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Trail race series, a new half marathon, fleet-footed high school athletes and more

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Ride across Europe

Local cyclist aims for world record

On “The Emerald Mile”

Three men, one boat, an epic river run Thursday, May 16, 2013 -Wed., May 22, 2013

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Author Kevin Fedarko delves into an epic run down the Colorado River in “The Emerald Mile.” Interviewed by Melanie Wong.

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mong river guides who float the stretch of the Colorado River twisting through the Grand Canyon, there are certain stories that are commonly told around the campfires in the evening. One particular tale that always fascinated author and river guide Kevin Fedarko revolves around a famed run of the Grand Canyon in June of 1983 by boatmen Kenton Grua, Rudi Petschek and Steve Reynolds. Due to a perfect storm of snowmelt from a record winter snowfall and enormous strain on the Glen Canyon dam, federal officials decided to unleash a torrent of water to prevent the dam from failing. What resulted were river conditions that were the fastest, highest and most dangerous the stretch had seen in about 25 years. Where officials saw the deadly conditions as a way to avert a water crisis, the three boatman saw a way to set the record for the fastest time down the 277-mile stretch of the canyon. Their plan: Row nonstop in a wooden dory called the Emerald Mile (a small, lightweight vessel something like a fishing boat) using the current as a slingshot. Most guided commercial trips take two to three weeks to complete the stretch, but the men planned to do it in three days. Fedarko, a former Time magazine writer and editor at Outside magazine, was also once an apprentice river guide on the Colorado River, and the story, the culture of the canyon river rats and the sleek dories themselves bewitched him. “My obsession with the Emerald Mile came from sitting around at night and listening to the river guides tell stories, and one of them is the speed run of 1983,” says Fedarko, who appears at The Bookworm in Edwards on Wednesday, May 22 to talk about his recently released book “The Emerald Mile.” “It was such a record year for everyone who was there, and it’s likely that nothing like it will ever be seen again. (The conditions) arose because of a series of really big miscalculations and mistakes the Bureau of Reclamation made. With that little boat and its story, there’s an unbroken thread of history, myth and storytelling that starts with (explorer) John Wesley Powell’s run in 1879. You can’t tell the Emerald Mile’s story without Powell’s story and everything in between.” The men rowed furiously, switching off rowing every 20 minutes with no respite, facing upstream to go with the current as long as they could, then spinning around 180 degrees. They brought only a car battery, jumper cables, a nightlight and food, the whole time hoping they weren’t caught by of-

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Author, journalist and river guide Kevin Fedarko. Photo special to SneakPEAK. ficials. Grua, Petschek and Reynolds lived to tell about their run, but barely – the Colorado spit them out, battered and boat barely intact. But those experiences make great stories, and that’s what attracted Fedarko to the tale. His book not only encompasses the men’s harrowing adventure and the river’s history, but also the unique culture of canyon river guides as the whitewater industry came of age. SneakPEAK caught up with the Santa Fe-based Fedarko while he was taking a rare break during his whirlwind book tour to chat about tracking down the river’s untold story, the joys of rowing a latrine boat and what those harrowing hours on the water must have been like for the Emerald Mile crew.

If you go... Who: “The Emerald Mile” author and Grand Canyon raft guide Kevin Fedarko Where: The Bookworm in Edwards When: Wednesday, May 22 at 6 p.m. More info: www.thebookwormofedwards. com

SneakPEAK: Tell us about the backdrop of the Emerald Mile’s story and what makes it so fascinating. Kevin Fedarko: The story of the speed run itself is sort of an excuse for me to drill into and profile the subculture of river guiding and rowing wooden boats at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. To paint a picture of that, I had to draw on the larger history of the canyon, how it was discovered and explored, and some landmark environmental battles. It was the coming of age for American wilderness conservation in the ‘60s and ‘70s, and I ended up profiling a set of very colorful, unique and eccentric characters. Also, the Grand Canyon is just the most iconic piece of landscape. SP: What was your time being a river guide like? KF: I came to this story because I was an apprentice river guide, hoping to become a dory guide. I never made it up to guide because I was such a terrible rower. I rowed “The Jackass” behind the dories – it was the last boat that fol-

[See EMERALD MILE, page 14]

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Run, run, as fast as you can The Vail Rec District’s popular La Sportiva Trail Running Series returns with familiar faces and trails. By Phil Lindeman. Cover photo by Zach Mahone.

Local runner Marlin Smickley is among the regulars who will hit the trail this summer for the Vail Rec District’s La Sportiva Trail Running Series. Zach Mahone photo.

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rail running has always been in Marlin Smickley’s blood. He just didn’t know it for six decades. On a typical Wednesday or Thursday in summer, the 74-year-old Edwards resident is found crisscrossing the trails around Berry Creek and June Creek, often in preparation for his self-professed favorite time of year: the Vail Recreation District’s beloved La Sportiva Trail Running Series. The May-to-September series kicks off on Saturday morning with a down-valley favorite, the Boneyard Boogie, a 6.3-mile course over caked, winding singletrack just east of Eagle. “I always ran for recreation, but I didn’t get into trail running until coming out here,” says Smickley, a retired teacher who moved from Pennsylvania to Colorado 13 years back. “I fell in love with it immediately. I enjoy being out in nature – even the little things like trees and rocks. There’s a feeling that’s different than asphalt or cement.” And 1,500-or-so like-minded runners follow in Smickley’s surprisingly spry footsteps. The series turns 16 years old this summer and continues to attract trail junkies from across the state, including La Sportiva-sponsored athletes

from Boulder and other Front Range running Meccas. This mix of die-hard and recreational runners lends the series an intimate, familial air often missing from massive road races like the Bolder Boulder and Cherry Creek Sneak. “The rec district has done so much for the weekend warriors around here,” says Smickley, who also competes in the wintertime snowshoe series and volunteers at bike races. “Between the running and biking, they have plenty for the large number of people who love getting out and competing, but aren’t professional athletes.” As Smickley alludes to, the race environment is hardly nerve-wracking. Like the VRD’s equally popular mountain bike series, the La Sportiva events have built a sterling reputation the old-fashioned way: athletes come first, flash and elitism come second. “Beyond just event planning, I like to think we bring lots of heart and excitement to the table,” says VRD Sports Coordinator Steve Croucher, who recently took over for former coordinator Marc Thomas. “I really like catering to the racers, seeing what athletes need to be successful. Along with that dedication to runners, the trail running series is also known for consistency. Each year brings seven races in Eagle, Beaver Creek and Vail Mountain, and the courses have changed little in nearly two decades. There’s the season-opening Boneyard race – one of Smickley’s favorites, thanks to Eagle’s unorthodox terrain – and the 37-year-old Vail Hill Climb, easily the series cornerstone with 400-plus racers. Smickley is one of several local runners to make the series his own, and since moving to Colorado, he has hardly missed a single event. Last year, he covered 52 miles and 16,475 vertical feet on race days alone. “I get so excited about these races,” says Smickley, who turns 75 years old on July 8, just two days after the 7.5-mile Vail Hill Climb. “They make the summer go by so quickly. It can be a downside sometimes – one day it’s June, and the next it’s September.” A series with spunk With trademark modesty, Smickley seems to identify as a

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La Sportiva Trail Running Series

May 18 – Boneyard Boogie Trail Run, 9 a.m. in Eagle June 22 – Summer Solstice Trail Run, 9:30 a.m. at Beaver Creek July 6 – Vail Hill Climb, 8 a.m. in Vail Village July 21 – Vail Half Marathon, 8 a.m. at Vail’s Golden Peak Aug. 4 – Berry Picker Trail Run, 8 a.m. in Lionshead Village Aug. 25 – 10K at 10,000 Feet, 9 a.m. in Lionshead Village Sept. 15 – EverGold Trail 10K and 5K, 10 a.m. at Vail Golf Club Registration for all races costs $29 pre-registration and $39 the day-of. For more information on course maps, race-day essentials and packet pickup times, visit the Vail Rec District website at www.vailrec.com.

weekend warrior – he can’t remember his best times for the series – but he hardly fits the mold. He often bests runners half his age, thanks to a combination of endurance training, yoga, Pilates and interval training with Ellen Miller, a local who has summated Mount Everest twice. Since the beginning, the La Sportiva series has been known for fiercely magnetic people like Smickley. It’s more of a culture than an occasional race, and 62-year-old Edwards local Nick Fickling enjoys it as much for the personalities as the lung-busting uphill. “Marlin is the heart and soul of trail running in the valley,” says Fickling, a former rugby player who took up running after leaving Britain. “Trail running is more natural. It’s ‘fartlek’ – you run what you feel. It’s like being on a ski trail, where you can pick your way up however you want.”

