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Thursday, April 26 - May 2, 2012

www.sneakpeakvail.com

Making tracks with 14-year-old

Ultrarunner Ethan Pence Longtime locals tell How they landed in Vail

Back in the game

Trainer Kirsten Stuart on rebounding from injuries

Fly fishing gear picks

Redington waders and Fishpond packs Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

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Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012


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A finished room by designer Michelle Anderson is displayed at last year’s home expo. Michelle Anderson photo.

Show welcomes vendors, homeowners for all things home-and-garden related. By Melanie Wong

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he largest High Country home-and-garden show kicks off this weekend, beginning Friday at the Eagle River Center in Eagle. The fifth annual Energy Smart Colorado Home Show will bring nearly 60 vendors and an estimated 1,700-plus visitors to town over two days. Besides being a one-stop shop for all things home-and-garden related, the expo also gives attendees the opportunity to make their homes more energy efficient. Homeowners can sign up for discounted home energy assessments, watch a design contest and shop for anything needed for a remodel or home improvement project. “A lot of homeowners come in for deals for their homes, or some people already know what they want and come looking for specific things,” promoter Holli Snyder says. The event also features food vendors and an e-waste recycling station (for anything with a plug) hosted by the Eagle Valley Alliance for Sustainability between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturday, April 28.

What is Energy Smart?

For more information about the program, which aims to reduce energy use in local homes through low-cost energy audits, visit www.energysmartcolorado.com or call the Edwards Energy Smart office, located in the community center of Miller Ranch, at 970328-8777.

Two attendees will also have the chance to win the set of furniture at the end of the competition. Basso admits she’s never done such a contest before, but is excited to get creative and meet some potential customers at the show. The $500 allowance is definitely a challenge, and she says she’s had to get creative to stay in the budget. “EBay, Thrifty (Shoppe) and consignment shops were the first things I hit up – I got a couple fun things there,” she says. “There were two pieces I ordered online because they Wine and Design The expo also affords businesses the opportunity to get were great design and what I knew I wanted. I have a local friend (painter Valerie Hays), who will add some of her their name out at the largest expos in the area. Eagle-based interior designer Elizabeth Basso of Basso embellishment to the wall, so we didn’t have to look for too Interiors will be at the expo, participating in a “design-off” much in the way of artwork.” against fellow local designer Elizabeth Anderson. Get energy smart The two designers, as part of the “Wine and Design” event, This is the second year that Energy Smart Colorado, a are given three walls at the expo, a set of furniture donated government program aimed at making homes more energy efficient, has sponsored the home show. Representatives from the program will be on hand, offering $25 home energy assessments – half off the normal rate. “Energy Smart Colorado will help homeowners with ideas on how to make their homes more energy efficient, and to When: Friday, April 27 from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., decrease their utility bills,” program representative John-Ryand Saturday, April 28 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. an Lockwood says. “We not only give them ideas on what to Where: Eagle River Center, Eagle Fairdo, but get them in touch with the contractors that will help grounds them get the job done.” Cost: $2 suggested donation to the local The program’s local goal in Eagle County is to decrease Habitat for Humanity energy use in about 2,100 local homes by 20 percent. Assessors will schedule an appointment with homeowners to by American Furniture Warehouse, and $500 to decorate and check appliances, furnaces and boilers for leaks, and wall accessorize the room. Beginning at 4 p.m. on Friday, the de- insulation for drafts. Based on the audit, homeowners get a

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[See HOME EXPO, page 22]

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Run Ethan run

Eagle native Ethan Pence, 14, on one of his favorite running trails behind the Eagle ice rink. The middle school student began running races at the age of six or seven and now competes in ultrarunning competitions, even pacing for the Leadville 100. Kelly Lemon photo.

Teenaged ultrarunner Ethan Pence hot on the heels of Colorado’s top runners. By Kat Jahnigen

W

hile most kids his age might be at the movies or hanging out at the mall, 14-year-old Ethan Pence gets his kicks running – for hours, sometimes days, at a time.

“There are many different strategies for doing that kind of event,” Ethan says, explaining the intricacies of finding time to sleep during 24-plus hours of athletic competition, “but mine is usually: get a good night’s sleep and come back and run as far as you can in the morning.” Surprisingly, Ethan says he has no training routine. “I’m still a kid so I don’t really take it that seriously,” he says. “Which is kind of disappointing for me sometimes because I think I could actually do a lot better if I actually focused on running… but I do so many sports, with the cross training, I can just be fit all year.” “He doesn’t train,” says his mother, Anne. “He just loves being active and competing.” Ethan’s other activities include other competitive sports, like snowshoe racing and school soccer, basketball and track, as well as non-competitive ones, like the pact he made with three other friends to ride bicycles to school every single day this year. “Like every day,” he reiterates with a touch of deserved pride, “even when it was negative degrees and snowing and stuff.”

For most runners, competing for the first time in a 24-hour running event is a pretty momentous occasion. The memory is faded for Ethan. He was only 9. The Eagle Valley Middle School 8th grader already has a longer roster of running and ultrarunning (running events involving distances longer than the traditional 26.2-mile length of a marathon) competitions than the average adult runner. He’s run the Vail Hill Climb – a Vail Recreation District race that gains 2,500 vertical feet over a 7-mile course – every year since he was nine. At the age of 12, he ran 50 miles in a 24-hour event. Last year he ran 100 miles in 72 hours during the Across the Years race in Arizona, a fixed-time multiday event that challenges runners to cover as much distance as possible in 24, 48 or 72 hours. “I think I’ve been a runner since… well, pretty much as long as I can remember!” laughs Off the trails Ethan, and this actually isn’t an exaggeration for a kid who, the family jokes, was doing Another surprising characteristic about Ethan is that he brings the same remarkable atrunning races practically before he could walk. titude that allows him to run multiple days at a time to his non-athletic endeavors. He’s “When he was probably three, I’d push him in the running stroller during 5 and 10Ks,” driven, yet level-headed, about his goals. says Ethan’s father, Eric Pence. “He ran his first 5K when he was five or six, maybe seven. “I try to keep it in balance,” says Ethan. “I take pride in being a 4-point (GPA) student. I can’t remember.” It’s hard to keep it in balance, but I think school comes before sports. There are times when I’ve had to skip practice or games for school stuff.” For the love of running Sounds like big talk, but it’s something he’s actually putting into action. Last weekend, The only son of Eric and Anne Pence, both lifelong, long-distance runners, Ethan cer- Ethan headed off to Denver to compete with his school team at the State Science Olympiad, tainly seems to have inherited the love of running. Last year, he was a “pacer” for his parents which forced him to miss a scheduled soccer game. It was a successful decision -- Ethan’s when his parents competed in the Leadville Trail 100, running the final 13 miles alongside team took first in the academic event, qualifying them for the national competition. them during the pre-dawn hours. While winning in his athletic endeavors is not at the forefront of Ethan’s pursuits, he’s “Basically, they have to get themselves to mile 50,” says Ethan. “Then pacers like myself found some success. This winter he competed – and took a high placing – in all the races of can run the last 50 miles, or parts of it, to help them either get in a faster time, or if they’re both the Beaver Creek and Pedal Power snowshoe series, and last year he was overall winstruggling, help them finish. Like maybe carry their water bottle. You kind of have to be ner in the Dirty Thirty, a seven-mile trail run in Golden. their Sherpa, I guess you could say. Usually when I’m pacing for (my parents) it’s in the And the idea of winning certainly seems to keep the young ultrarunner/straight-A student/ dark, so you have to keep them moving and carry extra flashlights and things like that.” Science Olympiad Champion motivated. Already, he’s set his sights on some impressive At age 11, Ethan wrote an article, published in Ultrarunning Magazine, titled “Ultrarun- competitors, making it a personal goal to someday beat local elite athletes he admires , such ning from a kid’s perspective.” as adventure racer Travis Macy, XTERRA champ Josiah Middaugh and runner Anita Ortiz. “People who get Ultrarunning Magazine see all these articles from adult runners,” says “They’re some of the best runners in the valley – and around the country – so I think it’s Ethan. “And I thought ‘There are kids out there who would like to see another kid out there a pretty good goal to be able to beat them head-to-head one day. I mean, that’s just the top running – and read about it – and get inspired to do more running.’” notch, you know?” To the uninitiated, the idea of running for 24 hours – or an even more unfathomable 72 hours – is a pretty hardcore (and perhaps slightly insane) concept. But to hear Ethan talk SneakPEAK writer Kat Jahnigen can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com about it, it’s as ordinary as going to the movies is for most other 14-year-olds.

