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Twist

Edwards-based Concrete Coast Clothing debutes in Vail stores

Crawlin’ to a Cure

Buggy races benefit breast-cancer awareness

Calling all beauty queens

Gypsum hosts first Miss Eagle Valley pageant

From grape to bottle

Churchill Wine Cellars uncorks a new season of winemaking Thursday, Oct. 4 -Wed., Oct. 10, 2012

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Sew Fantastic

Patrick Chirichillo (left) and members of Churchill Wine Cellars display their collection of wine at the wine co-op’s cellars. Kent Pettit photo.

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Churchill Cellars begins 21st year of homemade winemaking. By Melanie Wong or Patrick Chirichillo, making wine is more than a hobby – it’s generations of family history, lovingly squeezed and corked into a bottle. The Edwards resident and owner of local wine co-op Churchill Wine Cellars, tucked away on the grounds of 4 Eagle Ranch outside of Wolcott, began making wine with his grandfather when he was 8 years old. The little cellar and tasting room can easily go unnoticed amidst the noise of the ranch happenings, but last weekend there was noticeable bustle. It’s harvest crush season at the cellar, and a small crowd was gathered under tents and surrounded by crates upon crates of grapes. Everyone’s hands were sticky from the exquisitely sweet, little grapes, and the affair was half party, half work, with plenty of vino to go around, a grill smoking away, and “crushers� feeding crates of dark grapes through the crushing machine. Some even took a more traditional approach to the harvest, donning Lucille Ball costumes and stomping on the grapes in large vats, with similar comedy to the “I Love Lucy� episode it alludes to, where Ball’s character gets into trouble grape stomping at an Italian winery. Churchill Wine Cellars operates very much like a winemaking club – members buy into the co-op, committing to anywhere from a fourth to a full barrel of wine. In late September and early October, shipments of California grapes arrive at 4 Eagle, and the members spend the next few weeks crushing, pressing and squeezing the grapes. The juice is then but in oak barrels until it is ready for members to return in May to bottle and cork the wine, which they then take home to share with family and friends. None of it is sold commercially – all the members make the wine purely for

fun, but that doesn’t mean Chirichillo and company aren’t serious about their vino. Churchill Wine Cellars has won a slew of awards at amateur wine competitions and festivals, including nine medals at the Colorado Mountain Winefest in Palisade, Colo., this September. Their 2011 Cotes de Rhone even took gold. A family tradition While Chirichillo is an “amateur� winemaker, he knows a thing or two about the art. Together with his nephew Christopher Morano, a fourth generation winemaker, and sommelier Willem Johnson, there’s a wealth of knowledge at Churchill Wine Cellars. Both Chirichillo and Morano remember learning how to make wine from Chirichillo’s grandfather, who brought the tradition from his native Italy, in the basement of their New Jersey home. “Every year we helped grandpa. My brother and I made our own wine throughout college, and we started up again after grandpa died,� Chirichillo says. “It’s been a fun tradition for everybody. We just kept doing it and never stopped.� Chirichillo moved to the Vail area in 1989 and continued his hobby. The co-op was born one day at a summer solstice party, when a couple of friends got a taste of Chirichillo’s homemade wine. They suggested he should move the winemaking to the newly-opened dude ranch outside Wolcott, 4 Eagle. That was 21 years ago, and today, the co-op has grown from a few friends to a group of about 125, producing up to 30 barrels, or a bit fewer than 300 bottles of wine. Denver resident Christy Martin first heard about the winery nearly five years ago after seeing a Facebook post about the harvest crush party. Intrigued, she made the trip up to Eagle County and has been part of the co-op since. This season, she and a big group of friends went in together on a barrel of wine and arrived for the crush party in full “Lucy� costume. While it might be simpler to buy a bottle at the store, Martin says she returns to Churchill Cellars every year for the

[See UNCORKED, page 12]

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Crawlin’ for a Cure organizer Vikki Hobbs poses with one of her machines. The breast-cancer support benefit returns to Eagle Oct. 13. SneakPEAK file photo.

Boulder bustin’ for breast cancer

Second-annual Crawlin’ to a Cure in Eagle showcases monster Jeeps and off-road buggies. By Phil Lindeman

W

hile sitting behind the wheel of a burly, heavily modified Jeep, Eagle resident Stacey Hollis inches over boulders nearly larger than his vehicle and lurches precariously down slick-rock faces. It’s an adrenaline rush few experiences can mimic and even fewer can beat. “That vehicle is just a badass rock crawler,” Hollis says of his 1987 Jeep, outfitted with 44-inch tires and custom suspension. “I’ve always had buddies who did (rock crawling), and I made the mistake of going with them one time and got hooked. It’s really addictive – the only thing you can do going two miles per hour and still get your heart pumping.” Given Hollis’ background – he served in the Navy and has done a variety of racing, including rough-and-tumble motocross – the unbridled praise for rock crawling isn’t taken lightly. However unlikely, the low-speed rush gets multiplied during the Crawlin’ to a Cure event at the Eagle County Fairgrounds on Oct. 13, where he looks to defend his title following a win at the inaugural competition last year. Participant registration opens at 10 a.m. the day of the event and costs $100, with cash prizes going to top finishers in each of the four vehicle divisions. The annual series is a benefit for breast cancer survivors and supporters from groups in Vail and around Aspen. All proceeds from ticket sales and entry fees will support the

causes, including a brand-new scholarship for high school seniors on behalf of Team Keepin’em Real, a local organization involved with Susan G. Komen races and other fundraisers. As with last October’s muddy, rain-drenched event, Hollis goes up against roughly 50 local and Colorado-based drivers, many of whom are enthusiastic amateurs with little professional experience. In fact, many of the drivers are friends he goes rock crawling with on weekends, hauling their Frankenstein-like vehicles everywhere from Rangeley to Montrose to Moab. But don’t let the familial vibe fool you: Even on laid-back trips, Hollis can’t hide his competitive spirit, and it only gets heightened in front of a crowd. “The lights, the crowd – all of it makes you really do things you wouldn’t otherwise try,” Hollis says. “It’s always

Crawlin’ to a Cure

When: Saturday, Oct. 13 beginning at 2 p.m. Where: Eagle County Fairgrounds in Eagle. Cost: $10 for spectators, $100 for competitors ($50 for additional classes) Spectator tickets are sold at the event gate. Kids under 6 years old enter for free. Competition is open to four classes (stock, modified, unlimited class A and B) and entries are taken the day-of only, beginning at 10 a.m. Contact Vikki or Stewart Hobbs at crawlintoacure@ gmail.com or 970-376-0885 for more info.

a game of inches and even when you’re with buddies, it pushes you to compete.” Although Hollis walked away with the crown in the unlimited class-B division – the largest class around, open solely to vehicles with tires larger than 43 inches – last year was his first official rock-crawling competition, and it remains the

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only organized one he enters. Even for a brand-new event, though, he claims it was incredibly well managed, featuring around six obstacles on a course designed by his cousin, Stewart Hobbs. It covered everything from relatively basic dirt rollers to a massive, intimidating wall made of logs that titled vehicles nearly 45-degrees into the air. Hollis’ Jeep was more than up to the challenge, but it’s as much a credit to the driver as the vehicle – not everyone was so lucky. “There were some bigger rides with better tires and suspension, but I just mashed it to the floor and held on,” says Hollis, who expects even harder obstacles this year. “One guy had tire problems and another just couldn’t find the right line on some obstacles. I had a really good night – hope I can do it again.” An extended family affair Hollis’ close-knit group of rock crawlers includes event founder Vikki Hobbs – Stewart’s wife and also an avid crawler – as well as lifelong local Mike Long. The Eagle Valley High School graduate has worked for the Hobbs’ trucking business since graduation and known the family for more than three decades. But he didn’t get into rock crawling until about five years ago, when he bought an old vehicle from Stewart Hobbs. Like Hollis’ introductory experience in 2010 – fittingly enough, with another crawler bought from the Hobbs’ – it was practically love at first crawl. “We swap these vehicles back and forth pretty regularly, because we’re all friends and hit the trails together regularly,” says Long, who now drives a two-seater buggy with 43inch tires. “Even with the competition, I just want to go and have fun like I do every weekend.” Crawlin’ to a Cure is still young, but Long has been helping the Hobbs’ raise money for breast cancer outreach since he first took the wheel of a modified crawler. He was one of several drivers to help the couple raise money during the

[See CRAWLIN’, page 14]

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Writing from the heart of Africa

Award-winning author Naomi Benaron talks about her novel, “Running the Rift” Interview by Phil Lindeman

