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FREE, WEEKLY, LOCAL. Complete dining guide to the Vail Valley inside.

Thursday, June 7 - June 13, 2012

www.sneakpeakvail.com

take the trek

downvalley An insider’s guide to the best hikes west of Avon

Hot Summer Nights

Vail’s free concert series returns

The adventure race appeal

Beaver Creek’s Tough Mudder and more

HP’s Provisions in Eagle

Food from their home table to yours Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

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Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons bring rockin’ folk to Vail. By Melanie Wong

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the world with his music. Joseph first came to prominence in the mid-1980s with cult band Little Women, a reggae-rock, proto-jam band that played in the Rocky Mountains (including Vail) for nearly a decade. Joseph has a strong connection with jam giants Widespread Panic, which opened for Joseph and his band before they rose to fame. To this day, many of Panic’s favorite concert staples, including “North,” “Chainsaw City” and “Climb to Safety,” were written by Joseph. He says they still enjoy playing together and collaborating on projects. In 1995, Joseph met Ruppel in Salt Lake City, and the

Hot Summer Nights

[See HOT SUMMER NIGHTS, page 7]

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Jackmormons were formed along with another friend and musician, Drizos. “(Ruppel) was in a punk rockabilly band and I was thinking about not playing music,” Joseph says. “He came and got me into a show, and that was it. We’ve been together for a long time, and it’s really good.” Ruppel and Drizos are also musical “lifers,” with impressive resumes of their own. Drizos was a member of acoustic band Dexter Grove for nearly nine years, which performed over 1,500 shows nationally. Drizos produced the live Jackmormons record “Badlandia” and co-produced “Happy

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The free concert series’ are hosted at the Ford Amphitheater in Vail. All shows begin at 6:30 p.m. For more info, see www.vvf.org. June 12 – Jerry Joseph and the Jackmormons June 19 – Pimps of JoyTime June 26 – Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe July 3 – Martin Sexton July 10 – Queen Nation July 17 – Dirty Dozen Brass Band July 24 – Bud Light Hot Summer Night of Dance Aug. 14 – Chali 2Na and The House of Vibe Aug. 21 – Kyle Hollingsworth Band

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or Jerry Joseph, it’s always been about the music. Whether it was watching the Beatles cartoons as a boy, playing in his first band at the age of 11, or traveling the world today with his band of 17 years, The Jackmormons. Joseph’s love for music runs deep. In fact, he’s never been anything else but a musician his entire adult life. Only a few months after the release of a double record, “Happy Book,” he was back in the studio with his band recording for another project, a series of vinyls and singles, due out in December. Joseph and his band are prolific album writers – he estimates that he’s recorded about 30 albums over the course of his career. “As a writer, you always have stuff to write about,” he says. “I still get excited about music and it keeps me motivated. We’re pretty fortunate to be able to do this for a living.” Joseph and the Jackmormons perform at the Ford Amphitheater on Tuesday, June 12, as the kickoff to the Vail Valley Foundation’s Hot Summer Nights free concert series. Joseph says he’s proud of the latest album effort, which he describes as one of the bands most solid – it’s a signature collection of some of Joseph’s gritty, blues-tinged folk rock, delivered in his Cat Stevens-like growl. Many of the songs on “Happy Book” were written in Mexico right after Joseph’s father passed away, and the band added their creative juices to the writing process, accompanied by Joseph on guitar and vocals, JR Ruppel on bass and Steve Drizos on drums. “This record represents many different places and music,” Joseph says. “As far as lyrics go, life’s a pretty circular thing, and hopefully we’ve captured that and are at that point. We wanted all the songs to be good songs. None of it is filler. If you haven’t heard us, by the time you get done with ‘Happy Book,’ you’ll have a pretty good idea.” Many of the lyrics are raw and open, often with a nearly spiritual tinge, which Joseph says is up for interpretation. “I’ve emulated a lot of my heroes, such as Prince and Marvin Gaye, and it’s a thin line between sexuality and spirituality,” he says. “Part of it is that you write things for people to interpret. Some people interpret it on a spiritual level and that’s fine.” Originally from San Diego, Joseph is now based in Portland. However, between the two locations, he has traveled

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A day-hiker’s

guide to the

valley Explore these down-valley gateways to the Holy Cross and Flat Tops wilderness By Phil Lindeman

T

here’s no doubt Eagle County is a bona-fide winter playground, but Vail Mountain’s 5,289 lift-accessible acres pale in comparison to what’s in store for alpine junkies once the snow melts. The area’s four main wilderness zones – White River National Forest, Holy Cross Wilderness, Eagles Nest Wilderness and Bureau of Land Management forests – cover 865,000 combined acres and nearly 80 percent of the county, according to the U.S. Forest Service and latest U.S. Census data. The terrain is signature Colorado, with densely wooded forests, expansive wildflower meadows and remote clear-water lakes. More than 1,000 miles worth of pristine foot-only trails crisscross from Vail Pass to the mouth of Glenwood Canyon, and most are maintained fairly well. Many allow dogs, have nearby campsites and, if your timing is right, are remote enough to have entire forests to yourself. All that makes selecting the right day-trip a bit daunting. SneakPEAK scoured the local trail system to build a list of the area’s most awe-inspiring hikes, from simple jaunts to grueling tramps across boulder-filled peaks. We’ve included as much relevant info as possible, but keep in mind you’re dealing with Mother Nature – nothing is predictable. The following is first in a two-part series. Day hikes in this set are located down-valley in areas around Edwards, Eagle, Dotsero and outside of Glenwood Canyon. Nolan Lake Distance: 6.4 miles round trip Difficulty: Easy to moderate The Nolan Lake Trail combines picturesque vistas and relatively easy hiking, all with the reward of stellar brook trout

fishing at the eponymous 7-acre lake. Along with more than a dozen others, the trailhead is accessible through Fulford Cave Campground outside of Eagle and sits on the edge of the Holy Cross Wilderness. To get to the campsite, take the Sylvan Lake Road exit off of Grand Avenue in Eagle. After 1.5 miles, turn right onto Brush Creek Road and follow for nine miles until the fork of East and West Brush Creek. Take the east fork and drive six miles to the campground and parking lot. From there, drive or walk another five miles past Yeoman Park and take a left at the first switchback (FDR418). Continue 3.5 miles until the trailhead on the left. The well-maintained trail winds through spruce, aspen and pine forests, with small pikas found in the surrounding boulder fields. The meadows burst with wildflowers from July to early September and are interspersed with several steep, rocky sections. Towering over the lake is Craig Peak, at 11,902 feet, and to the south is the Gore Range. Lake Charles Distance: 11 miles roundtrip Difficulty: Easy to moderate The Lake Charles Trail in Holy Cross Wilderness can get packed in the summer, but with good reason: It’s the definition of meandering, with long, relatively easy stretches of clear trail leading to the area’s finest lakes. Although the total distance is intimidating for kids, the trail can be cut short at Lake Charles (9 miles roundtrip) or followed the full distance to Mystic Island Lake. Fisherman find rainbow, brook and brown trout in the nearby creek, and both lakes house Colorado cutthroat trout. Like Nolan Lake, the trailhead is accessible from Fulford Cave Campground. From the info board near the campsite parking lot, enter through the trail gate and take a left at the fork. To the right is the difficult, lightly used Ironedge Trail (13.2 miles roundtrip) leading into Sylvan Lake State Park. Hanging Lake Distance: 2.4 miles roundtrip

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Old & new injuries

Hiking in search of wildflowers in early summer can be breathtaking, if you know where to go. Check out SneakPEAK’s best hikes up and down the valley, including those well-trodden and off-the-beaten-path. Scott McClarrinon photo

Difficulty: Moderate The Hanging Lake Trail through the eastern portion of Glenwood Canyon in the Flat Tops Wilderness is ideal for a quick weekend jaunt, and easily one of the most popular routes in the area. Don’t let the distance fool you – the trail is steep, craggy and not for very small children – but the rewards are plentiful, including gorgeous canyon views, geological formation, the crystalline lake and nearby Spouting Rock waterfall. The surrounding ecosystem is extremely fragile, meaning no dogs, fishing, swimming or bushwhacking. Drive 22 miles west of Eagle along Interstate-70 to the Grizzly Creek exit in Glenwood Canyon. From the exit, turn around and take the interstate east to the Hanging Lake exit. The trailhead starts a quarter-mile east of the rest area, just before the bridge. Sneve Gulch and Sylvan Lake State Park Distance: 5 miles roundtrip Difficulty: Moderate Located south of Eagle near Sylvan Lake State Park – which boasts a handful of easy mile-long trails itself – Sneve Gulch packs an immense variety of terrain into a short trip. The well-maintained trail can be steep in places, but it’s a worthwhile sacrifice, leading through pine and fir forests, open meadows with wild roses and geraniums, and across hilltops with magnificent views of Sylvan Lake, Red Table Mountain and the maroon-hued cliffs of Mount Eve. From Grand Avenue in Eagle, turn south onto Sylvan Lake Road and drive 1.5 miles to Brush Creek Road. Follow the road for roughly nine miles until the fork of East and West Brush Creek. Turn right and travel 4.5 miles to the entrance of Sylvan Lake State Park. The trailhead is just past the park entrance on the left.

[See DAY HIKES, page 13]

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Competitors hose off after last year’s Beaver Creek Tough Mudder. Obstacle races such as the Tough Mudder have skyrocketed in popularity, spawning other variations such as Gypsum’s upcoming Dirty Dozen. Thomas Green photo.

By Phil Lindeman

It’s a scene pulled straight from reality TV: Hundreds of racers clambering over walls 20 feet high, sweating through jungle gyms from hell, and daring fields of electrified cattle prods, all for little more than a few new Facebook photos. There’s no enormous prize at the end – usually just a beer and unceremonious hosing down – but thousands of people across the world are ditching traditional 5-kilometer foot races for courses with intimidating, ultra-masculine names like Warrior Dash, Rugged Maniac and Spartan Race. “It’s something new, something fresh – it has that ‘wow’ factor,” says Scott Ruff, the general manager of the Gypsum Recreation Center, who competed last year in Copper Mountain’s Warrior Dash. “These races just aren’t boring. Everyone loves tackling something they aren’t sure they can do. People rally around each other, and you have that camaraderie that goes missing with individual races.” Thanks to the harrowing terrain of the Rocky Mountains, Colorado has become a hotbed for obstacle races, with events springing up in Vail, Gypsum, Colorado Springs and along the Front Range. This weekend’s Tough Mudder at Beaver Creek is one of the most diabolical of the lot, promoted as the brainchild of a British Special Forces agent. The course winds roughly 12 miles across the front side of the mountain, forcing racers nearly 2,500 vertical feet to the top of Centennial Lift and obstacles with weird nicknames: “Twinkle Toes” for balance beams hung over a mud pit, and “Shocks on Rocks” for a pit covered with electrified netting like barbed wire. “We want people to feel like they really accomplished something amazing – you can’t just jump off the couch and do this,” says Tim Baker, the executive director for Beaver Creek Resort Company, who’s in charge of coordinating the event with national Tough Mudder staff. “Beaver Creek is pretty unique and interest for this race is through the roof.