[See VRD TRAIL RUN, page 18]

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BMHS girls track takes regional title

Battle Mountain ladies look back on a record-setting season By John O’Neill

If there is one thing the Battle Mountain High School track team has proved this season, it’s that it is hard to stop momentum. The Huskies track and field team wrapped up their regional meet last weekend, and to no surprise, brought home a set of broken school records and podium finishes – as well as an overall league title for the women. “This was a big time team effort,” says head coach Rob Parish. “We had girls and guys across all events challenging for the win. On the girl’s side, there were eight or so girls that did a lot of heavy lifting. But there were solid efforts shown by all of the girls.” The two-day regional meet that was held at Stocker Stadium in Grand Junction brought talent deeper than usual for the Western Slope. The Huskies would rise to the occasion and challenge the tough field after facing stiff competition on the Front Range all season. The BMHS girl’s team would finish first, and the boys would finish fifth. As an example, in 2008, Husky alum Kenzie Grant won the 3,200-meter race in 12 minutes, fives seconds. This year, the top finisher for the Huskies was Mandy Ortiz in fourth place with a time of 11 minutes, 30 seconds. Greta VanCalcar of Palisade won the race in 10 minutes, 50 seconds. Coach Parish did some shuffling of his team - putting certain kids in certain events to gain the maximum number of points, regardless of if the event they were competing in was their strongest. The girl’s team scored 192 points for first, beating out second place Eagle Valley High School, which scored 145. “That is the approach you have to take if you want to do well at a meet like this, if you want to win the title like the girls did,” Parish says. “Each of the girls took on a load of different tasks, and they rose to the occasion.” Heavy hitters Friday, the first day of the meet, held a round of prelims in the sprint events. The BMHS girls set themselves up well by qualifying girls into a number of sprints and jumps finals, in addition to picking up points in distance finals and pole vault. Leading the BMHS girl’s team were their “heavy hitters,” as Parish calls them. In the distance events, Ortiz finished fourth in the 3,200-meter and 1,600-meter, Val Constein won the 800-meter and finished fifth in the mile. Also in the 800-meter, Izzy Calabrese finished third, and Tesha Olsen finished fourth. The Huskies were particularly strong in the jumping events under the leadership of Olsen, who finished second in the triple jump and first in the long jump. Molly Childers locked in her fourth league pole-vaulting title as the Huskies swept the podium, with Kate Pittel and Lilly McMurrian fin-

Cheer on the Huskies Keep an eye on the Battle Mountain High School track-and-field team this weekend as they head down to Jeffco Stadium for the state championships. Watch for Mandy Ortiz in the 3,200-meter and 1,600-meter, Val Constein in the 800-meter, and Tesha Olsen in the jumping events. On the men’s side, watch for David Suarez in the 800-meter and the mile.

ishing second and third respectively. BMHS would also sweep the podium in the 300-meter hurdles with Lilly McMurrian taking the title, followed by Sophia Calabrese and Izzy Calabrese. Taylor Anderson would finish second in the 110-meter hurdles. The relays also were strong events for the ladies as they finished second in the 3,200-meter relay and had a commanding win in the final event of the weekend – the 1,600-meter relay. To add to their success, the Huskies also toppled a number of school records. Constein won the 800-meter in a time of 2:16.43, nearly six seconds ahead of second place Roxy Trotter of Eagle Valley. Not only would that time get her the league win, but it is also a personal record and new school record for the BMHS junior. “I was happy with my 800. It was my best place. I won, so that was great,” Constein says. Constein took over the lead with a full 500 meters to go and nervously raced a mystery competitor to the finish line. That mystery competitor: her own shadow. “I know Roxy (Trotter) is fast. In the last 300 I was building the pace and kicking hard. I thought she was right with me,” Constein says. “I kept picking it up and didn’t realize it until the end, but it was just my shadow that I kept seeing.” Suarez leads the men On the men’s side for Battle Mountain, the standout competitor was senior David Suarez, who has been consistently lowering his times throughout the season and showed his competitive drive with a win in the 800-meter and the mile. In the 800-meter, the race officials had to review video of the finish to decide on the winner. Suarez won by 1/100 of a second in 1:58.47, just in front of a Rifle’s Aaron Wagler, who ran 1:58.48. “It was really close,” Suarez says. “In the last 300 I decided to really push, but we were already going really hard. I thought that I could just run for it.” The 1:58 mark earns Suarez the accolade of being only the 10th Husky in school history to record a time below 2:00 in the 800-meter. In the mile, Suarez led from the gun and held

Battle Mountain High School senior Mandy Ortiz finished fourth in the track-and-field regional championships 3,200-meter race this weekend. Kent Pettit photo. the lead throughout. He recorded a time of 4:40, winning by six seconds, but still 10 seconds slower than his personal best set earlier this season. At state, he should eye up the mile-school record of 4:24. Also showing strong finishes on the men’s side for the Huskies was Cameron Moore, who finished fourth in the 3200-meter run. Austin Tafoya finished second in the pole vault for the Huskies. Joshua Braun finished fourth in the 1600-meter run. Saruwut Yubonmai and Amadou Dath finished third and fourth in the triple jump. The Huskies travel down to Jeffco stadium for the state championship meet this weekend. SneakPEAK writer John O’Neill can be reached at info@ sneakpeakvail.com

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The sky is the limit Team First Descents takes one-of-a-kind approach to fundraising for high-adventure programs. By Phil Lindeman.

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rent Goldstein is addicted to the Leadville 100 – the sort of addiction he admits is borderline frightening. “It is unnatural and questionably disturbing how much I love it,” Goldstein wrote in his blog after completing the 2012 race. “I love the short but storied history of the race, I love the ambience, character and feeling of the town of Leadville, I love the characters associated with the race, I love the training and how strong it makes me feel, I love the pre-race and race-day experience, I love the sadistic suffering and, most of all, I love crossing the fu**ing finish line.” The grueling late-summer mountain bike race is popular with athletes across the country, and almost without exception, even die-hard cyclists talk about it with a mix of love and hate. Despite that confusing, masochistic enjoyment, it’s likely Goldstein would’ve never tempted the race without First Descents, a Denver-based nonprofit based on adventure programs for children and teens recovering from cancer. Goldstein’s best friend, late First Descents Executive Director Allan Goldberg, challenged him to tackle it in 2007. Aside from the promise of a torturous, one-day bike ride across 104 miles of brutal terrain at 10,200 feet, it seemed like a straightforward bet between friends. But Goldberg wanted to add a wrinkle: At the time, First Descents didn’t have many signature fundraising events, and he knew the Leadville 100 had the reputation to impress prospective donors. The ride wasn’t flawless – Goldstein, a Maryland native, battled exhaustion and extreme cramping – but by the time he finished 11 hours later, he and a cadre of riders had raised $80,000 for the nonprofit. For Goldstein, the elation of completing that first race, raising so much money and forming a new team came with a sober footnote: Goldberg was battling cancer at the same time, and the passionate cyclist was hardly able to walk from chemotherapy. The day also gave birth to Team First Descents, the nonprofit’s hugely successful fundraising branch and a fitting addition to its lineup of inventive, outdoorminded programs. “All the months of training, all the family sacrifices, the best friend with cancer, the fundraising efforts, the training injuries, the death of a friend two days before the race, the

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unconditional love and support of my wife, my kids, my extended family and my friends, the pain, suffering and exhaustion of the race (–) all of these things were hitting me at once, and I simply had no control over my feelings,” Goldstein wrote after the first race. “It was something I’ve never experienced before and may never experience again.”

the First Descents board, and shortly after Goldstein passed away, he used that first ride as a blueprint for the Team First Descents program. Unlike many fundraisers tied to races or organized events, Team First Descents members aren’t given minimum cash amounts or predetermined goals. Every aspect of fundraising – from finding donors to hand-selecting events – is up to the person. Anyone from age 18 to 39 can participate, and it has become wildly popular with former cancer patients who are in recovery. “A busy mother of three who’s just getting back from chemo can set something manageable, like running three nights a week,” says Erin Kelly, the Team First Descents Coordinator. “We really see this as a level of programming, the sort of

Join the team

Team First Descents isn’t exactly a traditional team – it’s more of a fundraising movement, meaning spots aren’t limited to hardcore athletes. Want to raise money while doing yoga, or are you eying an upcoming 5K with friends? Options are available for fully formed teams, folks looking to join a team and lone athletes out for a challenge. Registration for each (along with starter kits, tips and info on First Descentssponsored events) is found online at www.firstdescents.org

thing people who have been through our early programs can continue on and do.” That level of freedom is a major selling point for potential team members, and the approach has been proven where it matters: the bank account. In just six years, thousands of individuals across the country have raised a combined $3.5 million – easily First Descents’ most profitable fundraiser – and a major boon for future events. Each one-week program A Team First Descents runner powers through the for cancer patients (think kayaking tours on Gore Creek) final few miles at this year’s Boston Marathon. The costs $25,000 from start to finish, and Team First Descents nonprofit buys spots in high-profile races to raise has given access to more participants than ever before. It money for its outdoor programs for cancer survivors. has also inspired those same participants to give back, like First Descents photo. a group in North Carolina that enjoyed a weekend surf program, and then decided to form a team to pay for the next A new kind of team round of recovering surfers. Since 2007, Goldstein has competed in the Leadville 100 “It’s just inspiring to see 15 who benefited so much from every year, improving by nearly an hour-and-a-half for a a program come together to support something wholly new nine-hour, 52-minute finish in 2012. He’s now chairman of [See TEAM FIRST DESCENTS, page 18]


