth the sacrifice. “This is a great tool for the community,” said Wolff. “I believe the heart of the club’s growth will come with this new facility. Our members have never had something like this before, so they did not know what they were missing. But as a golf pro, I knew the importance of this driving range and how it will enhance our Club and make it better.” The construction of the new facility was funded through a Capital Campaign program, proof of club members’ and the community’s commitment to Willow Lake. From the club’s earliest days, the charter members of Willow Lake had a clear vision for their community. That vision led to the establishment of the original nine-hole private course and later expanded into what is now an 18-hole semiprivate course. It is the vision of the “next generation” of club members, including children and grandchildren of those founding fathers, that led to the enhancement of the club through the driving range and practice facility. With growth and expansion often comes change. But at Willow Lake some things stay the same -- especially the fun of a day at the links and the welcome smile of Wolff and his Pro Shop staff.

| Chamber Community Magazine


New 15 station driving range and pavillion

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Unto the least of these How faith feeds Candler County

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eeding the hungry has always been a mission of churches. And the churches of Candler County take this mission seriously, working on individual projects and through community-wide programs to see that the gospel is shared and that individuals and families are nourished and enriched.

Serving families at home For years, Metter Presbyterian Church has worked with America’s Second Harvest of Coastal Georgia to give free food to anyone in need. Through this Mobile Food Pantry, members of the church and volunteers from throughout the community gather and bag up food items to be distributed. The Mobile Food Pantry is designed to provide emergency food relief to residents who are elderly, disabled, low income, unemployed or at-risk in the community. Each visit typically serves well over 300 Candler County households and more than 1,000 individuals. The Pantry dates are announced in advance so that those in need can make arrangements to share in this bounty of love and compassion provided by the dedicated folks at Metter Presbyterian. At Metter Primitive Baptist Church, the youth of the community are nourished and encouraged during a weekly Prayer Breakfast, held on Thursdays at 7 a.m. during the school year. During these gatherings, bleary-eyed kids make their way through the line where breakfast might include cereal, sausage biscuits, fruit,

juice, and milk. After the meal, a devotional is led by one of the youth. Before boarding the church bus for the ride to school, all present gather together, hold hands, and bathe their day in prayer. “They say breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Prayer breakfast feeds their bodies and souls before a challenging day of school,” says a Metter Primitive Baptist Church volunteer. There is a song that claims “Love can build a bridge.” In Candler County, love has truly built “The Bridge.” The Bridge is an outreach program to help those who need assistance in Candler County. Initially conceived as the Community Care Cottage, The Bridge came into being when the Community Care Cottage’s 501(c)3 status was transferred. Located on the second floor of the Queensborough Bank building, The Bridge has shelves of nonperishable food items and racks of clothing available for those in need. The program is an affiliate of the local Family Connection program. Local churches have taken on the role of staff for The Bridge and also work as suppliers. Congregations collect food items through donation boxes, Bags of Hope programs, and direct contributions. everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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Church members are encouraged to volunteer to staff The Bridge each Monday and Thursday from 9 until 11 a.m. During their work time, volunteers might assist with loading and unloading groceries, sorting clothing, greeting and talking with those who are in need of services and always leave having experienced a blessing. The Bridge also accepts monetary donations because this is always a need. Whether a family has been burned out in a house fire or their money runs out before their next payday, there is a

need for funds to assist with keeping the power on for a family, providing overnight lodging in a local motel, or providing gas to get to a doctor’s visit. Each person’s case is individually reviewed to ensure that the money is spent on its intended purpose. “We depend on church support in order to exist,” says Family Connection Director Lisa Rigdon, “so it is imperative that we are good stewards of the gifts The Bridge receives.” One of the best blessings that comes from The Bridge is when someone who

has been a client returns to work in The Bridge as a volunteer, she said. Another program jointly supported by local churches is Back Pack Buddies. Several years ago, it came to the community’s attention that there were children in the schools who were not eating at all over the weekend. It wasn’t that they were picky. It was like Old Mother Hubbard: The cupboard was bare. Churches stepped forward and began sponsoring the Back Pack Buddies. Enough kid-friendly goods for a weekend are packed into bags that are delivered to all of the Metter schools to be taken home in the backpacks or book bags of hungry kids. Each week of the month, a different church packs items such as Pop-tarts, cereal, Spaghetti-O’s, and other things that kids like to eat and that can be prepared without adult supervision. Shortly before Friday afternoon’s dismissal, bags are distributed and children head home with no worries about what they will eat over the weekend.

And serving those far away Well before Halloween, New Life Baptist Church and other area churches are already gearing up for Christmas – Operation Christmas Child, that is. New Life is an official Collection Center for the project that is sponsored by Samaritan’s Purse, an organization that is run by Rev. Franklin Graham, son of Dr. Billy Graham. The church has been involved in this project for 15 years. In the early years, the Metter location was a relay center. That meant that shoe boxes packed by people in the area were collected at the church located on Highway 121 South. Members would load the boxes up and deliver them to Savannah. About five years ago, the church became one of two collection centers in Southeast Georgia. New Life Baptist has six relay centers that deliver shoe boxes, which have been packed in cartons, to the Metter location. The cartons are loaded into a huge transfer truck that delivers the cartons of boxes to the processing center in Atlanta. To put the project into prospective, Patty Jackson, Collection Center Coordinator, gives the most recent statistics. Over 7000 shoeboxes came in to the Collection Center at New Life Baptist Church. There were 22,000 shoeboxes collected in the entire Savannah area. 84 |

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S

ince the local community became part of the Archway Partnership in 2013, more than 35 projects have been completed and more are in the works. The Archway Partnership is a unit of public service and outreach at the University of Georgia. The Partnership connects Georgia communities to the full range of higher education resources available at UGA to address critical community-identified needs. The community drives the process through an executive committee of community leaders and local organizations. The funding partners for the Candler County Archway Partnership include Candler County Board of Commissioners, Candler County Board of Education, Candler County Industrial Authority, City of Metter, Metter-Candler Chamber of Commerce and UGA’s Office of Vice President for Public Service and Outreach. In Candler County, the program is coordinated by Archway Professional Catherine Muse, who came to the local community in January 2016. Muse serves as liaison between the community and the university as she works to connect higher education resources to locally identified issues and priorities. A native of Brunswick, she is a graduate of Emory University and Columbia University’s School of Professional Studies.

Catherine Muse, Archway Professional

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To learn more, visit archwaypartnership.uga.edu


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WORSHIP THE ANCHOR WORSHIP CENTER Rev. Jessie Goodman, Pastor 88 Eldridge Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2258 Sunday Services: Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Services: Choir Practice: 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: 7:00 p.m.

CEDAR STREET BAPTIST CHURCH Bo Fulginiti, Pastor 255 Cedar Street Post Office Box 555 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5352 cedarstreet.org

Office hours: Mon-Fri, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Sunday Services: Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship: 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Services: AWANA: 6:00 p.m., during school year Adult Prayer and Bible Study: 6:30 p.m.

EVERGREEN BAPTIST CHURCH 5250 Highway 129 South Cobbtown, GA 30420 912-685-6460

Sunday Services: Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening: 7:00 p.m. Wednesday Prayer Service: 7:00 p.m.

EXCELSIOR BAPTIST CHURCH Justin Merritt, pastor 13048 Excelsior Church Road Metter, GA 30439 912-667-6113 excelsiorbaptistchurch.org Sunday Services: Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m.

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FAITH MINISTRIES FREE WILL BAPTIST CHURCH

HOLY FAMILY CATHOLIC CHURCH

Sunday Services: Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship: 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Services: Youth: 6:00 p.m. Bible Study: 7:00 p.m.

Spanish Mass: Saturday: 7:30 a.m. English Mass Sunday: 9:00 a.m. Communion Services Wednesday: 12:00 noon Religion Classes for Children & Teens Wednesday: 5:30 p.m. Bible Study Wednesday: 7:00 p.m.

Rev. Johnny Beasley, Pastor 855 South Leroy Street (VFW Building) Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5619

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF METTER Tom Osborne, Pastor

50 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 34 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2208 fbcmetter.com Sunday Services: Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship: 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Services: Fellowship Supper, FBC Kids Children’s Ministry, Youth Ministry; Adult Bible Study: 5:30 p.m. Other Services: Senior Adult Ministry: Third Thursday of each month, noon Men’s Ministry: Mondays, 7:00 p.m.

GRACE & TRUTH HOUSE OF WORSHIP

George Rhodes, Pastor 63079 Highway 46 East Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3006 Sunday Services: Youth Sunday School: 2:00 p.m. Praise and Worship: 3:00 p.m. Wednesday Services: Worship: 7:00 p.m.

1110 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5811

METTER CHURCH OF GOD 235 Matthews Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2763

Sunday Services: Sunday School: 9:55 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship: 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Services: Kids, Teens, Adults: 7:00 p.m.

METTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Joe Anderson, pastor

611 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2986

Sunday Services: Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m.

METTER PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH

Elder Mike Newman, Pastor 85 South Kennedy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5188 metterprimitivebaptistchurch.com Sunday Services: Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship: 6:00 p.m.


WITH US METTER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Allen Cason, Pastor 30 West Lillian Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2777 metterumc.com

Sunday Services: Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Services: Dinner and devotions for children, youth and adults: 6:00 p.m.

MT. OLIVE CHURCH

Elder Wayne Fennell 1736 Williford Lane Cobbtown, GA 30420 912-685-5108 (Lora Williford) Sunday Services: Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m.

NEW LIFE BAPTIST CHURCH

Dr. William (Bill) Vansant, Pastor 29854 Highway 121 South Post Office Box 714 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-9700 newlifemetter.net Interpreted for the hearing impaired Sunday Services: Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship: 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Services: Youth & Children: 7:00 p.m. Bible Study: 7:00 p.m.

OPEN DOOR WORSHIP CENTER

Ray Woodcock, Pastor 9070 Oak Tree Road Post Office Box 833 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6083 opendoorworshipcenter.org Sunday Services: 10:30 a.m. Bible Study: 1st & 3rd Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. Kids Activities: 1st & 3rd Wednesday, 7:00 p.m. Ladies’ Bible Study: 2nd & 4th Monday, 6:00 p.m.