Do you have what it takes?

Local obstacle races like Tough Mudder and Warrior Dash join hundreds of other events across the country, with dozens more added each summer. Here are two of the wildest trendsetters: Spartan Death Race – 48 hours of hell Held on June 15 in rural Vermont, the Spartan Death Race is one of the original – and by far most grueling – obstacle events in the country. During two days of “racing” across a 40-mile course, participants are at the whims of sadistic organizers who invent challenges as they go. Racers have chopped wood while reciting memorized poetry, hiked non-stop up mountains carrying logs, or built fires after swimming for several hours. Since 2005, more than 90 percent of participants quit before the finish, willfully giving up the $900 entry fee. It has spawned several easier courses, including 5K and 10K runs at 30 different venues. Run for Your Lives – zombie-infested 5K On July 14, the world’s first undead obstacle race shuffles and groans into Denver. Along with the requisite tire fields, rope walls and mud pits, runners will dodge a horde of super-charged zombies a la the horror flick “28 Days Later.” The zombies aren’t hired guns: They’re registered racers, and although undead spots are already filled in Denver, the stop is one of 11 across the country. Chances are you can get your zombie on elsewhere for $87.

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Food heart from the

HP’s Provisions serves up coffee, food, ice cream and more in Eagle’s downtown. By Melanie Wong

At HP’s Provisions, the food, whether it be a pizza ordered to go, a frothing latte, or a scoop of homemade ice cream, comes with a deeply personal touch. In fact, many of the dishes served at Houston and Samantha Perkins’ new corner café and restaurant – you may have noticed the cheery new space located on Capitol St. in downtown Eagle Ranch – have stories rooted in the couple’s travels and their childhoods. Both came from families that loved to entertain and have fond mealtime memories from their younger years. Houston Perkins grew up in a foodie family, and his father had his children eating escargot, caviar and oysters while most kids were focused on candy and soda. Samantha Perkins was born in New Zealand, but due to her father’s job with a mining company, spent her childhood moving around the globe. With that came exposure to a variety of ethnic foods, as well as dinner parties her mother threw for diplomats and expatriates wherever the family found itself. From their table to yours A few years ago, when Houston lost his job in the hospitality industry, the couple decided to make their longtime dream of owning a restaurant a reality. The couple loved to entertain their friends, and the recipes and inspirations from their travels and families made it onto their own table. The new restaurant was a chance to share that food not just with friends, but also with the Vail Valley. “That’s the essence of how it all started,” Samantha says. “It all comes literally passion for cooking and entertaining.” At HP’s, which opened last August, diners can try moussaka inspired by Samantha’s time living in Greece, the Indian curry her mother used to serve at dinner parties, or the crab cakes made from Houston’s father’s recipe. For dessert, you can try homemade ice cream (such as “Cool Mint” requested by the Perkins’ three young daughters) or the mousse de chocolat, made from a recipe given to Samantha’s mother by a French countess in Paris. That personal touch goes beyond the menu options – nearly everything at the restaurant is made in-house from scratch, and the Perkins’ take pride in their customer service and attention to detail.

Top: Local kids enjoy ice cream homemade by HP’s Provisions owner Houston Perkins at the corner cafe, restaurant and market in downtown Eagle Ranch. Above: Try the Neopolitan pizza, made with cherry tomatoes, fresh mozzarella and basil on a European-style thin crust. Billy Doran photos.

Your gluten-free stop

HP’s Provisions has extensive options for gluten-free foods, both on its menu and from its market. Owners Houston and Samantha Perkins chose to make that a focus of the new business because two of their three children have Celiac disease. Houston, tired of seeing his daughters’ faces when they were told they couldn’t have a croissant or cookie, has been working on his own gluten-free flour, which will hit the shelves of the restaurant’s market soon. The couple says their products are gluten-free, but not taste-free. “A lot of gluten-free things on the market are crumbly and don’t have much taste,” Samantha says. “Our things are very different.”

and a family-style wooden table in the center of the room keeps the space from feeling preThe corner cafe tentious. You can also sit at one of the stools alongside the huge floor-to-ceiling windows The space itself has a cozy feel, like maybe you were at a friend’s house for a casual meal. that line the dining room, or relax on the large patio area. Located in the space formerly occupied by Starbucks and a hair salon, the Perkins’ installed One side of the space is dedicated to a small market, selling take-home family portions of a cheery counter space that serves as pastry case, ice cream stand, café and bar, and covered the restaurant’s lasagna, mac-and-cheese, ice cream, soups and more. You can also pick up a the walls with restored barn house wood. Large chalkboards announce the day’s specials, [See HP’S PROVISIONS, page 13]

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Dance for $20.12 tickets on sale Special show returns to Vail Dance Festival Aug. 7 SneakPEAK Staff Report A thrilling array of dance will again be on display Tuesday, August 7 when the popularly-priced Dance for $20.12 evening returns to the Vail Valley Foundation’s Vail International Dance Festival at the Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater at 7:30pm. Tickets for the mixed-bill performance went on sale Wednesday, June 6, with all reserved seats priced at just $20.12 and all general admission lawn seats priced at $12 each. Tickets for Dance for $20.12, as well as all other 2012 Dance Festival performances, are available online at www. vaildance.org, by calling the box office at 888-920-2787 or in person at the Vilar Performing Arts Center in Beaver Creek or Gerald R. Ford Amphitheater in Vail, which is now open for the 2012 summer season. This year marks the fifth installment of the public-minded performance that was created by Festival Artistic Director Damian Woetzel in an effort to make dance more accessible, both from a price and programming perspective. The evening is specifically designed to cultivate new dance audiences by providing a wide variety of dancers and dance styles in one evening’s lineup. “It’s a wonderful performance that I look forward to every year,” says Woetzel. “We welcome a house full of enthusi-

astic people, many of whom have never been to the dance festival before. The program itself reflects a variety of spectacular dancing going on in the world today, with appearances by many of the same stars that are seen on the regular festival schedule.” Dance for $20.12 will feature performances by contemporary dance groups Martha Graham Dance Company (MGDC) and BalletX. Informed by the expansive vision of pioneering choreographer Martha Graham, MGDC brings to life a timeless and uniquely American style of dance that has influenced generations of artists and continues to captivate audiences. Martha Graham Dance Company will perform “Steps in the Streets” from “Chronicle.” BalletX is an innovative and adventurous dance company based in Philadelphia that will perform “The Last Glass” by choreographer Matthew Neenan. Additional performing artists will be announced at a later date. Tickets for the 2012 Dance Festival are priced from $12 to $90 and are available online at vaildance.org or by phone at either 970-845-8497 or 888-920-2787. Specially priced festival passes and student passes are also available.

HOT SUMMER NIGHTS ––––––––––––––– Book,” as well as performed and recorded with musicians such as Dave Mason and Jim Capaldi (of Traffic), Widespread Panic, The Decemberists, Merle Saunders, Eric McFadden, and dozens of local Portland artists and bands. Ruppel has recorded and played live as a solo artist and with the bands Fabuloso and Moheynow. On playing with the Jackmormons, Drizos says, “I love the intensity of this band, the songs and live performances.

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Playing drums for this band sometimes feels like driving a runaway train about to fall off the tracks at any moment, but always manages to arrive at the station.” Don’t miss their arrival at the station later this month in Vail. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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DESTINATIONS // Peru

Travel: A hike to the “Lost City of the Incas” In Peru, the famed Machu Picchu isn’t the only treasure. By Kat Jahnigen

I

f you’re planning (or dreaming of) a trip to Peru, you probably have a single thing in mind: Machu Picchu.

It’s high on the bucket lists of countless people the world over – and justifiably so. But, because of the renown of this UNESCO World Heritage Site (one of the Seven Wonders of the World), many lesser known, but equally fascinating archeological treasures are often overlooked, and the country has more to offer the adventurous than 5,000-year-old ruins. Things like incredible cuisine, fantastic shopping for handmade crafts and a glimpse into an ancient – but still vibrant – culture offer rewarding experiences every step of the journey. Surfacing in the highlands of Peru sometime during the 13th Century, the Incan Empire had become the largest in the Americas by the time Spanish Conquistadors arrived in the 1500s. Nevertheless, it took only about 25 years for the invaders to overwhelm indigenous resistance and dominate the people. While conquerors systematically destroyed many elements of native culture, including their sophisticated farming system, some aspects were simply incorporated into the dominant society. Peru today is a place where European colonial Christian churches stand on top of ancient Inca stonework and religious and societal traditions display elements of both Christian/European and Incan influences. Lima Regardless of your itinerary, you will probably find yourself in Lima – Peru’s largest city and capitol – at some point. Often regarded as a necessary (you’ll probably have to travel to Lima for transportation to Peru’s more alluring sites), the city is actually a worthwhile destination in its own right, offering an intriguing juxtaposition of modern urban

Above: The Sacred Valley offers dramatic mountain scenery and incredible indigenous culture. Kat Jahnigen photos. Right: At a Catholic church built on top of the Inca ruins of Chinchero, worshippers participate in a Palm Sunday ritual.

culture and a rich heritage dating back thousands of years. The Historic Center of Lima is actually a UNESCO World Heritage Site with impressive architectural structures – like the Monastery of San Francisco, the Plaza Mayor, the Covenant of Santo Domingo and the Cathedral – memorializing the Spanish colonial era. The city houses a treasure trove of museums dedicated to preserving the unique art, archeology and history of this unique place. In addition to grandiose buildings and incredible cultural offerings, Lima offers plenty in the way of small, everyday pleasures. Wandering along the high bluff where the city abruptly ends in a 50-foot drop to the shore of the Pacific, an unsuspecting traveler can discover a delightfully incongruous tribute to John Lennon (with a 10-foot statue of the singer standing above a tile mosaic proclaiming, “Imagine”) or find incredible dining opportunities in the city known as the “gastronomical capital of the Americas.”

complex of Sacsayhuamán (nicknamed “Sexy Woman” by semi-serious tour guides to help visitors pronounce this tongue twister), which stands on a hillside overlooking the valley and offers incredible views of the city. The Sacred Valley If your passions include archeology, spirituality or big, glorious mountains, you’ll be in heaven in Peru’s Sacred Valley. About 15 kilometers north of Cuzco, the Urubamba River Valley – known popularly as the Sacred Valley – is home to some gorgeous archeological sites such as Pisac, Ollantaytambo, Chinchero and Moray, most of which also have a bustling commercial counterpart in nearby markets full of traditional, handmade crafts. Meanwhile, everywhere you turn, you’ll see pastoral green hillsides covered in iconic terracing giving way to dramatic, cloud-draped Andean peaks. Lest you subscribe to the philosophy of “seen one Incan ruin, seen them all,” each of these sites is incredibly unique, displaying different elements of an abundant and diverse culture – and each is absolutely, without-a-doubt worth visiting. For example, the steep, cliff-side Ollantaytambo (in-