Tee up the alpine links for a cause Small Champions Golf Tourney raises money for disabled children By Phil Lindeman

ships and other donations. It has also sold out every year since it was started, and as of press time, there is only room for four additional teams. Registration is $250 per person – slightly less than everyday green fees for visitors throughout the summer – and all proceeds go back to the nonprofit. Over the years, Small Champions has helped hundreds of kids connect with dozens of activities: skiing and snowboarding in the winter, horseback riding and weeklong camps in the summer. It joins the ranks of other valley-based nonprofits like First Descents and Roundup River Ranch, all of which pair kids with disabilities or illnesses to dedicated volunteers with a penchant for the outdoors.

a few years off, and then moved to its current home at Arrowhead, where it is often the course’s first large-scale event of the summer. Organizers have added a slew of interesting mini-games to entertain players – not to mention raise more money. Take the “Pay a Pro” game: On select holes throughout the day, players can donate a small amount to have the course pro take a shot. After play is finished, the “Thanks for Chipping In” challenge gives players the chance to show off short-game skills on the practice green in front of the clubhouse. For another donation, they see who comes closest to sinking a ball, and the winner walks away with a prize from a local business. “We’re grown and become a more followed event, the sort of thing people look forward too,” Miller says. “There are so many aspects to this event, and people really look forward to taking part.” Once all the teams have finished 18 holes, the day ends with an after-party at the country club’s Vista Restaurant. The party is included in the tournament fee, and includes appetizers, cocktails and live music from local bluegrass band Hardscrabble. It also boasts a silent auction with items like golf and tennis lessons, plus a final awards ceremony with presentations from Small Champions participants. Although the nonprofit is dedicated to local children, the tournament has slowly attracted people from across the state. Miller claims a small core of players regularly come up from Denver, even without much promotion beyond Eagle County. For her, it’s a sign that the organization’s work is needed – something as small as a disabled child driving a par 3 has that kind of effect. “This is a homegrown golf tournament and a homegrown cause,” Miller says. “It helps kids who wouldn’t otherwise enjoy all the activities and opportunities we have in this valley. There’s not really a system for our kids to get out and participate in normal sports, so there’s a real heartfelt sense of the long-lasting impact this has for them.”

Around the eighth hole at Country Club of the Rockies, a golf course winding through the Arrowhead community between Edwards and Avon, the Small Champions Charity Golf Tournament turns into something far more memorable than a fundraiser set against a gorgeous, bunker-lined backdrop. The nonprofit’s annual tournament boasts a typical scramble format – four-person teams play each hole based on the closest shot to the flag, with mini challenges like longest drive and “Pay a Pro” spread throughout – but the eighth green is different. At just 176 yards from the tournament tees, it’s the second-shortest hole on the Jack Nicklaus-designed course. During last year’s event, it’s also where a longtime member of Small Champions had the chance to drive the green. The child was one of 36 physically disabled locals the nonWhat: A four-person golf scramble to raise profit helps throughout the year, taking part in sports and outmoney for Small Champions, a local nondoor programs tailored for kids who can’t join recreational profit dedicated to sports and outdoor proleagues. The experience of playing on a private, members-ongrams for youth with disabilities. An afterly course would be exciting for any golf fan, but the child was party with food, a silent auction and live rarely able to take part in most sports people take for granted. music by Hardscrabble follows the tourney. As Small Champions Coordinator John Weiss remembers, Where: Country Club of the Rockies the moment was special for everyone involved. It defines the When: Thursday, May 30 (shotgun start at tournament as a whole: Scramble players aren’t separated 1:30 p.m.) from the cause they’re playing for – the kids are front and Cost: $250 per person center, from handing out awards at the after-tourney party to To register for the tournament or sign up participating in the one-of-a-kind experience of driving an as a sponsor, visit www.smallchampions. award-winning course. com. “This is a fun tournament for everyone,” Weiss says. “It’s an incredible cause we’re raising money for, and a lot of the programming we do throughout the year wouldn’t be possible “The people who play really get to know the kids they’re without it. It’s a great group of people with a great cause at helping,” Small Champions Executive Director Connie Miller heart.” says. “We’re honored and lucky to be a nonprofit-of-choice for the Country Club of the Rockies, and people love coming Tournament time to the course and seeing the kids. It’s a win-win all the way Held on May 30, the tournament celebrates its tenth tee-off around.” this year. It’s consistently Small Champions’ largest fundraisLike Small Champions itself, the tournament has come SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at er, earning close to $25,000 between player’s fees, sponsor- into its own over 12 years. It started in Gypsum before taking philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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Paul Spencer’s

“When I rode across Africa, I got malaria, and I learned what she must feel like all the time,” Spencer says. “She goes through that energy-sapping experience every day.”

The beginning of “the madness” Anyone who knows Spencer shouldn’t be surprised at his latest “wild ride.” The avid cyclist has loved bikes since growing up in North Wales, and he did his first long-distance ride on a dare at a party. “The madness,” as he calls it, began when his friends wondered how fast he could ride from Lands End to John o’ Groats, an 880-mile ride that people generally complete in two weeks. “I bet these people I could ride 880 miles in four days, and I did it,” Spencer laughs. “I rode from dawn until dusk everyday, and I rode through rain the first few days. The longest bike ride I’d ever done until that point was 100 miles.” Since then, Spencer has ridden from Kathmandu, Nepal, to Everest Base Camp; the Tour D’Afrique from Cairo, Egypt to Cape Town, South Africa; from Baja, Mexico back home to Colorado; and broke the record for the fastest ride across America in 2009. As Spencer explains it, he just likes riding bikes of all kinds, and he only needs half a chance to be convinced to go on a huge ride or weeks-long race. He works on Beaver Creek’s racecourse crew in the winter and dedicates summers to his epic rides. That transcontinental American record is impetus for Spencer’s current ride. Fellow Brit Glen Burmeister broke Spencer’s American record, so in a classic display of oneupmanship, Spencer decided to break a record of Burmeis– he aims to break the record ter’s. for the fastest transcontinen“I am obviously left with no option but to try for the Eutal bike ride across Europe. Avon resident Paul Spen- His route starts at the northcer (front) rides in the Tour ern point of Europe (North Track Spencer’s progress, donate to his cause d’Afrique, a bike race from Cape, Norway) and ends at or find out more at www.yeshesmad.com. Cairo to Cape Town, in 2011. the southern-most tip (Tarifa, - Planned for 29 days. The current record Currently, Spencer is riding Spain). The current record stands at 39 days. through Europe from north to stands at 39 days, but on a - Will cover nine countries. south in an effort to break the lightweight Felt time trial - Begins in North Cape, Norway and ends in world record for fastest ride bike, with the help of a small Tarifa, Spain. across the continent. Photo spe- support crew and a good - Plans to average 165 miles a day. dose of craziness, Spencer cial to SneakPEAK. - Gear includes a Felt DA2 time trial bike, Mad thinks he can complete the Fiber carbon wheels, Hammer Nutrition prodride in 29 days. ucts, Nuun and Navitas Superfoods suppleThe feat will involve ridments, and GoPro cameras. ing an average of 165 miles, for 10 to 15 hours, each day. He’ll be followed closely by his support crew. Vail Valley resident Chad Shoulders will cook meals and collect wit- ropean (record),” Spencer says. “So that’s why it is my next ness’ signatures along the way, a requirement for Guinness challenge this summer.” World Records. Spencer’s childhood friend Dean Stanley These “challenges,” as Spencer calls them, are all training will drive the team’s RV, and another Vail local, Jesse Mat- for his ultimate mission – to become the first person to pedal tice, will join the crew in Germany. around the world, on bike across land and a pedal-propelled It’s a skeleton group, considering how many people are boat across water. behind Spencer’s ride – he’s supported by Kimberly Clark Profession (UK), a slew of bike and nutrition companies, On the road and a host of friends. The ultimate goal is to raise money for Back in Norway, Spencer and his crew spent the latter part the Lupus Association of America and Lupus UK, a cause of last week traveling up to the northernmost point of the Spencer chose for his sister, Marie, who was diagnosed with country, enjoying the sights and trying to decide where to the autoimmune disease when she was 14 years old. The start the journey. They decided on the Globe Monument, a disease, which has no known cure, often leaves the patient large, metal sculpture on the coast, as close to the water as drained of energy, in pain or with inflammation. The way they thought Spencer could ride. The 32-year-old cycist and Beaver Creek employee em- Spencer sees it, his most trying days on the bike remind him “It’s going to be pretty chilly, the temperature is near barked on an ambitious mission beginning Sunday, May 12 of Marie and why he rides.

wild ride

Local cyclist aims to break speed record for ride across Europe. By Melanie Wong.

Follow the ride

W

hen Paul Spencer began his bike ride, the temperature was in the 30s, and he rode past snow, chunks of ice and curious reindeer. When he finishes his ride, about 29 days later, he’ll be riding along the Mediterranean, under what will likely be a sweltering sun.