PINE GROVE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 25137 Portal Highway Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3580 mbcpinegrove@gmail.com pinegrovembc@weebly.com

Sunday Services: Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship: 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Services: Prayer & Bible Study: 7:00 p.m.

PRIMITIVE GROVE PRIMITIVE BAPTIST CHURCH Elder Richard Davis, Pastor Canoochee Road Metter, GA 30439

2nd & 4th Sunday Services Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m.

PULASKI BAPTIST CHURCH 178 Railroad Street West Post Office Box 113 Pulaski, GA 30451 912-685-1635

Sunday Services: Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Evening Worship: 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Services: Bible Study: 7:00 p.m.

ST. LUKE INDEPENDENT METHODIST CHURCH

210 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2368, Claude Boatright Sunday Services, 2nd & 4th Sundays: Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Wednesday Services: Bible Study: 7:00 p.m.

TREMOUNT TEMPLE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH

307 North Trapnell Street Post Office Box 81 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5831 Sunday Services: Sunday School: 10:00 a.m. Morning Worship: 11:00 a.m. Tuesday Services: Bible Study: 7:00 p.m. Thursday Services: Prayer Meeting: 7:00 p.m. 2nd Saturday of the Month Women’s Ministry: 12:00 p.m.

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or a time of rest and relaxation, solitude and selfreflection, there’s no better escape than the one provided right here in Metter. At Guido Gardens, located at 600 North Lewis Street, you can find what soothes the soul -- sparkling waterfalls, shimmering fountains, babbling brooks, lovely gazebos and inspiring music. Despite being right in the heart of town, a walk through God’s Three Acres brings immediate tranquility. At the glass-enclosed Chapel in the Pines, which is open 24 hours a day, you can pray or just escape from the cares of the world for a brief time. There is also an opportunity to experience history with a visit to the Empty Tomb and the Carpenter’s Shop, which are reflective of the era in which Jesus Christ lived. Each year at Christmas, the Gardens are aglow with over 1 million twinkling lights. More than 25,000 guests plan their trips in December to enjoy the Nights of Lights, which also features narrated Bible stories told through unique animated displays. Guido Gardens is home of The Sower, the late Michael Guido whose broadcast, print and radio ministry spanned all seven continents. Even today his “Seeds from the Sower” television and radio broadcasts are heard around the world and his devotionals are read in countless daily and weekly newspapers. Michael and wife, the late Audrey Guido, established Metter, Audrey’s hometown, as the base of their international ministry in the 1950s and today, a stop at the Sower Museum allows visitors to see a glimpse into the lives of this extraordinary couple. Also housed at Guido Gardens is Guido Bible Institute where students can receive certificates and advanced degrees in Biblical Studies and Church Ministry. The Gardens are always free and open to the public, and visitors can schedule guided tours. Wedding services and special events can also be held.

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| Chamber Community Magazine

Guido

Gardens

To learn more, call Guido Evangelistic Association, 912-685-2222, or visit sowerministries.org.


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meet& retreat

L O C AT I O N I S E V E RY T H I N G

From formal gathering places to rustic retreats, you will find a location to suit your event needs & all conveniently located in or near Metter.

1. LUCY’S GATHERING PLACE Freedom Lane • Metter 912.685.2385 2. WILCOX AUDITORIUM South College Street • Metter 912.685.5713 3. HISTORIC METTER DEPOT South East Broad Street • Metter 912.685.2527 4. BEAVER CREEK PLANTATION 3689 Highway 80 East • Twin City beavercreekplantation.com 478.763.2920 5. JACK STRICKLAND BUILDING Pine Street • Metter Metter-Candler Recreation Department 912.685.2370

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downtown district

Ace Hardware 212 South East Broad Street 912-685-5757 Amit Food Mart #3 285 North Lewis Street 912-685-5583 B & M Pool Spa & Patio 10 North Leroy Street 912-685-5411 Baylee Lane’s Boutique 15 North Kennedy Street 912-314-3238 Clyde’s Market 316 South East Broad Street 912-685-4422 Farmers Home Furniture 20 North Leroy Street 912-685-5037 Flower Basket, The 28 North West Broad Street 912-685-4454 Flower Gallery, The 47 North East Broad Street 912-685-3900 IHS Pharmacy & Gifts 150 South Leroy Street 912-685-2803 Martha’s Gift Shop 55 North East Broad Street 912-685-7658 Metter Graphics 13 South Rountree Street 912-685-3600 Metter Meats 30 North West Broad Street 912-685-7082 N Good Spirits 15 South Leroy Street 912-685-2488 Sugar Babies Consignments 25 North Rountree Street 912-682-2997 TCC Verizon Wireless 75 North East Broad Street 706-338-7945 Tom’s Pawn City 27 South West Broad Street 912-685-7442

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area retail

automotive

Clifton Inc. 1205 South Lewis Street 912-685-3030

Daniels-Bishop Chevrolet 905 South Lewis Street 912-685-2191 Metter Ford 125 Oak Tree Road 912-685-2141 Randy’s Wrecker & Service Center 800 South Lewis Street 912-685-6900

Club 46 535 North East Broad Street 912-685-4745 Clyde’s Market 1125 South Lewis Street 912-685-3950 County Line Package Shop 78251 GA Highway 46 East 912-685-2378 Digital Office Equipment 611-C Northside Drive West Statesboro 912-489-6964 Jay’s Fuel Stop 1095 South Lewis Street 912-685-2187 Metter Farm Market 980 South East Broad Street 912-685-6071 Metter Pharmacy 705 South Lewis Street 912-685-6337 Pladd Dot Music 38 North Main Street Statesboro 912-764-3230

antiques Antiques, Etc. 409 South East Broad Street 912.655-1081 Metter Antiques & Collectibles 10 North Lewis Street 912-685-5444 Vickie’s Antiques 63 North East Broad Street 912-685-3444

Statesboro Golf Carts 19925 Highway 80 West Statesboro 912-536-3348 Vault 206 745 South Lewis Street 912-685-4298

online retail Candace & Kids Soap Company candaceandkidssoapcompany.com Martin Awards martinawards.com

MaMa E’s Home Bakery mamaesbakery.com

Mama C’s Sweet & Spicy BBQ Sauce facebook/ Mama C’s Sweet and Spicy BBQ Sauce


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From the outdoor enthusiast to the downtown shopper, Metter and its surrounding locations offer something for everyone.

V I S I T A N AT T R A C T I O N N E A R YO U

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1. BEAVER CREEK PLANTATION Twin City, Georgia beavercreekplantation.com

5. MOSLEY’S ANIMAL EXIT FARM Metter, Georgia 912.685.5577

2. MILL POND KAYAK Twin City, Georgia millpondkayak.com

6. METTER WELCOME CENTER Metter, Georgia everythingsbetterinmetter.com

3. WILLOW LAKE GOLF CLUB Metter, Georgia willowlakegolfclub.com 4. GEORGE L. SMITH STATE PARK Twin City, Georgia gastateparks.org /GeorgeLSmith

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7. CANDLER COUNTY MUSEUM Metter, Georgia everythingsbetterinmetter.com 8. GUIDO GARDENS Metter, Georgia sowerministries.org

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9. BEAVER RUN RV PARK Metter, Georgia beaverrunrvpark.com

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W

ho would ever think to name a community-wide celebration, attended annually by thousands, as “Another Bloomin’ Festival”? Well, Metter businessman Pernal Franklin would. When he casually tossed the name out during that inaugural committee meeting in 1994, an identity was born. And 23 years later, Another Bloomin’ Festival is synonymous with spring, family fun, good food and a great day! The festival first began as a local celebration to allow merchants to do a little “spring cleaning” with sidewalk sales, auctions and bargains galore. From those humble beginnings, the festival has grown into a premier regional event that attracts over 10,000 to Metter’s downtown park each and every year on the day before Easter. But Another Bloomin’ Festival is more than just an ordinary festival. It is a time for folks to come together in Metter to celebrate the joy of spring, the blessings of Easter, and the thrill of “running into” friends and family -- some that you may have seen just the day before and others that you haven’t seen since the previous year’s celebration!


The festival takes months of planning by a dedicated steering committee, whose primary responsibility is to provide attendees with a full day of shopping, browsing, socializing, food, games, entertainment and more. The steering committee, under the umbrella of MetterCandler Chamber of Commerce, was chaired for 20 years by Carvy Snell, publisher of The Metter Advertiser, who officially retired after the 20th anniversary festival in 2013. The celebration is now chaired by Jaime Riggs, executive director of the chamber of commerce. Under her direction, the steering committee continues to promote the traditional events that attendees look forward to each year. The 2016 festival saw the continuation of all of the festival favorite activities, including the second annual BBQ Cookoff. Grill masters from around the region converged in downtown Metter during the early morning hours of festival day to fire up their grills and offer samples of some of the best barbecue in the area. Other returning events include the Bloomin’ Egg Hunt sponsored by Metter Kiwanis Club at The Anchor Worship Center, where the side lawn is allowed

to grow several weeks in advance to provide a true egg hunt experience. Here, hundreds of excited children line up in their age divisions, decorated baskets in tow, searching for brightly-colored plastic eggs and those elusive prize eggs. Other favorite activities include the 5K Run and One Mile Fun Run/Walk, sponsored each year by the Candler County Program for Exceptional Children and the Bloomin’ Bike Ride, sponsored by Metter Kiwanis Club. An aerial view of the festival is enjoyed by those taking part in the annual Bloomin’ Fly-in. Participants can take part in flights throughout the day, and the youngest fliers even get their names listed in the “World’s Largest Logbook” as part of the Annual Young Eagle Flight Rally. The log book is on permanent display at the EAA Air Adventure Museum in Oshkosh, WI, and can be viewed online at www.youngeagles.org. Some attendees arrive at the festival in classic style as part of the Danny Johns Memorial Cruise-in. Vintage auto enthusiasts meet outside of Metter and parade into town as Golden Oldies play on the loud speaker. The drivers then park

their classic rides on South Rountree Street, where the cars are displayed for everyone to enjoy throughout the day. Metter Garden Club and Cherokee Rose Garden Club bring their fair share of spring blooms to the Bloomin’ Festival during the annual Flower Show, which is housed at the Old Depot and open for public viewing on the afternoon of the festival -- after judges select their blue ribbon winners, of course. No festival is complete without the squeals of delighted children enjoying rides and attractions. And Another Bloomin’ Festival dedicates an entire area on North Rountree Street just for that purpose -- to the delight of the young and the young at heart. And in between all these scheduled activities, there is also plenty of opportunity for shopping, browsing and eating. The shaded West Central Park is home to the arts and crafts booths and also houses the food court, where traditional festival fare and novelty treats are available. Central and East Park feature commercial booths and an assortment of food booths as well. With so much to see and do in just one day, it is easy to see why so many choose to “Come, Spend the Day in Metter.” everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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CLIMATE Elevation 197 feet above sea level Average rainfall 46.2 inches. Candler County annually has about 240 consecutive frost-free days, compared with Atlanta’s 220 and Savannah’s 265. EDUCATION The Candler County School System is served by four schools: Metter Elementary (pre-K through 2nd grades), Metter Intermediate (3rd through 5th grades), Metter Middle (6th through 8th grades), and Metter High School (9th through 12th grades). These schools serve approximately 2,200 students and employ 145 teachers and 165 noncertified personnel.