Cuzco Nestled high in the Andes at about 10,800 feet above sea level, Cuzco was once the capitol of the Inca Empire. According to legend, the city’s footprint was made to resemble the shape of a puma (an animal sacred to the Incas) and – with its stone streets, abundance of beautiful plazas, colonial architecture and surrounding mountains – it’s almost unbearably picturesque. While Spanish invaders sacked most of the Incan city, remains of the Palace of the Incas, Temple of the Sun, and Temple of the Virgins of the Sun still stand and are popular tourist attractions. The shopping is plentiful in Cuzco, as are colorful community events such as civic parades and religious processions. Opportunities for good eating and intimate music abound. But, for the eager traveler, Cuzco serves more as an ambiance-rich base camp for day trips, such as to the walled

[See PERU, page 17]

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Student heads to Telluride program

Junior Rebecca Cotton to attend academic experience SneakPEAK staff report

Battle Mountain High School (BMHS) junior Rebecca Cotton will be one of 64 students in the country attending the Telluride Association Summer Program (TASP), a sixweek, all-expenses paid educational experience for high school juniors. The program that offers challenges and seminars designed to bring together young people from around the world who share a passion for learning. The admission process to the program is competitive, and Rebecca’s application involved writing six essays and an interview. “I am honored to have been selected to attend the Telluride Association Summer Program,” says Rebecca. “I know this experience will be invaluable as I begin working on college applications.” Rebecca will be attending an academic seminars called “The Origin of the Species and the Politics of Evolution.” Each seminar is led by a team of two professors, and the classes are structured like university classes, with a focus on discussion, assigned readings and writing assignments. In addition to the seminar, students participate in a publicspeaking program, attend lectures by guest speakers, and hold other social and intellectual activities as a community. Through the guest lectures, the students learn about a range of ideas and academic disciplines, encouraging them to develop broad interests. Recent guest speakers have included a Nobel laureate physicist, a DNA researcher, a lawyer who worked at Guantanamo Bay, a prominent poet, a college president and an anthropologist.

Rebecca is also a member of the Vail Youth Ballet Company and plans to attend the Unviersity of Michigan at Ann Arbor after graduation. “TASP is the first opportunity I’ve had to participate in an academic summer program,” she says. “I think my teachers at Battle Mountain High School have prepared me well for the challenging academic environment that I will encounter in Ann Arbor.” Life at TASP extends beyond academic exploration. One of the program’s features is that the students are responsible for organizing most of their out-of-classroom time through weekly group meetings and on smaller committees. Students plan all kinds of activities, including group-wide discussions, field games, community service projects, music and theater events, reading groups, and excursions to state parks and art museums. Participants also share responsibility for keeping their environment clean and safe.. The TASPs seek to bring together students from across the United States and abroad who are not just intelligent but thoughtful, not just motivated but generous with their talents and energies. TASPers have a wide variety of life experiences, and come from many different kinds of backgrounds. TASP has a rigorous selection process and TASPers generally go on prestigious colleges. The more than 2,500 living TASP alumni include leaders in politics, journalism, academia, the sciences, education, medicine, business, and the arts. For more information on the Telluride Association Summer Program, go to www.tellurideassocation.org.

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For the love of the Games T

here’s never a shortage of hair-raising spectacles at Vail’s Teva Mountain Games. When a handful of slackliners slung a strip of webbing some 20 feet above Gore Creek last Saturday afternoon, they walked over a group of boaters practicing for an old-school event, the kayak freestyle. It was an unexpected treat for the throng of roughly 350 spectators and a near-perfect metaphor for Teva Games: old meets new, water meets land, all in the name of promoting mountain sports. “This has been a blast,” said Mike Payton, a Coloradoborn member of the Gibbon Slacklines team who took third in Sunday’s final behind Japan’s Toru Osugi and winner Alex Mason, a 14-year-old from California. “Vail is one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever been, and this is the biggest crowd I’ve ever been in front of. The energy is incredible.” During four days of competition, each of the 22 disciplines teemed with that energy. Slacklining was a fan favorite in its Teva Games debut, and easily drew the largest crowds with a marquee spot at the Solaris in Vail Village. After an inevitable rainstorm on Saturday afternoon postponed the slackline tournament and mountain bike freeride dual – a touch ironic for stand-up paddlers, who couldn’t compete due to low water – the weekend ended with ideal weather on Sunday. For the men, longstanding sports like kayaking, mountain biking and bouldering were dominated by veterans, who took home prizes of up to $3,000 each. Stephen Wright of Walling, Tenn., handled frighteningly low rapids to win Saturday’s kayak freestyle, and Austria’s Killian Fischhube defended his title in the Bouldering World Cup. Teva’s Sam Pilgrim of the United Kingdom dominated the mountain bike slopestyle Friday, while Boulder’s Jeremy Horgan-Kobelski took his second straight podium in the cross-country mountain bike. Local triathlete Josiah Middaugh held off Travis Macy of Evergreen for his sixth victory in the Ultimate Mountain Challenge, a four-race event spanning two days. The women’s events also went to superstars, including twotime Olympian Georgia Gould of Fort Collins in the crosscountry mountain bike and U.K. kayaker Claire O’Hara in the freestyle. The top-three spots in the UMC were filled by locals, led by past winner Sari Anderson of Carbondale, who eked out Avon’s Gretchen Reeves by six minutes. As usual, pros were only a portion of the more than 2,000 competitors, who traveled from as far as Australia and New Zealand to perform for nearly 45,000 spectators. One-of-akind events like the 5-kilometer mud run, DockDogs competitions and 8-ball kayak drew hundreds of weekend warriors from across Colorado. SneakPEAK was on hand to capture the awesome, jaw-dropping and just plain bizarre sights of the Teva Games. Enjoy, and we’ll see you next year. SneakPEAK reporter Philip Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

Daring and dazzling sights from last weekend’s Teva Mountain Games By Phil Lindeman Photos by Billy Doran

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Race report: Tales from the trail

The Trans-Sylvania MTB Epic - like summer camp for big kids By Jake Wells

Editor’s note: Jake Wells is an Avon-based professional cyclist and can be reached at jake@sufferfestsports.com. Imagine a bunch of mountain bikers spending seven days in the Pennsylvania woods housed at a Boy Scout Camp, doing nothing but eating, sleeping and riding bikes, and you have a recipe for a great week of summer camp for big kids. That was pretty much the schedule of events at the TranSylvania Mountain Bike Epic (TSE), a seven-day mountain bike race held at the end of May in Pennsylvania. This race has been on my to-do list ever since I first heard of it in 2010. Considering how good the riding is in the Central Pennsylvania woods and that one of my main sponsors, Stan’s NoTubes, has its offices in State College, the potential for me to finally get to do this race looked pretty good. I decided to team up with a fellow Coloradan, Dax Massey, and race the duo category. Team BreckEpic is born Racing the duo format creates an interesting dynamic for stage racing. The rules are that you have to ride with your partner, and you must be within 30 seconds of each other at all times throughout the stages, which ranged from 12-to-50 miles each day. It is important that you and your teammate are evenly matched, or at least have strengths that compliment each other. Being able to communicate and calmly handle the stress of a seven-day stage race is critical. Dax and I raced the TSE as ambassadors for the BreckEpic, a six-day mountain bike stage race that takes place in Breckenridge in the middle of August. Our goal was to go to Pennsylvania and not only help market the Colorado race, but to help grow the world of mountain-bike stage racing here in the United States. I’ve done quite a bit of racing in many different formats throughout my career as a bike racer, and one of the most enjoyable types of racing is stage racing. A stage race consists of multiple races, or “stages,” usually taking place over multiple days. At the end of the race, the rider with the fastest combined time for all the stages is the overall winner. Racers must complete each stage before the “cut off” in order to start the next day. A more consistent and wellrounded rider will typically be rewarded with the win at the end of the race. The outcome is more unpredictable because of the multiple stages, not to mention there is more opportunity for drama to play out. Mountain-bike stage races are a little less common; there are only a handful in North America that take place each year, and the TSE is one of the races that has garnered some attention over the last couple years. Dax is more of an ultra-endurance rider than I am. He typically focuses on 24-hour solo or duo events, often on a single speed bike. He has done the Trans Rockies, a stage race in Canada, a couple of times as part of a duo team, so he has

Avon resident Jake Wells bombs over obstacles during various stages of the Tran-Sylvania Epic, a week-long mountain-bike stage race. His partner, fellow Coloradan Dax Massey, follows close behind. A.E. Landes Photography

portantly, my teammate was riding away from me, having no idea that I was down. But I knew that once Dax realized that I wasn’t in the group, he would be waiting for me. Just as we started to summit the first climb, I could see him waiting over the top. We grouped up and ripped the descent together. As we popped out on to the pavement, we could see the main group just up the road, so we buried it to make contact with the group before it was too late. plenty of experience when it comes to this type of adventure. The school of hard rocks For me, this race came together fairly last minute, so I didn’t have an opportunity to do much specific training for it. However, I was confident in my fitness going into the race, but with this being my first mountain bike race of the season, the one big question mark for me was if I’d be able to handle the technical East Coast riding – and Pennsylvania has some of the most technical riding I have ever seen. The trails wind their way through dense forests full of wet roots, bridges and rocks... lots of rocks. I got some up-close and personal experience with this terrain on day 2, a stage that consisted of 43 miles and 5,000 feet of climbing. The skies had opened up the day before, so things were slippery. As I took a right turn off a bridge, both wheels went out from under me as if I was on a freshly zambonied ice rink. I hit the ground, but at fairly slow speed and only suffered a dropped chain. As I fumbled with getting the chain back on, I felt like the entire race was passing me by. But most im-

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Fast and steady wins the race Despite little mishaps like that, we started out strong, taking to the podium on every stage. Things were looking good until we had one day that was full of mechanical problems – I got a flat, and Dax had trouble with his rear shifting, losing his chain every few minutes. We ended up losing six minutes to our closest competitor. That easily could have been detrimental to the rest of our week of racing, but we both stayed calm and were able to help each other out. Through the experience, we were able to minimize our losses and grow a stronger bond throughout the rest of the week. The following day, stage five, was a brutal course that was only 26 miles, but felt like 40 miles. Dax and I put our heads down, rode hard, and took first by nearly 20 minutes. We finished up the overall race with a win by nearly an hour. Coming into the race, I knew our chances of getting on the podium were pretty good, but it was great to walk away with the win. Should you be interested in a similar adventure, the BreckEpic is a great opportunity to check out a mountain-bike stage race and go to summer camp a little closer to home... in case you get home sick. For more info on the race, see www.breckepic.com.