[See RECORD RIDE, page 18]

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Vail Valor half marathon New running event and 5K benefits Vail Veterans Program By Melanie Wong When locals Carl and Cynthia Bruggerman began looking for a date to hold a local half marathon, they ran into a problem very specific to Vail – it was difficult to find a weekend that didn’t already compete with other athletic events. The couple, both biking and running enthusiasts, settled on Memorial Day weekend, a fitting time considering that the event benefits the Vail Veterans Program. “We wanted to pick a Vail charity,” says Cynthia Bruggerman, who runs the event production company Specked Hound Racing. “Memorial Day generally commemorates fallen soldiers, but the Vail Veterans Program supports those who survived. Also, this year is their 10th anniversary, so this race is an opportunity for the community to bond together and support them.” The Vail Veterans Program supports those injured in the military and their families through outdoor programs such as skiing, golfing and more. Lt. Col. David Rozelle, of Boulder, helped found the organization 10 years ago and says he looks forward to running the race at the end of the month. “Running was one of those things in my life I thought I lost when I got injured, and it’s a thrill for me to be able to keep that up,” says Rozelle, who lost his leg below the knee to a landmine in Iraq in 2003. He now competes in everything from Ironman triathlons to marathons with a blade prosthetic and hopes to give other vets that opportunity as well. “Running was part of my therapy after I got my first prosthetic leg,” Rozelle says. “These men and women are pro athletes, and when they come back and rehab, we want them to be pro athletes again, whether that be running on a prosthetic or riding a hand cycle.” The half marathon follows a gently rolling route across Vail’s bike paths and through neighborhoods with views of the Gore Range. Eight aid stations line the way, and all racers finish with a meal and party at Manor Vail hotel. The event also features a 5K and 1K family fun run. Register or

Runners take off at the start of a Vail trail race last summer. This summer brings a slew of new foot races, including a Memorial Day half marathon, 5K and family run, benefiting a veterans outdoor rehabilitation program. Photo special to SneakPEAK. find more information at www.speckledhound.com. The Bruggermans hope to add a full marathon for next year. Also, keep an eye out for a few fall dirt events, dubbed the Vail Victory races, organized by Speckled Hound Racing. A 100-and 50-kilometer mountain bike race is in the works for Sept. 7, and a trail marathon and 6-mile run starting in West Vail and winding up to the Lost Lake area are slated for Sept. 8. (Both races are pending U.S. Forest Service permits.) SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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Get fit series

A non-runner sets her sights on the Bolder Boulder, a half marathon and beyond. By Phil Lindeman. training plan with almost stereotypical expectations: She would run, run and run some more, until she was either fit or couldn’t stand. Pain seemed like a natural side effect of getting into shape.

Meet Betsy Van Beek

Meet Betsy VanBeek Betsy Van Beek works with Vail Vitality Center Director Jeff Morgan in preparation for several running races this summer. Zach Mahone photo.

Editor’s note: This is part of a series of articles chronicling the stories of several Eagle County locals working toward a variety of health and fitness goals with professional trainers from Dogma Athletica in Edwards and the Vail Athletic Club Vitality Center in Vail. Check back for regular articles about their progress, advice from their trainers and more.

B

etsy Van Beek began with modest goals.

When the 35-year-old decided to run the 10-kilometer Bolder Boulder road race over Memorial Day weekend, she had the same thought process as thousands of people her age. Just over a week after she began training at The Vitality Center, part of Vail Mountain Lodge and Spa, she has committed to tackling a marathon in August – easily the furthest distance she’s ever attempted. Van Beek, an Indiana native who describes herself as “active, but not much of a team sports person,” enjoys hiking, skiing and simply being in the Colorado outdoors. She’s a healthy weight, has never suffered a debilitating injury and isn’t insecure about her body or wracked by self-image issues. From a health and wellness angle, Van Beek is almost perfectly normal, with the occasional soft spot for candy and late-night ice cream. She could be any number of 30-some-

things across the country who realize that a conscious, daily dedication to fitness somehow fell by the wayside between marriage, a career and evenings out with friends. “After winter, when you can get stuck inside and become a little lazy, springtime comes and it feels good to be fit and strong,” Van Beek says. “I want to be capable of doing what I want to do, and overall fitness is really my primary goal.” But first, back to the Bolder Boulder. With the thick of summer fast approaching, the high school English teacher just wanted to find a new hobby. She’s a thoughtful, playfully shy person who has never quite run for sport before, and learning to embrace such a basic form of exercise seemed simple and affordable. The Bolder Boulder is one of Colorado’s largest road races – some 54,000 people run it every year – and between the short distance and relatively even course, it’s a sought-after goal for first-time racers. “I’ve never been a runner,” Van Beek says. “I like my 30-minute jogs every once in a while, but I’ve never thought about form or muscles beyond my legs. I always just put one foot ahead of the other and hope to cross the finish line.” Training the body through the mind Roughly a month before the starting gun in Boulder, Van Beek visited The Vitality Center to get in shape. She had never considered a personal trainer before – let alone the sort of total-body approach the center is fast becoming known for – and she arrived at the first session of a three-month

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Yet Jeff Morgan had a more delicate plan. As director of The Vitality Center and Van Beek’s lead trainer, he saw in her shades of many first-time and casual athletes. Since graduating from Ball State University and Colorado State University with a master’s degree in kinesiology and a minor in nutrition, he used to consult for large-scale health clubs and was often shocked by the drill-sergeant mentality of many personal trainers. It feeds the tentative fear of exercise Van Beek felt but couldn’t quite express, and Morgan’s goal at the center is to take a more intimate, hands-on approach to wellness. “If you try to jump into a new diet or workout full-bore without past training experience, people usually crumble,” says Morgan, who took over as the center’s director just less than a year ago. “The approach makes all the difference for actual results. I’ve watched trainers eat people alive, and you just can’t do that to someone beyond a pro athlete. People freak out – it’s too much, too soon.” True to form, Morgan’s first session with Van Beek hardly looked like a typical afternoon at the gym. He talked with her for nearly an hour about usual issues – fitness goals, health issues, stumbling blocks – then subtly moved into more unexpected territory, like talking about “eating for fun.” He could tell her diet needed to be tweaked, but he didn’t want to nix the social side of food – say, grabbing dinner with friends on the weekend. “It’s an emotional overlay, and as a trainer, trust is so important,” Morgan says. “You have massive success when you approach someone on that trusting, emotional level, not just stare at the sky or yell while they’re in a plank.” This approach fits into Morgan’s overall vision for The Vitality Center, what he describes as a “well-living behavioral

[See GET FIT SERIES, page 14]

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Tasty secrets at The Rose in Edwards Find small plates and creative cuisine tucked away in the Riverwalk By Melanie Wong The Rose is full of surprises. It’s easy to walk past the hole-in-the-wall restaurant, tucked between Main Street Grill and Eye Pieces in Edwards’ Riverwalk. But poke your head through the doorway, as curious passerby have done in the couple weeks since the restaurant opened, and you’ll find a sophisticated menu, eclectic décor and cozy atmosphere. The Rose, sister restaurant to Vail’s popular Alpenrose, is the brain child of Jessica Havlik, whose parents own the Vail eatery, and fiancé Bryan Redniss. Neither has owned a restaurant before, but both had long craved a place they could find their favorite ethnic dishes from world travels or bistro-style fare common in bigger cities. When the space, formerly occupied by Bonjour Bakery, opened up, the couple jumped at the chance. “My parents originally wanted to do a bakery here, but I caught wind of it and had an idea for the space,” Havlik says. “We’re both creative people and big foodies, so we’re just having fun with the menu.” Redniss, who admits he saw a great chance to ask for her hand in marriage, jumped in on the project. He helped design the floor plan and scavenged everything from old wood beams to chairs to tiles to renovate the interior. The result is a chic vibe, from the sunny seating area by the windows and intimate tables tucked in the back to the long, inviting wooden bar where bartender Mark Summers mixes up creative cocktails from scratch. It’s comfortable, a great place to share a couple plates with friends, go on a casual date, or grab an after-work drink. One of the best parts for the budget conscious is the price point – with the exception of appetizer cheese and meat plates, everything on the menu is less than $11.

Left: (l-r) Co-owner Bryan Redniss, chef Bill Fitzgerald and co-owner Jessica Havlik. Right: Fitzgerald’s signature chicken and waffles plate, served with berries and maple ice cream. Katie Anderson photos.