Candler County School District 210 South College Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5713 www.metter.org

Nine miles away in neighboring Emanuel County is David Emanuel Academy, a private college preparatory school with a student count of 200 in grades K-3 through 12th grade. Call 912-685-2456 for more information. Higher education is readily available in and near Candler County at Ogeechee Technical College in Statesboro (20 miles); Southeastern Technical College in Swainsboro (25 miles) and Vidalia (28 miles); East Georgia State College Swainsboro Campus (25 miles) and Statesboro Campus (20 miles); Georgia Southern University in Statesboro (20 miles); and Guido Bible Institute in Metter.

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HEALTHCARE Hospital Candler County Hospital 400 Cedar Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5741 candlercountyhospital.com A 25-bed Critical Access Hospital accredited by the Joint Commission, licensed by the state, Medicare certified, and governed by a 7-member Authority appointed by the County Commission. Dental Services Dr. William W. Clance, DMD 500 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2100


Senior Living/Nursing Homes Azalea Health & Rehabilitation Lynis Howell 300 Cedar Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5734 azaleahealth.org

Cedar Plantation Senior Living & Alzheimer’s Community Steven Taylor 46637 Highway 46 East Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4700 cedarplantationseniorliving.com

Grace Gardens Renee Kalloniatis 30 South College Street Metter, GA 912-685-3033

Orchard Health & Rehabilitation Matthew Martin 1321 Pulaski School Road Pulaski, GA 30451 912-685-5072 mmartin@ethicahealth.org

Chiropractor Metter Chiropractic Center, Inc. 60 North Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2324 www.metterchiro.com Physical Therapy Facilities BetterLiving Services, Inc. 8 North Williams Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4331 betterlivingmetter.com

Candler County Rehab & Wellness Center 345 Cedar Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3213

Health Department Candler County Health Department 428 North Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5765 sehdph.org/candler-county.htm LOCATION Candler County and Metter are located in Southeast Georgia along Interstate 16 between Savannah and Macon.

LODGING Four hotels serve Metter and Candler County, as well as travelers on I-16. There are over 150 rooms available in the Metter area, offering a wide range of amenities.

America Inn 850 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7071

EconoInn 1235 Fortner Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4100

Garden Inn & Suites 720 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2700

Days Inn 1225 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3000 daysinn.com

POPULATION (2015 Census Estimates) County 10,886 City 4,111 PUBLIC SAFETY 911 Communications Services Metter Fire-Rescue 6 full-time and 20 volunteer firefighters. Station manned 24/7, 365. Fire substation in Pulaski. Protection outside city limits. 56 South Lewis Street. 912-685-6832 Police 13 full-time municipal personnel, including 12 sworn officers. 805 East Lillian Street. 912-685-5437 Candler County Sheriff’s Department Staff of 27, including 15 sworn deputies. Provides county-wide protection. 1015 East Hiawatha Street. 912-685-2568

SALES TAX The State of Georgia imposes a four percent state sales tax, with the county collecting a one percent local option sales tax and Candler County and the Board of Education each collecting a one percent special purpose tax. The Heart of Georgia Region, which includes Candler County, collects a one percent transportation tax. TAXES (2015) County Property Tax: Within city: 11.335 mills Outside city: 12.004 mills Hospital Authority: 1 mill City Property Tax: 7.958 mills Board of Education Tax: 12.988 mills Candler County exempts 100% of certain business inventory from property taxation. TRANSPORTATION Highway There are eight carriers serving Metter with pickup and delivery service. Rail Norfolk Southern serves Metter. CSX piggyback service is available in Savannah (64 miles). Air Service Metter Municipal Airport provides one 5,000 ft. paved and lighted runway for general aviation purposes. 912-685-4162 Commercial air service can be obtained in Savannah. Water Transportation Savannah provides the nearest deepwater port. The Savannah River is also the nearest navigable river. TRAVELING FROM METTER Savannah 65 miles east Augusta 80 miles north Macon 104 miles northwest Brunswick 108 miles southeast Jacksonville, FL 134 miles south Atlanta 175 miles northwest

Candler County EMS Operates 5 ambulances for emergency and non-emergency transport with a team of 8 paramedics and 6 EMTs. 1065 East Hiawatha Street. 912-685-5965 everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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ci v i c g ro u p s Candler County Branch NAACP #5178 William George Jr., president Meets on Monday after the 4th Sunday at St. Luke Independent Methodist Church at 6:30 p.m. For more information: 912-685-6275 Candler County Friends of the Library Meets the 1st Monday of the month (August to May) at the library, 2 p.m. Call 912-685-2455 Candler County Historical Society Grady Collins, president Meets the 1st Monday of the month at 245 West Vertia Street (the Museum) at 4:00 p.m. For more information: 912-685-2450 Candler County Retired Educators Felix Johnston Meets the 3rd Wednesday of the month at Bevricks at 11:30 a.m. For more information: 912-685-6671 Kiwanis Club of Metter Gary Howard Meets every Monday (except holidays) at Bevricks Char House Grille at 12:00 noon For more information: 912-685-7773 Metter Garden Club Meets the 2nd Tuesday (Sept. through May) at Candler County History Museum, 245 Vertia Street at 3:00 p.m. For more information: Kim Anderson, 912-739-7152 Metter Lions Club Meets the 1st & 3rd Tuesday of the month at Bevricks at 6:00 p.m. Metter Sons of Confederate Veterans Hu Daughtry, camp commander Meets the first Thursday of every month at Bevricks Char House Grille at 6:30 p.m. For more information: 912-687-6153 sidada11@yahoo.com Rotary Club of Metter Bill Lindsey, president Meets every Tuesday at Bevricks Char House Grille at 12:00 noon For more information: 912-685-2835

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EL ECTED OF F ICIAL S CANDLER COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Meets 1st Monday of each month at 6 p.m. at Commission Board Office, Hiawatha Street Glyn Thrift, Chairman 1020 Brannen Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6223 District 1 (To Be Sworn in January 2016) Brad Jones, District 2 2075 Turner Road Metter GA 30439 912-685-6014 David Robinson, District 3 2446 White Way Circle Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3333 Donny Wells, District 4 10025 Cowart Pond Road Metter, GA 30439 478-763-2581 CANDLER COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION Meets 3rd Thursday of each month at 5:00 p.m. in Board meeting room, South College Street Craig Lanier, Chairman 880 Bruner Circle Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2933 Carolyn Byrd 16272 Meridy Road Metter, GA 912-685-3362 Cheryl Hendricks 725 McLean Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3280 Rhonda Hendrix 605 Thain Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6837 Johnny Vines 355 South Williams Street Metter, GA 30439

METTER CITY COUNCIL Meets 2nd Monday of each month at 7 p.m. at City Hall, South Rountree Street Billy Trapnell, Mayor 73 South Williams Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2361 Marsha Colson 925 Cedar Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2141 Ed Boyd 320 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6289 Gregory Thomas 2 Thomas Lane Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6517 Chyrileen Kilcrease 300 Herschel Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6037 Paul MacGregor 442 South College Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6224 PULASKI TOWN COUNCIL Meets 2nd Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at City Hall, Downtown Pulaski Monte Tillman, Mayor Pulaski, GA 912-685-3585 Marty & Terry Franklin Pulaski, GA 912-685-6575 Kenny Davis Pulaski, GA 912-685-6767 Paul Greene Pulaski, GA 912-685-2028

con st it u t ion al of f icers CLERK OF COURT Linda Sewell (retiring 12/31/2016) Jenny Grimes (Clerk-elect) Courthouse Square 912-685-5257 PROBATE COURT JUDGE Tony Thompson Courthouse Square 912-685-2357

SHERIFF John Miles 1015 East Hiawatha Street 912-685-2568 TAX COMMISSIONER Patty Sikes Courthouse Square 912-685-5247


YO U R C O MM U N ITY L E ADE R SH IP CANDLER COUNTY BOARD OF EQUALIZATION Meets as needed. Wayne Culbertson Dopson Deal Myra Fordham Carol Mainer Bobby Odom CANDLER COUNTY BOARD OF HEALTH Meets 1st Wednesday quarterly at 9:30 a.m. Jane Flack Clara Frink Eula F. Hodges Dr. Bubba Longgrear Glyn Thrift Billy Trapnell James Lee Walker CANDLER COUNTY LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES Kelley Franklin Kendra Howard, Treasurer Felix Johnston, Vice-Chairman Ted Lewis, Chairman Beverly MacGregor Ruth McGowan Tammie Strickland Canary Whitfield

CITY OF METTER PLANNING COMMISSION Reviews the City of Metter’s Zoning Ordinance to review any requested amendments to the ordinance and make recommendations to City Council. Meets as needed. Martha Cannady 912-685-2223

METTER-CANDLER AIRPORT AUTHORITY An instrumentality and political subdivision of the State of Georgia, the Authority oversees local, state and federal government policies and procedures to ensure the safe operation of Metter Municipal Airport. Meets once a quarter, second Tuesday, 5 p.m.