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DAY HIKES ––––––––––––––––––––––– New York Mountain Trail Distance: 8.7 miles roundtrip Difficulty: Moderate The New York Mountain Trail wanders into the forests and valleys southwest of Edwards, and despite some nearby camping, it can be practically empty in the height of summer. The trail passes through portions of the Holy Cross Wilderness, with access to Nolan Lake Trail and the very difficult, cairn-marked New York Lake Trail (5.1 miles roundtrip). Starting in Edwards, drive under a mile west along U.S. Highway 6 to Lake Creek Road and turn south at the national forest access sign. Travel about two miles, then turn right onto West Lake Creek Road and follow for 2.7 miles to Baryeta Cabins Road. From here, roads are only 4-wheel accessible. Drive or walk right at the switchback for three miles, stopping at the trailhead near the Baryeta Cabins. The trail gets off to a steep, occasionally difficult start, but quickly plateaus on a ridge top surrounded by meadows and the New York Mountain Range.

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Nellie’s Trail Distance: 7.2 miles roundtrip Difficulty: Moderate to hard The photo ops along Nellie’s Trail in the southeast portion of Flat Tops Wilderness outside Dotsero are worth the occasionally grueling hike. It’s a good workout for folks who like steep, rocky terrain without 12 hours of scrambling or route-finding. Views of Sweetwater Lake, Sweetwater Canyon, Shingle Peak and surrounding mountain ranges are pristine, and the hike can be extended by following the 3.5mile Johnny Meyers Trail near the halfway point. At the Dotsero exit, follow the signs for Sweetwater/Burns and turn north onto Colorado River Road. Drive seven miles and turn left onto Sweetwater Creek Road, which continues 11.5 miles to parking at Sweetwater Wilderness Ranch. Hike or drive another quarter-mile to the gate above Hilltop Ranch. The trailhead is 1.5 miles up the Turret Creek Trail, where you take a right at the fork crossing the creek. SneakPEAK reporter Philip Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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rant. The place does it all, from serving quiche, pastries and pancakes for breakfast (ranging from $2.75 to $7), to soups, sandwiches and deli salads for lunch (ranging from $4 to $7), to thin-crust pizzas and rotating specials for dinner (around $10). Come try the Indian curry, fried chicken on Fridays, or a slice of fresh marguerita pizza. The café serves Coda coffee from the Denver-based roaster, and the bakery is stocked with fresh-made pastries created by Samantha. HP’s kicks off the evening with a bar menu, featuring smaller plates, $2 off pizzas, and a happy hour. The restaurant also hosts birthday or tea parties for special occasions. Seeing people enjoy the restaurant’s food is the best part of the whole operation, Samantha says. “The fun part is making the food and creating it, hands down,” she says. “I love seeing things we made the night before fly off the shelf. And I just love the feel of downtown Eagle Ranch – it’s such a little community we’re part of.” From breakfast to dessert Despite being a new business getting on its feet, the PerSneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at kinses have taken on an ambitious schedule for the restau- Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com small selection of organic and gluten-free groceries. Samantha says they hope to eventually stock it almost entirely with things made in-house. The goal is for customers to feel like HP’s Provisions is the friendly corner store and café, serving quality food and drinks – and it very much achieves that goal. The restaurant has a very nostalgic quality, with kids running in and out with ice cream cones in hand, people enjoying a coffee and newspapers on the patio and neighborhood locals breezing through to pick up something to go with dinner. “People love the idea of a corner market,” Samantha says. “Parents love coming to get ice cream with children after school. Moms say in the evenings they can enjoy a glass of wine while the kids have ice cream moms. Families can meet up here.”

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By Melanie Wong There’s no excuse to be bored in Gypsum this summer. Between the town, local businesses and community organizations, there are athletic events, concerts, shows, festivals and something to keep you busy straight through September. Thanks to community partners, the activities are family-friendly and affordable – and even in some cases, free. As the first article in a two-part series about summer activities down valley, SneakPEAK brings you a smattering of some of the fun happening west of Wolcott this summer. Check back next week for activities in Eagle. Free concerts and movies The town of Gypsum recently earned the distinction of being a “Playful City, USA” – one of five cities in the state that got the title – and looking at the town’s summer schedule, it’s not too big of a surprise. Each Friday beginning this week, the town will hold its own community-wide FAC, dubbed “People’s Friday.” The events start at 7 p.m. at Gypsum’s Lundgren Theater and feature movies, concerts, free children’s activities, food from local restaurant Manto’s Pizza, and other vendors. Teen Impact, a teen-and-family outreach program, is also on hand Friday evenings selling cotton candy, popcorn and other snacks to benefit the organization. The concert lineup includes Johnny Cash tribute band Instant Cash, renowned Canadian folk musician Jamie Stone, rockabilly artist Kort McCumber, the Mo-town inspired Soul School and Front Range Americana artists The Congress. Movies include “Back to the Future,” “Captain America” and “Real Steel.” “(People’s Friday) is such a hospitable environment and it really draws people to us,” the town’s special events coordinator Marie Sanders says. “It’s a nice place to relax and leave the worries of your week behind, and just connect with what the Colorado lifestyle is all about.” People’s Friday started as a very local affair, but in the last year has begun to draw people from surrounding communities, such as Eagle and Glenwood Springs. Movies and Concerts on the Green also returns for the fourth year at the Gypsum Creek Golf Course, featuring live concerts and family-friendly movies played on a twostory screen once a month through September. The golf course restaurant will have food and drink specials for attendees, and moviegoers can make it a “dive-in movie” by taking a dip in the pool while watching the movie. The first movie and concert night is June 16, and all events are free. Get outdoors Looking to get your blood pumping? The Gypsum Rec Center is also offering a variety of

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sports activities, such as the Gypsum Rec Center Sprint Triathlon by Columbine Market on June 16. Adults will complete a 500-meter swim, one-mile bike and 3.1-mile run. There are two shorter races for youth and kids. Cost for adults is $39 and $25 for kids with advance registration, and includes swimming and barbecue afterwards. The Gypsum Creek Golf Course also has golf specials, including $25 Sundays (includes greens fees and cart) on June 3, July 1 and August 5. Ladies Night Tuesdays, women’s golf evenings, go through August from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. and include a clinic with the club pro and a cocktail social hour. Want something a bit more unconventional? Gypsum is hosting its first-ever Dirty Dozen, an obstacle/adventure race held at and around the Gypsum Rec Center on July 14. The race, inspired by similar events such as Copper Mountain’s Warrior Dash, will feature plenty of mud, along with challenges such as running through a field studded with tires, climbing an A-frame structure with the help of a rope and vaulting over hay bales. The race covers three miles and 12 obstacles, ending in a party at the rec center with live music, food and a beer garden. Entry costs $65 for adults and includes the race and a free beer. Don’t worry, says race organizer Scott Ruff, none of the challenges are painful or scary – just mostly messy. Shenanigans such as costumed racers are highly encouraged as well, Ruff says. In fact, there is even a kid’s version of the race midday, costing $25. The race can be done as a team or individually, and organizers hope the Dirty Dozen will become an annual event drawing people from all over western Colorado, not only for the race itself, but for the food, festivities and contests revolving around it. The day ends with a concert from country artist Collin Raye at 8:30 p.m. “For our first year, our goal is the locals, but hope we get the Western Slope region in coming years,” Ruff says. “(This kind of event) is what people are looking for. A 5K road run is just not enough – with this you get obstacles and get muddy. It’s so much fun, and it really tests your will and skills.” The Dirty Dozen ushers in what is Gypsum’s marquee summer event, Gypsum Daze, which officially runs from July 20 to July 21. Historically, the summer festival has been a weekend-only event, but this year the town is making the celebration of summer a full week of concerts, food vendors, talent shows and other activities. The bulk of activities are still on July 20 and July 21, including a fishing tournament, pancake breakfast, car show, youth talent show and a free concert from Southern rockers The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. For the younger crowd The Gypsum Public Library also has a full slate of events

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Free concerts are among the attractions at Gypsum Daze in July. In addition to the festival, the town hosts free concerts and movies at the golf course throughout the summer, as well as a full slate of athletic activities. Photo special to SneakPEAK.

Summer fun in Gypsum

For a full schedule and details for People’s Friday, Movie and Concerts on the Green, and the Gypsum Daze lineup, see www.townofgypsum.com. For information on Gypsum’s sprint triathlon and the Dirty Dozen adventure race, see www.wecmrd.org or call the Gypsum Rec Center at 970-777-8888.

Teen Services Librarian Julie Richards of the Gypsum library says the program has picked up steam in the last couple years; last summer, almost 100 kids signed up for the program, she says. Younger kids can get involved through the Reading Buddies program, where high school students volunteer to read with elementary-aged kids. Afterwards, participants do an activity related to the reading with their high school mentors. Parents can register their kids by calling the Eagle or Gypsum libraries. There’s more… A theater group, The Porchlight Players, also lights up the summer stage at Lundgren Theater with a free show, “The Apple Tree.” The show is a series of three musical mini-plays, each with its own storyline, but tied together by a common theme. The free shows are on Friday, Aug. 24 and Saturday, Aug. 25 at 6 p.m. As Sanders of the town of Gypsum says, the packed summer schedule is an effort to create a vibrant community in Gypsum. “The goal is to make sure that the residents have a community to call home,” she says. “To make that happen, (the town) has to be a participant and a partner. These activities allow people to be able to get out and enjoy the community they call home.”

for kids and teens. The library might not be the first place you’ll convince your child to go during summer break, but the organizers at Gypsum’s library make a pretty good case. The teen summer reading program kicks off on Thursday, June 7. Open to middle and high school students, the program’s summer theme is “Own the Night.” Participants read books of their choice throughout the summer and receive prizes per number of books completed. The reading is paired with Wednesday afternoon activities, including author visits, arts and crafts, and self-defense classes. The first Wednesday activity, which starts at 4 p.m. at the Gypsum library and 2 p.m. at the Eagle library, features Denver teen novel author Denise Vega, who will help the participants write their own song lyrics. A later Wednesday will bring in a local musician to help the students put their lyrics to music. Another class on June 20 has Eagle County Sheriff depuSneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at ties teaching basic self-defense. The program will culmiMelanie@sneakpeakvail.com nate in a dance party on July 25 at Gypsum Town Hall.