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Looking at personal trainer Kirsten Stuart, you’d never guess the energetic, athletic-looking blonde has undergone 14 reconstructive surgeries, including five back operations. You’d also never guess that Stuart, positive and always ready with a smile, has learned the hard way what it means for an athlete to lose the ability to exercise. The Aspen native grew up playing sports, skiing and played college volleyball for the University of Wyoming. Later, she became a certified personal trainer and made her living helping others reach their fitness goals. Various injuries sidelined Stuart through the years, but the biggest blow came with a series of back injuries that led to five back surgeries and the possibility of more in the future. The injuries plunged Stuart into a cycle of depression and unhealthy coping. However, she survived to share her story, and now uses her past experiences to help clients struggling with injuries or other physical limitations as a trainer at Edward’s Dogma Athletica. Her experience spotlights a very real aspect of injuries in an area where regular exercise and activity is a way of life – your surgeon can fix you up and your physical therapist can help you regain strength, but what about the mental toll? “It’s shown that after your body is in pain for two weeks, there are chemical changes in your brain – you end up feeling depressed,” says Stuart. “We all have our outlets and coping mechanisms, and mine was exercise.” The mental toll of injuries That love of sports began at a young age, and after she moved to the Vail Valley, she began teaching fitness classes. Today, she has more than 20 years experience teaching fitness and 12 years under her belt as a personal trainer. When in her 20s, Stuart set into a breakneck schedule of teaching aerobics at the Avon Rec Center, skiing and biking. She ended up tearing a calf muscle, an injury that led to a herniated disc in her back. She had her first surgery in 1997, which according to Stuart, fixed the immediate problem, but not the causes. Eight years later, she herniated another disc and had her second back surgery. “At physical therapy, they said, ‘You’re a trainer, you know what to do (to fully recover),’ but I really didn’t,” admits Stuart. “So I just did some core stuff and lower back exercises.” Less than a year later, she was right back in the hospital with the same injury and same surgery. She remembers waking up from surgery and feeling like something was terribly wrong. “I was in such pain, and my legs were on fire,” she says. The surgery brought many complications – there wasn’t enough space between the discs, and the pain was both consuming and debilitating. Now in her 30s, she was looking at an operation to get her back fused. Later, doctors would find her bone wasn’t growing back correctly, a complication that would eventually lead to two more surgeries. After the spinal fusion, Stuart began taking a medication that affected her memory and speech. The following months were a struggle, as she had lost not only her ability to be active and lost 30 pounds, but began losing her friends as well. Feeling without support, and unable to drive or work, she plunged into depression and began turning to unhealthy coping mechanisms.

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Reaching others That recovery began four years ago, and today, while Stuart still experiences daily pain from her back injuries and the complications, she’s back to training. “In training you have to be able to relate to a client in order to work with them. You have to understand both their physical and emotional needs. That’s a huge component, and I think that’s where I’m different. I help clients look for longterm improvement as opposed to a quick fix,” she says. Her clients have included those coming back from blownout knees, back operations and even someone who had childhood polio. Minturn resident Sarah Dorman began working with Stuart after tearing her ACL at the beginning of the 2010-2011 ski season. Stuart showed her how to exercise the rest of her

[See KIRSTEN STUART, page 18]

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Redefining the

Mountain Local Longtime residents look back on how they landed in Vail By Melanie Wong

M

any Vail Valley residents will agree: There’s something about mountain living that is magical. It makes you move here when you originally only came for vacation. It makes you stay for a summer when you only intended to stay for a winter. In some cases, it keeps you here for decades when you only meant to pass through. As the second installment of a two-part series, SneakPEAK brings you vignettes featuring familiar faces from around town. Read on for stories featuring two longtime local residents who, unlike many others, never meant to end up in Vail. Now, they call it home.

Above: Michael Staughton is part-owner of two Vail Village restaurants, Russell’s and Los Amigos. He got his start while traveling from the East Coast to San Diego - he stopped in Vail for a bus boy job and never left. Right: Ben Krueger stands outside his home in Avon. Krueger helped build and design much of the golf course in Vail, a job he found out about while day skiing in Vail. Melanie Wong photos.

race of sorts involving costumes, alcohol and events such as swimming in ski boots and riding tricycles. “I was walking up Bridge Street, and I looked up and saw all these people just hanging around. People were dressed up in funny outfits, and then someone else comes screaming around the corner being pushed on a gurney, all dressed up. The person in the gurney took a drink of whiskey and a shot and screeched off again down the street,” he laughs. “It was a huge race, and it looked like everyone was having so much fun, and I thought, ‘I might stay here awhile.’” Staughton not only stayed, but also became The Great Race team captain for the Red Lion team for three years. He learned to powder ski, and eventually became the maître d’ and then manager of several village restaurants. In 1985, he became a part owner in the slope-side Mexican restaurant, Los Amigos, and in 1989 became a part owner of Russell’s. He still resides in the valley with his wife and 13-year-old son. “Vail is Vail, and I loved it. There were probably 3,500 people here when I got here, and now it’s grown,” Staughton says. “It’s a huge difference, but I still like that small-town feel, when you walk up and down the street and know most of the people.”

Michael Staughton – restaurant owner When Michael Staughton arrived in Vail in 1974, he didn’t plan on staying, and he certainly didn’t plan on planting roots and ending up as the owner of two of Vail Village’s most popular restaurants. Staughton, then 26, rolled into town in his Volkswagen van, fresh from the East Coast, where he had worked as a tennis pro near Philadelphia for a few years. The job ended, and he decided to travel and work his way to San Diego, Calif. “I had planned to get a job in construction or something until I figured out what I wanted to do,” says Staughton, a part owner of Russell’s and Los Amigos restaurants. “It was like, ‘Go West, young man.’ I wasn’t married and no kids, so why not? I was footloose and fancy free.” Obviously, Staughton never made it to San Diego. A friend of his had come to Vail, and although he wasn’t crazy about skiing, he was game to stop by and work for a couple months. Ben Krueger – retired Vail Recreation He secured housing – a mattress under a kitchen table – District Superintendent and landed a job as a busboy at the Red Lion in Vail VilChicago native Ben Krueger had always loved skiing and lage. One day, while walking to the village courtyard outside the mountains – he met his wife, Celine, skiing in Michigan, the restaurant, he witnessed The Great Race, an adventure and made annual ski trips to Aspen and Winter Park with a

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friend as a young man. However, Krueger, now 75, never planned to set roots in Vail, much less raise several generations of Kruegers in the valley. As he puts it, he was on his way to Aspen for a job interview, but never made it. Before coming to Vail, Krueger spent time as an Army paratrooper from 1958 to 1960, and later moved to Denver, where he designed golf courses. He and a friend decided to take a ski trip to Vail and Aspen, and specifically to inquire about a job offer in Aspen. While skiing in Vail, they stopped in the corporate headquarters to check out jobs, then headed out on the slopes. “We were skiing and heard on the loudspeakers, ‘Will Ben Krueger come down to the office after skiing,’” he remembers. “I met with the entire newly formed board of the Vail Rec District, and they asked for my resume.” Krueger moved to Vail with his wife and two young sons in April of 1967. As manager of the town’s budding rec district, he was in charge of taking care of the golf course’s existing holes and building 12 more, along with maintaining the tennis courts, outdoor ice skating rinks and landscaping. He had worked as a caddy on golf courses since he was 10

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Beav’s demo teams catch “sychro bug” d d d d d d d Teams make finals at international competition By Melanie Wong The Beaver Creek men and women synchronized skiing demo teams returned from an international championship held in Engelberg, Switzerland, after a few whirlwind weeks of competition. Both teams brought home hardware for “Best Foreign Team,” and overall the men placed ninth out of 48 teams, and the women placed fourth out of seven teams. The teams completed several weeks of competition and travel, starting with the Aspen World Synchronized Championships on April 13, where the women placed third. “The gals experienced many breakthroughs during the two training days prior to the competition,” says women’s team member Linda Guerrette. “The team became a solid unit and brought their performance level to new heights. The Aspen event served as a great training event for our ultimate goal of competing in Switzerland, in an international event.” That success in Aspen led to an even bigger competition, the Swiss Snow Happening event from April 20 to April 21, a competition not only marked by the strongest teams in the world, but by incredible amounts of snow. “Europe has received an abundance of snow this season. The last week didn’t disappoint on that front,” says Guerrette. “We had a few clear days, but a few days where it was puking snow all day. The visibility was down to nothing at times, which makes it difficult to ski with speed and precision with other skiers about 5 feet away.” Synchronized skiing competitions involve teams skiing in formation, and their runs are scored by technical merit, synchronization, and overall appearance based on the formation, speed, precision and the team’s dynamics. At the Switzerland event, the teams skied one standard formation

Skiing for a cause The women’s team, dubbed the Epic Chix, have been competing and training in support of two Colorado charities, First Descents, which provides outdoor programs for young cancer survivors, and SOS Outreach, which works with youth through snow sports and other outdoor activities. So far, the Epic Chix have already raised $8,000 for the causes. You can also follow their efforts through their Facebook page under BCWomensDemo. Donations through the Epic Chix can be sent to: Colorado Demonstration Skiing P.O. Box 2525 Edwards, CO 81632

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and then a freestyle of their choice to qualify for the finals, although competitions were interrupted and modified due to snow. The competitions gave the men and women’s teams the opportunity to ski against much more experienced teams – many teams had been together for years, while Beaver Creek’s teams are relative newcomers to the sport. Guerrette says the teams loved the experience so much that they hope to continue in coming seasons. “The most defining moment was being able to witness the team surpass their expectations and continually inspire themselves and in turn inspire others,” she says. “I was very proud of what these women were able to accomplish in such a short time. They now have the synchro competition bug and want more.”

SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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SneakGEAR: Simply fly fishing Fishpond packs and Redington waders make a splash By Larry Grossman

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would have to consider myself a creature of habit in general and a bit of an old curmudgeon, according to most, at my advanced age.