Jeffery Hilderbrandt 912-685-2727

Ralph Clifton 912-685-5318

John Jones Jr. Chairman 912-685-3047

Marty Franklin 912-685-6575

Martha Smith 912-685-6372 Greg Strickland 912-685-6910 CITY OF METTER TREE BOARD Serves in an advisory capacity to the mayor and council on matters relating to tree management in the city, including appropriate funding mechanisms and Tree Ordinance and also oversee the management of the city tree inventory in regards to the condition and major maintenance needs of all city trees. Meets six times a year.

CANDLER COUNTY FAMILY & CHILDREN SERVICES BOARD Meets the 3rd Wednesday of every month at 10 a.m.

Lucille Adams 912-685-4251

Lena Braziel Charles Collum Jerry Gibson Judy Jones

Eddy Jones 912-685-2121

CANDLER COUNTY TAX ASSESSORS BOARD Meets the 2nd Tuesday of every month at 8:30 a.m. Lanelle Jarriel Letrelle Thomas Laura Vines

Elon Flack 912-685-6733

Sarita Manuel 912-685-7921 Yvonne Trapnell 912-685-2361 CITY OF METTER ZONING APPEALS BOARD Reveals appeals for specific variances from the terms of the city’s zoning ordinance. Meets as needed. Harold Boston Jr. 912-687-6936 Rhonda Cardell 912-685-3080 Myra Fordham Chairman 912-685-6633

REGIONAL BOARDS CENTRAL SAVANNAH RIVER RESOURCE CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT BOARD Glyn Thrift HEART OF GA ALTAMAHA AGING ADVISORY COUNCIL Meets every quarter, 10:30 a.m. Linda Banks Donna Parker HEART OF GEORGIA ALTAMAHA REGIONAL COMMISSION COUNCIL Meets the fourth Thursday of every month, 6 p.m.

John Jones, Jr. 912-685-3047 Cliff Hendrix 912-685-7845

Brad Jones Chyrileen Kilcrease Billy Trapnell

Bobby Smith 912-685-5763

MIDDLE COASTAL UNIFIED DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY BOARD

Bill Walden 912-685-3227 METTER HOUSING AUTHORITY Oversees state, local and federal government policies and procedures in providing safe, decent, affordable low-income housing for the City of Metter. Meets as needed. Donna Parker Executive Director 290 North Lewis Street Post Office Box 207 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5377 hametter@pineland.net

Dustin Durden Hannah Mullins WORK FORCE INVESTMENT ACT BOARD Meets every month Billy Trapnell Tamra Wells

Juanita Lott 912-685-5434 Martha Cannady 912-685-2223 Angela Mack 912-685-5253 Allen Tyler 912-685-6484 Judy Swint 912-685-3710 RECREATION DEPARTMENT BOARD Meets 2nd Monday of every month, 6 p.m. Jesse Durden Jeffery Hilderbrandt Jason Jones

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MEMBERSHIP INVESTMENT BENEFITS CHAMBER DIRECTORY LISTING

CANDLER CASH

Chamber member businesses can be searched both alphabetically and by category in the Chamber’s Community Guide and online business directory. Also, members can be linked from the Chamber’s website to your business website.

The Candler Cash program is aimed at keeping revenues in our local economy and is specifically designed to promote chamber members’ businesses in Candler County, Georgia. Candler Cash can be purchased in $25 increments and is accepted at more than 35 local merchant locations.

CHAMBER PUBLICATIONS

DISCOUNTED INSURANCE

MAILING LABELS

AWARENESS/ RECOGNITION

• Weekly e-newsletter • Chamber Community Guide and Directory • Metter and Candler County Map

Chamber members may purchase Group Health Care Coverage at a reduced rate.

Purchase mailing labels to target your direct mail advertising to other Chamber members and important contacts.

All members will receive a membership decal and other signage to promote their Chamber affiliation.

MEMBER REFERRALS

CHAMBER PROGRAMS/ EVENTS

The Chamber receives many inquiries during the year from visitors and others desiring information about our community and its businesses. The Chamber ONLY recommends its members!

Business After Hours, the Chamber’s Annual Membership Banquet, annual gala, committee meetings and other events provide excellent ways to network with other Chamber businesses.

RIBBON CUTTING/ OPEN HOUSE/ GROUND BREAKING

EVENT & PROGRAM SPONSORSHIPS

The Chamber will post your Ribbon Cutting, Open House or Ground Breaking event on the Chamber website, and if given enough notice, will include it in the Events section of the Chamber newsletter. We will advertise the event on the Chamber Facebook page and will post a photograph to our Facebook page following the event.

Partner with the Chamber through sponsorship investment of exclusive programs and events during the year. Sponsoring Chamber events will help your company gain exposure and build lasting relationships with key business leaders throughout the MetterCandler County area.

LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS

JOIN NOW

Many opportunities exist for showcasing and improving your leadership skills. Get involved and volunteer on one of our Chamber committees. This will give you and your business exposure. Also, the Chamber sponsors the Youth Leadership Candler and adult Leadership Candler programs.

We hope you are interested in joining the many businesses and professional men and women who want to see the area grow and prosper. Contact us at 912-685-2159 and we will walk you through the application process. everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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YOUR CHAMBER in action State of the Community Address

Youth Leadership Candler

Shop Small Saturday Education Grants

Annual Auction & Gala  Your business is our business. At the Metter-Candler Chamber, we provide connections, resources and solutions to help your business thrive. Think of us as an extension of your staff. We are here to save you time and money. If you are looking for targeted connections to prospective customers or clients, business advocacy at the local, state and federal levels of government, workforce solutions to find and retain talent or enhanced visibility, we can help you!  Our community may be small but we have the Big Business state of mind to pull up our boot straps and to move you forward. Please call on the Metter-Candler Chamber to learn more about membership benefits and how we can become your business partner. It is because of our members that we can proudly say that Everything IS Better in Metter! 104 |

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Small Business Ribbon Cutting & Grand Opening

New Industry Ribbon Cutting & Grand Opening


BOARD LEADERSHIP

Luke Lanier Chairman Metter Bank/ Durden Banking Co

Bill Lindsey Chairman Elect Candler County Administrator

Bryan Aasheim Director Pineland Bank

Wes Clifton Director Clifton, Inc

Chris Earls Ex-Officio UGA Extension Office

Tess Fordham Director Olliff & Fordham, CPAs, PC

Melinda Franklin Director Candler County Special Ed

Amy Harrelson Director Pineland Telephone Cooperative

Dr. Bubba Longgrear Ex-Officio Candler County Schools

Marcus McCray Director Whitaker Funeral Home

Hannah Mullins Ex-Officio Candler County Industrial Authority

Jessica Spears Immediate Past Chairman Hulsey, Tootle & Harrison, LLP

Debra Stanford Director Sea Island Bank

Glyn Thrift Ex-Officio Candler County Commission Chairman

Billy Trapnell Ex-Officio Mayor, City of Metter

Jaime Riggs Executive Director Chamber of Commerce

Victoria Gaitten Welcome Center Manager & Chamber Assistant

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chamber listings by alphabetical A ACE Hardware Trent Franklin 212 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5757 trentafranklin@gmail.com AgSouth Farm Credit, ACA Adam Hebert 26 South Main Street Post Office Box 160 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-764-9091 ahebert@agsouthfc.com Altamaha Pest Control, Inc. Talmadge Yarbrough 7417 US Highway 280 Post Office Box 834 Claxton, GA 30417 912-739-1206 altamahapest@gmail.com Ambassador Personnel, Inc. Deb Snell 1515 Bass Road, Suite B Macon, GA 31210 478-275-9041 d.snell@teamambassador.com Amit Food Mart #3 Al Patel 285 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5583

Baylee Lane’s Boutique Michelle Penn 15 North Kennedy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-314-3238 BB&T Branch Banking & Trust Brian Fitzgerald 205 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4005 bfitzgerald@bbandt.com BBWH Insurors Jim Grindler 1100 Brampton Avenue, Suite M Post Office Box 877 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-764-9602 jimgrindler@bbwhins.com Beauty Plus Dr. Diane McNeely 203 South Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-314-4943 dmcneely@msn.com Beaver Creek Plantation Ike Webb 3698 U.S. Highway 80 East Post Office Box 310 Twin City, GA 30471 478-763-2920 beaverck@pineland.net

Antiques, ETC Pam Holloway 409 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-655-1081

Beaver Run RV Park Jim & Shelley Savage 22321 Excelsior Church Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2594 camp@beaverrunrvpark.com

Azalea Health & Rehabilitation Lynis Howell 300 Cedar Street Post Office Box 356 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5734 lhowell@ethicahealth.org

BetterLiving Services, Inc. Rhonda Cardell 8 North Williams Street Post Office Box 211 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4331 betterliving@pineland.net

B B&M Pool Spa & Patio Beverly Wright 10 North Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5411 bmpools@pineland.net

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Bevricks Char House Grille Rick Patrick 1055 Fortner Road Post Office Box 26 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4110 bevricksmetter@yahoo.com Bird’s Painting Bird Snell 912-690-1966

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Bowen, Patsy 912-685-5337 Boys & Girls Club of Candler County Lisa Rigdon 421 West Vertia Street Post Office Box 1118 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2900 lrigdon@metter.org Brantley, Pamela B. 912-618-0102 mercerfm@pineland.net Bruner, Clyde 912-685-6089 or 912-657-2308 cbruner@pineland.net Burger King Sonya Holloway 1065 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2395 Mail: 942 Tallulah Falls Scenic Loop Tallulah Falls, GA 30573 bk11515@pineland.net C Candle, Jerry N., PC Jerry N. Cadle Post Office Box 68 Swainsboro, GA 30401 478-237-2271 jerry@cadlelawfirm.com Campbell’s Greenhouse & Nursery Margaret Campbell 2062 Greenhouse Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2661 Candace & Kids Soap Company Candi Daniel 2541 Highway 56 South Swainsboro, GA 30401 706-975-0004 mattandcandodaniel@gmail.com Candler County Board of Commissioners Bill Lindsey 1075 East Hiawatha Street, Suite A Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2835 blindsey@candlerco-ga.gov