SneakPICKS at The Rose

Beet salad – Caramalized beets with decadent goat cheese and pistachios ($7). Chicken and waffles – Served with maple ice cream and berry sauce ($11). The Jeffrey – A smooth, margarita-like cocktail, featuring tequila and ginger liqueur ($8).

be an ever-changing selection. You’ll find versions of bahn mi (a Vietnamese pork sandwich), down-home comfort food like mac and cheese, and once summer is in full swing, all World and local cuisine sorts of dishes using goods from the local farmer’s markets. With the menu, diners find tastes from around the world “We wanted to provide something you couldn’t get here in and the backyard, all as part of what the owners hope will the valley,” Havlik says. “It’s good, affordable food, with a

focus on small plates.” Inspired by a recent trip to Peru, she is working on some South American cuisine, and also hopes to debut some gluten-free and vegetarian options soon. The couple’s ideas are complimented by the talents of chef Bill Fitzgerald, formerly at Avondale and Cima in Avon. The chef, originally from Tahoe, earned his chops in a number of Napa Valley kitchens, becoming a pastry and dessert specialist when he came to the Vail area. The wide range of food and a fresh-first philosophy at The Rose have given him a chance to “go back to the hot side,” as he puts it. Try his chicken and waffles (perfectly sized for two), a pleasant mix of salty, crispy chicken drumsticks and chewy waffle squares, with sticky-sweet berries and maple ice cream. If you’re looking for a healthier option, go for the roasted beet salad, slathered in lemon-poppyseed vinaigrette

[See THE ROSE, page 14]

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Eagle Valley track claims regional win, shattered records By Phil Lindeman

By way of points, the Eagle Valley High School men’s track team blew away the competition at last weekend’s regional meet in Grand Junction. The team’s final score was 232, more than double second place Palisade High School, which recorded 109 points. EVHS head coach Jeff Shroll was dully impressed with the result, even if part of him expected a strong (and even dominant) showing from a team he dubs “virtually unbeatable.� The women were equally impressive, earning 145 points to end in second behind Battle Mountain High School with 192 points. “The quality of athletes who came to the team stronger and better after the off-season was just incredible,� Shroll says. “The points we are able to put up were dominating. This team is really beyond a team now – it’s a family.� During the season, that track-and-field family has made

Rewriting the record book Between the men’s and women’s teams, Eagle Valley High School track and field athletes broke eight school records this season – several had even stood for 20 years or more. Here’s a look at history in the making. Men’s 400-meter dash – 50.63 seconds (Zeke Sandoval) Men’s 4x200-meter relay – 1:30.97 seconds (B. Walker, N. Ross, T. Mills, Z. Sandoval) Men’s 4x800-meter relay – 8:12.28 seconds (D. Patterson, H. Burnham, D. Hill, L. Chavez) Men’s pole vault – 14 feet, 0 inches (Aaron Kline) Women’s 400-meter dash – 58.76 seconds (Carly Volkmer) Women’s 4x200-meter relay – 1:46.23 seconds (K. Sisson, C. Volkmer, R. Trotter, M. Asmussen) Women’s 4x400-meter relay – 4:09.51 seconds (C. Volkmer, R. Trotter, H. Collier, V. Schwaiger) Women’s 800-meter medley relay – 1:51.65 (K. Sisson, C. Volkmer, R. Trotter, M. Asmussen)

Senior Riley Rowles-Birdsong launches during the triple jump last weekend at the regional meet in Grand Junction. Rowles-Birdsong won first and helped push the team past competitors. Natalie Landin photo.

and 22 athletes have qualified for state in nearly every event. After 16 years as a coach at EVHS, Shroll has rarely seen such a hungry, well-rounded Devils squad. Aside from standouts like junior Michelle Carbajal and senior Zeke Sandoval, who won the Western Slope Athlete of the Year award, the team has few earth-shattering superstars. But the team-minded approach is working: Eagle Valley will arrive at state with three times the usual number of qualifiers. “They want to improve and they want to work hard,� says Jenn Sewall, a first-year hurdling coach and former state track champion in Wisconsin. “They may not be the most natural-born hurdling athletes, but they aren’t afraid to try. They go hard and fast, and they know what has to be done to Coach Shroll a proud papa. The men’s and women’s squads improve. They’ve already done it.� have continued to improve at each meet, besting even Shroll’s 3A league and state championship team from 2004. With a Regional recap week left before the 4A state finals at Jeffco Stadium outside If you were to sit in the jam-packed stands and watch the of Denver – EVHS was bumped up a division as the student regional meet – hundreds of people arrived from across the population grew – eight school records have been broken, Western Slope to watch eight schools duke it out, including

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The Eagle Valley High School track team douses 16-year head coach Jeff Shroll after a blowout overall win at last weekend’s regional meet in Grand Junction. The team sends 22 athletes to the state meet at Jeffco Stadium outside of Denver this weekend, the largest number in Shroll’s tenure as head coach. Natalie Landin photo.

Eagle Valley neighbors and rivals Battle Mountain – you might’ve been surprised to see the EVHS point total skyrocket the way it did. Sure, Shroll’s crew had individual champions in several events over the weekend, but the team’s real strength came from athletes who consistently finished second, third or even fourth in almost every event. In track, this matters. Results are tallied by placing finishers into the top eight, with points distributed in descending and decreasing order. (In plain English, first place is awarded 10 points in an event, while eighth place is awarded one point.) Even a moderate finish helps boost the team. As Shroll explains, simply snagging one or two top-eight finishes in every possible event can quickly add up. For an EVHS squad of 90-some-odd athletes, hoarding points became the story of the afternoon, from a podium sweep in the men’s 200-meter dash to an unexpected second-place finish for the women’s 4x400-meter relay. Of course, every school took advantage of the point system, picking up eight points here, six points there and, every so often, a full 10 points. The Devils did the same, only better: They often put three or four athletes in a scoring position. While other teams might pick up 10 points with one athlete winning, the Devil’s would take home 25 points overall – even without a top finish. Perhaps the most unassuming yet vital contribution came from senior Aaron Kline, who competes in pole vault, 110-meter hurdles and 300-meter hurdles. Kline demolished the field in pole vault – he broke the EVHS record three times this season alone, ending with a vault of 14 feet even – but he also notched a first-place finish in the 110 hurdles, going one-two with teammate and triple-jump winner Riley Rowles-Birdsong. While a touch of big-picture thinking helped the men win, Shroll says the size and scope of his team was more important than cerebral coaching. When the men are paired with the continually improving women – that 4x400 relay lost to a stacked Battle Mountain team by a little more than one second – strategy gave way to sheer tenacity. Look at the women again: Aside from a fifth-place finish in the always difficult

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4x800, teams took second place or higher in each relay. “It wasn’t so much strategy as it was just a testament to how deep the team is,” Shroll says. “We just have rock-solid kids in every single event. It made for an amazing weekend, to see that kind of showing.” State in sight The regional results were enough to make Shroll hopeful for a top-10 finish at state, where he says wins come with “a big price tag” when facing powerhouse schools like Pueblo South and Green Mountain. But this EVHS team has already made an impact at home and across the league, and Shroll hopes they take a moment to bask in once-a-decade glory. “We make a big deal about breaking records, and we should,” Shroll says. “We can go 10 years sometimes without breaking a single one, but this year, we managed to break eight. That’s just not going to happen all the time, so when it does, it’s special. You wonder what can happen next.” For Kline, taking a state title in pole vault will be difficult. The 14-foot EVHS record is his best jump ever, but he’s tied for second in the 4A state standings behind a division-leading 14-foot, 6-inch vault. “I’ve always liked how much fun I have with track, and I like how it challenges you as an individual,” says Kline, who also knows second or third place could lead to another laudable team finish. “This team is set apart by dedication. In years past, people would skip workouts and not put the effort into track. Everyone was in it together this year.” Coach Sewall also knows the rush of competing on a major stage. Like Shroll, she also knows it can be fleeting, and she hopes her athletes – especially promising seniors like Kline, Sandoval and Rowles-Birdsong – savor the experience. “I’d like to see the whole team enjoy themselves, have fun and see this as a memorable event in their high school careers,” Sewall says. “I still look back on those moments from my time as an athlete and find them rewarding. I want these kids to have that same sense of pride.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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GET FIT SERIES ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

center” with nearly all the tools people like Van Beek need: chiropractors, acupuncturists, nutritionists, massage therapists, a cadre of trainers with physiology degrees or more. For her three-month program, Van Beek will work with Morgan, as well as Drew Tarkington, the center’s running coach, and Julia Clarke, the head yoga instructor. It’s an allangles fitness plan, and it has worked for Morgan countless times before. “By spreading out trainers, you have a group – not just an individual – and that accountability is important,” Morgan says. “It’s a team working for you, and that interruption of routine can have a major impact.” The plan After the first “getting to know you” session, Morgan laid out Van Beek’s fitness plan. Bolder Boulder is the first goal, and fixing her stride was topped the to-do list. Van Beek tended to wobble at her core – healthy runners stride forward, or “float” over their feet and toes as opposed to pound into their heels – and Morgan gave her several exercises to strengthen her midsection and knees. The first two weeks

of hour-long training sessions hone in on small muscle patterns, from building inner-thigh and hamstring strength with lunges to hitting deep inside the glutes (“butt muscle,” as Van Beek says) with squats and treadmill work. “When we talked, he said my core could use work, and I thought, ‘What? My abs? What does that have to do with running?’” Van Beek recalls. “I’m a teacher and not exactly raking in the dough, but part of me didn’t know what I was missing without a trainer.” What immediately surprised even Morgan, though, was Van Beek’s drive. During their third session together, her heart rate reached 180 beats per minute – a point where Morgan would usually step in. But he let Van Beek choose her own pace, and by the end of her run on the treadmill, she’d reached two miles easily. “I see surprise and delight when my clients discover they’re doing something new, and that confidence is important,” Morgan says. “It becomes a culture. This isn’t just training to run – there’s something deeper there, and Betsy wants to set goals and achieve something.” Outside of the gym, Morgan also has Van Beek on weekly