But with age comes wisdom, they say, and a recent test of some of the latest fly-fishing gear have led me to change things up a bit. A new pair of waders and a pack, to be specific, proved themselves worthy of mention and have become the latest additions to the toy box. Having been a fly-fishing guide in Colorado’s rivers for more than 20 years, there were systems and equipment in place which were standard because they worked, and they worked very well. Today, there are a variety of high-quality brands out there, and many are worth a try. Fishpond Dragonfly Guide pack Just over a decade ago, a company named Fishpond (www.fishpondusa.com) made their presence felt with a line of packs that were designed specifically for and by fly fisherman who live and fish in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. Fishpond has been getting it right for

Dragonfly Guide LTE Chest/ Lumbar Pack 1. Carries it all in a small package 2. Great design, convenient to use 3. Quality construction a long time now, and I had seen, but not used, their product while angling for savvy trout. Their lineup includes a large variety of chest packs, backpacks, fishing vests, bags, luggage, dog-related products and accessories. I found their packs proved to be easy-to-use and convenient, well designed and very well constructed. I have never fly fished without the use of a fishing vest, which is usually stuffed with every single item I would need to fish in Colorado (or on the moon, for that matter). It’s almost flat-out dumb how much gear I would carry with me to the river, but you just never knew when I would need those woolly buggers I tied up 18 years ago, which were still in a

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pocket somewhere with rusty hooks. Chest packs were available, but I always thought they were too small to carry what I needed. I was wrong. The Fishpond Dragonfly Guide LTE Chest/Lumbar Pack ($89.95) carries everything you need for an entire day on the river and then some. I spent two days fishing the South Platte River in Park County to test this chest pack. The Fishpond Dragonfly has been designed to carry it all. It’s made with very lightweight and durable materials and has a generous capacity of 305 cubic inches. I fit four fly boxes stuffed with my favorite patterns into the main compartment of the Dragonfly without any problem. There are a variety of tabs, webbing and elastic loops for accessory attachment. All of its straps are adjustable, and the zip-down fly bench with replaceable foam is a fantastic feature, acting as a “bench” on your chest out in the field. Two water bottle holders (beer?) are also part of the design, which goes a long way if it’s a hot day on the river. The pack can be worn on your chest, down lower on your side and even as a fanny pack. I especially liked that the Dragonfly also has large zippers that slide easily when you need them to. This is a great product that simplified my day on the river tremendously and keeps everything -- like tippet, flies, clippers, fly floatant, strike indicators, split shot and forceps for pinching down barbs and removing hooks -- all in one place. Redington Waders I remember many, many years ago, while guiding for a small outfitter in Frisco, I first saw a Redington fly rod and wanted one. Since that day back in the early 1980s, the Redington company has expanded and now has a versatile line of fly rods, reels, apparel, wading boots and waders. I got my hands (actually my feet) on a pair of the Redington Sonic Pro Wader Pants and spent a couple of days abusing them in South Park, Colo. If you fish, you know that a good pair of waders is critical to a good day of fishing, comparable to a good pair of ski boots while skiing. Without either of these, your day will be miserable. I’ll start by saying that there was not much I did not like about these waders. They are super light weight, pack small into a mesh carrying bag they come with, have an adjustable Velcro waist band which eliminates the use of a wading belt, and have an easy suspender system to get in and out of. Redington claims the Sonic Pro Wader Pant ($229.95) is 100 percent nylon and made with a three-layer fabric that has been treated to be waterproof and breathable – and they

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Redington Sonic Pro Wader Pant 1. Comfortable and lightweight 2. Durable and well constructed 3. Perfect alternative to chest waders during low water Bottom line: this is the first time in 30 years of flyfishing in Colorado that I have used products from either of these companies, and I was very impressed with both. Were I ever to guide again, both of these items would be part of my fishchasing arsenal, and they should be part of yours as well. SneakPEAK writer Larry Grossman can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

970.446.7912 info@sneakpeakvail.com Publisher...Erinn Chavez Editor...Melanie Wong Ad Director...Kim Hulick The Glue...Shana Larsen Graphics...Scott Burgess Photography...Billy Doran Reporter...Phil Lindeman Ad Sales...Stephanie Samuelson

970-926-1796

105 Edwards Village Blvd., C107• Edwards

95

are. (Find out more at www.redington.com.) The seam technology in these waders is interesting. Redington uses a technology called “ultrasonic welding,” which uses special glues, eliminating the use of any needle holes to attach material during construction. The seams are smooth and work perfectly. The neoprene booty attached to the pant leg has an easy-to-use gravel guard attached to it and a tough plastic hook that connects to your bootlaces to keep it in place. I personally loved the two zippered, waterproof pockets on the front of these waders. Throw your fishing license, lip balm, sunscreen or whatever else you prefer in these pockets so you always have the necessities right at your fingertips. These waders are perfect for early spring and fall fishing when the rivers and streams are at their lowest flows and chest waders are not needed. It’s hard to find a better value out there at this price point, and the durability and function of the product should last you for years on the river.

695 Lindbergh Drive, Gypsum •

328-9000

©2011 sneakPeak. All rights reserved.


52 WEEKS VAIL VALLEY DON SJOSTROM of the

sneakPeak wants you to send in your photo submissions that capture what makes living in the Vail Valley great. We’ll feature one photo each week, so send in images from your latest adventures and other captured moments from around town, along with a short caption, to melanie@sneakpeakvail.com.

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Spiritually-integrated psychotherapy COUNSELING THAT CONNECTS HEART, MIND & SPIRIT Have you asked yourself any of the following questions? • From what sources do I draw the strength and courage to go on? • Where do I find peace? • When I am afraid or in pain, how do I find comfort and solace? • What sustains me in the midst of my troubles? • Who is my true self? Finding one’s way in life’s struggles can be difficult. In addition to the more traditional disciplines of professional counseling, finding strength, resource, and resiliency in one’s spiritual journey can be immensely important in discerning a way through the difficulty of life. Dr. Randy Simmonds is able to speak purposefully and deeply about the religious and spiritual resources that help one cope through difficult times in life.

Rev. Randy J. Simmonds, Ph.D., L.P.C. is an ordained minister, Clinical Member of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Fellow in the American Association of Pastoral Counselors, and has been a therapist for 29 years. He can be reached at 970-926-8558.

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Eagle-Vail Business Center • Mon-Sat 10-5:30 • 949-0153 Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

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Warm weather calls for cool drinks Vail’s “Wine Wizard” gives top picks for spring beverages By Mickey Werner Mojito - 2 to 3 oz. light rum - 1 fresh lime - 2 tsp. sugar - 2 to 4 mint sprigs - club soda Lightly muddle the mint and sugar with a splash of soda water in a glass until the sugar dissolves, and you smell the mint. Squeeze the lime (about 1 oz.) into the glass, add the rum and ice, and give it a good shake. Strain into a highball glass over ice, add another splash of club soda and garnish with mint.

Editor’s note: Guest writer Mickey Werner is the resident “Wine Wizard” at Alpine Wine and Spirits in Vail. He writes about his favorite beverages for SneakPEAK. Spring is in the air, and tastes change to lighter, more refreshing cocktails, beer and wine. For the warmer weather, nothing says ‘springtime’ to me more than the classic cocktail of the Kentucky Derby – the Mint Julep. A blend of mint with Kentucky Bourbon (none of that Tennessee Sour Mash stuff allowed!), ice and a hint of powdered sugar is a beautiful thing. Some recipes allow for the addition of bitters, and how many mint sprigs you use is up to you -- usually four to eight is the recommended number. The Mojito is another popular, mint-flavored cocktail. Rum, lemon or lime juice, mint, sugar and a hint of club soda, and you can magically transport yourself to the is Caribbean in no time (mentally, anyway). And if you’re a little tired of the Margarita, try mixing it up a little bit with a Tequila Sunrise -- tequila, orange juice and a splash of grenadine. Beer drinkers can also change with the seasons, favoring lighter, crisper brews. Some great thirst quenching Pilsner like Oskar Blue’s Mama’s Little Yella Pils is one of my favorites. It’s not quite as hoppy as their signature Pale Ale, and it’s a little lighter on the palate, but it’s still clean and refreshing. There are some great Belgium style white ales, like Avery’s White Rascal, and unfiltered white ale brewed with a hint of spice, a combination which remains the brew master’s secret formula. Blue Moon, a Coor’s product, is also popular, and best served with an orange slice. The citrus gives a nice balance to the crisp, almost dry tones of these white ales. You can also add fruit with a nice wheat beer, like the classic Spaten Franziskanner or the domestic Pyramid Hefeweizen. For wine, I like a good Pinot Gris or un-oaked Chardonnay. Pinot Gris is the same grape as Pinot Grigio, just stylistically different with a little more weight and fruit; the Van Duzer from Oregon is also a favorite. For un-oaked Chardonnay, a recent favorite is the Lincourt from the Santa Rita Hills area of Santa Barbara – it has hints of golden apple and kiwi, with great weight and body, without the toasty oak complexities. Another one worth trying is the Louis Latour Ardeche – it has tastes of bright green apple and a little lees (think yeasty) on the nose, and is really crisp in the mouth. Check out the recipes for Mint Juleps and Mojitos, or come into the wine shop to grab some of these other recommendations. Cheers!

Mint Julep - 4 fresh mint sprigs - 2 ½ oz. Bourbon - 1 tsp. powdered sugar - splash club soda. Muddle the mint, powdered sugar and club soda together in a tall highball glass. Fill glass with crushed ice, and add the bourbon. Top with more ice, and garnish with a mint sprig. Serve with a straw.