Candler County Board of Education Dr. Bubba Longgrear 210 South College Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5713 blonggrear@metter.org Candler County Farm Bureau Lucy Monroe 1000 South East Broad Street Post Office Box 798 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5777 lfmonroe@gfb.org Candler County Historical Society Grady Collins 245 West Vertia Street Post Office Box 325 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2450 wallersc@aol.com Candler County Rehab & Wellness Center Bridget Dixon 345 Cedar Street Post Office Box 597 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3212 Candler Internal Medicine Dr. Rani Reddy 380 Cedar Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3992 Candler Machine, Inc. Jimmy Braddy 1155 East Lillian Street Post Office Box 661 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2772 candlermachine@pineland.net Candler Peanut Bo Patterson 15 Green Street Post Office Box 716 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5412 CarterFranklin, LLP Brent Carter 690 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 27 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5500 brent@carterfranklin.com CPBS, Inc. dba Curl’s Paint & Body Shop Jeremy Curl 1406 Georgia Highway 57 South Cobbtown, GA 30420 912-684-5753


City of Metter, The Billy Trapnell 49 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 74 Metter, Georgia 30439 912-685-2527 metter@pineland.net Clance, William W., DMD Sharon Jarrell 500 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2100 drclance@pineland.net Clean By Lucy, Inc. Mattie Collins 1367 Freedom Lane Post Office Box 1143 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2385 lucybrown@pineland.net Clifton, Inc. Wes Clifton 1205 South Lewis Street Mail: 9505 Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3030 rclifton@pineland.net Club 46 Eva Collins 535 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4745 Clyde’s Market Gail Baker • Clyde’s Market #77 316 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4422 • Clyde’s Market #32 1125 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3950 Mail: Post Office Box 428 Glennville, GA 30427 912-654-3052 gbaker@clydesmarket.com Colville, LLC Marshal Mize Post Office Box 8278 Chattanooga, TN 37414 423-667-2073 marshalmize@gmail.com Concerted Services, Inc. Mamie Baldon 430 North Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2580 Mail: Post Office Box 1550 Reidsville, GA 30453 mdekle@concertedservices.org

Crooked Pine Design Tyler Riggs 26787 St. Matthews Church Road Metter, GA 30439 912-541-3999 riggs.ty@gmail.com

EMC Engineering Services, Inc. Daniel Chicola Post Office Box 2086 Statesboro, GA 30458 912-644-3262 dan_chicola@emc-eng.com

Curl, Gail 912-684-5753 gcurl@durdenbc.com

ERA Hirsch Real Estate Team/Statesboro Jean Melton-Furr 408 South Zetterower Street Statesboro, GA 30458 912-690-0924

D D & S Electric Brad & Lisa Jones 1070 East Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5662 dands@pineland.net Daniels-Bishop Chevrolet, Inc. Jalvis Motes 905 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 237 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2191 danielsbishopchevrolet@yahoo.com David Emanuel Academy Haylee Free 602 North 4th Street Post Office Box 400 Stillmore, GA 30464 912-685-2456 hfree@deaeagles.com

F Facial Spa, The Teresa Lytle 1711 St. Matthews Church Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6100 thefacialspa@yahoo.com Farmers Home Furniture Debra H. Greenway 20 North Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5037

Davis Heating & Air Cheryl Hendricks 1060 East Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7576 cheryl@davisheating-air.com

Flower Basket, The Dot Cowart 28 North West Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4454 flowerbasket30439@hotmail.com

DFCS Region 9, Candler County Rose Morris 750 South Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2163 rose.morris@dhs.ga.gov

Flower Gallery, The Wanda Holland 47 North East Broad Street Mail: 232 South Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3900 theflowergallery@pineland.net

Digital Office Equipment Brad Blackmon 611-C Northside Drive West Statesboro, GA 30458 912-489-6964 brad@digitalofficeequipment.com Donaldson, Carol 912-481-1702

cdonaldson_sunshinehouse@yahoo.com

Donaldson, Terry 912-685-6787 tdonaldson@pineland.net E

County Line Package Shop Landrum Hodges 78251 GA Highway 46 East Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2378

East Georgia State College Foundation Elizabeth Gilmer 131 College Circle Swainsboro, GA 30401 478-289-2037 egilmer@ega.edu

CPE America Sebastion Falzon West Lytell Street Post Office Box 1067 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5200 sebastion.falzon@gmail.com

EF Woodcraft Elon Flack Post Office Box 418 Metter, GA 30439 912-682-1211 eflack@pineland.net

Crider Foods Dondra Rigdon 1 Plant Avenue Post Office Box 398 Stillmore, GA 30464 912-562-9177 drigdon@criderinc.com

Excelsior EMC Greg Proctor 986 South East Broad Street Post Office Box 297 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2115 eemc@excelsioremc.com

El Mariachi Margarito Franco 1140 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5000

Frank Fortune Photography Frank Fortune 239 Wellington Circle Statesboro, GA 30458 912-687-5512 Furr, Jean & Leslie 912-690-0924 G GA Real Estate Research & Titles, Inc. Jenny Grimes 1007 Peach Lane Metter, GA 30439 912-687-5181 gatitles3@gmail.com Garity Consulting, LLC dba Schooley Mitchell John Garity 395 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-297-6840 john.garity@schooleymitchell.com Georgia Hometown Realty Heather Strickland Womack 85 North Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-690-7557 heather@georgiahometownrealty.com Georgia Power Company Tanzania Adams 888-660-5890 tuadams@southernco.com

Gross, J. Kendall, Attorney at Law Kendall Gross 235 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 695 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4619 kendall@jkendallgross.com Guido Evangelistic Association Dr. and Mrs. Larry Guido 600 North Lewis Street Post Office Box 508 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2222 lcguido@pineland.net H H & H Timber Co., LLC Ben Spears 11 North Kennedy Street Post Office Box 543 Metter, GA 30439 912-531-2735 handhtimber@gmail.com Hairline, The Jeff Deal 10 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6119 Headquarters Melissa Spears 30 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5233 Henderson, Dan 912-690-1961 wdanh@pineland.net Hendrix Produce, Inc. Kevin Hendrix 29252 GA Highway 129 South Post Office Box 145 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3220 re@hendrixproduce.com High Impact Leadership Dr. Thomas F. Bigwood Post Office Box 323 Brooklet, GA 30415 912-690-0771 tbigwood@gmail.com Hill, Jack, State Senator 912-557-3811 jackhill1@windstream.net Housing Authority of the City of Metter, The Donna Parker 290 North Lewis Street Post Office Box 207 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5377 hametter@pineland.net Hulsey, Tootle & Harrison, LLP Brian S. Tootle 2 South East Broad Street Post Office Box 476 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6400 btootle@hthcpa.com I IHS Pharmacy & Gifts Krista Stone 150 South Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2803 krista@ihsrx.com

Invest Financial Corporation Terry Manuel Post Office Box 798 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5777 terry.manuel@investfinancial.com

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J J. L. Williamson Law Group, LLC Jeffrey Williamson 1219 Merchants Way, Suite 101 Post Office Box 238 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-489-5573 jlw@jlwlawgroup.com Jay’s Fuel Stop, Inc. Brenda Olliff 1095 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 601 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2187 jaysbp@hotmail.com Job Training Unlimited Renee Goggins 107 North Duval Street Claxton, GA 30417 912-685-7927

renee.goggins@jobtrainingunlimited.com

Johnston, Felix & Judy 912-685-6671 fjohnston45@yahoo.com Jomax BBQ Maxine Hulsey 1120 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3636 Jones, Mr. and Mrs. James M. 912-685-2252 jmjones123@pineland.net Jones & Boyd Insurance Ed Boyd 8 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 358 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5139 eob@amsure.com Jones Realty & Auction Company John E. Jones, Sr. 225 West Broad Street Post Office Box 71 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5045 info@jonesrealtyco.com Jonson Service Company Cal H. Jonson 19526 Turner Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4320 K Kelley Honeybee Farm Rhett Kelley 921 GA Highway 46 East Metter, GA 30439 912-682-3806 rhettkelley77@yahoo.com Kelly Farms Jennifer Kelly-Pitout 1535 Pecan Road Metter, GA 30439 561-305-3352 kellyfarmsga@gmail.com Kennedy Funeral Homes Jamie Anderson 223 South West Broad Street Post Office Box 466 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2131 kenfuneral@pineland.net

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Kiwanis Club of Metter Gary Howard Post Office Box 386 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4996 kiwanis@pineland.net

Maxwell Reddick & Associates Joey Maxwell 1203 Brampton Avenue Statesboro, GA 30458 912-489-7112 jmaxwell@signmaxred.com

Metter Meats McKenzie Newkirk 30 North West Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7080 mettermeats@yahoo.com

Krissy Edenfield Photography Krissy Edenfield 478-494-3427 krissyedenfield@nctv.com

McCorkle Cricket Farm Lisa Young 39 North Leroy Street Post Office Box 285 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2677 cricket@pineland.net

Metter Pharmacy Bryan Moseley 705 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 1148 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6337 metterpharmacy@outlook.com

McDonald’s Kevin Griner 1215 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 Mail: 208 Durden Street Vidalia, GA 30474 912-685-4663 feg0701@yahoo.com

Metter Veterinary Clinic Sheryl Bridgers 1020 South East Broad Street Post Office Box 937 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5621