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Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

&Wellness

Health

Seaweed, spinach, super foods By Phil Lindeman Call them The Avengers of your pantry: “Super foods” have garnered mounds of press in the past five years, led by relatively obscure eats with supposedly otherworldly properties. TV doctors and others are enamored with fruits like acai and goji berries, citing everything from digestive health to cancer cures. Of course, catchy terms in the nutrition world are usually marketing tools – look at goji berry, which is a commercial name for wolfberry and closely related to everyday staples like tomatoes. To pin down the role of super foods, local nutritionist Hillary Sargent of Busy Body Wellness has a mellower nickname: nature’s condiments. “Most super foods have certain properties that give them an edge over normal foods, but they can do the same thing as ketchup on a hot dog and work great as an addition to any meal,” Sargent says. “They provide little nutrients here or there we don’t get in the standard American diet.” Marketing ploy or not, any movement to expand that standard diet – heavy on meat, dairy and processed foods – is a good one, and Sargent doesn’t mind the attention super foods have attracted. These foods make an ideal addition to healthy diets of lean meat and veggies, thanks to the richness of additional nutrients, antioxidants, probiotics and healthy fats like omega-3s. In keeping with the condiment theme, Sargent’s list of super foods goes beyond buzz worthy berries to include a slew of complimentary, nutrient-dense grub. But how do mere mortals work these into a meal as easily as mustard and relish? It doesn’t take a diet of steel, just a bit of creativity. The good Don’t let the popularity of trendy berries like acai and goji fool you: They tout major health benefits, particularly for immune systems that need an antioxidant boost. Research shows antioxidants protect bodily cells by targeting free radicals – the chemicals we take on from air pollution and hard minerals – which increase the risk of certain cancers. But supermarket fruits like blueberries and cranberries have similar properties, and in a mountain community, these humbler berries are often easier to find and tend to be cheaper. No matter your choice, Sargent recommends organic varieties and notes the nutritional benefits don’t disappear when fruit is frozen. This turns berries into ready-made ice cubes for light, brightly flavored summertime smoothies. Sargent also champions fermented foods, such as yogurt and sauerkraut, which have active cultures that produce probiotics. These little germs help with digestion and can provide energy, often without the dreaded crash of a sugar rush. Along with the unexpected boost of probiotics, yogurt is high in protein, vitamins and dairy fat. The increasingly popular Greek variety is thicker and creamier thanks to an even higher fat content. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing: Fat is as important as any other nutrient, and highly active folks like athletes or children need a well-rounded diet. The same goes for almond and coconut milk, two of Sargent’s

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For folks in perpetual motion, smoothies packed with super foods are a simple way to load up on nutrients between meals. Local nutritionist Hillary Sargent shares her favorite recipes for breakfast and post-workout recovery. Smoothies should never fully replace meals, though. Eat with granola or whole fruit, instead. Breakfast smoothie 1/2 can organic coconut milk, full fat 1/3 can organic pumpkin puree 1/2 cup frozen cherries 1 frozen acai berry pack 3-6 leaves of fresh kale 1 tbs. ground flax seed 1 scoop organic whey powder Recovery smoothie 1 frozen banana 1 tbs. raw nut butter (such as almond) 2 cups organic almond/coconut/cow milk Dash of cinnamon Dash of nutmeg Handful of fresh spinach 1 tsp. honey or maple syrup (optional) 1 scoop greens powder (like Vibrant Health Green Vibrance and Amazing Grass Brands) recommended smoothie ingredients. The strange Berries and yogurt are good foundations, but super foods wouldn’t have the same allure without a few off-the-wall additions. One of Sargent’s favorites is the chia seed – yes, the same used to grow hair on ceramic busts. Chia seeds are excellent sources of Omega-3s and fiber, and they pack loads of energy into a food the size of sesame seeds, once eaten by Aztecs during long, sustained runs and hikes – not far removed from modern-day trail warriors in Vail. The seeds can be a bit difficult to track down, but packages from the natural food company Bob’s Red Mill can occasionally be found at City Market or Safeway. Along with an occasionally sparse selection of super foods at the grocery store, mountain dwellers are also light on the nutrients found in seafood-heavy diets, including protein, iodine, calcium and zinc. “We miss out on a lot of those minerals, as opposed to people who live near the ocean or have a typical Asian diet,” Sargent says. She suggests seaweed varieties – kombu, nori and wakame, along with others – which have the same benefits as fish, minus the mercury found in commercial meat. Greens like kale, spinach and chard makes funky (but fun) additions to any meal, including drinks. If you’d rather go

[See SUPER FOODS, page 26]

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PERU ––––––––––––––––––––––––––– cidentally the starting point to hike the famed Inca Trail), was built as royal estate and ceremonial center of Emperor Pachacuti and houses incredible structures like the Sun Gate and numerous, celebrated fountains built for religious activities. Alternately, the concentric stone circles of Moray actually served as a type of Inca nursery where different strains of corn could be cultivated at various elevations in order to improve agriculture throughout the empire. While you can pay an entrance fee at each historical park individually, the most economical option is to purchase a park pass that offers access to all the notable ruins in the region. With its thousands-year-old reputation as a sacred place, there is much here to appeal to the modern spiritual journeyer. There are spiritual retreats, offering everything from massage to “energetic healing,� opportunities to observe or participate in Shamanic rites, and even places that offer Ayahuasca (the hallucinogenic drug of Inca Shamans) ceremonies – though the authenticity – not to mention the prudence – of that might be questionable.

[From page 8]

same time as the Spanish Conquest, and the “estate� for Inca rulers remained unknown to everyone except local inhabitants, protecting it from the irreparable destruction and pilfering that other archeological sites suffered. By the time it was rediscovered and brought to international attention in 1911 by a Yale professor, the world was ready to appreciate and protect this incredible legacy. What can be said about Machu Picchu that hasn’t already been said? Honestly, nothing. You simply must see it for yourself because words and photos don’t do justice. When you go, get up early and grab the first bus from the closest town, Aguas Calientes, at 5:30 a.m. By 11 a.m. the ruins will be swarming with tourists who not only flaw otherwise perfect photo opportunities but might impale you with a stiletto heal on crowded pathways. If you don’t have time or inclination to hike the entire Inca Trail, at least follow it from Machu Picchu to the Sun Gate, a 30-minute hike that offers stunning views of the ruins unfolding beneath you. If you’re able, climb the distinctive Wayna Picchu (you’ll need to make a reservation), which looms over Machu Picchu. It’s a relatively short but grueling climb. The summit consists of slanting slabs of overlapping rock and can be precarious, especially when crowded with other climbers jockeying for a secure spot, but it’s worth suffering for. Seeing Machu Picchu from 1,200 feet above is an incredible experience.

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Machu Picchu Peru’s national treasure, one of the most famous tourist and academic destinations in the world, is even more aweinspiring in person than photos and writings would have you believe. The vast and unfathomably skillful stone construction, which seems to virtually hang among the clouds and strikingly steep peaks, was abandoned by its inhabitants a SneakPEAK writer Kat Jahnigen can be reached at mere 100 years after its completion. info@sneakpeakvail.com Fortunately, the abandonment took place at roughly the

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SneakGEAR: Cool riding gear, technically Rudy Project debuts new Windmax helmet, sport shades and more By Larry Grossman So who in the world is Rudy? Rudy is actually Rudy Barbazza, a name I would imagine not one of you reading this review have ever heard before. If you’re an athlete in virtually any discipline, from cycling to golf, water sports to shooting disciplines, I guarantee you that you have seen Mr. Barbazza’s products donning competitor’s faces, torsos and also evident in some of the gear they carry along with them. Barbazza is the founding father of a company called Rudy Project, which began producing sport sunglasses in 1985 with a fairly limited line of product. Rudy Project labeled themselves the makers of “technically cool eyewear.” Let me tell you this right up front, their product line is as functional and stylish as any out there. Whatever your flavor, Rudy Project has you covered, and they have multiple options for those of you that need prescription and shatter-proof lenses in just about every tint and color you can think of. Let’s start with the glasses. “Technically cool” indeed With sunglasses designed to help protect your eyes in style, Rudy Project lists 16 sports and literally thousands of frame, lens color, lens material and prescription options to choose from. The glasses are crafted and designed in Italy, ooo la la! Nearly all of their designs come with an adjustable and comfortable nosepiece, which you can shape to fit your face and nose as needed. The temple portions are also all adjustable. There are countless options for replaceable lens kits for different light conditions as well. Perhaps the most desirable lens option for many athletes is the RX Interchangeable lens that is both impact resistant (ImpactX) and has the ability to get darker in brighter sun conditions (photochromic). I got my hands on a pair of their Rydons with this exact lens in the red tint -- I like to call it a rose-colored lens, being a John Conlee fan. They have performed flawlessly for

Rudy Project’s new Windmax helmet. Cody Downard photo

They would be a perfect choice for women, but I actually have taken to the lower profile on days when there is not as much wind. While on the bike, I find I barely notice I’ve got the glasses on, which is perfect. The plastics that Rudy Project uses in its designs are incredibly durable, and the customer service, should you need any assistance with any product, is quick and precise. They take care of their customers and back the product like no other.

Gear guy Larry Grossman suffers in style at the Koppenberg road race in Superior in a Rudy Project kit. Photo special to SneakPEAK. three seasons now and are the most durable pair of glasses I’ve ever owned, without a scratch on them, in part due to the plastic hard shell case and cleaning cloth that come with the glasses for storage. Just out this year is the Revenge, which has a lower profile than the Rydon and many of the other Rudy Project models.

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Protecting your noggin A couple of years ago, Rudy Project came out with what was a revolutionary helmet for the company, the Sterling. The Sterling ($229.99) had some incredibly well-thought out features, like sunglass docks in the air vents, a mesh bug guard insert held in place with Velcro, which stayed in place and evenly distributed pressure across the top of your head, and an easy-to-adjust internal strap to help the helmet fit on your own dome. The large helmet weighed in at 374 grams and a medium weighed 349 grams. This year, the next generation of lightweight cycling helmet arrived from Rudy Project, and you will see a good

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Calendar of Events Thursday, June 7 Pete & Justin at Main St. Grill

Live music starts at 9:30 p.m. at Riverwalk’s Main St. Grill in Edwards.

Friday, June 8 People’s Friday Kick-Off Party

The Town of Gypsum’s weekly free movie and concert parties kick off for the season at 7 p.m. at the Lundgren Theater. Musical guest is instant cash, a Johnny Cash tribute band. The movie is “Ink Heart” and begins at dusk. There are also free children’s games and crafts, as well as a “best 80s costume contest,” and water and mud games for the entire family. Enjoy great food from the Fox Den Café, Manto’s Pizza and snacks sold by Impact Ministries.