Award-winning documentary “Bag It” comes to Vail SneakPEAK staff report The acclaimed documentary “Bag It” will play in Vail on Thursday, April 26 in honor of Earth Day. The screening, hosted by community leaders at the town of Vail, Eagle River Watershed Council and Eagle Valley Alliance for Sustainability, will begin at 6 p.m. at Donovan Pavilion. A suggested donation of $5 will support local nonprofit organizations. The event is open to the public. The documentary follows “everyman” and Telluride local Jeb Berrier as he tries to make sense of our dependence

on plastic bags. Although his quest starts out small, Berrier soon learns the problem extends past landfills to oceans, rivers and ultimately human health. The average American uses about 500 plastic bags each year, for about 12 minutes each. This single-use mentality has led to the formation of a floating island of plastic debris in the Pacific Ocean more than twice the size of Texas. The film explores these issues and identifies how an abundance of plastics in the environment threatens not only waterways and marine life, but human health, too. Two of the most common plastic additives are endocrine disruptors, which have been shown to link to cancer, diabetes, autism,

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Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

attention deficit disorder, obesity and infertility. According to the Eagle River Watershed Council, plastic bags are one of the most common items collected during river and highway cleanups each year. “Bag It” first premiered in Vail when the town was a participant in the Colorado Association of Ski Towns plastic bag challenge in 2009. For more information on the film or the town’s environmental initiatives, contact Kristen Bertuglia, environmental sustainability coordinator, at 970-477-3455 or kbertuglia@ vailgov.com.

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SneakSPORTS: News flash, playoff hockey is here

Being a fan of this underrated sport requires some toughness Editor’s Note: Minturnbased sports fan Patrick Whitehurst writes for www. fanrag.com. Read his musings on the site or in SneakPEAK. It’s not easy being a hockey fan in Anytown, USA. The NHL playoffs are underway, and unannounced to most of the population in America -Patrick Whitehurst all of the fast-paced puck action is actually on television. Of the four major professional sports (football, baseball, basketball and hockey) in the United States, hockey is the least popular. If you were to throw soccer, NASCAR, and even mixed-martial arts into the mix, hockey would be at the bottom of the list in terms of overall attendance and television viewership. Hockey is a fabulous sport to not only watch, but also to play. Hockey takes skill and speed; the hand-eye and foot coordination surpasses baseball and soccer in degree of difficulty. For my money, attending an NHL game is more entertaining and action packed than any other sport. So why is this beautiful, hard-to-master game such a tiny blip on the radar of American sports fans?! There are four factors that I believe play a major role in the lack of popularity for the sport of hockey. Regional exposure -- Most NHL hockey players come from Canada, Minnesota, the Northeast and Europe. If you’re a kid growing up in the South, Texas or California, you’ve probably never been on or even seen ice. Kids in

Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan endure long, cold winters; those states (along with the Northeast) have ice-covered lakes and ponds along with established hockey programs. Boys and girls growing up in Memphis or Seattle have no prior history with hockey and no ice to play it on. Cost -- Hockey skates, pads, sticks and helmets cost money. Hockey is a physically and financially demanding sport. Individual players and teams often have to pay for ice time and buy new equipment on a yearly basis. Conversely, soccer and basketball players need to have a pair of shoes and maybe a ball. Scoring, or lack thereof -- Basketball has the threepoint shot, football teams can score two, three or six points depending on the play, and baseball has the homerun. In hockey, like soccer, a goal is worth a single point, and those are often few and far between. A 1-1 double overtime game might be incredibly well-played, but most casual fans are going to become bored with the lack of scoring and turn the channel, or shout out, “Boring!” Perceived star power -- Everyone knows the names LeBron James and Derek Jeter, and most people would recognize that Drew Brees and Tony Romo are NFL quarterbacks. Outside of Sidney Crosby and Alex Ovechkin, most people across the United States couldn’t name three or four more hockey players. Hint: Wayne Gretzky and Mark Messier retired quite a while ago. This is not to say that hockey is on its way out of our sports culture. Hockey has a single unique characteristic that will always keep its fans coming back for more and bring a new generation into the sport -- fighting! Like car-racing fans who watch intently for the next big crash, hockey fans want to see fights. Hockey is the only major sport where fighting is not only allowed, but often encouraged and ex-

pected. The only thing that charges up a hockey crowd more than two players dropping the gloves and going at it is when every player on the ice drops their gloves and the goalies skate toward each other for a full-on brawl. Hockey allows its players to unleash aggression (or frustration) on their opponents for a minute or two and then penalizes them by removing them from the on-ice action for two or five minutes. The only place in America where bare-knuckle boxing is legal is on the ice; boxing and MMA require its combatants to wear protective hand gear. When hockey players drop gloves, their bare fists will make contact with an opponent’s face. There has been talk and initiatives regarding eliminating fighting in hockey once and for all. Hockey players or fans sure aren’t the ones proposing these measures. Rather, the politicians and politically correct watch groups who don’t consider themselves fans are the ones who want to ban this brutal, but necessary aspect of the sport. Every NHL team has enforcers and tough guys on the ice whose sole purpose is protecting the star players and intimidating opponents. Hockey isn’t for the soft or weak at heart. Hockey is for the mentally and physically toughest athletes in the world. Referees call penalties if they think players are taking dives or faking injury. Those same referees allow fighting and only break it up when one player has gained a distinct advantage. I hope fighting is never banned in the NHL. If fighting is someday eliminated, hockey will certainly lose a large portion of its fan base. Enjoy the Stanley Cup playoffs -- it’s going to be a real fight!

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Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

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Friday Nights

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Eagle brings new faces to town hall

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Conveniently located at 200 Loren Ln. Inside the Eagle Lodge & Suites Find us on Facebook! (970) 328-6316

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Mother’s Day

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Spring Creek Floral 524.7059 • 106 Oak Ridge Dr. #103, Gypsum (Next to Mac’s Liquor & Mantos Pizza)

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Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

The Town of Eagle is a community in flux. The same can be said of just about any town, but Eagle is at a peculiar crossroads. After skirting most of the fallout from the nationwide depression, Eagle was hit hard in the past two years. The town now has one of the highest home-foreclosure rates in the state, spurred by a rash of job losses and a noticeable dip in down-valley tourism. Last month, the changes extended to 200 Broadway when residents elected four new town officials, including three Town Board trustees and a mayor in long-time public figure Yuri Kostick. With the exception of Anne McKibbin, who has served on town commissions in the past, new trustees Joe Knabel and Brandi Resa have never held public office before. McKibbin brings eight years of experience with the town’s inner workings, and all three trustees bring fresh ideas to the town board. As a follow up to interviews with Kostick and Resa a week after the elections, SneakPEAK asked Knabel and McKibbin to weigh in on everything from Eagle’s current economic hurdles to the future of down-valley growth. SneakPEAK: Now that campaigning is finished and you’ve taken office, what issue requires your most immediate attention? Joe Knabel: Improving the financial strength of the town is very important at this time. Due to the economic conditions, we have seen a decrease in the available revenues to the town. While

aggressive steps have been taken to cut back on the expenditures, the overall budget has seen a steady decline over the past several years. The town needs to continue to support the existing businesses where we can and create opportunities for growing new businesses. As citizens of the town, we all pay our share of property taxes, but the main “boost” to the town’s budget comes from sales tax revenues generated by the local businesses. Anne McKibbin: The most important issue for the town has been and will continue to be living within its means. The town’s budget is driven largely by sales tax revenue, and preserving the existing revenue stream while working to bring commercial development to the town that will add to that stream is critical. At the same time, the town needs to be very careful in planning its expenditures to make the most of the financial resources we have. As much as possible, I would like to see the town remain financially viable without the need for significant cuts in staff or services. SP: Your most pressing concern may be different from Eagle’s biggest longterm challenge. If so, what’s the biggest challenge the town faces? Knabel: During the campaign, I mentioned that one of the biggest issues facing the town over the next several years would be the replacement of the existing town manager. Willy Powell, the existing town manager, has indicated his desire to retire within the coming years, though an exact timeframe has not been decided upon. Willy has been

committed, persevering and enduring at the position of town manager – finding the right replacement will not be a simple task. Regardless of the path the town chooses in the selection of the town manager, we must consider a transitional period so there is not a missed step in the operations of our town and its government. McKibbin: (Answered the same as the first question.) SP: The Eagle River Station proposal is a major issue, and you now share office with people of differing views at a time when residents demand action. How will you work productively with other officials to find a solution you think is best? Knabel: It is the responsibility of the Town Board of Trustees to make decisions for the community based on fact rather than emotion. We must be able to weigh through all the information and make the best decisions for the town and its continued financial strength. In the case of Eagle River Station, the project will be voted on by the citizens of the town. If the project is approved, the Town Board of Trustees and the town staff will continue to work with the development team to ensure the greatest success for the project. McKibbin: The town board is like any other group of people charged with a responsibility: Not everyone will agree on how to best address any one issue. The art of finding solutions is to hear what everyone has to say, to actively contribute to that discussion, and then in the end reach a consensus about how to move forward, and then

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Anne McKibben, left and Joe Knabel, right, are two of the four new members of Eagle’s Board of Trustees. Photos special to SneakPEAK.