[From page 10]

distance and interval runs. Both will help boost stamina and lung capacity – the first big step to prep for her August marathon. Despite Van Beek’s drive in the gym – she admits the first few session left her tired, but she hardly felt exhausted or pained – the most pressing challenge after the Bolder Boulder won’t be the marathon: She leaves for a three-week Hawaii vacation in early June. Morgan has already started building a plan for her time away, filled with beach running, hotel-friendly exercises and diet tips. For now, Van Beek and Morgan are taking baby steps – her distance days last 45 minutes, and both believe the Boulder race is easily within reach. “Before last week, running a 10K was the extent of my vision,” Van Beek says. “A week later, I’m convinced I can do the half marathon. I’m still nervous – I wonder if I should make that kind of commitment – but it’s a goal I’m ready to tackle.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

EMERALD MILE –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

lowed behind the dories, the latrine. So I got to think about biggest water crisis of their careers. But those engineers them all day and became bewitched by the boats themselves. wanted their story to be told – it’s a forgotten crisis, and what They were as seductive for me as the canyon itself. they did to solve it was pretty extraordinary. I also used three very long interviews conducted with Grua SP: What kind of research did you do to write this book? (before his death in 2002) that gave me insight into who he You go in-depth into the federal decisions that created the was. I made contact with Rudi Petschek, who now lives in river’s conditions, and you also narrate the Emerald Mile’s California. He introduced me to Steve Reynolds, who was run as if you were in the boat. suffering from liver cancer at the time. I spoke to him six KF: The biggest challenge of the research was to talk to weeks before he died. members of two separate subcultures that are diametrically opposed to each other. One is the river guides, and the other SP: During the research for this book, what did you learn is the fraternity of engineers, bureaucrats and managers who about the story of the run that surprised you? KF: Well, you can’t be a boatman in the Grand Canyon are employed by the Bureau of Reclamation. I worked my without having a deep-seated hatred of what the Bureau of way in with the river folk by rowing their poop (laughs). With the Bureau of Reclamation, it was difficult at first Reclamation did to the rivers of the West – they’re really to convince them to talk to me, because they thought I was loathed. Their first sin was building the dam in the first place, writing about some stunt someone pulled during the single and then they failed to manage the reservoir, so the conven-

[From page 3]

tional view is that they’re the villians. However, I discovered when I began to interview them that they’re highly competent, serious people with integrity. It’s just that they were committed to something fundamentally different. What happened was carefully planned and executed – it’s a difference between the values of wilderness and those of science and technology. That was the biggest surprise for me. SP: Do you have any plans for your next project? KF: I’m currently on the publicity tour for this book, but I’d like nothing better than to get started on my next project. I have a closet full of books waiting. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

THE ROSE ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

[From page 11]

and gussied up with goat cheese and candied pistachios. Or, accompany your drink with an order of the creamy and crunchy avocado fries dripped in soy aioli. Pop in for a quick breakfast as well – the doors open at 8 a.m. daily with a selection of baked goods from the Alpenrose, plus fruit-and-veggie packed smoothies, crafted by Havlik. As the restaurant picks up momentum, also look out for a late-night menu. The owners, noticing a gap in any sort of late-night dining options in Edwards, hope to have a selection of small plates for hungry diners after 10 p.m.

ginger liquor, egg whites and a touch of mint and citrus, reminiscent of a South American favorite, the pisco sour. For a hot summer day, try the blackberry-fig mojito, a fruity combination of caramelized figs and tart berries. In a nod to the Alpenrose’s German roots, the bar is stocked with a variety of German liquors, beers and Rieslings. Happy hour goes from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and touts $1.50 PBRs, $6 glasses of wine, $5 well drinks and $6 cocktails. “We’re trying to offer something unique, and the idea is that sometimes simple is better, At the bar as long as it’s quality,” Redniss says. “This is sort of a combination of all our favorite things The Rose’s creativity doesn’t stop in the kitchen. At the bar, Summers serves up a number and tastes, and we’re excited to see what happens.” of one-of-a-kind drinks. Fans of spice will enjoy the Red Harvest, a gin-based cocktail laced with chili syrup, red peppers and mint. The Jeffery is a smooth, creamy drink of tequila, SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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Thursday, May 16, 2013 -Wed., May 22, 2013


SneakSPORTS: Handshakes and hardware A look at the end of playoff hockey and the best gesture in sports Editor’s Note: Minturnbased sports fan Patrick Whitehurst writes for www. fanrag.com. Read his musings on the site or in SneakPEAK. Give hockey its due; the NHL has the greatest trophy, as well as tradition, in all of sports. The NFL has the Lombardi Trophy, but it Patrick Whitehurst pales in comparison to Lord Stanley’s Cup. The presentation of this trophy, along with the ceremonial handshake, occurs after the conclusion of a series in the Stanley Cup playoffs. A handshake is intended to display friendliness when greeting another person. It can be used as a bond of your word or to seal an accepted deal. Handshakes mean congratulations but also offer sympathy during loss. It is said that a person’s handshake can tell a lot about them. A firm handshake implies strength and confidence. A soft handshake can be seen as signs of weakness or uncertainty. Friends, co-workers, family members, fraternity brothers and casual acquaintances have elevated and personalized the art of shaking hands. Besides the politician’s favorite version (the hand hug), there’s the “bro-shake” where two men cup the base of the other person’s hand and lean in for a semi-hug or shoulder bump. The fist bump and subsequent explosion was really big for a while, and when shaking hands with a member of the opposite sex, use the “queen’s shake” (grabbing only a few of the horizontally held fingers of the female). There’s the cold head nod in place of a shake, and a fully outstretched arm (“the Heisman”) signals to your counterpart, “Stay as far away as possible,” or “Don’t even think about going in for a hug!” In the sports world, handshakes take on a life of their own.

This season the NBA had to place a time limit on pre-game player introductions because several teams and star players elevated the handshake to a bizarre rhythm and dance-slapping carnival that never ended. Decades ago, the high five replaced the handshake, and we have sports to thank for that. The “high five-reverse-low-five” looked cool in the ‘80s and the Bash Brothers in Oakland decided to use their entire steroid-developed forearms instead of the palms of their hands to congratulate and greet each other. The chest and hip bumps that athletes implement today are an upgrade over the actions of the Washington Redskins’ “Fun Bunch” or the double high-five and “butt-pat” of yesteryear. While teammates and colleagues are mostly seen using variations of the handshake, foes and rivals routinely shake hands, too. Opposing soccer players exchange jerseys after matches and boxers are instructed, “Shake hands and come out fighting.” After a quarrel involving children, teachers and parents routinely demand that all parties shake hands in order to dispel the dispute. After the conclusion of their suspended third round at The Players’ Championship on Sunday, Tiger Woods and Sergio Garcia silently shook hands because it was the proper and expected thing to do. Following their heated spat and years of disdain for the other, viewers and even their caddies knew

what each player was probably thinking. Tiger: “You can’t beat me, you whiney little punk.” Sergio: “You’re a real jerk, mister. I hope your skier girlfriend dumps you.” Back to the ceremonial handshake on the ice rink -- every member of both teams meet at center ice and shakes hands. It is a beautiful sight and reckons back to the believed origins of the handshake itself. Because of their immense armor, knights would grasp the forearms and sleeve of their counterparts in order to gauge their intentions and determine if they were friendly (not holding a knife). After a brutal seven game series, these warriors on the frozen pond offer their respect and congratulations to one another. I often wonder what the players are saying, but find it best to simply imagine the phrases being uttered. “I’ll be ready to throw off the gloves next season.” “Your goalie was standing on his head this entire series. Make sure to thank him.” “I know a great dentist that can help you out.” “We really wanted this for Canada.” “Can you believe we used to play without helmets?” “See you on the golf course.” “Sorry about that elbow to your skull.” “That playoff beard looks good on you, though,” and “Respect and take good care of the Cup!”

Rant and react to every playoff game

Be Seen, Be Heard, Be a Fan at fanrag.com

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Featured Wedding of the Week

Anderson- Fiedler Wedding Bride: Katie Fiedler of Belleville, Ill. Groom: Copper Anderson of Vail, CO Married: Oct. 6, 2012 Location:Avon, Colo.

How they met Katie and Cooper met during Katie’s first winter in Vail (Cooper is a native local), when she was working as a ticket scanner. “He was the hottest skier that came through the line,� she says. Katie had a deal with her friend and co-worker Nell that whenever Cooper came through the lift line, Katie got to scan him. “It became very obvious, when Nell would yell my name, and I would abandon my scan line to go scan Cooper’s pass in a different line,� Katie says. “What can I say? It worked!� How he proposed In March of 2011, the couple went skiing. The snow was terrible, so Katie went home to have lunch. Cooper begged her to take another lap, but she told him to go on his own. He came home and asked Katie if she would marry him, but she thought he was joking until he showed her the ring, which he had for months. Apparently, Katie had ruined many attempted proposals by Cooper because she couldn’t sit still long enough for him to propose. Why they got married in the Vail Valley The couple wanted to have their wedding in a place that has given them so many memories. They also liked having everything close for planning purposes. Favorite memory from the wedding day “My favorite part of the wedding was looking around the room and seeing the incredible group of people that we have in our lives sitting there just for us,� Katie says. “It was a truly special moment to have so many dearly loved friends and family in one room.� Colors: Green and purple Ceremony: The Westin Riverfront Resort in Avon, by the gondola Reception: Vin 48, Avon Vendors: DJ DC Ballard, Go Photo Booth, Alpenrose (wedding cakes), The Westin Riverfront Resort, The Seasons at Avon, Alpine Party Rental and Eden Flowers.