L L.C. Anderson Memorial Library Maxine Griffin 50 South Kennedy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2455 maxineg@strl.info Lanier’s Auction Company Grant Lanier Post Office Box 655 Metter, GA 30439 912-389-0345 galanier2@yahoo.com Lanier, Luke & Susannah llanier@durdenbc.com Lanier, Vaughan & Faye 912-684-4276 Linzer Shotaro Abe 100 Wallace Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3555 shawlinzerproducts.com Longgrear, Bubba 912-685-3947 blonggrear@metter.org Lynda Brannen Williamson Foundation, The Post Office Box 727 Statesboro, GA 30459 info@LBWFoundation.com M M & S Lawn Care Michael Cliett Post Office Box 455 Metter, GA 30439 912-682-8443 cliett@pineland.net MacGregor, Paul & Beverly 912-685-6224 pandb@pineland.net Mama C’s Sweet & Spicy BBQ Sauce Cheryl Olliff 840 Sugars Road Metter, GA 30439 912-682-2088 mamacsbbq2015@gmail.com MaMa E’s Home Bakery Marie Motes 3011 Pond View Road Metter, GA 30439 912-531-3269 mamaebakery@yahoo.com Martha’s Gift Shop Martha Cannady 55 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7658 martha.cannady@rocketmail.com Martin Awards Dino Martin 1303 US Highway 80 East Swainsboro, GA 30401 478-289-7779 dino@martinawards.com

| Chamber Community Magazine

Metter Advertiser, The Carvy Snell 15 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 8 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6566 csnell@metteradvertiser.com Metter Antiques & Collectibles Lynn Lamb 10 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5444 Metter Bank A Division of Durden Banking Company Gail Curl 900 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 1160 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2265 gcurl@durdenbc.com Metter-Candler County Airport Authority Cliff Hendrix Post Office Box 61 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7845 chendrix@pineland.net Metter Farm Market Walter and Teila Driggers 980 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6071 driggersfarm@windstream.net Metter Ford Marsha Colson 125 Oak Tree Road Post Office Box 327 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2141 metrford@pineland.net Metter Garden Club, The Kim Anderson 912-739-7152 kltanderson@yahoo.com Metter Graphics Jennifer Mercer 13 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 8 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3600 jmercer@mettergraphics.com Metter Insurance Agency Michelle Holloway 59 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6867 mhcpa@pineland.net

Mill Pond Kayak, LLC Wesley Hendley 313 Fifth Avenue Post Office Box 576 Twin City, GA 30471 478-299-6616 info@millpondkayak.com Modern Finance, Inc. Joey Pittman 42 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5754 modernf@pineland.net N N Good Spirits, Inc.   Elaine and Tommy Flynt   15 South Leroy Street   Metter, GA 30439  912-685-2488  eflynt@pineland.net Norton, Dr. Nancy B. 912-685-5997 nbnorton@pineland.net O Olliff & Fordham, CPAs, PC Dale Fordham 3 North East Broad Street Post Office Box 537 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6850 ofcpa@pineland.net One Life America, Inc. Scott Glanton 1135 East Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6468 sglanton@onelifeamerica.com Orchard Health & Rehabilitation Matthew Martin 1321 Pulaski School Road Post Office Box 118 Pulaski, GA 30451 912-685-5072 mmartin@ethicahealth.org P Papa Buck’s BBQ Jeremiah Johnson 1085 South Lewis Street Mail: 710 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4421 papabucksbbq@gmail.com Parrish, Butch, State Representative 478-455-0333 ljparrish@bellsouth.net


Parrish, Wanda 912-685-2833 wparrish@pineland.net Parrish Portable Toilets Paul Parrish 225 JC Cannady Road Statesboro, GA 30458 912-687-5373 ppittman@frontier.com

Paul’s Pond House Paul & Dee Collins 1320 Crabby Lane Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3400 paulspondhouse@yahoo.com Pineland Bank Candi Salter 257 North East Broad Street Post Office Box 178 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2195 csalter@pinelandbank.com Pineland Telephone Coop., Inc. Amy Harrelson 30 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 678 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2121 aharrelson@pinelandtelco.com Pladd Dot Music Chris Mitchell 38 North Main Street Statesboro, GA 30458 912-764-3230 Pruitt Health Rosby McKenzie Post Office Box 1208 Twin City, GA 30471 478-494-9439 rosbymckenzie@gmail.com Purchasing Alliance Solutions 736 Johnson Ferry Road, #C-200 Marietta, GA 30068 800-782-8254 ext. 3515 purchasingalliance.com Q Queensborough National Bank Dennis Allen 20 North West Broad Street Post Office Box 66 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4000 dallen@qnbtrust.com R Randy’s Wrecker & Service Center Randy Hendrix 800 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6900 randys@pineland.net RE/MAX Preferred Realty Cindy Osborne 208 South Main Street Statesboro, GA 30458 912-489-4529 ResCare HomeCare Services Tracy Castellaw 38 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 478-484-8653 tcastellaw@rescare.com

Rotary Club of Metter Bill Lindsey Post Office Box 794 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2835 blindsey@candlerco-ga.gov S Sea Island Bank A Division of Synovus Bank Billy E. Patterson, Jr. 47 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 116 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7700 billypatterson@seaislandbank.com Servpro of Statesboro Carrie Adams Post Office Box 2091 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-764-9542 carrie.adams@servprostatesboro.com Shepeard Community Blood Center Jacqualine Clemmons 1533 Wrightsboro Road Augusta, GA 30904 706-733-5214 jclemmons@shepeardblood.org Sikes, Ronald 912-685-5809 rjsikes@pineland.net Sikes Brothers, Inc. Larry Sikes 150 Aline Avenue Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6328 rickys@sikesbrothers.com Silver Fox Farm Mal White 15238 Turner Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4910 malkat@pineland.net Snell, Carvy 912-682-2974 csnell@metteradvertiser.com Southeast Fire & Burglar Alarm Amy Harrelson Post Office Box 678 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2121 aharrelson@pinelandtelco.com Southeastern Technical College David Yarbrough 3001 East First Street Vidalia, GA 30474 912-538-3100 dyarbrough@southeasterntech.edu State Farm Insurance Tommy Gillis Agency Tommy Gillis 218 West Broad Street Post Office Box 696 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5773 tommy.gillis.bw7m@statefarm.com Statesboro Coca-Cola Dennis Key 104 Raybon Anderson Boulevard Post Office Box 1865 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-681-2653

Statesboro Golf Carts Josh Thompson 19925 Highway 80 West Statesboro, GA 30458 912-536-3348 statesborogolfcarts@gmail.com Strickland’s Electrical Greg Strickland 235 Greenwood Drive Metter, GA 30439 912-682-4110 gstrick30439@yahoo.com Studio South Dance Academy Blair Rackett 37 South Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-531-3545 studiosouthdance@yahoo.com Sugar Babies Consignments Les Ramsey 25 North Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-682-2997 sbabiesconsignments@gmail.com T TCC Verizon Wireless 75 North Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7777 tccverizonwireless.com Thrift, Glyn 912-536-7621 Tom’s Pawn City Tom Hunt 27 South West Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7442 toms_pawn_city@yahoo.com Tootle, Ray & Cindy 912-685-2767 rctootle@pineland.net ctootle@yahoo.com Touch of Class Catering Annette McCray 46636 GA Highway 46 East Metter, GA 30439 912-682-2445 touchofclasscatering912@gmail.com Trademark Pest Solutions Barry Booth Post Office Box 702 Metter, GA 30439 912-682-0021 barrybooth@ymail.com Trapnell, William (Billy) & Yvonne 912-685-2361 btrapnel@pineland.net Tucker, Dwayne 912-685-2853

U-V Vanguard Services Gary Howard 1640 Deerfield Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7773 glhoward@aol.com Vault 206 Crystal Burkhalter 745 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4298 vault206.com Vickie’s Antiques & More Vickie Gross 63 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3444 grossvickie@yahoo.com W Warren, Evelyn F. 912-685-5554 West Farms Inc. Chris West 615 West Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-682-6427 cmtwest@pineland.net Whispering Pines Kim Critchley 2905 Canoochee Road Cobbtown, GA 30420 912-685-4579 wpfarmhands@gmail.com Whitaker Funeral Home Marcus McCray 25 North Kennedy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5158 whitakerfh@pineland.net Wiggles & Giggles Learning Center Lynette Long 17 North Kennedy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2010 wigglesandgiggles17@gmail.com Willow Lake Golf Club, Inc. Gregg Wolff 550 West Willow Lake Drive Post Office Box 302 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2724 willowlake@pineland.net Wolff, Gregg 912-685-2347 Wright, Wallace 912-685-2032 X-Y-Z

24 Seven Family Fitness & Tanning Sy Jones 225 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2474

Zaxby’s 1235 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4361

24sevenfamilyfitnessandtanning@gmail.com

Tyson Utilities Construction, Inc. Ty Tyson 777 Little Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-9651 tson@pineland.net

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chamber listings by type Accounting Hulsey, Tootle & Harrison, LLP Brian Tootle 2 South East Broad Street Post Office Box 476 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6400 btootle@hthcpa.com Olliff & Fordham, CPAs, PC Dale Fordham 3 North East Broad Street Post Office Box 537 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6850 ofcpa@pineland.net Agribusiness Candler Peanut Bo Patterson 15 Green Street Post Office Box 716 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5412 H & H Timber Company, LLC Ben Spears 11 North Kennedy Street Post Office Box 543 Metter, GA 30439 912-531-2735 handhtimber@gmail.com Hendrix Produce, Inc. Kevin Hendrix 29252 GA Highway 129 South Post Office Box 145 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3220 re@hendrixproduce.com Kelley Honeybee Farm Rhett Kelley 921 GA Highway 46 East Metter, GA 30439 912-682-3806 rhettkelley77@yahoo.com Kelly Farms Jennifer Kelly-Pitout 1535 Pecan Road Metter, GA 30439 561-305-3352 kellyfarmsga@gmail.com McCorkle Cricket Farm Lisa Young 39 North Leroy Street Post Office Box 285 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2677 cricket@pineland.net Silver Fox Farm Mal White 15238 Turner Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4910 malkat@pineland.net

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West Farms, Inc. Chris West 615 West Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-682-6427 cmtwest@pineland.net Whispering Pines Kim Critchley 2905 Canoochee Road Cobbtown, GA 30420 912-685-4579 wpfarmhands@gmail.com Antiques Antiques, Etc. Pam Holloway 409 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-655-1081 Metter Antiques & Collectibles Lynn Lamb 10 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5444 Vickie’s Antiques & More Vickie Gross 63 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3444 grossvickie@yahoo.com Attorneys Cadle, Jerry N., PC Jerry N. Cadle Post Office Box 68 Swainsboro, GA 30401 478-237-2271 jerry@cadlelawfirm.com CarterFranklin, LLP Brent Carter 690 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 27 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5500 brent@carterfranklin.com Gross, J. Kendall, Attorney at Law J. Kendall Gross 235 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 695 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4619 kendall@jkendallgross.com J. L. Williamson Law Group, LLC Jeffrey Williamson 1219 Merchants Way, Suite 101 Post Office Box 238 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-489-5573 jlw@jlwlawgroup.com

| Chamber Community Magazine

Auctions Lanier’s Auction Company Grant Lanier Post Office Box 655 Metter, GA 30439 912-389-0345 galanier2@yahoo.com Automotive Repair/Wrecker & Service Center CPBS, Inc. dba Curl’s Paint & Body Shop Jeremy Curl 1406 Georgia Highway 57 South Cobbtown, GA 30420 912-684-5753 Randy’s Wrecker & Service Center Randy Hendrix 800 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6900 randys@pineland.net Beauty