When novelist Naomi Benaron was around 8 years old, she wanted then-candidate Richard Nixon to win the presidency simply because the man painting her parent’s house liked him. As the author tells it, her mother, a liberal Jewish immigrant who escaped Europe when Hitler took power, loved her strong-willed daughter enough to visit Nixon headquarters and get a fat, colorful pin with his name in block letters as a gift. Benaron realizes now that her interest in Nixon was illinformed – “I honestly never would’ve voted for him today,” she laughs – but her mother’s same brand of warm, unconditional love is apparent in her first full-length novel, “Running the Rift.” Set in rural Rwanda, it tells the story of a young Tutsi boy with a gift for running and dreams of winning his country’s first Olympic gold medal. Over the span of 10 years, the boy battles racial tension and appalling violence at the hands of radical Hutu militias, all while training for his dream. Benaron’s subject matter in “Running the Rift” is often heavy – genocide, senseless violence, racial hatred – but her approach is deeply humanist, mixing lyrical descriptions of a misunderstood country with a deep and uplifting sense of humor. All are hallmarks of her mother, including a passion for social justice that earned the novel the prestigious Bellwether Prize for Fiction in 2010. The prize led to a publishing contract and adds clout to her collection of short stories, “Love Letters from a Fat Man,” which covers everything from African genocide to the Jewish experience in America. Before Benaron’s appearance at The Bookworm in Edwards on Oct. 9 at 6 p.m., SneakPEAK spoke with the author about writing “Running the Rift,” her personal experience in Rwanda and what authors she returns to for inspiration. SneakPEAK: “Running the Rift” is your first major novel. Talk about the difference between writing short stories and full-length books. Naomi Benaron: It was night and day. You can write a short story at different times and put together a collection, then edit them at once or separately. This novel took me five years of constant work – it truly is the difference between a marathon and a 100-yard dash. I’ve written short stories that can exhaust me because of the subject matter, but a novel is draining because you have to sit down every single day and write. I’ve spent days at a time where I only get one page, then I’ll come back one week later and get rid of the entire thing. SP: The majority of “Running the Rift” takes place in the poorest, most dangerous areas of Africa. Have you ever visited Rwanda? NB: Yes, I have, but before I went to Rwanda I had been working with African refugees in Tucson, and I knew I want-

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ed to write about their experience. That’s all I really knew. I also had a friend who ran in the Olympics for Burundi and fictionalizing his experience began as a short story, so through a series of serendipitous events I was finally led out there. The place itself is incredible. Even before the plane landed, I looked out at this country that rose up out of the mist, and I was giddy to be there. I started making contact with the people and knew again it was what I wanted to write about. I had a seminal moment when I was on a beach and found human bones, and when I held those bones in my hands, I knew it – genocide, the Rwandan people, all of it – I knew it was a story that had to be told. SP: Talk about your experience as an outsider in an un-

Discussion with author Naomi Benaron

When: Tuesday, Oct. 9 at 6 p.m. Where: The Bookworm in Edwards Riverwalk Cost: $10 presale. Tickets available online at www.bookwormofedwards.com.

Naomi Benaron, author of “Running the Rift” - a story about a gifted Rwandan boy who holds fast to his dream of running in the Olympics in the midst of his country’s civil war - speaks the The Bookworm in Edwards on Oct. 9. Photo special to SneakPEAK.

derprivileged nation. Was it emotionally draining, or did you take an objective, journalistic approach? NB: Both things were true – there were days when I would break down and cry. The second time I went in 2005, I met a man who was crazy in the street, and he was very educated, but he started screaming at me, “What right do you have to be here?” There was a lot of resentment toward white people, but I really, really wanted to communicate to the man what I wanted to do. Writing this novel was my way of asking for forgiveness. I constantly fight with the problems of being a person who represents colonial power. But I would also meet many, many people who said it was very appropriate and meaningful for me to be there and tell their story. It was both uplifting and difficult. SP: Do you see “Running the Rift” as particular to a certain culture, or can the themes be applied to broader issues? NB: That was one of the main reasons I wrote this novel – I wanted people to realize that this wasn’t something specific to Rwanda. The problems that caused genocide there are the same behind the Holocaust and the genocide in Darfur – it’s a societal evil that transcends all cultures and all ethnicities. It can be challenged and changed no matter what you are. SP: When did you become interested in social justice and humanitarian issues? NB: It was all my mom (laughs). I grew up in a family that was very active with those issues. My mom was active in civil rights and anti-war events – we had meetings in our house and other gatherings around us. They worked with people who needed help. I believe it was something I very much understood and believed was important. My mother

was Jewish and came from Switzerland to Canada, and she was involved with all those anti-Nazi movements. SP: You recently wrote an essay about fiction and social responsibility, and your novel often uses terrifying situations to illuminate the characters. Is it possible to find beauty in horrific events? NB: (Pause) I would say yes we can, but it’s not like people are going to describe genocide in a beautiful way. One of my favorite Holocaust novels is “Fugitive Pieces” (by Canadian author Anne Michaels), and there’s a way she finds beauty necessary while making necessity beautiful. Look at the Holocaust: People risked their lives to record what happened, and people can find beauty in the horror of what happened. They played music, and the children made beautiful drawings – there was an attempt to transcend the horror of what surrounded them. SP: Who are some of your influences, either fictional or real? NB: Faulkner is an influence, but there is also Nigerian a writer, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. She has written some incredible things. I also like Tim O’Brien, from “The Things They Carried.” Two things all these writers share is a very lyrical sense – they’re very poetic, and I think of myself as a poet on top of everything. Aside from that, they are all authors of experience. It’s the way I like to write and the way I like to think. SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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A soft twist on

Concrete Concrete Coast, a sportinspired, lifestyle clothing line, launches in the valley. By Larry Grossman Cover by Connor Walberg

Athlete Matt Minder (pictured on cover) models a Concrete Coast shirt. Connor Walberg photo. It is a very familiar story here in the high country that you may have heard more than once -- “I was planning on going to a really good college, then I moved up here and realized I could have a lot more fun and learn much more up here on my own than sitting in a classroom. It just seemed faster to me and that it would work out better that way.” These were the words of Connor Walberg, the owner of a new lifestyle clothing company called Concrete Coast Clothing (www.concreteclothingco.com). Walberg’s path to this latest business endeavor makes perfect sense in his grand scheme of things -- he is once again following personal passion to make a go of it in the business world.

Concrete Coast Clothing was to simplify the logo, while at the same time keeping it recognizable. The idea was to focus on product design and style, starting simple with a line of T-shirts. The company’s long-term goal is to get into a full line of clothing, footwear and accessories. Look for hoodies, beanies and women’s shirts to come off the production line this winter. Walberg sees his clothing line appealing to people who are looking for comfortable, everyday type of clothing, influenced by the skateboarding (concrete) and surfing (coast) lifestyle. The company has been up and running since the end of July, entirely financed by Walberg himself with his savings. Concrete Coast Clothing apparel can be purchased on the company’s website, at American Ski Exchange in Vail and Transition Sports in Avon. Walberg stresses that one of, if not the most important, characteristics of Concrete Coast is that all its products are made in the USA. He sees the extra cost of production worth the better reputation of his company. “I’d rather have my product made in a place that is not a sweat shop, and I’d rather have it made where I’m going to sell it. It does not make sense to me to have something made and shipped half way around the world. It seems like such a waste of resources,” he says. His clothing is supplied through American Apparel, a brand he chose for its closer fit and the comfort of their fabrics. The environmentally friendly Denver Screen Print Embroidery does all of the screening of his shirts.

Figuring out the future Like so many who live in recreation-based regions of the country, Walberg decided to take a year off from school after graduating from high school to try and figure out what he wanted to do with his future. He did not completely blow of the schooling portion of his life however and ended up enrolling in a couple of Colorado Mountain College for what he described as “business basics.” Meanwhile, he was also shooting photos of his friends mountain biking. One of his good friends that he had been photographing suggested he go buy a professional-level camera and get some freestyle skiing shots. So with the challenge on the table, Walberg purchased an expensive SLR camera and began shooting images everyday for the next three years during the winter. The popularity of his photos expanded, and Walberg now professionally shoots a variety of subjects, including real estate. Some of his images have ended up in national magazines such as Powder. The Concrete Clothing team Like many other locals, he also had other jobs to make ends meet, including working as So how does a new clothing company that doesn’t want to plaster its logo all over its a bellman at the Tivoli. It was not long before he realized he would have to look beyond clothing get recognition? Concrete Coast has come out of the gates with a fairly aggressive photography for his future. marketing plan, utilizing a team of sponsored athletes to get the company and its apparel in front of their targeted audience. Currently they have skateboard and BMX riders on the Concrete Coast Clothing is born team and plan to include several freestyle skiers as well. The team includes skier/skate“I wanted to start a clothing company for along time” he says, remarking that he was boarder Matt Minder, BMX biker Alejandro Velasco and 11-year-old skateboard phenom influenced by apparel companies like Volcom. He admired the company’s unique style and Jack Coyne. So look for Concrete Coast Clothing athletes to be rippin’ in your hood soon. alternative vibe. The company looks to get involved with the community as well -- for every new “like” on Walberg, at age 25, wanted to create a company that was a little different. Most of today’s Concrete Coast Clothing’s Facebook page, fifty cents will be donated to St. Jude’s Chilbrands and products are basically billboards for the company, he says. The idea behind dren’s Research Hospital.