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bring commercial enterprises to this town that will provide jobs, increase business diversity, and either directly (as a retail business) or indirectly (by infusing money into the community through payrolls which can then be spent at other town businesses) support and hopefully increase our tax revenues. With the new Eagle Area Community Plan, we have taken a significant step in this direction. More tangible actions, such as the upcoming redesign of Eby Creek Road, are ways the town can mitigate economic uncertainty. SP: As of 2011, communities in the Central Rockies had the highest home foreclosure rates in Colorado. Foreclosure filings in Eagle County hit 437 last year, with the majority coming from Eagle and Gypsum. What can be done at the town level to help struggling homeowners? Knabel: Unfortunately, home foreclosure is typically a direct result from the homeowner’s loss of income or a result of financing decisions that did not work out. The Town Board of Trustees needs to continue to work to keep the town in the best financial position. In a time when foreclosures have been

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at historically high levels, increases in property taxes may not be the most feasible solution. On several occasions, I have heard citizens recommend an increase in property taxes to help offset the decline in sales tax revenues for the town. This option would only add further financial burden to an already unstable housing market. It is my opinion that the town needs to capitalize on new development opportunities to create both immediate and long-term jobs for the citizens of our community. McKibbin: The town can best help struggling homeowners by first making sure it takes care of itself and continues to provide the essential services that all of us as homeowners expect and need. We need to do that as much as possible, without adding burden to homeowners and property owners. We certainly will not solve the economic crisis on our own, but we can continue to make Eagle an attractive place to live.

only

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18” Large Pizza Any 3 toppings or House Combo only... move forward as a unified body. It does not preclude disagreement, but it does require respect and a willingness to acknowledge and support a collective action or decision once that action or decision has been made. SP: Economic uncertainty is inescapable in Eagle County, from school district budget cuts to a disappointing season at up-valley ski resorts. How will you ensure Eagle’s long-term security while moving forward with town projects? Knabel: The town needs to have an established, yet flexible, long-term economic plan that can be monitored for progress. The plan needs to be flexible to allow for the uncertainties that inevitably occur. In better terms, the plan needs to be somewhat conservative to allow us to “weather” through the economic uncertainties. I do believe that the town must capitalize on any development opportunities that are presented as long as they meet the long term economic plan for the town and they satisfy the requirements set forth in guiding documents. McKibbin: The town needs to position itself to be receptive to property owners and developers who wish to

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Calendar of Events Thursday, April 26 “Bag It� documentary in Vail

The award-winning documentary about a man’s research into America’s plastic bag dependence and the environmental and health problems discarded bags create. The movie will show at 6 p.m. at Donovan Pavilion in Vail. There is a $5 suggested donation to support local nonprofits. See the trailer at bagitmovie.com.

Thursday, April 26 Gore Range Brewery fundraiser

Half of all proceeds from lunch and dinner at the Edwards restaurant go to the Taft Conlin Memorial Scholarship Fund. Taft Conlin was a local high school student who passed away nearly three months ago. In his honor, proceeds from the fund will go to the Youth Foundation and the Vail Mountain School scholarship fund.

Friday, April 27 and Saturday, April 28 Energy Smart Colorado Home Show in Eagle

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Friday, April 27 and Saturday, April 28 “Picasso at the Lapin Agile� in Avon

The Vail Valley Theatre Company presents a play by Steve Martin for the second and last weekend. According to the company, last week’s show premiered to soldout crowds. The comedy is built upon the premise of what would happen if artist Pablo Picasso met scientist Albert Einstein in a bar. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. both nights at Montaùas After Dark in Avon. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased at www.vvtc.org.

The Energy Smart Colorado Western Slope Home Show is an event which gives homeowners and builders an oppor- Saturday, April 28 tunity to see thousands of home ideas under one roof. On Eagle County Education Film: “AmeriFriday, April 27, from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m., the show opens with can Teacher� the Wine & Design Event. On Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 5 The film tells the deeper story of the teaching profession p.m., the home show will be open to attendees all day. The in America today and provides a true glimpse into educaevent is held at the Eagle River Center of the Eagle County tion and teaching in all their various facets. Film is 81 minFairgrounds. utes and will be shown at Battle Mountain High School in Edwards. Kids can be dropped off at the WECMRD Field Friday, April 27 House from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. for $10 (benefiting Wild West Trivia and Karaoke in Eagle Days) while parents attend. For more info see www.educaEagle’s Back Bowl hosts a night of karaoke, trivia and prizes tionfilmseries.org. with DJ Shy Guy beginning at 8:30 p.m.

Saturday, April 28 Stand-up comedy at the Back Bowl

Friday, April 27 and Saturday, April 28 Vail Mountain School garage sale

This community-wide event supports VMS programs. Held in the school dining room, shop among the VMS family’s outgrown, gently used, and long-neglected clothing, toys, furniture, housewares, and much more at bargain prices. The sale includes a “designer� section and “early bird� shopping on Friday afternoon. Sale goes from 3:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. Entry is free.

Deacon Gray and Matt Baca take the stage at Eagle’s Back Bowl. Gray makes his fifth appearance in Eagle and is one of the top stand-up artists in the region, coordinating all comic acts for Denver’s The Comedy Works. He has opened for Chris Rock, Jeff Foxworthy, Drew Carey, Paula Poundstone, Craig Ferguson and Dave Chappelle. Matt Baca opens for Gray – he has been invited to various top comedy festivals around the country. Tickets are on sale now for $12 in advance and $15 on the day of the show. Buy tickets at by calling 970-328-BOWL, or go to www.thebackbowl.com

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10 a.m. to noon. Please, no needles (sharps) or pressurized 926-3956. To volunteer for the Eagle portion of the cleanup, Saturday, April 28 National Prescription Drug Take Back Day canisters. The event is free of charge and no personal info email at evega@eastwestresorts.com or call 970-328-2172.“ The Vail Police Department is participating in the fourth annual event. Last year’s event collected over 22 pounds of pills in Vail. The collection will be from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the Vail Municipal Building parking lot on 75 S. Frontage Rd. Clean out your medicine cabinets of all unwanted, expired or unused medications and have them disposed of safely. The collected items will be incinerated in an environmentally friendly manner by the Drug Enforcement Administration. There will also be collection sites at Battle Mountain High School and Columbine Market in Gypsum from

will be collected.

Saturday, April 28 Community Pride Highway Cleanup

Saturday, April 28 Anti-gravity trampoline competition

The WECMRD Fieldhouse in Edwards holds a competiVolunteers from around the valley gather from 9 a.m. to 2 tion at its anti-gravity center hosted by pro freeskier Tayp.m. from Vail to Dotsero along Interstate 70 and U.S. Hwy. lor Seaton. Divisions for ages 8 and up, and event begins at 6 to clean up the roadsides. A volunteer BBQ will be held noon. More info at www.wecmrd.org. at the Broken Arrow Ranch in Arrowhead at noon. To volunteer for the Highway Cleanup please contact the Eagle Watershed Council at hwycleanup@erwc.org or call 970-

Keller Williams, The Expendables, to perform at Teva Games SneakPEAK staff report While some of the world’s foremost adventure athletes tackle the mountains and rivers of Vail during the 11th annual Teva Mountain Games, some equally prominent musical artists will take to the main stage for a pair of free concerts when the Bud Light Mountains of Music series rocks Vail Village from May 31 and June 2. The musical acts ring in the 2012 Teva Mountain Games, which feature professional and amateur outdoor athletes competing in everything from mountain biking to bouldering to dock dog jumping. Both free shows will be on the main Teva Mountain Games stage at Checkpoint Charlie in Vail Village and begin at 7 p.m. The May 31 performance, featuring Keller Williams, will be held as part of the event’s opening ceremonies. Described as a “wildly inventive musician” by The Wall Street Journal, Williams first appeared on the music scene in the early ‘90s and has defined the independent artist. Keller built his reputation initially with engaging live performances, no two of which

are ever alike. Most of his career is spent performing as a one-man band, and Williams’ solo live shows and his ability to improvise his determinedly quirky tunes have quickly become well known. Prior to the Keller Williams show, competitors from around the world will gather in Vail Village to kick off the games at the official opening ceremonies. Athletes from more than 25 countries will create an international parade up Gore Creek Drive to the Checkpoint Charlie stage for welcome speeches and an athlete oath by the World Cup bouldering competitors. The Expendables will play on June 2. The band members are known as “down-to-earth guys from a little surf town called Santa Cruz.” The band’s classic summertime sound blends reggae, ‘80s punk rock and ska, with songs that have made heads turn and floors shake for 15 years. The California surf-rockers have toured with well-known names in their genre, including 311, Pepper, Fishbone, G. Love & Special Sauce and Slightly Stoopid. For more information on the Teva Mountain Games, visit www.tevamountaingames.com, or follow Teva Mountain Games on Facebook and @TevaMtnGames on Twitter.

Spend your special occasion with us!