Saturday, June 9 and Sunday, June 10 Beaver Creek Tough Mudder

Friday, June 8 and Saturday, June 9 EOTO, Robotic Pirate Monkeys at State Bridge EOTO of String Cheese Incident with special guests and Robotic Pirate Monkey play at State Bridge Riverside Amphitheater. The show is on Friday, June 8 at 9 p.m. and Saturday, June 9 at 6 p.m., with EOTO playing at 10 p.m. Tickets to Friday’s show are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Saturday’s show is $25 in advance and $27 at the door. Visit www.statebridge.com to view schedule and purchase tickets. Wm Bradley Johnson photo. in the yoga practice. Yoga for Land is presented by Revolu- Tuesday, June 12 tion Power Yoga and Eagle Valley Land Trust. For more info Whitewater Kayak Demos see http://www.evlt.org/ or call 970-748-7654. Alpine Kayak School will be on hand at the Gore Creek Whitewater Park in Vail Village on Tuesday evenings from Saturday, June 9 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Experienced kayakers will have the opportunity to demo kayaks and gear free of charge. Spectators Trail workday and BBQ Rocky Mountain Sport Riders hold a trail work and ride day will be able to observe local and visiting kayakers taking at Bocco Mountain (Wolcott). Meet at 8:30 a.m. Free barbe- advantage of the world-class features in the park. cue in the afternoon. For more info see www.rmsrco.com.

This adventure/obstacle race at Beaver Creek puts athletes of all levels to the ultimate test. Described as a mix of Ironman meets Burning Man, Tough Mudder tests competitors’ allaround strength, stamina, mental grit and camaraderie. The 10-plus mile obstacle course is complete with 22 militarystyle challenges including electric shocks, ice-cold plunges, eight-foot walls, barbed-wire crawls, 100-foot long mud pits and the patented FireWalker gauntlet of flames. Designed by British Special Forces, Tough Mudder is recognized as the Sunday, June 10 most difficult mud-run on the circuit. For more info, or to Musical theater workshop register, go to www.toughmudder.com. Hone your musical performance talents at the Vail Valley Theatre Company’s workshop from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Bring Saturday, June 9 a song and music you would like to work on, or choose one from the VVTC’s files. Cost is $25 per person and class is 2012 Summer Fun Run Eagle County Early Childhood Programs (ECECP) offers intended for performers ages 13 and older. Class will be at the first annual Summer Fun Run. The Summer Fun Run the CMC Lecture Hall at the Colorado Mountain College’s includes a 5 K race and a 1-mile Family Trot held on Satur- Edwards location. RSVP to vailtheater@gmail.com. day, June 9 beginning at 9 a.m. at Freedom Park in Edwards. Pre-registration is available at participating Early Childhood Monday, June 11 Programs, and registration tables open at 8 a.m. on race day. Acoustic bluegrass at Main St. Grill See http://efec.org/events for more info. Live music starts at 10 p.m. at Riverwalk’s Main St. Grill in

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Heavy rains meant that the expert and pro categories at the Eagle Ranch Classic in the Vail Recreation District’s mountain bike race series did not get to race, and women’s sport categories did not get to finish. The race for those categories only is rescheduled for June 13 with Men’s Pro and Expert going off at 5:45 p.m., with an after party to follow at Dusty Boot Steakhouse in Eagle. For full details and start times see www.vailrec.com.

Wednesday, June 13 Vail’s Annual Mountain Cleanup

Community volunteers are invited to join employees for the annual cleanup. All volunteers receive a single-day lift ticket voucher for 2012-2013 winter ski season. Volunteers are encouraged to pre-register with the Mountain Information Monday, June 11 Center and complete release waivers prior to cleanup day. Creating with chocolate at CMC On cleanup day, all volunteers should meet at the base of Pastry chef Felicia Kalaluhi teaches students how to create the Eagle Bahn Gondola (#19) in Lionshead by 8 a.m. with beautiful chocolate treats and the lore behind our favorite their own work gloves, water, sun block, hat, snacks, sturdy sweets. Classes is June 11 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Register hiking shoes and clothing for inclement weather. At noon the through Colorado Mountain College in Edwards. Vail Mountain dining staff will provide a barbecue for volunteers. For more info see www.vail.com/mountaincleanup. Edwards.

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TOUGH MUDDER ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– As a national race series with more than 50 venues globally, Tough Mudder has the clout to attract enormous crowds, particularly young athletic types like Ruff who are bored with normal racing. In its first year in 2011, the Beaver Creek event had 10,000 racers, and Baker estimates this year will draw up to 16,000. Kate Portz, a lift dispatcher at Vail Mountain who competed in the inaugural Tough Mudder, returns this weekend with the Vail Ski Patrol team knowing there’s no way to be fully prepared. “I thought I was training for it, but in all reality I should’ve been sprinting straight up ski runs,” Portz says. “It was one of those weird things where you were in so much pain, but it was so much fun. It’s not just going out and cranking through a running race. If I set out to just run 12 miles, I would never finish.” Mud, blood and social media The Tough Mudder is one of hundreds of obstacle races, part of a trend that has grown exponentially in the past five years. The concept is a blend of military training, adventure racing and a triathlon on steroids, all with the youthful energy of a music festival. Ever since the trend was sparked in 2005 by the 48-hour Spartan Death Race in Vermont, most obstacle races have toned things down, opting for traditional 5-kilometer and half-marathon formats. The 5K Warrior Dash, a precursor to the Tough Mudder founded in 2009 by Chicago-based Red Frog Events, is now the largest running series in the world, according to race director Alex Yount. Halfway through the 2012 season, the Warrior Dash has already seen 750,000 participants, an explosion from 2,000 in 2009. Yount predicts 20,000 will show for the third-annual race at Copper in August, making it the

largest obstacle race in the state. Along with the challenge angle – what Beaver Creek’s Baker calls the “mystique of an Ironman event” with an everyman appeal – the trend’s growing popularity is rooted in social media. On Facebook, the Warrior Dash page has 850,000 “likes,” surpassed only by the Tough Mudder with more than 2.2 million. The mix of digital chatter and a barbaric format separate obstacle races from the old-school triathlons and road races they’ve started to displace. “I honestly think these races are something people enjoy bragging about,” Baker says. “It appeals to that social-media set, and that aspect has become extremely addictive and important for participants.” Facebook chatter is one thing – actual participation is another. That’s where the insanity of obstacle races comes into play: The crazier the course, the higher the interest. Cheryl Cannataro, who works at Vail with Portz, is taking on the Tough Mudder for the first time this year. In the week before, she flits between excitement and nervousness. “It sounded like fun, and I had friends who did it before,” Cannataro says, then laughs jokingly. “It seemed scary, but I wanted to challenge myself – I think I’m going to pee my pants.” As females, Portz and Cannataro aren’t anomalies in the world of obstacle racing – despite the “hoo-rah” culture, most races see an even split between males and females. The events have even become tourist attractions: Cannataro will compete in the paint-splattered Color Run in New York this summer, and Baker sees the Tough Mudder as a vital part of the Beaver Creek aura, much like the Birds of Prey ski races. “High-profile athletic events have been a part of Beaver Creek’s DNA for years,” Baker says. “For us, this is about

extending the Beaver Creek brand.”

Down and dirty for a cause Like the Susan G. Komen breast cancer walks and runs, most obstacle races support a cause. The Tough Mudder has raised $3.2 million to date for the Wounded Warriors Project, a major reason Baker wanted the resort to be a host venue. It was also a selling point for Portz, who initially balked at entry fees over $100. After the Warrior Dash partnered with St. Jude Research Hospital, Yount says they’ve raised $1 million in just five months, with the bulk of summer racing still to come. As expected, the events inject the fundraising process with personality: At the end of the Tough Mudder, Baker says people will make an enormous pile with their battered shoes, which are then cleaned and donated to local thrift stores. Perhaps one of the most interesting facets of the obstacle race culture is a lack of hard-nosed competition; unlike regular races, timing means very little. At the Tough Mudder, people can opt out of any obstacle, but many make it through with the help of friends. Portz says each of the 30-odd members of her team completed the race last year and expects more of the same on Saturday. For organizers like Baker, this zeal for friendly competition is fresh and exciting. “A lot of folks who enter that race aren’t doing it to compete. It’s a participatory event built around camaraderie and teamwork,” Baker says. “We have people who say this created lifelong memories. They come for the challenge and the culture.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

RUDY PROJECT –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– number of the pro peloton riders wearing it this year. The Windmax ($299.99) weighs in at a miniscule 270 grams in a large, making it virtually feel like you have nothing more than a pile of feathers on your head -- it’s ridiculously light. I ride both mountain and road bikes, and the interchangeable visors literally snap on and off in a second. This is the lightest and most comfortable helmet from Rudy Project yet. The color selections leave an option for everyone. Even a bag for business The large majority of us these days find it important to be able to carry our laptop computers with us wherever we travel, whether it be locally or traveling to remote destinations. The Rudy Project Biz Case 3 meets this need in a very stylish, functional and affordable way ($79.99). The bag is designed properly with layered and zippered compartments that make it very easy to find and reach whatever you choose to organize. It’s got internal padding for a large interior pocket that will protect your laptop. I placed laptop with a 17-inch screen in the bag with no problem, and it is easy to remove. The bag is tough, and I tested the shoulder strap connection by mistake when the bag got hung up in an elevator door while I was carrying an assortment of bike gear, and it easily took the brunt of my 180-pound frame at full force with no tearing of seams or stitching. The security video of that incident at the Evergreen Lodge

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[From page 5]

[From page 18]

is probably very worthy of a good old belly laugh session, I would imagine. There are cleverly placed slots for pens, keys and all of your other accessories including cameras and cords. It’s a very smart looking product that performs better than you would expect – everything fits snug into place but is still easy to access. It’s a big thumbs-up. Rudy also carries a full line of traveling bags and packs. I’ve used the Rudy Project Cycling gear bag for 10 years, and the zippers are all still functioning perfectly, and minus some stink and dirt, still as good as the day I purchased it. Time for cycling kits With cycling and triathlon season now getting into full swing, be sure to check out the E-Rudy store online (www.e-rudy.com) where they often have some great deals. Currently, they have a two-for-one offer that is hard to beat. If you are in the market for high-quality cycling or triathlon clothing, Rudy Project offers a full line of product that is both bomber quality and great looking at the same time. I especially like the simple, but stylish offerings in black and white. Rudy even offers a couple of super high-end, Italian-designed and manufactured watches -- it’s time for Rudy Project! SneakPEAK writer Larry Grossman can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

Stay in Denver in Style! Newly renovated rooms

89

$

00 night

Includes breakfast for two!

2 miles from Park Meadows Mall and a new IKEA store Walk to Denver Light Rail 10 minutes from Outlets at Castle Rock • Indoor pool & Jacuzzi 24 hour fitness center • Free Business Center • Free Shuttle to mall • Free parking • Sonoma'z Grill Formerly Asian Spice Bistro

926.6628

69 Edwards Access Rd., Unit 6, Edwards • 1/2 mile from I-70, in Alpine Bank Bldg.

10345 Park Meadows Drive • Littleton, CO DenverMarriottSouth.com • 303.925.0004 Ask for Neighborhood rate or rate code A3P. Based upon availability Thur-Sun. Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

|

sneakpeak

21


sneakSHOTS | Who’s Up To What

Manto’s patio is now open! Stop in and see Jay and Donna for their $5 lunch menu, available Tuesday through Friday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Manto’s is located near Columbine Market in Gypsum.