[See CONCRETE CLOTHING, page 12]

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SneakEATS: Tavern on the Gore

Local brews and eclectic menu mark Vail’s newest bar By Phil Lindeman

is as far removed from a pitcher of Coors Light as imaginable – although football specials help pad any check. During Editor’s note: SneakEATS are features in which Sneak- Broncos’ games, Coors Light is $3 per glass, and the MonPEAK writers review, dish on or praise a meal at a local day Night Football crowd is spoiled with $5.75 Don Julio, restaurant. This article represents one writers’ dining expe- Captain Morgan and Ketel One drinks. rience. The food I have a confession: I’ve never been a fan of sports bars. On the cuisine side, game time diners will find plenty of The beers are overpriced, the food is hit or miss, and if very diverse fare to enjoy. The special game-day menu has you’re not in the mood, the whole scene can be a sensory only 10 items, but most are under $10 and all come in poroverload. Unless the Rockies are in the World Series and tions large enough to share. It’s also half the price of the norrioting is sure to follow a win, I’d much rather watch a game from the comfort of my couch. With that in mind, I’m either the best or worst person for Tavern on the Gore, a new restaurant co-owned by Bearfish Drink founder George Hilliard. Nestled in the old Sapphire space One of nearly two dozen Colorado beers from overlooking Gore Creek in Vail Village, the tavern is touted breweries like Odell, SKA, Boulder Beer, Avery and as an upscale sports bar, a chic spot for your multimillionaire Upslope. Most under $5 for bottle or draft. college football fan. Since opening in early summer, it has Taste The fruchetta with friend green tomatoes ($12), a created and filled a niche no one knew Vail needed, with a thoroughly American take on caprese salad with full menu reaching into the $30 range and small flat-screen Mozzerella, basil, battered green tomatoes and balTVs at every booth. samic reduction piled on crunchy bruchetta. It’ll be interesting to see how Tavern on the Gore fares Eat come winter – the location and a heated patio are major The hearty black bean nochos, featuring housemade tortilla chips, fresh guacamole, a silky cheese draws – but on a Sunday evening early in football season, sauce, buffalo meat and all the nacho fixings. Bring the inside dining area was dead. A handful of diners were on an appetite or friends on a sonday afternoon, when the patio, enjoying the last rays of sun and hardly interested an enormous platter off the game-day menu is only in football. Our group of four came to watch a highly-antic$10.95. ipated Detroit Lions and San Francisco 49ers match, and we took a table not far from the small liquor bar and oyster bar, the latter of which is one of the few remaining features from mal menu, which starts at $6 for a bowl of clam chowder and Sapphire. goes to $35 for shrimp and bacon-wrapped scallops. Again, Vail is full of quirky characters and hangouts, but seeing a not what a typical sports bar patron is used to, let alone willposh oyster bar surrounded by glowing TVs is bizarre. And ing to pay for. the rampant cognitive dissonance continued, with a dining Beyond pricing, both menus have highlights and lowarea accented by dark oak tables, dim wall lamps and a gold- lights. Our group started with the two appetizers from the plated ceiling that echoed the sound of football announcers. full menu: crab cakes and bruschetta with fried green tomaAs one of my fellow diners commented, it felt like a place toes, each for $12 a piece. The tavern’s culinary team defor romantic-ish dinner with the same girl you proposed to cided to keep Sapphire’s seafood focus, and the crab cakes at a baseball game – not quite the vibe for a night out with share menu space with clams, mussels and crab legs. friends. If all of Tavern on the Gore’s seafood items are as wildly jarring as the crab cakes, I wouldn’t make it a go-to spot for The drinks ocean fare. My mom’s a Maryland native, and these cakes It’s my job to have opinions, but I’ll stop short of say- were far removed from the fat, overflowing variety I’m used ing the atmosphere doesn’t work. The brand-new interior is to from Chesapeake Bay. For $12, they were disappointingly free of sticky floors and dried beer stench, and a handful of small – roughly the size of a Jimmie Dean sausage patty. Desports-themed paintings are a welcome substitute for neon spite the underwhelming appearance, the cakes were satisfybeer signs. However, the combination of an intriguing menu ing, packed with plenty of blue crab meat with a soft, buttery and laudable beer list is sure to snag customers. biscuit holding everything together. Of course, my initial unease was eased by a couple pints of The bruschetta with fried green tomatoes was a major tap-poured Dale’s Pale Ale. Dale’s is a personal favorite, but improvement and almost perfectly reflect the best aspects the beer list as a whole was chock-full of Colorado bottles, of an “upscale sports bar” concept: The dish is basically from Odell to Boulder Beer to Upslope Brewing. If there’s a Southern-fried caprese salad, with fresh basil, mozzarella, quick way to win the hearts of locals and adventurous tour- battered green tomatoes and a balsamic reduction, all nesists alike, it’s packing your bar with state-made brews. tled on crispy, herb-coated slices of bruschetta. A plate only The wine list is up to Vail standards, where even your cor- comes with four, but they were a definite success, reminding ner saloon caters to winos. Pricing is also typical of Vail – one friend of a childhood meal. When I was slow to eat my the $52 “Millionaire Margarita” with Don Julio 1942 tequi- slice, I noticed him eyeing it lustily – a sure sign of foodie la, Grand Marnier 150, agave nectar liqueur and lime juice approval.

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Upscale sports bar Tavern on the Gore is located in Vail Village in the location formerly occupied by Sapphire restaurant. Phil Lindeman photo. Like the crab cakes, the entrees were surprising for reasons good and bad. As much as the décor tried to convince me otherwise, it was still a football night, and dishes like $31 grilled quail would have to wait. The game-day menu featured a one-third rack of baby back pork ribs for $10.95, but to share, I opted for the full menu’s $22 half rack, served with potatoes and grilled corn on the cob. The remaining two dishes, Kobe beef sliders and a giant order of black bean nachos, came from the special menu and cost no more than $12 a piece. All three are typical bar fare, and all three drew shockingly different responses. The ribs were excellently smoked but much too tart, with an overpowering apple-flavored finishing sauce. The sliders featured a luscious, juicy patty finished with a red wine reduction, but the bun was the starchy McDonald’s variety and much too large for the modest patties. Only the nachos were a unanimous success, thanks largely to simplicity – you’d be hard-pressed to find better anywhere in town. As with the bruschetta, they made a case for the weirdness of an upscale bar, featuring house-made tortilla chips and guacamole, loads of black beans, buffalo meat, a surprisingly delicious cheese sauce and enough spice to satisfy heat fiends. Unfortunately, I didn’t see nachos on the normal menu – you’ll have to visit on a Sunday or Monday to find them. Much like the space itself, the menu left me thoroughly confused as to how I should feel. Each dish seemed to come from an entirely different kitchen, and aside from fried green tomatoes and seafood, little stood out as signature. One of my journalism idols, Roger Ebert, occasionally writes bemused reviews where he neither recommends nor disowns a film – he simply explains what he saw and lets the view decide if a $12 ticket is worth it. Tavern on the Gore is like one of those films. I’m sure the mid-winter college bowl season will be kind. SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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VMS

Sisterhood fosters a

Vail Mountain’s seasoned volleyball team bolstered by years of history and friendship. By John O’Neill