Churches/Religious Organizations Guido Evangelistic Association Dr. Larry Guido 600 North Lewis Street Post Office Box 508 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2222 lcguido@pineland.net Civic Organizations Boys & Girls Club of Candler County Lisa Rigdon 421 West Vertia Street Post Office Box 1118 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2900 lrigdon@metter.org Candler County Historical Society, The Grady Collins 245 West Vertia Street Post Office Box 325 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2450 wallersc@aol.com

Beauty Plus Dr. Diane McNeely 203 South Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-314-4943 dmcneely@msn.com

Kiwanis Club of Metter Gary Howard Post Office Box 386 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4996 kiwanis@pineland.net

Facial Spa, The Teresa Lytle 1711 St. Matthews Church Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6100 thefacialspa@yahoo.com

Metter Garden Club, The Kim Anderson 912-739-7152 kltanderson@yahoo.com

Hairline, The Jeff Deal 10 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6119 Headquarters Melissa Spears 30 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5233 Bottling Distributor Statesboro Coca-Cola Dennis Key 104 Raybon Anderson Boulevard Post Office Box 1865 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-681-2653 Childcare Wiggles & Giggles Learning Center Lynette Long 17 North Kennedy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2010 wigglesandgiggles17@gmail.com

Rotary Club of Metter, GA Bill Lindsey Post Office Box 794 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2835 blindsey@candlerco-ga.gov Communications Pineland Telephone Coop., Inc. Amy Harrelson 30 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 678 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2121 aharrelson@pinelandtelco.com TCC Verizon Wireless 75 North Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7777 tccverizonwireless.com Community/Home Maintenance Jonson Service Company Cal Jonson 19526 Turner Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4320


M & S Lawn Care Michael Cliett Post Office Box 455 Metter, GA 30439 912-682-8443 cliett@pineland.net

Strickland’s Electrical Greg Strickland 235 Greenwood Drive Metter, GA 30439 912-682-4110 gstrick30439@yahoo.com

Parrish Portable Toilets Paul Parrish 225 JC Cannady Road Statesboro, GA 30458 912-687-5373 ppittman@frontier.com

Tyson Utilities Construction, Inc. Ty Tyson 777 Little Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-9651 tson@pineland.net

Consulting Services Garity Consulting, LLC DBA Schooley Mitchell John Garity 395 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-297-6840 john.garity@schooleymitchell.com High Impact Leadership Tom Bigwood Post Office Box 323 Brooklet, GA 30415 912-690-0771 tbigwood@gmail.com Construction/Engineering/ HVAC/Electrical Bird’s Painting Bird Snell 912-690-1966 Crooked Pine Design Tyler Riggs 26787 Saint Matthews Church Road Metter, GA 30439 912-541-3999 riggs.ty@gmail.com D & S Electric Brad & Lisa Jones 1070 East Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5662 dands@pineland.net Davis Heating & Air Cheryl Hendricks 1060 East Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7576 cheryl@davisheating-air.com EMC Engineering Services, Inc. Daniel Chicola Post Office Box 2086 Statesboro, GA 30458 912-644-3262 dan__chicola@emc-eng.com Maxwell Reddick & Associates Joey Maxwell 1203 Brampton Avenue Statesboro, GA 30458 912-489-7112 jmaxwell@signmaxred.com Sikes Brothers, Inc. Larry Sikes 150 Aline Avenue Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6328 rickys@sikesbrothers.com

Dance Studio Studio South Dance Academy Blair Rackett 37 South Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-531-3545 studiosouthdance@yahoo.com Dentistry William W. Clance, DMD Sharon Jarrell 500 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2100 drclance@pineland.net Educational Institutions Candler County Board of Education Dr. Bubba Longgrear 210 South College Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5713 blonggrear@metter.org David Emanuel Academy Haylee Free 602 North Fourth Street Post Office Box 400 Stillmore, GA 30464 912-685-2456 hfree@deaeagles.com East Georgia State College Foundation Elizabeth Gilmer 131 College Circle Swainsboro, GA 30401 478-289-2037 egilmer@ega.edu Southeastern Technical College David Yarbrough 3001 East First Street Vidalia, GA 30474 912-538-3100 dyarbrough@southeasterntech.edu Financial - Lending Institutions AgSouth Farm Credit, ACA Adam Hebert 26 South Main Street Post Office Box 160 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-764-9091 ahebert@agsouthfc.com BB&T Branch Banking & Trust Brian Fitzgerald 205 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4005

bfitzgerald@bbandt.com Metter Bank A Division of Durden Banking Company Gail Curl 900 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 1160 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2265 gcurl@durdenbc.com

Modern Finance, Inc. Joey Pittman 42 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5754 modernf@pineland.net Pineland Bank Candi Salter 257 North East Broad Street Post Office Box 178 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2195 csalter@pinelandbank.com Queensborough National Bank Dennis Allen 20 North West Broad Street Post Office Box 66 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4000 dallen@qnbtrust.com Sea Island Bank A Division of Synovus Bank Billy Patterson 47 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 116 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7700 billypatterson@seaislandbank.com Fitness 24 Seven Family Fitness & Tanning Sy Jones 225 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2474 24sevenfamilyfitnessandtanning@gmail.com

Funeral Homes Kennedy Funeral Homes Jamie Anderson 223 South West Broad Street Post Office Box 466 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2131 kenfuneral@pineland.net Whitaker Funeral Home Marcus McCray 25 North Kennedy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5158 whitakerfh@pineland.net Governments/Community Agencies Candler County Board of Commissioners Bill Lindsey 1075 East Hiawatha Street, Suite A Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2835 blindsey@candlerco-ga.gov

City of Metter, The Billy Trapnell 49 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 74 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2527 metter@pineland.net Concerted Services, Inc. Mamie Baldon 43 North Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2580 mdekle@concertedservices.org Department of Family & Children Services Region 9, Candler County Rose Morris 750 South Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2163 rose.morris@dhs.ga.gov Housing Authority of the City of Metter, The Donna Parker 290 North Lewis Street Post Office Box 207 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5377 hametter@pineland.net L.C. Anderson Memorial Library Maxine Griffin 50 South Kennedy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2455 maxineg@strl.info Metter-Candler Airport Authority Cliff Hendrix Post Office Box 61 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7845 chendrix@pineland.net Greenhouse - Nursery Campbell’s Greenhouse & Nursery Margaret Campbell 2062 Greenhouse Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2661 Health & Medical Services BetterLiving Services Inc. Rhonda Cardell 8 North Williams Street Post Office Box 211 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4331 betterliving@pineland.net Candler County Rehab & Wellness Center Bridget Dixon 345 Cedar Street Post Office Box 597 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3212 Candler Internal Medicine Dr. Rani Reddy 380 Cedar Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3992

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Pruitt Health Rosby McKenzie Post Office Box 1208 Twin City, GA 30471 478-494-9439 rosbymckenzie@gmail.com

Metter Insurance Agency Michelle Holloway 59 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6867 mhcpa@pineland.net

ResCare HomeCare Services Tracy Castellaw 38 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 478-494-8653 tcastellaw@rescare.com

OneLife America, Inc. Scott Glanton 1135 East Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6468 sglanton@onelifeamerica.com

Shepeard Community Blood Center Jacqualine Clemmons 1533 Wrightsboro Road Augusta, GA 30904 706-733-5214 jclemmons@shepeardblood.org

Purchasing Alliance Solutions 736 Johnson Ferry Road #C-200 Marietta, GA 30068 800-782-8254 ext. 3515 purchasingalliance.com

Industry Candler Machine, Inc. Jimmy Braddy 1155 East Lillian Street Post Office Box 661 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2772 candlermachine@pineland.net CPE America Sebastion Falzon West Lytell Street Post Office Box 1067 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5200 sebastion.falzon@gmail.com Crider, Inc. Dondra Rigdon 1 Plant Avenue Post Office Box 398 Stillmore, GA 30464 912-562-9177 drigdon@criderinc.com Linzer Shotaro Abe 100 Wallace Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3555 shawlinzerproducts.com Insurance BBWH Insurors Jim Grindler 1100 Brampton Avenue, Suite M Post Office Box 877 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-764-9602 jimgrindler@bbwhins.com Candler County Farm Bureau Lucy Monroe 1000 South East Broad Street Post Office Box 798 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5777 lfmonroe@gfb.org Jones & Boyd Insurance Ed Boyd 8 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 358 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5139 eob@amsure.com

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State Farm Insurance Tommy Gillis Agency Tommy Gillis 218 West Broad Street Post Office Box 696 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5773 tommy.gillis.bw7m@statefarm.com Investments Colville, LLC Marshal Mize Post Office Box 8278 Chattanooga, TN 37414 423-667-2073 marshalmize@gmail.com Invest Financial Corporation Terry Manuel Post Office Box 798 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5777 terry.manuel@investfinancial.com Janitorial Services Clean by Lucy, Inc. Mattie Collins 1367 Freedom Lane Post Office Box 1143 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2385 lucybrown@pineland.net ServPro of Statesboro Carrie Adams Post Office Box 2091 Statesboro, GA 30459 912-764-9542 carrie.adams@servprostatesboro.com Marketing/Design/Photography