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Edwards

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15


&Wellness

Health

Pre-Natal, Birth & Post-Birth Services Vail Valley Doula Marcy Tracy CD, PC D (DONA) 970-688-4868 www.vailvalleydoula.com

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Family Room Co. Inc. Appointments 970.333.3128 Stacey Horn, LCSW, CHT • 970.926.4357 Edwards & Eagle

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A look at the new vegetarianism

Veggies are an athlete’s best friend - or are they? By Phil Lindeman When valley resident Stephanie Drew visits E-Town in Edwards, she gets lettuce wraps with a twist -- the cook replaces the meat filling with a veggie patty for the lifelong vegetarian, spiced up with occasional mushrooms. “My parents cooked that way when I was growing up, and I haven’t tasted anything that was good enough to change my mind since then,” says Drew, a physical therapist with Howard Head. “It’s not too difficult to be a vegetarian because it’s what I enjoy.” Eating out occasionally presents a challenge for Drew, but she claims most restaurants are willing to work with vegetarians. And she rarely feels weak or unsatisfied, a common concern for budding vegetarians. “My family likes to call me the Energizer bunny,” laughs Drew, who hikes, bikes, runs and rock climbs. “I’ve never known anything different, so I have nothing to compare it to.” Vegetarianism might be the original diet. Each year introduces a new (and often questionable) “crash diet,” meant for rapid weight loss or some other kind of system flush. But vegetables and fruits are nature’s answer to quick fixes, and local health professionals believe any diet that makes you conscious of eating habits is a plus. “One reason people tend to be vegetarian is that they’ve made a choice to pay attention to their diet,” says Rod Connolly, owner of Dogma Athletica in Edwards. “Like any diet, they’re making a conscious change.” Connolly, a longtime athletic trainer and certified USA Cycling coach, admits he often sees people lapse into plantonly diets to shed a few pounds, but says vegetarianism can be self-sustaining and a good option for athletes. As a trainer, he believes endurance athletes are better suited for a veggie diet than strength athletes, who need a balance of carbohydrates and protein from meat. “Typically, somebody in that realm would be better suited for a good omnivore diet,” Connolly says, noting a vegetarian diet with occasional fish and chicken fills the protein gaps. Hillary Sargent, a local nutritionist and owner of Busy

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Nutritionist Sally Connelly with Vail-based Nutritional Allies claims vegetarian diets are some of the healthiest around – if done right. Without balance, vegetarians can compromise their immune system, feel weak and have trouble healing after injury. The following are commonly missed nutrients, along with foods to supplement deficiencies. Vitamin B-12: Found in eggs, milk and cheese. Supplement with seaweed and whey protein. Iron: Found in red meat and important for women. Supplement with pumpkin seeds, quinoa and dried peaches. Omega-3 fatty acids: Found in fish. A number of companies make vegan pills from algae, a plant source of healthy fats. Folic acid: Most diets are naturally low in folic acid. Supplement with asparagus, avocado and leafy greens, like kale.

Body Wellness, agrees with Connolly about shying away from strict vegetarianism. She also caters her advice to athletes, and sees building a healthy diet as a spectrum of eating – not a set of strict rules. “There are obviously pros and cons to either side of the diet spectrum,” Sargent says. “Vegetarian is definitely a nutrient-dense diet, with lots of needed antioxidants. The more of those colorful vegetables you can get – kind of ‘eating the rainbow’ – the better you will perform when active.” Doing it the right way The advice of trainers and nutritionists skirts the ethical reasons for going vegetarian – iconic baseball coach Tony La Russa stopped eating meat after watching a cow farm documentary – but even animal activists need to eat right. “There is a healthy way to do it, but it takes planning and forethought,” Sargent says. “Everyone is different. If your friend is on a raw food diet, you may think it will work for you, but that’s not always going to be true. People need to

[See HEALTH AND WELLNESS, page 18]

You have a special purpose...

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Intuitive Counselor for Adults & Children

970.414.0868

finis bonis • 926.9060 • www.finisboni.com

328.3937 313 Chambers Ave., Unit C, Eagle

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General Dentistry

Dr. Anne Pence Eye care in our community for over 15 years.

Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

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524-1105

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sneakSHOTS | Who’s Up To What

Barret with the Habitat Home Outlet is ready to help you find something special! Building materials, rugs, furniture and so much more! Conveniently located off Chambers Ave in Eagle - helping you help others. Visit www.habitatvailvalley.

Call Jamie and Karlie r at Rootz Hair Salon fo t, cu g rin all of your sp g color, and highlightin . 88 67 needs at 970-748-

The students of Higher Elevation Healing Arts School are studying hard. Visit them in the student clinic before they graduate. Higher Elevation’s first night class begins May 22. Call 970926-1957 for more info or to schedule an appointment. Pictured: Mercedes, Dana, Audrey, Angela, Trixie, Mira, Kellie and Molly.

If you have a photo you would like to have in sneakSHOTS, just send us an email with the picture and a brief description, kudos or shout-out to info@sneakpeakvail.com. Please include “sneakSHOTS” in the subject line.

The Mountain Communications Team is ready to help you with all of your technology and smart phone needs! Technology set up for your home, office and everything in between! Call 970-9496702 today! Located in Eagle-Vail.

Evil Elf and Moon Dog are taking the party wherever they go. The Shotz Ski has tele bindings with removable boot shot glasses. If you want to know about the Shotz Ski you can email theshotzski@gmail.com

Dr. Tom’s Healthy Habits has

EXPANDED! Re-opening Mon. 4/23

Check out the new juice/smoothie bar

FREE

nt to Maida and Delsey wa nch or lu t as kf serve you brea ons isi ov Pr dinner from HP Open h! nc located in Eagle Ra 8 ay Tuesday through Sund ke ba d a.m. to 7 p.m.. Fresh and goods, roasted chicken g availdinners to go! Caterin 5280! able too! Call 970-328-

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Dr. Tom’s Healthy Habits Doctor owned & operated Located next to Mountain Man Nut & Fruit Avon Crossing, Near National Velvet • 970.949.0906 M-F 9:30-6:30, Sat 11-5

Located at 4695 Vail Racquet club Dr.

Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

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MOUNTAIN LOCAL –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– years old, and later in maintaining and designing them, but Vail’s course presented special challenges. “It was swampy, rocky land, and the Gore Creek would rise up some years, leaving standing water,” Krueger says. “It was a challenge.” Kreuger continued working for the rec district for the next 24 years. Today, he lives in Avon, and his four grown chil-

dren and eight grandchildren also live in the valley. The family fell in love with the mountain summers, and all became extremely involved in the community. For the family, Vail was just “ideal,” he says. Last fall, Krueger published a book, called “Ben Here” (referring to his customary way of answering the phone all those years at the rec district), chronicling the building of

[From page 6]

the golf course. “Every movie or book you ever see about Vail is about skiing,” he says. “But what about the golf in the summer? It just sets the record straight.” SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

KIRSTEN STUART –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

[From page 5]

HEALTH AND WELLNESS ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

[From page 16]

body, helped her structure a good diet and encouraged her on powder days, when Dorman you have an injury,” Stuart says. We all have injuries – whether it’s major or something was stuck indoors. that’s not quite balanced in” our bodies. Take an injury as a time to learn about your body “She knew how much I was hurting, with all my friends having this great ski year. She and come back stronger than you were before.” saw the emotional and mental struggles coming before I did,” says Dorman. She understood what not being able to exercise does to you, mentally, how depressing it is.” For Stuart, she’s just glad her negative experience can help others. “People here just push themselves very hard, and you need to listen to your body when SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

tailor diets to their bodies, not a label.” Although she has never been a vegetarian, Sargent says summer is a great time to experiment with veggie-rich eating habits. The abundance of fresh, organic fruits and vegetables from farmer’s markets and community farms makes it simple and, in most cases, affordable. Grant Family Farms near Fort Collins has pickups throughout Eagle County beginning in June, starting at $600 for 22 weeks. Beyond the basic fruits and leafy vegetables – which are woefully low in natural protein – nutritionists recommend healthy doses of nuts, seeds and grains. Pairing rice and beans is a classic way to combine complimentary foods to make a “complete protein,” which includes all 10 amino acids the body needs. Sargent says these pairings don’t need to come in every meal, just at some point throughout the day. To find how much protein a client needs, she takes the person’s ideal body weigh and cuts it in half. The number is how many grams of protein they should get daily – a feat that takes conscientious effort without meat. Yet it’s not impossible, Sargent says, and it never hurts to be a good cook. She admits a major challenge is avoiding

easy meals, like processed foods for the veggie-friendly set. “I see a lot of people who turn to pre-packaged foods, the ‘fake meats’ as I call them,” Sargent says. “These ‘meats’ aren’t always organic – they can be full of additives.” Many processed vegetarian meals are soy or grain based, Sargent says, which are not only difficult to digest, but can also aggravate hormones like estrogen. Occasional vegetarians often turn to pizza, bread and fat-rich dairy products, but she recommends replacing these with healthy fats and oils found in fish or humus.

and supplements. “The most important thing for all athletes is what they get during recovery,” says Connolly, referring to the 30-minute window immediately after exercise. “Your body is metabolically optimized to take in carbs and proteins. It’s the beginning of muscle synthesis – the building of muscle – and timing is crucial.” Sargent recognizes the importance of timing also, particularly for local athletes at altitude. To feel more energetic, she says many cyclists, skiers and climbers compensate for missing meat by overloading on carbohydrates – particularly bread and other grains – which can lead to another set of problems. Bloating is a common problem when athletes get too much grain, along with “leaky gut syndrome,” where the intestines become inflamed and allow toxins to leak into the blood stream. It’s not yet a fully recognized condition, but it affects people who eat an abnormal amount of grains or are gluten intolerant.