V

ail Mountain School (VMS) girls’ volleyball players go onto the court with a long-standing history of friendship in front of them. On a whiteboard in the VMS gym is a quote. The words aren’t worth mentioning as, by now, that quote has changed. The quote changes everyday, much like the team itself is changing as they move forward in their season. Currently, the lady Gore Rangers hold a winning record on the court for the season. In nonleague play, the ladies managed to come away with a win over the much larger Battle Mountain High School Huskies. It was the first time anyone on this team has beaten the Huskies, and only the second time in program history. They also won their homecoming game last Saturday against Hotchkiss. “They have been playing good volleyball,” says head coach Mike Garvey. “And when they are playing well, they can play with anybody.” The ladies, though, aren’t fazed by their recent success. Nor are they caught up in postseason aspirations. “Bit-by-bit, step-by-step” – that has been their approach to the 2012 season, and that means making the most out of every practice and every moment with a group of girls that transcends that of a team and competes as something of a family At the Vail Mountain School, the culture of athletics is at odds with the larger programs such as the Huskies or the down-valley Eagle Valley High School Devils. Because VMS is grades kindergarten through 12th, the athletes in their programs grow up together. From irritable youngsters to chatty middle-schoolers, and to volleyball teammates playing varsity, this year’s group of volleyball girls has spent years together in almost every stage of life. Like a family At practice, under the eye of coach Garvey the day before the homecoming game, the girls were energetic as ever. They had just come off of a win over BMHS and were slated to play Hotchkiss for homecoming. Four girls in particular encapsulate the familial sense that bonds the players. Arm-in-arm and leaning on one another, seniors Sierra Brill, Lizzie Bolyard, Monika Gehl and Ellen Edgerton take turns finishing each other’s sentences as they explain what it means to be long-time friends and now senior teammates. “We have been so tightly knit for so many years,” says Bolyard. ”Literally we spend every weekend together and every day from 4 (p.m.) to 6 (p.m.) together. We eat lunch together most days. We are so close to each other that every minute that we have left to play together is really special.” Brill came to VMS in 2006. Bolyard arrived in 2005. Gehl and Edgerton might not remember the first time they met, because they were only in elementary school. After serves, the girls chat about things boys they wouldn’t name, or the Justin Bieber

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(l-r) Seniors and longtime friends Monika Gehl, Lizzie Bolyard, Sierra Brill and Ellen Edgerton anchor the Vail Mountain volleyball team. Zach Mahone photo. poster that they have hanging in their locker room, about swagger and about beating other teams. “We have such a strong group of friends, and that translates into a strong group of players,” Brill says. “We have 10 girls on varsity and every single person helps, every single person goes in every single game. We can lean on each other all the time. This has taken us so far.” The upperclassmen group regularly works with the younger players to continue fostering the sisterhood of volleyball players. “I remember as a middle schooler, when we came to the gym to play during practice, and the high school players marched in to set their goals. It was really special. Now, we are those older girls,” says Edgerton. With four nodding heads, the girls agreed that when they were coming up, they always had someone to look up to. They dropped the name Molly Etters, a 2008 graduate of VMS. Etters now paddles for the USA White Water Rafting Team, but her volleyball presence continues on the court. “She was a really good player,” Brill says. “We looked up to her. And now it is fun to see someone look up to us. We hope to have that for the younger players.” Coach Garvey As coach, Garvey has only missed two games during his tenure as the Gore Rangers’ head volleyball coach. The statistic is impressive, considering he has been the head coach at VMS for 16 years. Garvey is also the physical education teacher at the school, and has worked with some of his players for their entire maturation as athletes. “It is nice to get the fundamentals since kindergarten,” laughs Gehl. Gehl may have been laughing, but she wasn’t joking. In elementary P.E. classes, the kids start knocking around beach balls in place of volleyballs. They progress to a lighter version of volleyball before finally taking hold of the real thing. “I met some of these girls for the first time when they were three years old,” Garvey says. “Some of the girls I have seen all the way through VMS.” Garvey graduated his first kindergarten class in 2009 when the VMS volleyball team finished their season as district champions. He says that seeing these girls mature and succeed is something he feels deeper than coaches at four-year-only high schools might. “By their senior year, we have already spent so much time together,” Garvey says of the seniors. “Every success or challenge is like a shared family experience. After 13 years, a final senior season culminates in something extra special.”

[See VOLLEYBALL, page 14]

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SneakGEAR: Boa laces Meet the sports worlds’ new “shoelace” system By Larry Grossman

It is more than likely that you have heard about this before. The wheel cannot be reinvented, and you might think the same about the shoelace. The simple, time-tested shoelace could never really be improved upon as a closure system for your footwear could it? Who in their right mind would ever even consider trying to figure out a way to not only properly tighten in place your shoe, but also give you a better allaround fit? Gary Hammerslag was that guy, and he continues to build an empire of fantastic product improvements, and the Boa closure system is now being used on an increasing number of products. The Boa system (www.boatechnology. com), like so many other innovative ideas, was born out of curiosity. Hammerslag, a Southern California transplanted to Steamboat Springs in the 1990s with his family, made the progression from surfing the waves of the Pacific Ocean to snowboarding the snowy waves of the Colorado Rockies. Fixing the obvious Hammerslag immediately found that the snowboard boots of the early 1990s had some issues that needed to be addressed. The early generation snowboard boots used a traditional lacing system that had a tendency to become untied and clog with frozen snow. Traditional shoelaces also created pressure-point problems and were difficult to adjust when out on the ski hill or in the backcountry with cold, wet hands. The Boa system addressed all of these issues. Here’s how it works – it is a simple component made up of steel-braided lacing, nylon guides, and a mechanical reel that tightens or loosens the laces. You push down on the reel to lock the lacing in place and pop it up to loosen, and the system can now be found on over 8 million products worldwide. The simplicity of using the system combined with how well it works make it virtually unbeatable for a closure system when comparing it to traditional laces, buckles, ratchets or hook and loop fasteners. K2 and Vans began using the Boa on snowboard boots in 2001, and you can now find Boa in ski helmets, ski boots, cycling shoes, backpacks, hydration packs, trail, hunting and running shoes, equestrian boots, inline skates and even in medical braces. For roughly a dozen years now, the snowboarding community has embraced the Boa system in their snowboard boots. Some even use the double Boa system, which gives you the advantage of fine tuning not only the liner of the snowboard boot, but also the outer shell of the boot for a better fit to your foot. Boa is best known for its application in recreational shoes and equipment, but what may turn out to be their most notable contribution in the future is in the medical field. One local cyclist had severely sprained his wrist in a biking accident recently and was wearing a Boa-closure brace. He had been injured during a crash at 12 Hours of Mesa Verde and

970.926.9099 Tanning Special The Boa closure system on a pair of Viking trail running shoes. Walt Denson photo. needed something to prevent further damage at work. “The Boa worked great because I was able to easily remove the brace after work to wash it or do light activity at home,” he says. “Its unique design also allowed me to fine tune the amount of support with a couple clicks on the mechanism.” Easy does it The good folks at Boa were kind enough to send me a pair of lightweight running shoes that used the closure system. I’ve got to admit, when I was a much younger man living in Florida, there was a time when I chuckled at the older folks who always wore loafer-type shoes because they just did not want to deal with tying their shoes. Well, guess what? I find myself bothered by having to tie shoelaces myself these days, and the Boa system is not only ridiculously easy to use, but it also gives you the option to adjust the fit with one simple click of the knob. It’s really a quite revolutionary and simple technology that works incredibly well, all while producing even pressure that you can dial to your personal preference. I’ve also got a couple of Smith Optics ski helmets that use Boa to keep the helmet snug on your head. For more detailed information about all of the products available with the Boa system, be sure to check out the website. Whether you golf, cycle, ski, snowboard, run or just want a shoe to work in or knock around in, BOA has got a product line for your needs. The wheel has not been re-invented – just fine-tuned to fit your needs. SneakPEAK writer Larry Grossman can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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Tiaras and sashes in Gypsum Miss Eagle Valley pageant benefits cheerleading team By Melanie Wong

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Cheer on The proceeds from the pageant entry fees and from spectator tickets will go toward EVHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; budding cheerleading squad. (Besides the competition, the event will also include food, drinks and live music.) The teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new coach and former collegiate cheerleader Wendi Ortiz says the squad doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get too much funding, so sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to raise enough money to buy tumbling mats and maybe cover uniforms for next year. Ortiz aims to take the team to new heights this year, bringing an increased level of intensity to performances and practices. For the first time, the team has been run more like an athletic team, says Ortiz. The girls began training over summer, and their after-school practices are focused and sweat inducing. They perform choreographed rou-

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applications. Sanders hopes that the pageant will grow into something bigger for the community, with the opportunity to win scholarships and for winners to go on to regional and state pageants.