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Calendar of Events Submit your event to SneakPEAK’s weekly community calendar by sending information to info@sneakpeakvail.com.

Friday, May 17 to Sunday, May 19 Ross Rayburn Yoga Workshop in Avon

kicks off in Eagle for the first in the seven-race lineup. Dayof registration will be open from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. at the Eagle Pool and Ice Rink. Pre-registered racers can pick up their bibs at the start. The race starts at the Bluffs BLM Trail head parking lot in Eagle and works up the dirt road following the singletrack to the left at the top of the hill. Racers will enjoy a free brunch at the Dusty Boot in Eagle Ranch, following the race, and prizes will be presented to the top three finishers of each age group at each race. See www.vailrec. com for more info.

Vail Mountain Lodge, is encouraging kids and teens to find out more about the sport at a VAC Climbing Team Open House on from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The club’s Climbing Team provides support and instruction for children and teens interested in competing. Kids ages 5 to 18 are welcome. Call 970-476-7960 to RSVP. Climbing gear is provided.

Saturday, May 18 Eagle Fire Department barbecue

Broughton Coburn, author of “The Vast Unknown: America’s First Ascent of Everest,� comes to the Bookworm for a discussion and signing. The book combines riveting adventure, a perceptive analysis of history and revelations about a secret mission that followed. Coburn also wrote New York Times-bestselling “Everest: Mountain Without Mercy. Event is at 6 p.m. at the Edwards bookstore. Cost is $10/person; $50/book club. See www.thebookwormofedwards.com.

Join the local Eagle firefighters for a day of fun in the sun. There will be demonstrations, food, entertainment and more provided by Eagle Fire Department and the dedicated firefighters. Food is provided by Moe’s Original BBQ & Sarah Braucht Sweets. Event will be at the Eagle Town Park all day.

Internationally renowned yoga instructor Ross Rayburn will lead a three day yoga workshop titled “A New Beginning� at Studio Anjali at The Westin in Avon. At the workshop, participants will be encouraged to explore new yoga and life experiences while also honoring and learning from the past. Price is $190 for the general public. Individual sessions are available for $55 per session. For more info or to register, Saturday, May 18 call 970-790-2051 or visit www.athleticclubwestin.com. For Roller Derby Bout in Eagle Watch a battalion of gutsy female athletes duke it out at the more information on Rayburn, see www.rossrayburn.com. Eagle Ice Rink. Roller derby is a full contact, aggressive, competitive sport conducted on four-wheeled quad skates. Friday, May 17 Come support your local 10th Mountain Roller Derby Dolls Benefit wine tasting in Vail at 12:30 p.m. Cost to attend is $5/person and $3/kids. Sonnenalp Resort of Vail presents Family Wineries Road Trip, a benefit wine tasting for Shaw Cancer Center. FamSunday, May 19 ily wineries from around the world will offer different wine samples from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Cost is $40. Call 970-926- Project Funway in Vail Benefiting the Education Foundation of Eagle County, the 5665 for more info. second annual Project Funway has amateur designers coming up with designs in two categories: Absolutely Fabulous Friday, May 17 and Anything But Fabric. The event includes a fashion show, Danny Shafer in Eagle appetizers, drinks, auction, dancing, consignment shopping Boulder-based bluegrass and folk singer/songwriter Danny and more. Cost is $45 in advance and $55 at the door, and Shafer plays at Eagle’s Bonfire Brewery beginning at 8 p.m. $55 to submit a design. See www.pro-fun.org for more info. Grab a glass of the brewery’s latest beer, kick back on the patio and enjoy the music.

Saturday, May 18 Boneyard Boogie 10K in Eagle

The Vail Rec District’s La Sportiva Trail Running Series

Sunday, May 19 Climbing open house at the VAC

Summer climbing season is drawing near and the Vail Athletic Club (VAC), part of the Vail Vitality Center at

Monday, May 20 Broughton Coburn author discussion in Edwards

Tuesday, May 21 Vail Kayak Race Series

The Vail Kayak Race Series take place in the Vail Kayak Park from mid-May to mid-June. Stop by the Vail Whitewater Park and watch the competition... or throw on your helmet and join in! This week’s race is the Ring Your Bell Race. Competitors race from the Covered Bridge to the International Bridge, but they cannot complete the race unless all bells on buoys are rung. Cost is $5 for participants, free for spectators. For more info call 970-926-3867.

Wednesday, May 15 Short Track MTB Race at Beaver Creek

The Vail Recreation District’s three-race series hits a new course each Wednesday, and this week racers tackle a route at the base of Beaver Creek. With five divisions to choose from, the series is made for novices and experts alike. Racing begins at 5:15 p.m., followed by an after party. Registration is available online at www.vailrec.com or at the event. Cost is $7 per race for kids ($21 for the series) and $15 per race for adults ($45 for the series). For more info, see www.vailrec.com.

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VRD TRAIL RUN ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

As a trail-running series, the courses themselves have as much personality as Fickling or Smickley. Perhaps it’s part of the appeal – insanity attracts insanity. Fickling recently ran the Boston Marathon and London Marathon back-toback, resting just five days in between, but the Vail Hill Climb still strikes him as masochistic. “I like variety in my running, but some races, like the Hill Climb, you don’t really do them because you enjoy it,” Fickling says of the race, which covers more than 2,100 vertical feet. “They’re really more of a rite of passage.” For beginners, series coordinator Croucher recommends more gentle offerings, like Beaver Creek’s Summer Solstice race on June 22 and the series-ending EverGold 10K and 5K. Both cover well-trod singletrack – a blessing for run-

ners used to endless stretches of asphalt – and are light on vertical gain. True to form, the VRD is constantly searching for ways to better the series while staying to its spirit. New this year is the “Racer Refuel Program,” a collaboration between VRD and restaurants like Eagle’s HP Provisions. Eateries give runners healthy, filling snacks – think granola and frittatas – after each race, along with generous gifts like the free tshirts handed out before the events. (The design is credited to series regular Bernie Bercher, who was unable to run after being struck by a car on his bike). Still, Croucher says the series isn’t for the lighthearted. Most races attract around 250 people, and in the middle of summer, conditions can change rapidly from the 8 a.m. starts

[From page 4]

to 11:30 a.m. finishes. “If you do all seven races, it’s really not for slouches,” Croucher says. “But one thing I love about this series is it invites people who have never tempted trail running before. If you have it in your head that you can finish this challenge, it can be done, and there are plenty of people rooting you on.” Chances are, Smickley will be one of them. “I am so blessed,” he says. “I had a beautiful teaching career, and now I live here and enjoy the life I have. Running is something I just love.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

[From page 6]

RECORD RIDE ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

[From page 8]

TEAM FIRST DESCENTS

for someone else,” Kelly says. “It’s incredible to see one week with First Descents inspire them so much. They look beyond all they’ve been through – all the chemicals and treatments – and see the sky is the limit.” The open-ended format also gives Kelly and her team plenty of leverage at large-scale events like the Boston Marathon or New York Marathon. First Descents purchases a handful of entries and makes them available to participants who would otherwise struggle to make it past lottery rounds. Take the Leadville 100 team: It’s relatively small with 20 members, but they manage to raise between $100,000 and $130,000 each year, with some $75,000 coming from Goldstein himself. “The sky is the limit in terms of opportunities,” Kelly says. “We want to understand what motivates participants and challenges them. There is a certain amount of beauty to creating

freezing,” Spencer said last week by phone. “We’re also so far north the sun barely sets. Yesterday, the sun set at 10:30 p.m., but it never got dark. It looks like dusk for an hour or two, then it comes back up.” Anxious to get started, Spencer says his ride will take him through Norway, Finland, Russia, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, the Czech Republic, Germany, France and finally Spain. The first stretch of the ride will be grueling, as he’ll average 185 miles per day try to reach the Russian

River Report

your own challenge, but there is also a level of beauty to 20 different people from 20 different areas coming together under one name.” As Kelly claims, there’s “no barrier to entry” – anyone can craft a team around any goal and any sport. The list of current programs is nearly endless – First Descents Founder and Chief Executive Officer Brad Ludden built a stand-up paddle challenge for the summer – but the potential is even greater. For Kelly, building a community around First Descents and cancer awareness is the team’s loftiest purpose. “We want to empower people, spread the word about First Descents and help as many people reach the goals they have in front of them,” Kelly says. “This is a way to live our culture and tie everything back together.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

border before the end of the week. Once in Russia, Spencer will go solo for a day (his support crew were unable to get visas to enter the country). That means he’ll need to ride the 205 miles across Russia alone before meeting Shoulders and Stanley at the other border. He won’t be off the grid, though, thanks to a GPS tracker that monitors his progress. “It’s going to be quite scary. I’ll have to carry my own supplies that day, and it will be the longest day of the whole trip, in a country where I don’t know anyone and I don’t

The Eagle

Colorado River

speak the language,” Spencer says. Then, just as quickly as it came, all apprehension disappears from his voice. “After that we’ll go into Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia and Poland,” he says. “I’ve never been to those countries, so I’m probably most excited to ride through those.” SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

Gore Creek

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Water levels are rising, espeFlows are up and the fishing Water levels are rising, but cially on warm days. Fishing flows are still below normal. has improved greatly. The river the middle to upper river has will rise and go off color in Floating had been great with been most productive, espethe afternoons. Recommended large stones and streamers. cially in the mornings. Recom- Recommended flies: PRL’s in flies: Kyle’s Yellow Sally #16mended flies: PRL’s in numer- numerous colors, Evan’s 2be 18, Olive and Black sparkle ous colors, San Juan Worms midges #20-22, MA Larva #16- RS 2’s #18-22 and Small Tan and Cranefly Larva. Buggers. #18 and Black Slumpbusters.