Cheryl and Danny (Ekahi Grill - yum!) hang out with Jorge (SteamMaster - more than just carpet cleaning) at the last Gypsum Chamber mixer held at Werks in Gypsum! For more information on all the great benefits of the Gypsum Chamber contact info@gypsumchamber.com!

If you have a photo you would like to have in sneakSHOTS, just send us an email with the picture and a brief description, kudos or shout-out to info@sneakpeakvail.com. Please include “sneakSHOTS” in the subject line.

Principal Jarnot and Ms. Redland were hanging out with the 7th grade leadership class at the inaugural Eagle FunFest! A special thanks to all the businesses and parents for their support! Lead on!

Phenomenal gifth grade teachers, Ms. Lopez and Ms. Turnipseed, take a break at Ameritowne! Thanks to all the parent volunteers and teachers!

Time to plant! Get your veggies, herbs, annuals, and perennials at GH Daniels on U.S. Hwy. 6 in Gypsum. Pictured: Rhonda.

Vail 476-9026 Avon 949-9900 Eagle 337-9900

11

95 $ Only...

Any 3-topping or House Combo 18” Large Pizza

Good in all locations • One pizza per coupon One coupon per check • No other discounts apply

* must present coupon when ordering

VAiLd MOndAy tHru tHursdAy OnLy - tiLL 6/13/12 22

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

Open for the summer season!

30

%

off All Food Nightly

Vail Villages Finest Sushi & Japanese inspired cuisine 168 East Gore Creek Dr. • Vail Village Call for reservations 970.476.7332


Agave | 1060 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.8666 Avon Bakery & Deli | 25 Hurd Lane | 970.949.3354 Cima | 126 Riverfront Lane | 970.790.5500 Blue Plate | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.2252 Bob’s Place | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.8566 Carniceria Tepic | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.6033 China Garden | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.4986 Columbine Bakery | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.1400 Domino’s Pizza | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.3230 Fiesta Jalisco | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.8088 Geno’s Sandwiches | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.0529 Gondola Pizza | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.6000 Loaded Joe’s | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.1480 Montanas Cantina and Grill | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.7019 Northside Coffee and Kitchen | 20 Notingham Rd. | 970.949.1423 Nozawa Sushi | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.0330 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.6093 Subway Avon | 47 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.1312 Swiss Hot Dog Company | 101 Fawcett Rd. | 970.467.2013 Taqueria No Se Hagan Bolas | 91 Beaver Creek Place | 970.845.7959 Ticino | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748-6792 Vin 48 | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.9463

Mexican & Tex/Mex

LD

Organic Deli

BLD

Contemporary Latin

LD

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Chinese Cuisine

LD

$

European Cafe & Bakery

BLD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Italian Sandwiches

LD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Southwest Grill

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Sushi & Asian, Thai

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Hot Dogs & Soup

L

$

Mexican

LD

$

Italian Food & Pizza

LD

Rustic American

D

Organic/Local American Cuisine

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

D

$$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

American Comfort

LD

$$

Pizza & Sandwiches

LD

$

Tex-Mex

BLD

Steakhouse & Saloon

LD

BBQ & Deli Sandwiches

LD

$

Asian Fusion & Sushi

LD

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$$$

Seasonaly Focused Fine Dining

D

$$$

Coffee/Breakfast/Wine/Tapas

BLD

French Cuisine

D

$$$

Tapas Bar and Lounge

D

$$

Gelato, Chocolate & Wine

LD

Classic American Grill

BD

Contemporary Colorado Cuisine

D

$$$

Seasonal American

D

$$$

$ $ $$$

$ $$

BEAVER CREEK 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill | Park Hyatt Beaver Creek | 970.949.1234 Beano’s Cabin | 210 Plaza Way | 970.754.3463 Beaver Creek Chophouse | Beaver Creek Lodge | 970.845.0555 Black Diamond Bistro | 120 Offerson Road | 970.949.1251 Blue Moose Pizza | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.8666 Coyote Cafe | 210 The Plaza | 970.845.9030 Dusty Boot Saloon | 210 Offerson Rd. | 970.748.1146 Flying Pig Sandwich Shop | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.0333 Foxnut Asian Fusion and Sushi | 15 W. Thomas Place | 970.845.0700 Golden Eagle Inn | 118 Beaver Creek Plaza | 970.949.1940 Grouse Mountain Grill | 141 Scott Hill Rd. | 970.949.0600 The Metropolitan | 210 Offerson Road | 970.748.3123 Mirabelle Restaurant | 55 Village Rd. | 970.949.7728 Osprey Lounge | 10 Elk Track Ln. | 970.754.7400 Rimini Cafe | 45 W. Thomas Place | 970.949.6157 Rocks Modern Grill | 27 Avondale Le. | 970.845.9800 Saddleridge | 44 Meadow Ln. | 970.754.5450 Spago | The Ritz Carlton, Bachelor Gulch | 970.343.1555 Splendido at the Chateau | 17 Chateau Ln. | 970.845.8808 Toscanini | 60 Avondale Ln. | 970.754.5590

No need to get decked out on our deck. Introducing Friday Afternoon Casual

F.A.C.

The Lazy, Hazy

Days of Summer Starts Friday at 5pm

• • • •

sponsored by: Vail PM & Double Diamond Ski Shop

Late Night Bar Menu til 1am Thurs, Fri, Sat

Free keg of Crazy Mountain draft every Friday on the deck starting at 5pm.

DJs spinning your favorites Drink specials Tequila tasting Games & giveaways

82 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. AVON • 970.949.7019

$ $$

$$

$ $$

Rustic American & Seafood

D

$$$

Italian Pasta Grill

D

$$$

/08 01&/

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

AVON

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

$PĂŹFFt.JTUP -BUUFt&TQSFTTP $BQQVDDJOP 4NPPUIJFT *DFE'SBQQVDDJOP #BHFMTt.VĂŻ OT 4UVĂŹFE$SPJTTBOUT #GBTU4BOEXJDIFT $FSFBM.03& Open daily 7:30am-12pm Closed Tuesdays 4695 Vail Racquet Club Dr., East Vail Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

|

sneakpeak

23


4 Eagle Ranch | 4091 Highway #131, Wolcott | 970.926.3372 Baboune’s | 0131 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2425 Back Bowl | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.BOWL Dietrich’s Cafe | 313 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.5021 Dog House Grill | 10663 Highway 6, Gypsum | 970.524.1660 Dusty Boot | 1099 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.7002 Eagle Diner | 112 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.1919 Ekahi Grill and Catering | 116 Park Street, Gypsum | 970.524.4745 Fusion Cafe | 422 McIntire St., Eagle | 970.328.1234 Grand Avenue Grill | 678 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.328.4043 Gypsum Grill Steakhouse | 686 Trail Gulch Rd., Gypsum | 970.524.7365 H.P.’s Provisions | 1160 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5280 Heidis Brooklyn Deli | 150 Cooley Mesa Rd., Gypsum | 970.777.3663 Luigi’s Pasta House | 1143 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5400 Mantos | 106 Oak Ridge Ct., Gypsum | 970.524.6266 Moe’s Original BBQ | 630 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.337.2277 Paradigms | Corner of 4th and Capital St., Eagle | 970.328.7990 Pastatively Roberto’s Italian Cuisine | 94 Market St., Eagle | 970.328.7324 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.337.9900 Red Canyon Cafe | 128 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2232 Yeti Grind | 330 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9384

LD

$

Omelets, burritos and more

BL

$

American Cuisine/ Bowling

LD

$$

Coffee, Sandwiches, Soups, Ice Cream

BL

$

LD

$

Steakhouse/American Cuisine

LD

$$

Traditional American Diner

BLD

$

Hawaiian Style Food

LD

$

American

BLD

$

Casual American

LD

$

Steakhouse

LD

$

BLD

$

Soups & Sandwiches

BLD

$

Pasta & Pizza

LD

$$

Pizza

LD

$

Barbecue

BLD

$

Creative American

LD

$$ $$

Classic Italian

LD

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches

BLD

$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

Italian, Pasta

LD

$$

Eclectic American

BL

$

Chinese, Asian

EAGLE-VAIL Ristorante Ti Amo | 40982 US Highway #6 | 970.845.8153 Route 6 Cafe | 41290 US Highway #6 | 970.949.6393

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Ranch Western Atmosphere

Pricing

EAGLE/GYPSUM

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

EDWARDS Asian Spice Bistro | 69 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.6628 Balata | 1265 Berry Creek Rd | 970.477.5353 Bonjour Bakery | 97 Main St. | 970.926.5539 Bookworm | 295 Main St. | 970.926.7323 Belmont Deli | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1796 Cafe 163 | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1163 Cafe Milano | 429 Edwards Access Rd. #A208 | 970.926.4455 Dish | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.3433 E town | 295 Main St. | 970.926.4080 Eat! Drink! | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1393 Fiesta’s Cantina | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.2121 French Press | 34295 US Highway #6 | 970.926.4740 Gashouse | 34185 US Highway #6 | 970.926.2896 Gore Range Brewery | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2739 Grouse on the Green | 100 Kensington Dr., Cordillera Divide | 970.926.5788 Henry’s Chinese Cafe | 175 Main St. | 970.926.3050

25

$

(Reg. $50)

LD

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Homemade Bakery & Soup

BL

$

Coffee & Crepes

BL LD

$

Sandwiches American

B L

$

Contemporary Italian

BLD

$$

High End Tapas

D

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Tasting/Wine Bar, Paninis

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

French Bistro

BLD

$$

Colorado Wild Game Grill

LD

$$

Rustic Pub

LD

$$

Pub/American

D

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

$

5 course tasting menu

And $25 bottles of wine

3

$

Happy Hour Nightly 5-6:30 pm Red & White Wine, Greyhounds and bar snacks

926-3433 | corner at edwards | eatdrinkdish.com 24

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

$

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

• •


Juniper Restaurant | 97 Main St. | 970.926.7001 Larkburger | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.9336 Last Course Dessert Bar & Pastries | 275 Main Street C-106 | 970.926-1979 Local Joe’s Pizza | 280 Main St. | 970.926.4444 Log Cabin Sports Bar and Grill | 34500 Highway 6, #B1 | 970.926.9726 Main St. Grill | 97 Main St. | 970.926.2729 Marko’s Pizzeria | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7003 Mirador | 2205 Cordillera Way, Cordillera Lodge & Spa | 970.926.2200 Old Forge Co. | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2220 Sato | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.7684 Smiling Moose Deli | 1170 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2400 Subway Edwards | 439 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7010 Vista At Arrowhead | 676 Sawatch Dr. | 970.926.2111 Woody’s Kitchen & Pub | 27 Main St. | 970.926.2756 Zino Ristorante | 27 Main St. | 970.926.0777