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The Eagle Valley is known for many things â&#x20AC;&#x201C; worldclass skiing and a rugged Western heritage â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but not usually beauty queens. Tiaras and sparkling dresses will debut in Gypsum Oct. 7 beginning at 2 p.m. with the first-annual Miss Eagle Valley Beauty Pageant, which will raise funds for the Eagle Valley High School cheerleading team. The pageant, held in the EVHS auditorium, will be open to girls from kindergarten through high school from all over the county, with age divisions within the pageant. The winners from each category will participate in community events such as Gypsum Flight Days and EVHSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homecoming, as well as receive tiaras, trophies and sashes. Event organizer Marie Sanders, whose three daughters have competed in pageants for years, says the goal of the event will be conveying inner beauty and helping girls gain confidence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re judged on personality, on stage presence and overall confidence â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not necessarily a beauty pageant,â&#x20AC;? Sanders says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to see more community pageants that celebrate the girls in the community. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what the vision is for this, giving them an opportunity to build confidence.â&#x20AC;? Girls from kindergarten through second grade will compete without makeup and are asked to wear their â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunday best.â&#x20AC;? A panel will judge competitors based on stage presence and the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; pageant applications. Middle and high school girls can wear makeup and formal wear and will speak before judges about their accomplishments and goals, all based on their written

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Tires and Wheels tines at football games and now cheer through the entire game, instead of making brief appearances as before. Ortiz admits that sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tough coach, and consequently, the team has been whittled down to a core group of 12 girls and is in the process of rebuilding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For me itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sport,â&#x20AC;? Ortiz says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It takes athletic ability to perform, and this core group realizes that and has a passion for the sport. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited for the exposure weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve gotten so far. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to change the image of the team and get out into the community.â&#x20AC;? Sandersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; daughter is on the cheerleading squad, and when the team was looking for a fundraiser, the idea of a pageant came up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The cheerleaders needed a fundraiser, and they wanted to promote cheerleading as not only being on the sidelines, but as something that promotes girl confidence and community awareness. The girls really liked the idea, and when we found out there hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been one in the valley before, they were really excited about that,â&#x20AC;? says Sanders.

When Sandberg heard that Eagle County was holding its own competition, she wanted to help out. Pageants helped her overcome shyness and a fear of speaking in public, she says, and wants to give other girls a similar shot of confidence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is nothing better to boost confidence then doing something youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re afraid of,â&#x20AC;? Sandberg says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It takes a lot of courage to get on stage in front of an audience, but once you do, you can walk off that stage with your head held high knowing youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done something most are scared to do and that will instill self confidence.â&#x20AC;? Sanders has seen the effects in her daughtersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives as well. Her oldest daughter began competing when she was three and won her first crown at age eight. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s used her titles to help out in the community through book drives and volunteering with foster kids. Her middle daughter was diagnosed with autism and the family was told she would never want to speak or be around crowds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We used pageants as a vehicle of therapy for her autism,â&#x20AC;? Sanders says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By the time she was eight, she could walk on stage and speak into a mic more articulately than I could.â&#x20AC;? Of course, the very phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;beauty pageantâ&#x20AC;? evokes certain stereotypes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; drama queens and lots of hairspray â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but Sandberg says pageants are nothing like most people envision. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There will always be at least one crazy mom or contestant who manages to keep the idea going that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all crazy,â&#x20AC;? Sandberg says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But in my experiences, girls are never mean to each other, we all like to eat, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re always happy to just compete and make new friends. I have met some of the most wonderful people in my life through pageants.â&#x20AC;?

Building confidence Some pageant contestants will tell you that the competitions have not only boosted their confidence, but help them overcome significant obstacles. Annika Sandberg, who graduated from EVHS in 2010, will be emceeing the event and presenting winnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; crowns. She began competing in pageants at age 14 after an injury sidelined her for the soccer season. She was looking for a competitive outlet, and as a tomboy, her parents were shocked when she said she wanted to be in a beauty pageant. Sandberg loved the experience and still competes now as a junior at the University of Colorado in Boulder. She is currently Miss District of Colombia Collegiate America and will be competing in the Miss Colorado USA pageant at the end of October. She was Miss SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Colorado High School America in 2010 and Miss Teen Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com. of Colorado in 2006. $

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win $200

EVERY WEEK IN THE BIGGEST LOSER GAME CHALLENGE

Check the team you think is going to lose this week. Fill in your contact info at the bottom and drop off this ballot to one of the businesses below. We DO NOT accept photocopies. Entry is FREE of charge. Deadline to submit is Wednesday noon. Submissions by mail are not accepted. One entry per week. Submissions of more than one entry will disqualify all of your submissions. Must be 21 or over to enter.

THURSDAY, OCT 11 Pittsburgh Steelers @ Tennessee Titans

SUNDAY, OCT 14 Oakland Raiders @ Atlanta Falcons Detroit Lions @ Philadelphia Eagles St. Louis Rams @ Miami Dolphins Dallas Cowboys @ Baltimore Ravens

UNCORKED –––––––––––––

[From page 3]

experience and camaraderie. “It’s the atmosphere. It’s the wine. It’s the people I get to see. It’s just a magical setting,” Martin says, gesturing towards the view of grazing fields, distant peaks and blue sky. Another co-op member, John Kirkutis, called the cellar “a hidden gem.” The Edwards resident has been winemaking with Chirichillo and company for 20 years. He likens the satisfaction of winemaking to eating the harvest from your own garden. “To actually make the wine with your hands and be part of the process is really cool,” Kirkutis says. From grape to bottle Following the crush party last week, the crushed grapes and juice will be fermented with yeast and left for a week. This weekend, they’ll go through the pressing process, in which the grapes are put into big vats and the skins are squeezed for the remaining juice. The skins are pressed to extract all the colors and tannins. The mixture is then put into oak barrels and stored in the cool, dirt-encased cellar. Members will taste their wine once during the co-op’s Christmas party, then when it is ready to be bottled in May, June and July. That’s a party, too, as members bring their friends and family to the small cellar to celebrate another season out of the barrel. Part of the fun and tradition is designing your own label and signing the wall of the cellar, now covered floor to ceiling with notes and signatures. Churchill Wine Cellars mostly produces red wines, with the exception of muscato. Chirichillo says his favorites to make include zinfandel, grenache and petite sirah. “We mix it up, and we do a lot of blends. We have some signature blends we do that we invented here,” he says. While Chirichillo has never produced wine commercially, he eventually hopes to build a winery resort down the road from 4 Eagle on U.S. Highway 131. The project, dubbed Vines at Vail, is still in the planning stages and would include a winery, banquet hall and hotel, says Chirichillo, whose “other job” is in real estate and development. The other factor that gives Churchill Wine Cellars an intimate and underground feel is that the co-op is never advertised, nor does it even have a website. All its members heard about it through word-of-mouth. Those interested in finding out more about the wine co-op can contact Chirichillo at churchre@vail.net.

CONCRETE CLOTHING ––––––

SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

[From page 6]

It has been a whirlwind summer for Walberg and the Concrete Clothing Company. Don’t be surprised to see the company’s presence in many places and events in the near future. Walberg is just proud that he’s been able to create a company directly inspired by his passions for skiing, biking, skating and surfing. As the company’s tagline says, it’s “a lifestyle, not a label.” SneakPEAK writer Larry Grossman can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

Kansas City Chiefs @ Tampa Bay Bucs Indianapolis Colts @ New York Jets Cincinnati Bengals @ Cleveland Browns Buffalo Bills @ Arizona Cardinals New England Patriots @ Seattle Seahawks New York Giants @ San Francisco 49ers Minnesota Vikings @ Washington Redskins Green Bay Packers @ Houston Texans

MONDAY, OCT 15 Denver Broncos @ San Diego Chargers

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Calendar of Events

Oct. 9 to Nov. 13 – Lighten Up Fitness experts at the Vail Vitality Center are debuting a new program called “Lighten Up in Vail.” Going beyond counting calories, Lighten Up aims to change the way people approach wellness. The six-week program includes testing,, weekly support sessions, education, nutrition and exercise plans, yoga and meditarion, and coaching. The program is 50 percent off Oct. 9 to Nov. 13 -- $350 for members $450 for nonmembers.

Friday, Oct. 5 Earthkeepers Preschool Program

Preschool children (ages 2-5) and their adult chaperone will participate in fun activities to explore nature while participating in activities such as songs, stories, and games. Topics and activities vary week-to-week. Come dressed to be outdoors and bring water and a snack to the Walking Mountains Science Center in Avon. Cost is $10/child and adult. Event is 10 a.m. to noon. Call www 970-827-9725 for more info.