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Thursday, May 16, 2013 -Wed., May 22, 2013

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BLD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

American

BLD

$

New American

D

$$$

Pizza

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$$

American/Western

LD

$$

Authentic Italian

D

$$

Pizza and Italian

LD

$

American Bistro

LD

$$

Steakhouse, AprĂŠs and Dinner

D

$$$

Mountain Fare/Steakhouse, AprĂŠs,

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

New American

D

American Pub

LD

$ $$$ $

$$

MINTURN Kirby Cosmos | 474 Main St. | 970.827.9027 Magusto’s | 101 Main St. | 970.827.5450 Minturn Country Club | 131 Main St. | 970.827.4114 Nicky’s Quickie | 151 Main St | 970-827-5616 Sticky Fingers | 132 Main St. | 970.827.5353 Minturn Saloon | 146 N. Main St. | 970.827.5954 Turntable | 160 Railroad Ave. | 970.827.4164

VAIL Alpenrose | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8899 Ale House | 2161 N. Frontage Road | 970.476.4314 Atwater on Gore Creek | Vail Cascade Resort | 970.476.7014 Bart & Yeti’s | Lionshead, North of Arrabelle | 970.476.2754 Bearfish | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7596 Big Bear Bistro | 297 Hanson Ranch Road | 970.300.1394 Billy’s Island Grill | Lionshead | 970.476.8811 Bistro 14 | Eagle’s Nest, Top of Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.445.4530 Block 16 | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 Blue Moose Pizza | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.476.8666 bol | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.5300 Bully Ranch | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5460 Campo de Fiori | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8994 Chicago Pizza | 1031 S. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7000 CinÊBistro | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.3344 Elway’s Steakhouse | 174 East Gore Creek Dr. | 970.754.7818 Flame | Four Seasons, Vail | 970.477.8600 Frost | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8050 Game Creek Restaurant | Vail Mountain | 970.754.4275 Garfinkel’s | Next to Lionshead Gondola | 970.476.3789

Best Gourmet Breakfast and Lunch Sandwiches in the Vail Valley

2

$ 50 off 1

$

Any two sandwiches

Open Daily 7 am - 7 pm 970-300-1394 Top of Bridge St. Vail Village.

Any one sandwich

970-926-1796

105 Edwards Village Blvd., C107• Edwards

Mon-Fri 8am 8am to to 4pm 6pm || Sat Sat & & Sun Sun 8am 8am to to 3pm 5pm Mon-Fri

$

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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• • •

• •

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Come in!

Or we’ll both starve Open Daily. Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner

off

Sandwiches, wraps, soups, salads & more!

$ $$$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Colorado Wild Game Grill

Pricing

EDWARDS

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

5/22 exp 4/24

Rooms available! Sleep Sweet in a Sleep Suite $29.95

     Thursday, May 16, 2013 -Wed., May 22, 2013

|

sneakpeak

21


Gohan Ya | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7570 Joe’s Famous Deli | 288 Bridge St. | 970.479.7580 Kelly Liken | Gateway Building, 12 Vail Rd. | 970.479.0175 La Bottega | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0280 Lancelot | Next to Children’s Fountain | 970.476.5828 Larkspur Restaurant | Golden Peak | 970.754.8050 La Tour | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.4403 Left Bank | Sitzmark Lodge in Vail Village | 970.476.3696 The Little Diner | West Lionshead Plaza | 970.476.4279 Lord Gore & the Fitz Lounge | Manor Vail at the base of Golden Peak | 970.476.4959 Los Amigos | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.5847 Ludwig’s | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5429 The Marketplace | One Willow Bridge Rd. | 970.477.4370 Market Café | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 May Palace | Next to City Market, West Vail | 970.476.1657 Matsuhisa | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.6682 Moe’s Original BBQ | Upstairs from the General Store, Lionshead | 970.479.7888 Montauk Seafood Grill | Lionshead Village | 970.476.3601 Nozawa | Holiday Inn, West Vail | 970.476.9355 Ocotillo | Vail Mountain Marriott Resort & Spa, Lionshead | 970.477.5675 Old Forge Co. | 2161 N Frontage Rd | 970.476.5555 Old Forge Co. | 521 East Lionshead Cir. | 970.476.5232 Ore House | 232 Bridge St. | 970.476.5100 Osaki’s | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0977 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.9026 Pepi’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.4671 Qdoba | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7539 Red Lion | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.7676 Russell’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.6700 Subway West Vail | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.3827 Sushi Oka Hibachi | 100 East Meadow Drive. Suite #4 | 970.476.1588 Sweet Basil | 193 E. Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.0125 Tap Room | Top of Bridge St. | 970.479.0500 The Tavern On The Square| 675 Lionshead Place | 970.754.7400 Terra Bistro| 352 Meadow Dr., Vail Mountain Lodge& Spa | 970.476.6836 The George | 292 Meadow Dr. | 970.476.2656 Up The Creek Bar & Grill | 223 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.8141 Vendetta’s | 291 Bridge St. | 970.476.5070 Vail Chophouse | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.477.0555 Westside Cafe & Market | 2211 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7890 Yama Sushi | 168 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.7332 Yeti’s Grind | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.1515

You wouldn’t ride without your helmet...

Asian Cuisine

LD

Sandwiches

BLD

Seasonal American

D

Northern Italian

LD

$ $ $$$ $

Prime Rib/Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Creative American

D

$$$

French and American

D

$$

French

D

$$$

Classic Diner, Traditional Favorites

BL

Contemporary American

D

$ $$

Mexican

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$

Family/American/European

BLD

$

International Café

BLD

$

Chinese

LD

$

Japanese/Peruvian

D

$$

Barbecue

LD

$

Creative Seafood/Meat

LD

$$

Sushi/Asian

LD

$$

Southwestern Steak House

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

$ $

Sushi/Japanese

D

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

BLD

$

Continental/Wild Game

LD

$$

Mexican

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Sushi, Asian

LD

$

Creative American

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Mountian American Grill

BLD

$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Eclectic Pub

D

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Italian & Pizza

LD

$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Sushi and Pacific Spices

D

$$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

The team at Oakson Dentistry is here for you!

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

VAIL

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Off Season Special

12 Entrées

$

Fri. 5/17 @ 10 p.m.

New Country Dog Why would you ride without insurance? shop Compare apply online Mountain Health Insurance.com 970.845.8910 Brill Insurance Agency Avon, CO 22

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, May 16, 2013 -Wed., May 22, 2013

Steve Oakson, DDS General Dentistry

Located in Gypsum since 2001 Gypsum Plaza Suite, 620 D Red Table Drive

524-1105

Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-6 pm

97 Main St., W101 Riverwalk in Edwards 926-2729


Simplify Your Life!

A Sensible and Aordable Approach to Child Care • Flexible... in-home child care, up to

45 hours per week

• Choose... an au pair from France,

Germany, China, Spain, Brazil and many other countries

• Educated, English Speaking... au pairs,

18-26 years of age

• Culturally Rewarding... experience

for the entire family

• $344 Weekly Cost... per family,

not per child

Consignment Furniture... RedeďŹ ned New Furniture Daily!

970-949-0989 222 Chapel Place Avon, CO 81620 www.nestvail.com

                

Intercultural Child Care Programs

The perfect child care solution for today’s busy families!

Call us today 800-333-3804 ext.2

www.euraupair.com

    

  

    

   

     - Using the combined buying power of 1000 Carpet One stores, we have been able to stock up on incredible deals. We are passing Huge Savings on to our customers.    - With 140 wall-to-wall Carpet and Hardwood Floors In Stock, You will be sure to find one that is just right for your home. We can install your new floor right away.



        

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Serving the Vail Valley since 1972 810 Nottingham Road, Avon • 970-949-5390 • www.ruggsbenedict.com

Thursday, May 16, 2013 -Wed., May 22, 2013

|

sneakpeak

23


24

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, May 16, 2013 -Wed., May 22, 2013


SneakPEAK May 16, 2013