Outdoor Recreation Beaver Creek Plantation Ike Webb 3698 U.S. Highway 80 East Post Office Box 310 Twin City, GA 30471 478-763-2920 beaverck@pineland.net Beaver Run RV Park Jim & Shelley Savage 22321 Excelsior Church Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2594 camp@beaverrunrvpark.com Mill Pond Kayak, LLC Wesley Hendley 313 Fifth Avenue Post Office Box 576 Twin City, GA 30471 478-299-6616 info@millpondkayak.com Willow Lake Golf Club, Inc. Gregg Wolff 550 West Willow Lake Drive Post Office Box 302 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2724 willowlake@pineland.net Pest Control Altamaha Pest Control, Inc. Talmadge Yarbrough 7417 US Highway 280 Post Office Box 834 Claxton, GA 30417 912-739-1206 altamahapest@gmail.com Trademark Pest Solution Barry Booth Post Office Box 702 Metter, GA 30439 912-682-0021 barrybooth@ymail.com Publishing Companies Metter Advertiser, The Carvy Snell 15 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 8 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6566 csnell@metteradvertiser.com Real Estate/Abstractors

Frank Fortune Photography Frank Fortune 239 Wellington Circle Statesboro, GA 30458 912-687-5512

ERA Hirsch Real Estate Team/Statesboro Jean Melton-Furr 408 South Zetterower Street Statesboro, GA 30458 912-690-0924

Krissy Edenfield Photography 478-494-3427 krissyedenfield@nctv.com

Georgia Hometown Realty Heather Strickland Womack 85 North Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-690-7557 heather@georgiahometownrealty.com

Nonprofit foundation Lynda B. Williamson Foundation, The Post Office Box 727 Statesboro, GA 30459 info@lbwfoundation.com

| Chamber Community Magazine

GA Real Estate Research & Titles, Inc. Jenny Grimes 1007 Peach Lane Metter, GA 30439 912-687-5181 gatitles3@gmail.com Jones Realty & Auction Company John E. Jones, Sr. 225 West Broad Street Post Office Box 71 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5045 info@jonesrealtyco.com RE/MAX Preferred Realty Cindy Osborne 208 South Main Street Statesboro, GA 30458 912-489-4529 Restaurants/Catering/Bakery Bevricks Char House Grille Rick Patrick 1055 Fortner Road Post Office Box 26 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4110 bevricksmetter@yahoo.com Burger King Sonya Holloway 1065 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 Mail: 942 Tallulah Falls Scenic Loop Tallulah Falls, GA 30573 912-685-2395 bk11515@pineland.net El Mariachi Margarito Franco 1140 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5000 JoMax BBQ Maxine Hulsey 1120 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3636 MaMa E’s Home Bakery Marie Motes 3011 Pond View Road Metter, GA 30439 912-531-3269 mamaebakery@yahoo.com McDonald’s Kevin Griner 1215 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 Mail: 208 Durden Street Vidalia, GA 30474 912-685-4663 feg0701@yahoo.com Papa Buck’s BBQ Jeremiah Johnson 1085 South Lewis Street Mail: 710 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4421 papabucksbbq@gmail.com


Paul’s Pond House Paul & Dee Collins 1320 Crabby Lane Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3400 paulspondhouse@yahoo.com Touch of Class Catering Annette McCray 46636 Georgia Highway 46 East Metter, GA 30439 912-682-2445 touchofclasscatering912@gmail.com Zaxby’s 1235 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4361 Retail - Alcohol Club 46 Eva Collins 535 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4745 County Line Package Shop Landrum Hodges 78251 GA Highway 46 East Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2378 N Good Spirits, Inc. Elaine and Tommy Flynt 15 South Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2488 eflynt@pineland.net Retail - Automotive Daniels-Bishop Chevrolet, Inc. Jalvis Motes 905 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 237 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2191 danielsbishopchevrolet@yahoo.com Metter Ford Marsha Colson 125 Oak Tree Road Post Office Box 327 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2141 metrford@pineland.net Retail - Floral Flower Basket, The Dot Cowart 28 North West Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4454 flowerbasket30439@hotmail.com Flower Gallery, The Wanda Holland 47 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3900 theflowergallery@pineland.net Retail - Gas Amit Food Mart #3 Al Patel 285 North Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5583

Clifton, Inc. Wes Clifton 1205 South Lewis Street Mail: 9505 Hiawatha Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3030 rclifton@pineland.net Clyde’s Market Gail Baker • Clyde’s Market #77 316 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4422 • Clyde’s Market #32 1125 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3950 Mail: Post Office Box 428 Glennville, GA 30427 912-654-3052 gbaker@clydesmarket.com Jay’s Fuel Stop, Inc. Brenda Olliff 1095 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 601 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2187 jaysbp@hotmailcom Retail - General Ace Hardware Trent Franklin 212 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5757 trentafranklin@gmail.com Baylee Lane’s Boutique Michelle Penn 15 North Kennedy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-314-3238 Candace & Kids Soap Company Candi Daniel 2541 Highway 56 South Swainsboro, GA 30401 706-975-0004 mattandcandodaniel@gmail.com

Pladd Dot Music Chris Mitchell 38 North Main Street Statesboro, GA 30458 912-764-3230 Statesboro Golf Carts Josh Thompson 19925 Highway 80 West Statesboro, GA 30458 912-536-3348 statesborogolfcarts@gmail.com Sugar Babies Consignments Les Ramsey 25 North Rountree Street Metter, GA 30439 912-682-2997 sbabiesconsignments@gmail.com Tom’s Pawn City Tom Hunt 27 South West Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7442 toms_pawn_city@yahoo.com Vault 206 Crystal Burkhalter 745 South Lewis Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-4298 vault206.com Retail - Grocery Metter Farm Market Walter or Teila Driggers 980 South East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6071 driggersfarm@windstream.net Metter Meats McKenzie Newkirk 30 North West Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7080 mettermeats@yahoo.com Retail - Pharmacy

Digital Office Equipment Brad Blackmon 611-C Northside Drive West Statesboro, GA 30458 912-489-6964 brad@digitalofficeequipment.com

IHS Pharmacy & Gifts Krista Stone 150 South Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2803 krista@ihsrx.com

Farmers Home Furniture Debra Greenway 20 North Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5037

Metter Pharmacy Bryan Moseley 705 South Lewis Street Post Office Box 1148 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-6337 metterpharmacy@outlook.com

Mama C’s Sweet & Spicy BBQ Sauce Cheryl Olliff 840 Sugars Road Metter, GA 30439 912-682-2088 mamacsbbq2015@gmail.com Martha’s Gift Shop Martha Cannady 55 North East Broad Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7658 martha.cannady@rocketmail.com

Retail - Specialty Products Martin Awards Dino Martin 1303 U.S. Highway 80 East Swainsboro, GA 30401 478-289-7779 dino@martinawards.com Metter Graphics Jennifer Mercer 13 South Rountree Street Post Office Box 8 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-3600 jmercer@mettergraphics.com Security Southeast Fire & Burglar Alarm Company Amy Harrelson Post Office Box 678 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2121 aharrelson@pinelandtelco.com Vanguard Services Gary Howard 1640 Deerfield Road Metter, GA 30439 912-685-7773 glhoward@aol.com Staffing & Hiring Ambassador Personnel, Inc. Deb Snell 1515 Bass Road, Suite B Macon, GA 31210 478-275-9041 d.snell@teamambassador.com Job Training Unlimited Renee Goggins 107 North Duval Street Claxton, GA 30417 912-685-7927 renee.goggins@jobtrainingunlimited.com Skilled Nursing Facility Azalea Health & Rehabilitation Lynis Howell 300 Cedar Street Post Office Box 356 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5734 lhowell@ethicahealth.org Orchard Health & Rehabilitation Matthew Martin 1321 Pulaski School Road Post Office Box 118 Pulaski, GA 30451 912-685-5072 mmartin@ethicahealth.org Utilities

Retail - Pool B & M Pool Spa & Patio Beverly Wright 10 North Leroy Street Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5411 bmpools@pineland.net

Excelsior EMC Greg Proctor 986 South East Broad Street Post Office Box 297 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-2115 eemc@excelsioremc.com

everythingsbetterinmetter.com |

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Georgia Power Company Tanzania Adams 888-660-5890 tuadams@southernco.com Veterinarians Metter Veterinary Clinic Sheryl Bridgers 1020 South East Broad Street Post Office Box 937 Metter, GA 30439 912-685-5621 Woodcraft EF Woodcraft Elon Flack Post Office Box 418 Metter, GA 30439 912-682-1211 eflack@pineland.net

Donaldson, Carol 912-481-1702

cdonaldson_sunshinehouse@yahoo.com

Donaldson, Terry 912-685-6787 tdonaldson@pineland.net

Henderson, Dan 912-690-1961 wdanh@pineland.net

Bowen, Patsy 912-685-5337 Brantley, Pamela B. 912-618-0102 mercerfm@pineland.net

CANDLER

Curl, Gail 912-684-5753 gcurl@durdenbc.com

Furr, Jean & Leslie 912-690-0924

Individual Members

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Bruner, Clyde 912-685-6089 or 912-657-2308 cbruner@pineland.net

Hill, Jack, State Senator 912-557-3811 jackhill1@windstream.net Johnston, Felix & Judy 912-685-6671 fjohnston45@yahoo.com Jones, Mr. and Mrs. James M. 912-685-2252 jmjones123@pineland.net

| Chamber Community Magazine

Lanier, Luke & Susanah llanier@durdenbc.com

Thrift, Glyn 912-536-7621

Lanier, Vaughan & Faye 912-684-4276

Tootle, Ray & Cindy 912-685-2767 rctootle@pineland.net ctootle@yahoo.com

Longgrear, Bubba 912-685-3947 blonggrear@metter.org MacGregor, Paul & Beverly 912-685-6224 pandb@pineland.net Norton, Dr. Nancy B. 912-685-5997 nbnorton@pineland.net Parrish, Butch, State Representative 478-455-0333 ljparrish@bellsouth.net Parrish, Wanda 912-685-2833 wparrish@pineland.net Sikes, Ronald D. 912-685-5809 rjsikes@pineland.net Snell, Carvy 912-682-2974 csnell@metteradvertiser.com

Trapnell, William (Billy) & Yvonne 912-685-2361 btrapnel@pineland.net Tucker, Dwayne 912-685-2853 Warren, Evelyn 912-685-5554 Wolff, Gregg 912-685-2347 Wright, Wallace 912-685-2032


Candler Magazine | 2015-201616  
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