Friday, Oct. 5 to Sunday, Oct. 7 Man of the Cliff Festival in Red Cliff

This fourth annual nonprofit event is comprised of outdoor, rugged activities such as wood chopping and beer drinking to challenge the real mountain man or woman. Proceeds 7:30 p.m. at Beaver Creek’s Vilar Center: Tickets are $25 vailrestaurantmonth.com. benefit First Descents. The event will take place at Man- and are available online at www.vilarpac.com, or by calling Tuesday, Oct. 9 go’s Mountain Grill at Red Cliff. For more info see www. 888-920-2787. manofthecliff.com. Naomi Benaron at the Bookworm Sunday, Oct. 7 Author of “Running the Rift” leads a book discussion at Miss Eagle Valley Beauty Pageant the Bookworm in Edwards. The novel follows Jean Patrick Saturday, Oct. 6 to Sunday, Oct. 7 The first annual Miss Eagle Valley competition will be held Nkuba, a gifted Rwandan boy, from the day he knows that Vail Valley Challenge Cup Soccer at Eagle Valley High School’s auditorium, with divisions running will be his life to the moment he must run to save One of the Vail Valley’s biggest sporting events will bring for girls grades kindergarten through high school. The event his life, during a ten-year span in which his country is un100 teams from all over Colorado to compete throughout starts at 2 pm. and will include food and music. Proceeds done by the Hutu-Tutsi tensions. Event begins at 6 p.m. and Eagle County. For more information see www.vailsoccer. from the event go toward the EVHS cheerleading team. Cost tickets are $10. com. is $30-$40 to compete and $4-$5 to attend only. To apply for the compeition, call 970-524-1740 or see www.townofgyp- Tuesday, Oct. 9 Sunday, Oct. 7 sum.org.

Last day to register to vote

Leon Redbone at the Vilar

The careers of performers who reside in the limelight are Monday, Oct. 8 to Sunday, Oct. 14 usually short-lived and over-overexposed. Not so with Leon Vail Restaurant Month: LoveFest Redbone, who over the course of his 30-plus year, 15-plus The month-long celebration of Vail’s culinary scene ends album career, has continued his love affair with tunes from with the theme “LoveFest,” featuring romantic activities the turn-of-the-century, flapper-era radio ditties, Depressionfor couples, champagne and wine tastings and specials from spawned ragtime and World War II folk-jazz. Show starts at Vail’s star chefs. For a full schedule and details, see www.

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Deadline to register to vote is Oct. 9. Ballots will be mailed to voters who have requested mail-in ballots starting Oct. 15, then daily as requests are received. See www.eaglecounty.us or www.govotecolorado.com to verify your addresses, make changes to your voter registration or to become a permanent mail-in voter.

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sneakpeak

13


sneakSHOTS | Who’s Up To What

It’s 5 o’clock somewhere! And today that is at Bonfire Brewery in Eagle. Stop in and see Andy for your favorite local beer.

Janell and Alesha are The Infinity Dream Team, The Future of Awesomeness. The Comcast store is located on Metcalf in Avon. Come by and say hello today.

J.D. at Werks collected a ton of food during their customer-appreciati on event held in September. Right now Werks is offering a $39.95 oil change with a FREE tire rotation. Make sure you rip out their coupon in today’s paper and call them for an appointment at 970-32 8-9000.

CRAWLIN’ TO A CURE –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Gypsum Daze celebration every July, where they’d take turns giving local kids rides over a two-obstacle course. The newbie crawlers loved the experience, and it raised nearly $1,000 each year, but Long says the eight-hour days and repetitive course became monotonous. “With the competition, we get to set the whole thing up ourselves and be done with it in a single night,” Long says. “At Gypsum Daze, we were going all day long and running over the same two cars each time. When it’s 95 degrees out, sitting near a hot engine all day can be tough. It just got a little boring.” For Long and other racers, the large-scale competition is a solution to the ho-hum repetition of Gypsum Daze. For orga-

nizers like Vikki Hobbs, an adrenaline-pumping format borrowed from monster truck rallies has the potential to bring in more money. Last year’s crowd was thinned out by rainy, cold weather – always a threat in the funky transitional period of late autumn – but Vikki Hobbs is confident this year will see higher attendance. She learned quite a bit from the first event, going so far as to turn Crawlin’ to a Cure into a nonprofit business to better support the Keepin’em Real Scholarship Fund, a fund for Eagle County high schoolers who have been impacted by breast cancer in a major way.. “We thought what we made last year was fantastic, but we can always do so much more for the scholarship,” Vikki Hobbs says. “That is the most important thing to me. Every-

body is so excited for the fund and money we raise to stay here so they can actually see the effect it has.” Although Stacy Hobbs says numbers are difficult to predict, the event raised $12,000 last year, and she’d like to take in the same or more next Saturday – a definite boon for the fledgling scholarship. “It’s a great thing Vikki’s doing, and anything she needs help with, I’m going to stand behind her,” Hollis says. “She’s very dedicated to this event and cause.”

SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

VOLLEYBALL ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Confidence, poise and grace Back in the gymnasium, next to the ever-changing quote is a set of goals -- there are long-term goals and short-term goals. There are goals for different opponents and situations. There are goals for team unity. Each girl also has a personal goal book. Like any close group of friends, the team has their own equivalent of inside jokes and meanings. The girls’ shirts are lavender, which for these girls, means confidence. Confi-

dence means facing down teams who have a pool five-times larger to draw talent from. Confidence means beating those teams, like BMHS. “Everything that we do has a purpose,” says Brill. “We make shirts, we set goals, and we find quotes. We drive team spirit and unity. We look for three things: confidence, poise and grace.” The girls say they are taking the season in small steps, savoring every point they put down on the court. For the senior

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girls, a season’s end means separation. They want to push into the state tournament, but more so, they want to leave everything on the court. “At the end of the season when we are looking back,” Gehl says, “we want to be saying that there is nothing that we regretted.” SneakPEAK writer John O’Neill can be reached at info@ sneakpeakvail.com

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Agave | 1060 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.8666 Avon Bakery & Deli | 25 Hurd Lane | 970.949.3354 Cima | 126 Riverfront Lane | 970.790.5500 Blue Plate | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.2252 Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.8566 Carniceria Tepic | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.6033 China Garden | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.4986 Columbine Bakery | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.1400 Dominoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.3230 Fiesta Jalisco | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.8088 Genoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sandwiches | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.0529 Gondola Pizza | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.6000 Loaded Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.1480 Montanas Cantina and Grill | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.7019 Northside Coffee and Kitchen | 20 Notingham Rd. | 970.949.1423 Nozawa Sushi | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.0330 Pazzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.9900 Subway Avon | 47 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.1312 Swiss Hot Dog Company | 101 Fawcett Rd. | 970.467.2013 Taqueria No Se Hagan Bolas | 91 Beaver Creek Place | 970.845.7959 Ticino | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748-6792 Vin 48 | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.9463

Mexican & Tex/Mex

LD

Organic Deli

BLD

Contemporary Latin

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Chinese Cuisine

LD

$

European Cafe & Bakery

BLD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Italian Sandwiches

LD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Southwest Grill

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Sushi & Asian, Thai

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Hot Dogs & Soup

L

$

Mexican

LD

$

Italian Food & Pizza

LD

$

Rustic American

D

$$

Organic/Local American Cuisine

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

D

$$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

American Comfort

LD

$$

Pizza & Sandwiches

LD

$

Tex-Mex

BLD

$

Steakhouse & Saloon

LD

$$

BBQ & Deli Sandwiches

LD

$

Asian Fusion & Sushi

LD

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$$$

Seasonaly Focused Fine Dining

D

$$$

Coffee/Breakfast/Wine/Tapas

BLD

$$

French Cuisine

D

$$$

Tapas Bar and Lounge

D

$$

Gelato, Chocolate & Wine

LD

$

$ $

BEAVER CREEK 8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill | Park Hyatt Beaver Creek | 970.949.1234 Beanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cabin | 210 Plaza Way | 970.754.3463 Beaver Creek Chophouse | Beaver Creek Lodge | 970.845.0555 Black Diamond Bistro | 120 Offerson Road | 970.949.1251 Blue Moose Pizza | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.8666 Coyote Cafe | 210 The Plaza | 970.845.9030 Dusty Boot Saloon | 210 Offerson Rd. | 970.748.1146 Flying Pig Sandwich Shop | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.0333 Foxnut Asian Fusion and Sushi | 15 W. Thomas Place | 970.845.0700 Golden Eagle Inn | 118 Beaver Creek Plaza | 970.949.1940 Grouse Mountain Grill | 141 Scott Hill Rd. | 970.949.0600 The Metropolitan | 210 Offerson Road | 970.748.3123 Mirabelle Restaurant | 55 Village Rd. | 970.949.7728 Osprey Lounge | 10 Elk Track Ln. | 970.754.7400 Rimini Cafe | 45 W. Thomas Place | 970.949.6157 Rocks Modern Grill | 27 Avondale Le. | 970.845.9800 Saddleridge | 44 Meadow Ln. | 970.754.5450 Spago | The Ritz Carlton, Bachelor Gulch | 970.343.1555 Splendido at the Chateau | 17 Chateau Ln. | 970.845.8808 Toscanini | 60 Avondale Ln. | 970.754.5590