Protein: An athlete’s friend For the endurance athletes Connolly works with at Dogma Athletica, the main drawback of a vegetarian diet is building the “complete amino-acid profile” needed to fuel muscle growth, he says. With the exception of quinoa, no plant contains all 10 amino acids found in meat, which help the body recover after exercise and lead to long-term strength. The amino acids come naturally in most animal proteins – it’s why athletes often load up on chicken, fish and beef when training, and finish bouts of exercise with protein-rich shakes

SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

HAPPY HOUR 5-6:30PM Discounted Sushi, Sake & Beer

Wine of the Week

Beer of the Month

Open Nightly 5-10pm Corner at Edwards • 926-7684

Great NEW menu items including

Rorey's Fried Chicken and Spicy Shrimp & Grits! Serving Breakfast ALL DAY! Across from the Post Office in Edwards • 926-1163

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Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

Matua N.Z. Pinot Noir

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Agave | 1060 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.8666 Avon Bakery & Deli | 25 Hurd Lane | 970.949.3354 Cima | 126 Riverfront Lane | 970.790.5500 Blue Plate | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.2252 Bob’s Place | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.8566 Carniceria Tepic | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.6033 China Garden | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.4986 Columbine Bakery | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.1400 Domino’s Pizza | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.3230 Fiesta Jalisco | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.8088 Geno’s Sandwiches | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.0529 Gondola Pizza | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.6000 Loaded Joe’s | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.1480 Montanas Cantina and Grill | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.7019 Northside Coffee and Kitchen | 20 Notingham Rd. | 970.949.1423 Nozawa Sushi | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.0330 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.6093 Subway Avon | 47 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.1312 Swiss Hot Dog Company | 101 Fawcett Rd. | 970.467.2013 Taqueria No Se Hagan Bolas | 91 Beaver Creek Place | 970.845.7959 Ticino | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748-6792 Vin 48 | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.9463

Mexican & Tex/Mex

LD

Organic Deli

BLD

Contemporary Latin

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Chinese Cuisine

LD

$

European Cafe & Bakery

BLD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Italian Sandwiches

LD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Southwest Grill

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Sushi & Asian, Thai

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Hot Dogs & Soup

L

$

Mexican

LD

$

Italian Food & Pizza

LD

$

Rustic American

D

$$

Organic/Local American Cuisine

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

D

$$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

American Comfort

LD

$$

Pizza & Sandwiches

LD

$

Tex-Mex

BLD

$

Steakhouse & Saloon

LD

$$

BBQ & Deli Sandwiches

LD

$

Asian Fusion & Sushi

LD

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$$$

Seasonaly Focused Fine Dining

D

$$$

French Cuisine

D

$$$

Tapas Bar and Lounge

D

$$

Gelato, Chocolate & Wine

LD

$

Classic American Grill

BD

$$

Contemporary Colorado Cuisine

D

$$$

Seasonal American

D

$$$

$ $

BEAVER CREEK 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill | Park Hyatt Beaver Creek | 970.949.1234 Beano’s Cabin | 210 Plaza Way | 970.754.3463 Beaver Creek Chophouse | Beaver Creek Lodge | 970.845.0555 Black Diamond Bistro | 120 Offerson Road | 970.949.1251 Blue Moose Pizza | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.8666 Coyote Cafe | 210 The Plaza | 970.845.9030 Dusty Boot Saloon | 210 Offerson Rd. | 970.748.1146 Flying Pig Sandwich Shop | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.0333 Foxnut Asian Fusion and Sushi | 15 W. Thomas Place | 970.845.0700 Golden Eagle Inn | 118 Beaver Creek Plaza | 970.949.1940 Grouse Mountain Grill | 141 Scott Hill Rd. | 970.949.0600 Mirabelle Restaurant | 55 Village Rd. | 970.949.7728 Osprey Lounge | 10 Elk Track Ln. | 970.754.7400 Rimini Cafe | 45 W. Thomas Place | 970.949.6157 Rocks Modern Grill | 27 Avondale Le. | 970.845.9800 Saddleridge | 44 Meadow Ln. | 970.754.5450 Spago | The Ritz Carlton, Bachelor Gulch | 970.343.1555 Splendido at the Chateau | 17 Chateau Ln. | 970.845.8808 Toscanini | 60 Avondale Ln. | 970.754.5590

Rustic American & Seafood

D

$$$

Italian Pasta Grill

D

$$$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

AVON

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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GREAT DECK! Delicious Food! 8

starting at 5PM + Happy Hour 3-6PM +

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82 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. AVON â&#x20AC;˘ 970.949.7019 Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

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4 Eagle Ranch | 4091 Highway #131, Wolcott | 970.926.3372 Babouneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 0131 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2425 Back Bowl | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.BOWL Dietrichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cafe | 313 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.5021 Dog House Grill | 10663 Highway 6, Gypsum | 970.524.1660 Dusty Boot | 1099 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.7002 Eagle Diner | 112 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.1919 Ekahi Grill and Catering | 116 Park Street, Gypsum | 970.524.4745 Fusion Cafe | 422 McIntire St., Eagle | 970.328.1234 Grand Avenue Grill | 678 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.328.4043 Gypsum Grill Steakhouse | 686 Trail Gulch Rd., Gypsum | 970.524.7365 H.P.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Provisions | 1160 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5280 Heidis Brooklyn Deli | 150 Cooley Mesa Rd., Gypsum | 970.777.3663 Luigiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pasta House | 1143 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5400 Mantos | 106 Oak Ridge Ct., Gypsum | 970.524.6266 Moeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original BBQ | 630 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.337.2277 Paradigms | Corner of 4th and Capital St., Eagle | 970.328.7990 Pastatively Robertoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian Cuisine | 94 Market St., Eagle | 970.328.7324 Pazzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.337.9900 Red Canyon Cafe | 128 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2232 Yeti Grind | 330 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9384

Ranch Western Atmosphere

LD

Omelets, burritos and more

BL

$

American Cuisine/ Bowling

LD

$$

Coffee, Sandwiches, Soups, Ice Cream

BL

$

$

LD

$

Steakhouse/American Cuisine

LD

$$

Traditional American Diner

BLD

$

Hawaiian Style Food

LD

$

American

BLD

$

Casual American

LD

$

Steakhouse

LD

$

BLD

$

Soups & Sandwiches

BLD

$

Pasta & Pizza

LD

$$

Pizza

LD

$

Barbecue

BLD

$

Creative American

LD

$$

Classic Italian

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches

BLD

$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

Italian, Pasta

LD

$$

Eclectic American

BL

$

EAGLE-VAIL Ristorante Ti Amo | 40982 US Highway #6 | 970.845.8153 Route 6 Cafe | 41290 US Highway #6 | 970.949.6393

Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Pricing

EAGLE/GYPSUM

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Type of food

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Meals served

Dining Guide

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

EDWARDS Asian Spice Bistro | 69 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.6628 Balata | 1265 Berry Creek Rd | 970.477.5353 Bonjour Bakery | 97 Main St. | 970.926.5539 Bookworm | 295 Main St. | 970.926.7323 Belmont Deli | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1796 Cafe 163 | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1163 Cafe Milano | 429 Edwards Access Rd. #A208 | 970.926.4455 Dish | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.3433 E town | 295 Main St. | 970.926.4080 Eat! Drink! | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1393 Fiestaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cantina | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.2121 French Press | 34295 US Highway #6 | 970.926.4740 Gashouse | 34185 US Highway #6 | 970.926.2896 Gore Range Brewery | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2739 Grouse on the Green | 100 Kensington Dr., Cordillera Divide | 970.926.5788 Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinese Cafe | 175 Main St. | 970.926.3050

LD

$

LD

$$

Homemade Bakery & Soup

BL

$

Coffee & Crepes Sandwiches

BL LD

$

American

B L

$

Contemporary Italian

BLD

$$

High End Tapas

D

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Tasting/Wine Bar, Paninis

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

French Bistro

BLD

$$

Colorado Wild Game Grill

LD

$$

Rustic Pub

LD

$$

Pub/American

D

$$

LD

$

25

Chinese, Asian

$ Who wants to spend the day cooped up in the kitchen? Life's too short! Let us do the cooking for you!

Chinese, Asian American Cuisine

(Reg. $50)

$

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

5 course tasting menu

And $25 bottles of wine

If You Can Imagine It...We Can Create It!

  

HOMECHEFS MACCOM 20

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

3

$

Happy Hour Nightly 5-6:30 pm Red & White Wine, Greyhounds and bar snacks

926-3433 | corner at edwards | eatdrinkdish.com

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘


Juniper Restaurant | 97 Main St. | 970.926.7001 Larkburger | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.9336 Last Course Dessert Bar & Pastries | 275 Main Street C-106 | 970.926-1979 Local Joe’s Pizza | 280 Main St. | 970.926.4444 Log Cabin Sports Bar and Grill | 34500 Highway 6, #B1 | 970.926.9726 Main St. Grill | 97 Main St. | 970.926.2729 Marko’s Pizzeria | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7003 Mirador | 2205 Cordillera Way, Cordillera Lodge & Spa | 970.926.2200 Old Forge Co. | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2220 Sato | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.7684 Smiling Moose Deli | 1170 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2400 Subway Edwards | 439 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7010 Vista At Arrowhead | 676 Sawatch Dr. | 970.926.2111 Woody’s Kitchen & Pub | 27 Main St. | 970.926.2756 Zino Ristorante | 27 Main St. | 970.926.0777