Contemporary American

D

$$$

Organic Gourmet Fast Food/Burgers

LD

$

Tapas/Wine Bar/Desserts

BLD

$

Pizza

D

$

American/Mexican

BLD

American Grill

LD

$ $$

Pizza & Pasta

LD

Regional/Seasonal Fare

BLD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

$ $$

Sushi & Japanese Cuisine

LD

$$

Deli

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

Contemporary American

D

Bar & Grill

LD

$

Contemporary Italian

D

$$

Southern BBQ

LD

Traditional American

LD

$

Steakhouse

D

$$

Meditrainian/Greek Cuisine

BLD

$

Coffee and Sandwiches

LD

$

Mexican/American/Western

D

$$

American

BLD

$

Continental

LD

$$

European American Bistro

D

$$

Regional American

BLD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

American

BLD

New American

D

Contemporary American

BLD

$

Casual American

LD

$$

American/Western

LD

$$

Authentic Italian

D

$$

Traditional French Brasserie

D

$$$

Pizza and Italian

LD

$

American Bistro

LD

$$

Steakhouse, AprĂŠs and Dinner

D

$$$

Mountain Fare/Steakhouse, AprĂŠs,

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

New American

D

American Pub

LD

$

Asian Cuisine

LD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

Seasonal American

D

Northern Italian

LD

$

Prime Rib/Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

$ $$$

MINTURN Kirby Cosmos | 474 Main St. | 970.827.9027 Magusto’s | 101 Main St. | 970.827.5450 Minturn Country Club | 131 Main St. | 970.827.4114 Nicky’s Quickie | 151 Main St | 970-827-5616 Sticky Fingers | 132 Main St. | 970.827.5353 Minturn Saloon | 146 N. Main St. | 970.827.5954 Turntable | 160 Railroad Ave. | 970.827.4164

$

VAIL Alpenrose | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8899 Alpine Tavern | Vail Racquet Club, East Vail | 970.476.7888 Atwater on Gore Creek | Vail Cascade Resort | 970.476.7014 Bart & Yeti’s | Lionshead, North of Arrabelle | 970.476.2754 Bearfish | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7596 Billy’s Island Grill | Lionshead | 970.476.8811 Bistro 14 | Eagle’s Nest, Top of Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.445.4530 Block 16 | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 Blu’s | Downstairs from Children’s Fountain | 970.476.3113 bol | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.5300 Bully Ranch | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5460 Campo de Fiori | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8994 Centre V | The Arrabelle at Vail Square, Lionshead | 970.754.7700 Chicago Pizza | 1031 S. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7000 CinÊBistro | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.3344 Elway’s Steakhouse | 174 East Gore Creek Dr. | 970.754.7818 Flame | Four Seasons, Vail | 970.477.8600 Frost | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8050 Game Creek Restaurant | Vail Mountain | 970.754.4275 Garfinkel’s | Next to Lionshead Gondola | 970.476.3789 Gohan Ya | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7570 Joe’s Famous Deli | 288 Bridge St. | 970.479.7580 Kelly Liken | Gateway Building, 12 Vail Rd. | 970.479.0175 La Bottega | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0280 Lancelot | Next to Children’s Fountain | 970.476.5828

7 In-house beers on tap!

NEW SUMMER MENU! Happy Hour Daily 4-6 pm

3 Pints, Bud, & Bud Light bottles, $5 Selected glasses of wine $4 Well cocktails, $4 special cocktails, $5 Selected glasses of wine

$

105 Edwards Village Blvd Edwards, CO 970.926.2739

$ $$$

$ $$$

$ $$$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

EDWARDS

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • •

•

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

• •

• •

Open for Lunch & Dinner 7 days a week

25 Dinner Entrees %

off

Happy Hour 4-5:30pm Beer and 2 tacos $6 Big Margarita $5 7BJM7JMMBHFt Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

|

sneakpeak

25


Larkspur Restaurant | Golden Peak | 970.476.8050 La Tour | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.4403 Left Bank | Sitzmark Lodge in Vail Village | 970.476.3696 The Little Diner | West Lionshead Plaza | 970.476.4279 Lord Gore & the Fitz Lounge | Manor Vail at the base of Golden Peak | 970.476.4959 Los Amigos | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.5847 Ludwig’s | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5429 The Marketplace | One Willow Bridge Rd. | 970.477.4370 Market Café | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 May Palace | Next to City Market, West Vail | 970.476.1657 Matsuhisa | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.6682 Mezzaluna | Lion Square Lodge, next to Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.477.4410 Moe’s Original BBQ | Upstairs from the General Store, Lionshead | 970.479.7888 Montauk Seafood Grill | Lionshead Village | 970.476.3601 Nozawa | Holiday Inn, West Vail | 970.476.9355 Ocotillo | Vail Mountain Marriott Resort & Spa, Lionshead | 970.477.5675 Old Forge Co. | 2161 N Frontage Rd | 970.476.5555 Old Forge Co. | 521 East Lionshead Cir. | 970.476.5232 Ore House | 232 Bridge St. | 970.476.5100 Osaki’s | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0977 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.9026 Pepi’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.4671 Qdoba | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7539 Red Lion | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.7676 Russell’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.6700 Sandbar Sports Grill | West Vail Mall | 970.476.4314 Subway West Vail | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.3827 Sushi Oka Hibachi | 100 East Meadow Drive. Suite #4 | 970-476-1588 Sweet Basil | 193 E. Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.0125 Tap Room | Top of Bridge St. | 970.479.0500 Terra Bistro| 352 Meadow Dr., Vail Mountain Lodge& Spa | 970.476.6836 The George | 292 Meadow Dr. | 970.476.2656 Up The Creek Bar & Grill | 223 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.8141 Vendetta’s | 291 Bridge St. | 970.476.5070 Vail Chophouse | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.477.0555 Wendy’s Alpine Coffee Shop | 4695 Racquet Club Dr. Westside Cafe & Market | 2211 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7890 Yama Sushi | 168 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.7332 Yeti’s Grind | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.1515

Creative American

LD

$$$

French and American

D

$$$

French

D

$$$

Classic Diner, Traditional Favorites

BL

Contemporary American

D

$$

Mexican

LD

$

BD

$

Family/American/European

BLD

$

International Café

BLD

$

Chinese

LD

$

Japanese/Peruvian

D

$$

Modern Italian

ld

$$

Barbecue

LD

$

Creative Seafood/Meat

LD

$$

Sushi/Asian

LD

$$

Southwestern Steak House

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sushi/Japanese

D

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

BLD

$

Continental/Wild Game

LD

$$

Mexican

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Americana

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Sushi, Asian

LD

$

Creative American

LD

$$$

$ $

Contemporary American

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$$

Eclectic Pub

D

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Italian & Pizza

LD

$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

Pastries

BL

$

Casual American

BLD

$

Sushi and Pacific Spices

D

$$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

SUPER FOODS ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– backs, and Sargent tells clients to consider personal needs rather than follow trends. Allergies are a consideration, and the popular grain quinoa (a substitute for glutens) can occasionally cause allergy-like reactions. Not to pick on goji berries, but as a member of the “nightshade” family along with tomatoes and eggplants, the berries The ugly occasionally cause joint inflammation, Sargent says. And no As with any diet change, super foods aren’t without draw- single super food is meant to treat or cure diseases – benefits

• • •

$

Contemporary American

the powder route, companies like Vibrant Health and Amazing Grass make supplements. An even stranger addition to the greens category is chlorophyll. It’s turned into a supplement from algae, and helps deodorize the body and oxygenate cells, a huge benefit for people living at altitude.

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

VAIL

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

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[From page 16]

can take months or years to show. “You can think of these foods as having superpowers, but what works for your friend may cause you issues,” Sargent says. “You always have to go back to your body and what you’re feeling.” SneakPEAK reporter Philip Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

7 Weekly Specials

$ 95

Proud to feature Eileen

Free facial wax with any hair service thru June 30.

970.328.7887 • 404 Broadway, Unit D Eagle , CO • OurSalonOnline.com/Adagio 26

sneakpeak

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Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

Monday The Breakfest Crepe - eggs, bacon, spinach & goat cheese Tuesday The Big BLT - classic bacon, lettuce and tomato with your choice of mayo or avocado spread Wednesday The Philly Cheese Steak - heaped with steak, peppers and onion topped with creamy cheese Thursday The Meaty Meatball Sub - a hoagie stuffed with meatballs and sauce topped with grated cheese Friday Veggie Sandwich Pesto alioli, roasted red peppers, fresh mozzarella, tomatoes and spinach Saturday The Ultimate Breakfast Sandwich - pork roll, ham and bacon with cheese on a kaiser All sandwiches served with a small fountain drink or coffee and a bag of chips All breakfast sandwiches served with a large coffee.

970.446.7912 info@sneakpeakvail.com Publisher...Erinn Hoban Editor...Melanie Wong Ad Director...Kim Hulick The Glue...Shana Larsen Photography...Billy Doran Reporter...Phil Lindeman

970-926-1796

Ad Sales...Stephanie Samuelson

Mon-Fri 7am to 4pm | Sat & Sun 8am to 3pm

©2011 sneakPeak. All rights reserved.

105 Edwards Village Blvd., C107• Edwards


Creating memories one meal at a time! m o o R s s i e w l e • Ed nt-casual Elega r a B y d d u M d l •O Family friendly e e f f o C s ' y d n e •W • Weddings & Events

New Lighter Summer Menu!

t h g i N y r e v E

r e n n i D a t Pas Special

18

$

Choice of two pastas use wine

ss of ho la g a d n a d a e r salad, b

Free Parking!

Reservations suggested

476-7888

Restaurant & Bar 4695 Vail Racquet Club Dr., East Vail Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

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sneakpeak

27


of

Big Fun

small Town July 20 & 21, 2012 Gloriana

3 DAZE of FUN Gypsum Colorado est. 1911

Amazing Bands

2

1

Sensational Price

Thompson Square Tickets On Sale Now!

$15 advance, $25 day of, under 12 free with Adult!

Nitty Gritty dirt Band 28

sneakpeak

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Thursday, June 7-Wednesday, June, 13 2012

Purchase online or at a local outlet! Online Sales begin April 1, through July 19-NOON 2012 Box Office Sales Begin June 1, 2012 through July 20 at the following locations Alpine Banks in Gypsum & Eagle, Active Communications, Columbine Market, Gypsum Town Hall, Online Sales: www.townofgypsum.com

info. | Registration

www.townofgypsum.com/gypsum daze

SneakPEAK June 7,2012  

Hot summer nights, Tuff Mudder, Best down valley day hikes and much more.

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