Classic American Grill

BD

$$

Contemporary Colorado Cuisine

D

$$$

Seasonal American

D

$$$

Rustic American & Seafood

D

$$$

Italian Pasta Grill

D

$$$

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4 Eagle Ranch | 4091 Highway #131, Wolcott | 970.926.3372 Adamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mountain Country Club | 1094 Frost Creek Drive, Eagle | 970.328.2326 Babouneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 0131 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2425 Bonfire Brewing | 0127 W. 2nd St., Eagle | 970.422.6258 The Bowlmor CafĂŠ | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.BOWL Brush Creek Saloon | 241 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5279 Dietrichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cafe | 313 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.5021 Dog House Grill | 10663 Highway 6, Gypsum | 970.524.1660 Dusty Boot | 1099 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.7002 Eagle Diner | 112 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.1919 Ekahi Grill and Catering | 116 Park Street, Gypsum | 970.524.4745 El Pariente Mexican Restaurant | 0050 Chambers Ave. #E, Eagle | 720.289.8782 Fiesta Jalisco | 0701 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9300 Gourmet China | 0212 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.0866 Grand Avenue Grill | 678 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.328.4043 Gypsum Grill Steakhouse | 686 Trail Gulch Rd., Gypsum | 970.524.7365 H.P.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Provisions | 1160 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5280 Heidis Brooklyn Deli | 150 Cooley Mesa Rd., Gypsum | 970.777.3663 Luigiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pasta House | 1143 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5400 Mantos | 106 Oak Ridge Ct., Gypsum | 970.524.6266 Moeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original BBQ | 630 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.337.2277 Old Kentucky Tavern | 225 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5259 Paradigms | Corner of 4th and Capital St., Eagle | 970.328.7990 Pastatively Robertoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian Cuisine | 94 Market St., Eagle | 970.328.7324 Pazzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.337.9900 Red Canyon Cafe | 128 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2232 Yetiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grind | 330 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9384

Ranch Western Atmosphere

L

$

Eclectic American & Sunday Brunch

LD

$$

Omelets, burritos and more

BL

$

American Cuisine/ Bowling

LD

$$

TexMex

BL

$

Coffee, Sandwiches, Soups, Ice Cream

BL

$

Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

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Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

Rustic Home Brew Pub / Music / Patio

LD

$

Steakhouse/American Cuisine

LD

$$

Traditional American Diner

BLD

$

Hawaiian Style Food

LD

$

Authentic Mexican

LD

$

Mexican

LD

$

Chinese

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

Steakhouse

LD

$

BLD

$

Soups & Sandwiches

BLD

$

Pasta & Pizza

LD

$$

Pizza

LD

$

Barbecue

BLD

$

Southern Eclectic

BLD

$

Creative American

LD

$$ $$

Classic Italian

LD

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches

BLD

$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

Italian, Pasta

LD

$$

Eclectic American

BL

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Homemade Bakery & Soup

BL

$

Coffee & Crepes Sandwiches

BL LD

$

American

B LD

$

Contemporary Italian

BLD

$$

High End Tapas

D

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Tasting/Wine Bar, Paninis

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

EAGLE-VAIL Ristorante Ti Amo | 40982 US Highway #6 | 970.845.8153 Route 6 Cafe | 41290 US Highway #6 | 970.949.6393

EDWARDS Balata | 1265 Berry Creek Rd | 970.477.5353 Bonjour Bakery | 97 Main St. | 970.926.5539 Bookworm | 295 Main St. | 970.926.7323 Belmont Deli | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1796 Cafe 163 | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1163 Cafe Milano | 429 Edwards Access Rd. #A208 | 970.926.4455 Dish | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.3433 E town | 295 Main St. | 970.926.4080 Eat! Drink! | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1393 Fiestaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cantina | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.2121

25

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Devinder S. Mangat, M.D., F.A.C.S. Board Certified by the American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and the American Board of Otolaryngology

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Gashouse | 34185 US Highway #6 | 970.926.2896 Gobi Mongolian BBQ | 69 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.6628 Gore Range Brewery | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2739 Grouse on the Green | 100 Kensington Dr., Cordillera Divide | 970.926.5788 Henry’s Chinese Cafe | 175 Main St. | 970.926.3050 Juniper Restaurant | 97 Main St. | 970.926.7001 Larkburger | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.9336 Last Course Dessert Bar & Pastries | 275 Main Street C-106 | 970.926-1979 Local Joe’s Pizza | 280 Main St. | 970.926.4444 Log Cabin Sports Bar and Grill | 34500 Highway 6, #B1 | 970.926.9726 Main St. Grill | 97 Main St. | 970.926.2729 Marko’s Pizzeria | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7003 Mirador | 2205 Cordillera Way, Cordillera Lodge & Spa | 970.926.2200 Old Forge Co. | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2220 Sato | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.7684 Smiling Moose Deli | 1170 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2400 Subway Edwards | 439 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7010 Vista At Arrowhead | 676 Sawatch Dr. | 970.926.2111 Woody’s Kitchen & Pub | 27 Main St. | 970.926.2756 Zino Ristorante | 27 Main St. | 970.926.0777

Colorado Wild Game Grill

LD

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

$

Rustic Pub

LD

$$

Pub/American

D

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

Contemporary American

D

Organic Gourmet Fast Food/Burgers

LD

Tapas/Wine Bar/Desserts

BLD

$

Pizza

D

$

American/Mexican

BLD

$

American Grill

LD

$$

Pizza & Pasta

LD

$

Regional/Seasonal Fare

BLD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Sushi & Japanese Cuisine

LD

$$

Deli

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Contemporary American

D

Bar & Grill

LD

$

Contemporary Italian

D

$$

Southern BBQ

LD

$

Traditional American

LD

$

Steakhouse

D

$$

Meditrainian/Greek Cuisine

BLD

$

Coffee and Sandwiches

BL

$

Mexican/American/Western

D

$$

American

BLD

$

Continental

LD

$$

European American Bistro

D

$$

Regional American

BLD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

American

BLD

New American

D

Contemporary American

BLD

$

Casual American

LD

$$

American/Western

LD

$$

Authentic Italian

D

$$

Pizza and Italian

LD

$

American Bistro

LD

$$

Steakhouse, Aprés and Dinner

D

$$$

Mountain Fare/Steakhouse, Aprés,

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

New American

D

American Pub

LD

$

Asian Cuisine

LD

$

$ $$$ $

$$

$$$

MINTURN Kirby Cosmos | 474 Main St. | 970.827.9027 Magusto’s | 101 Main St. | 970.827.5450 Minturn Country Club | 131 Main St. | 970.827.4114 Nicky’s Quickie | 151 Main St | 970-827-5616 Sticky Fingers | 132 Main St. | 970.827.5353 Minturn Saloon | 146 N. Main St. | 970.827.5954 Turntable | 160 Railroad Ave. | 970.827.4164

VAIL Alpenrose | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8899 Alpine Tavern | Vail Racquet Club, East Vail | 970.476.7888 Atwater on Gore Creek | Vail Cascade Resort | 970.476.7014 Bart & Yeti’s | Lionshead, North of Arrabelle | 970.476.2754 Bearfish | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7596 Billy’s Island Grill | Lionshead | 970.476.8811 Bistro 14 | Eagle’s Nest, Top of Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.445.4530 Block 16 | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 Blu’s | Downstairs from Children’s Fountain | 970.476.3113 bol | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.5300 Bully Ranch | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5460 Campo de Fiori | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8994 Chicago Pizza | 1031 S. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7000 CinéBistro | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.3344 Elway’s Steakhouse | 174 East Gore Creek Dr. | 970.754.7818 Flame | Four Seasons, Vail | 970.477.8600 Frost | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8050 Game Creek Restaurant | Vail Mountain | 970.754.4275 Garfinkel’s | Next to Lionshead Gondola | 970.476.3789 Gohan Ya | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7570

NFL Special %

30 Off All Apps & Pizzas All mug club members during NFL games

Happy Hour Daily 4-6 pm 3 drafts, $5 Selected glasses of wine $4 Well cocktails, $6 Appetizer Special $