Contemporary American

D

$$$

Organic Gourmet Fast Food/Burgers

LD

Tapas/Wine Bar/Desserts

BLD

$

Pizza

D

$

$

American/Mexican

BLD

American Grill

LD

Pizza & Pasta

LD

Regional/Seasonal Fare

BLD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

$ $$ $ $$

Sushi & Japanese Cuisine

LD

$$

Deli

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Contemporary American

D

Bar & Grill

LD

$

Contemporary Italian

D

$$

Southern BBQ

LD

$

Traditional American

LD

$

Steakhouse

D

$$

Meditrainian/Greek Cuisine

BLD

$

Coffee and Sandwiches

LD

$

Mexican/American/Western

D

$$

American

BLD

$

Continental

LD

$$

European American Bistro

D

$$

Regional American

BLD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

American

BLD

New American

D

Contemporary American

BLD

$

Casual American

LD

$$

American/Western

LD

$$

Authentic Italian

D

$$

Traditional French Brasserie

D

$$$

Pizza and Italian

LD

$

American Bistro

LD

$$

Steakhouse, Aprés and Dinner

D

$$$

Mountain Fare/Steakhouse, Aprés,

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

New American

D

American Pub

LD

$

Asian Cuisine

LD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

Seasonal American

D

Northern Italian

LD

$

Prime Rib/Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

VAIL Alpenrose | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8899 Alpine Tavern | Vail Racquet Club, East Vail | 970.476.7888 Atwater on Gore Creek | Vail Cascade Resort | 970.476.7014 Bart & Yeti’s | Lionshead, North of Arrabelle | 970.476.2754 Bearfish | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7596 Billy’s Island Grill | Lionshead | 970.476.8811 Bistro 14 | Eagle’s Nest, Top of Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.445.4530 Block 16 | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 Blu’s | Downstairs from Children’s Fountain | 970.476.3113 bol | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.5300 Bully Ranch | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5460 Campo de Fiori | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8994 Centre V | The Arrabelle at Vail Square, Lionshead | 970.754.7700 Chicago Pizza | 1031 S. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7000 CinéBistro | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.3344 Elway’s Steakhouse | 174 East Gore Creek Dr. | 970.754.7818 Flame | Four Seasons, Vail | 970.477.8600 Frost | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8050 Game Creek Restaurant | Vail Mountain | 970.754.4275 Garfinkel’s | Next to Lionshead Gondola | 970.476.3789 Gohan Ya | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7570 Joe’s Famous Deli | 288 Bridge St. | 970.479.7580 Kelly Liken | Gateway Building, 12 Vail Rd. | 970.479.0175 La Bottega | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0280 Lancelot | Next to Children’s Fountain | 970.476.5828

7 In-house beers on tap!

Join us on our deck Sundays 3-6 pm for

LIVE MUSIC

Olora Brothers 3 Pints & 5 Special Cocktails

$

• • • • • • •

$$$

MINTURN Kirby Cosmos | 474 Main St. | 970.827.9027 Magusto’s | 101 Main St. | 970.827.5450 Minturn Country Club | 131 Main St. | 970.827.4114 Nicky’s Quickie | 151 Main St | 970-827-5616 Sticky Fingers | 132 Main St. | 970.827.5353 Minturn Saloon | 146 N. Main St. | 970.827.5954 Turntable | 160 Railroad Ave. | 970.827.4164

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

EDWARDS

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

$ $$$

$ $$$

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • •

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

• •

50off Entrees %

$

$$$

• •

Spring Menu starting at 5:30 pm

$

Happy Hour Daily 4-6 pm 3 Pints, Bud, & Bud Light bottles $4 Well cocktails $5 Selected glasses of wine 105 Edwards Village Blvd Edwards • 970.926.2739

$

Happy Hour 4-5:30pm 3 Domestics, $5 Big Margaritas

$

Open Tuesdays-Saturdays

Vail Village • 476-5100 Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

|

sneakpeak

21


Creative American

LD

$$$

French and American

D

$$$

French

D

$$$

Classic Diner, Traditional Favorites

BL

Contemporary American

D

• • •

$ $$

Mexican

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$

Family/American/European

BLD

$

International Café

BLD

$

Chinese

LD

$

Japanese/Peruvian

D

$$

Modern Italian

ld

$$

Barbecue

LD

$

Creative Seafood/Meat

LD

$$

Sushi/Asian

LD

$$

Southwestern Steak House

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sushi/Japanese

D

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

BLD

$

Continental/Wild Game

LD

$$

Mexican

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Americana

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Sushi, Asian

LD

$

Creative American

LD

$$$

$ $

Contemporary American

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$$

Eclectic Pub

D

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Italian & Pizza

LD

$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

Pastries

BL

$

Casual American

BLD

$

Sushi and Pacific Spices

D

$$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

life insurance Do you? is affordable. to protect their family.

Life insurance

Be prepared for the unforeseen.

Call Mike Neff Insurance

949.5633

Located in the Slifer, Smith & Frampton Building in Avon www.michaelneffagency.com

22

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

[From page 3]

certified contractors in the area who do the work. Coming soon, we’ll also have financing options to give you a loan to do the work. It’s a start-to-finish service.” Kostick urged homeowners to take advantage of the discounted audits (they’re a $500 dollar value, he says), which are subsidized by a federal grant that will last another year and a half. “We’ve done over 500 homes, and feedback has been tremendous,” he says. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

Local’s Appreciation Month

10

%

off

All Procedures (Ends April 30th)

“25 Years of Service” Todd H. Shainholtz, D.D.S.

(970) 328 - 6347

www.SmileMakersOfEagle.net

“We care about people... not just teeth.”

info@sneakpeakvail.com

John and Theresa have

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

HOME EXPO ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– variety of suggestions on how to minimize energy loss in their home. According to home energy advisor Yuri Kostick, changes range from small-scale improvements like replacing lighting and plugging up drafts, to bigger projects like fully replacing insulation in attics or basements. Even changing your light bulbs to energy-efficient bulbs can result in energy savings up to six percent, he says. “You can begin saving energy really quickly on some of these projects,” Kostick says. “We’ll do the audit and then give you a list of the incentives and rebates available, and the

970.446.7912

Larkspur Restaurant | Golden Peak | 970.476.8050 La Tour | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.4403 Left Bank | Sitzmark Lodge in Vail Village | 970.476.3696 The Little Diner | West Lionshead Plaza | 970.476.4279 Lord Gore & the Fitz Lounge | Manor Vail at the base of Golden Peak | 970.476.4959 Los Amigos | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.5847 Ludwig’s | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5429 The Marketplace | One Willow Bridge Rd. | 970.477.4370 Market Café | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 May Palace | Next to City Market, West Vail | 970.476.1657 Matsuhisa | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.6682 Mezzaluna | Lion Square Lodge, next to Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.477.4410 Moe’s Original BBQ | Upstairs from the General Store, Lionshead | 970.479.7888 Montauk Seafood Grill | Lionshead Village | 970.476.3601 Nozawa | Holiday Inn, West Vail | 970.476.9355 Ocotillo | Vail Mountain Marriott Resort & Spa, Lionshead | 970.477.5675 Old Forge Co. | 2161 N Frontage Rd | 970.476.5555 Old Forge Co. | 521 East Lionshead Cir. | 970.476.5232 Ore House | 232 Bridge St. | 970.476.5100 Osaki’s | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0977 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.9026 Pepi’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.4671 Qdoba | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7539 Red Lion | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.7676 Russell’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.6700 Sandbar Sports Grill | West Vail Mall | 970.476.4314 Subway West Vail | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.3827 Sushi Oka Hibachi | 100 East Meadow Drive. Suite #4 | 970-476-1588 Sweet Basil | 193 E. Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.0125 Tap Room | Top of Bridge St. | 970.479.0500 Terra Bistro| 352 Meadow Dr., Vail Mountain Lodge& Spa | 970.476.6836 The George | 292 Meadow Dr. | 970.476.2656 Up The Creek Bar & Grill | 223 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.8141 Vendetta’s | 291 Bridge St. | 970.476.5070 Vail Chophouse | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.477.0555 Wendy’s Alpine Coffee Shop | 4695 Racquet Club Dr. Westside Cafe & Market | 2211 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7890 Yama Sushi | 168 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.7332 Yeti’s Grind | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.1515

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

VAIL

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide


Clown with balloon animals. Ice cream and treats!

Global

Child

children’s resale Think Green. Think Global.

Up to 50% off Entire Store!

Save Our Planet. Re-Selling is Recycling

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Re-using is Rewarding. Go Green.

GRAND OPENING! April 28th

Photos with Vail Image Photography

enter to win a photo package ($240 value) or many giftcard giveaways! Edwards location next to the Post Office Edwards (970) 926-4733

GlobalChildResale.com • Like us on

Go Green. Buy and sell at Global Child.

SPRING CLEARANCE SALE Ruggs Benedict Voted 2009 Business of the Year

% % 20 -50 OFF BUY YOUR NEW FLOOR TODAY... WE CAN INSTALL RIGHT AWAY. SHOP SOON FOR THE BEST SELECTION Find Huge Savings - Using the combined buying power of 1000 Carpet One stores, we have been able to stock up on incredible deals. We are passing Huge Savings on to our customers. In Stock Now - With 140 wall-to-wall Carpet and Hardwood Floors In Stock, You will be sure to find one that is just right for your home. We can install your new floor right away.

140

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Serving the Vail Valley since 1972 810 Nottingham Road, Avon • 970-949-5390 • www.ruggsbenedict.com

Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012

|

sneakpeak

23


GET READY FOR SPRING! PRP (aka "Vampire Facelift")

A technique widely used in orthopedics & cardiology has recently been adapted to stimulate rejuvenation in aesthetic treatments in the form of volume, softer wrinkles & luminous skin for a limited time

800

$

treatment

CORRECT WINTER SUN DAMAGE

and get a hair-free body!

50 % 20 $ 200 %

laser hair off removal

save

custom peel and/ off or photofacials on CO2 Fractional Resurfacing

Call now at 331-1599 for more information or to schedule an appointment! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just stop time, reverse time exclusively at

A Wrinkle in Time Skin Care Clinic

24

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, April 26-Wednesday, May 2, 2012


SneakPEAK April 26, 2012