105 Edwards Village Blvd Edwards, CO 970.926.2739

25

%

$ $$$

$ $$$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

EDWARDS

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

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• •

All Dinner Entrees

Off This week Join us for Restaurant Month

Biggest Loser Football pool drop off location

Happy Hour 4-5:30pm Beer and 2 tacos $6 Big Margarita $5 Vail Village • 476-5100 Thursday, Oct. 4 -Wed., Oct. 10, 2012

|

sneakpeak

17


Joe’s Famous Deli | 288 Bridge St. | 970.479.7580 Kelly Liken | Gateway Building, 12 Vail Rd. | 970.479.0175 La Bottega | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0280 Lancelot | Next to Children’s Fountain | 970.476.5828 Larkspur Restaurant | Golden Peak | 970.754.8050 La Tour | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.4403 Left Bank | Sitzmark Lodge in Vail Village | 970.476.3696 The Little Diner | West Lionshead Plaza | 970.476.4279 Lord Gore & the Fitz Lounge | Manor Vail at the base of Golden Peak | 970.476.4959 Los Amigos | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.5847 Ludwig’s | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5429 The Marketplace | One Willow Bridge Rd. | 970.477.4370 Market Café | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 May Palace | Next to City Market, West Vail | 970.476.1657 Matsuhisa | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.6682 Mezzaluna | Lion Square Lodge, next to Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.477.4410 Moe’s Original BBQ | Upstairs from the General Store, Lionshead | 970.479.7888 Montauk Seafood Grill | Lionshead Village | 970.476.3601 Nozawa | Holiday Inn, West Vail | 970.476.9355 Ocotillo | Vail Mountain Marriott Resort & Spa, Lionshead | 970.477.5675 Old Forge Co. | 2161 N Frontage Rd | 970.476.5555 Old Forge Co. | 521 East Lionshead Cir. | 970.476.5232 Ore House | 232 Bridge St. | 970.476.5100 Osaki’s | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0977 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.9026 Pepi’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.4671 Qdoba | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7539 Red Lion | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.7676 Russell’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.6700 Sandbar Sports Grill | West Vail Mall | 970.476.4314 Subway West Vail | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.3827 Sushi Oka Hibachi | 100 East Meadow Drive. Suite #4 | 970-476-1588 Sweet Basil | 193 E. Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.0125 Tap Room | Top of Bridge St. | 970.479.0500 Terra Bistro| 352 Meadow Dr., Vail Mountain Lodge& Spa | 970.476.6836 The George | 292 Meadow Dr. | 970.476.2656 Up The Creek Bar & Grill | 223 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.8141 Vendetta’s | 291 Bridge St. | 970.476.5070 Vail Chophouse | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.477.0555 Wendy’s Alpine Coffee Shop | 4695 Racquet Club Dr. Westside Cafe & Market | 2211 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7890 Yama Sushi | 168 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.7332 Yeti’s Grind | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.1515

Sandwiches

BLD

Seasonal American

D

Northern Italian

LD

Prime Rib/Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Creative American

D

$$$

French and American

D

$$$

French

D

$$$

Publisher...Erinn Hoban Editor...Melanie Wong

BL D

Mexican

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$

Family/American/European

BLD

$

International Café

BLD

$

Chinese

LD

$

Japanese/Peruvian

D

$$

Modern Italian

ld

$$

LD

$

Creative Seafood/Meat

LD

$$

Sushi/Asian

LD

$$

Southwestern Steak House

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Oct. 4 -Wed., Oct. 10, 2012

$ $

Sushi/Japanese

D

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

BLD

$

Continental/Wild Game

LD

$$

Mexican

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Americana

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Sushi, Asian

LD

$

Creative American

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$$

Eclectic Pub

D

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Italian & Pizza

LD

$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

Pastries

BL

$

Casual American

BLD

$

Sushi and Pacific Spices

D

$$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

99

X-Rays, Cleaning ($300 value, new & Exam & existing patients) (Limited time offer)

la

b Ha

E

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a sp

www.vailmountaininjury.com

“We Help Injured People” Aggressive Attorneys Percentage Fee Auto & Motorcycle Accidents Bicycle Accidents Ski & Recreational Accidents Wrongful Death Medical Malpractice Other Serious Injuries

Reporter...Phil Lindeman

18

$ $$

Barbecue

The Glue...Shana Larsen

©2011 sneakPeak. All rights reserved.

$

Classic Diner, Traditional Favorites

Ad Director...Kim Hulick

Ad Sales...Brand Bonsall

$$$

Contemporary American

$ 970.446.7912 info@sneakpeakvail.com

$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

VAIL

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

Todd H. Shainholtz, D.D.S.

(970) 328 - 6347

www.SmileMakersOfEagle.net

- Riverwalk at Edwards -Emerald Building Suite G-1 -

Edwards/Denver Offices

970.926.1700


Feeling Down? Turn that frown upside down

Fall Massage Special ge ssa C Ma CLINI s ard LIC Edw w PA o is n

The Samaritan Center offers professional counseling at an affordable price.

35

$

sixty minute massage

(Adjustable rates based on income) Individuals, families, couples, and children. For more information call 926-8558.

Samaritan Counseling Center Tel:970.926.8558 | Fax: 970.926.6845 www.samaritan-vail.org | emyers@samaritan-vail.org

{„z‰ GFEIGEGH

Dr. Thomas J. Palic D.C., P.C. Feel the difference

We make house calls!

Packa discou ge n availa ts ble

MLLDMGFF © KL [zwˆz‰ l‚‚w}{ X‚ŒzD k„Š GGJ b…ywŠ{z „ [zwˆz‰B €‹‰Š ƒ„‹Š{‰ |ˆ…ƒ lw‚ w„z X{wŒ{ˆ Yˆ{{

10 - 50 %

%

OFF

KARASTAN AREA RUGS

SAVE BIG DURING NATIONAL KARASTAN MONTH

140

With hundreds of classic and contemporary rugs in stock and on sale now, you will be sure to find one that’s just right for your home. Hurry in to our Avon showroom soon for the best selection. Sale ends November 16, 2012.

CARPET & HARDWOOD FLOOR CHOICES IN STOCK

Ruggs Benedict - Voted 2009 Business of the Year

Serving the Vail Valley since 1972 810 Nottingham Road, Avon 970-949-5390 • www.ruggsbenedict.com Thursday, Oct. 4 -Wed., Oct. 10, 2012

|

sneakpeak

19


Fall Savings We Do It All. We Do It Right. The Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only certified shop certified factory diesel certified Air Induction Service Air Filter Placement Alignments Alternators Ball Joints Battery Replacement Bearings Belts/Hoses Brake Caliper Brake Rotors Brakes-Front Disc Brakes-Rear Disc/Drum Cabin Vent Filter Replacement Catalytic Converters Ignition Coils Coolant Fluid Service C.V. Axles Diesel Diagnostic Services Diesel Repair Distributor Caps and Rotors DOT Inspections Fan Belts Flat Repairs Fuel Filter Replacement Fuel Injectors Headlight Replacement Hoses Lube, Oil, and Filter Pre-owned Vehicle Inspection Mufflers and Tail Pipes Oxygen Sensors Rack and Pinion Steering Radiator Replacement Rotate and Balance Tires Serpentine Belts Shocks and Struts Starters Thermostat Tie Rod Ends Tune Up Transmission Fluid Service Universal Joint Water Pumps Wiper Blade Replacement AND MORE!

20

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Oct. 4 -Wed., Oct. 10, 2012

Snow Tire Change Out

Oil Change

39

$

95

with FREE tire rotation. Must present coupon*Most Vehicles*Not combined with any other offer*See store for details* Expires 10/31/12

Battery Inspection

10

$

off

includes installation of summer tires, mount & balance. Excludes tires over 20â&#x20AC;? & custom wheels. Does not include stems or dually trucks Must present coupon*Most Vehicles*Not combined with any other offer*See store for details* Expires 10/31/12

Complete Brake Service

FREE 75 up to

and $10 off new battery

Must present coupon*Most Vehicles*Not combined with any other offer*See store for details* Expires 10/31/12

Winterize Special

9

$

95

Battery check, coolant temperature, check wipers, check and top off all fluids. Belts, tires & breaks checked. Must present coupon*Most Vehicles*Not combined with any other offer*See store for details* Expires 10/31/12

$

off front & rear

30 off per axle/or front & rear together $

Must present coupon*Most Vehicles*Not combined with any other offer*See store for details* Expires 10/31/12

Transmission Fluid Service

20

$

off

includes transmission fluid, service kit & labor Must present coupon*Most Vehicles*Not combined with any other offer*See store for details* Expires10/31/12

We are now your local

dealer!

"#$%&'''!

! (&)!*+,-./012!304 56789: ;/0<8=9>?4@?:

SneakPEAK Oct. 4, 2012  

Vail's entertainment and lifestyle resource.

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