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Thursday, Mar. 21 - Mar. 27, 2013

Welcome cat crew to the

How the evolution of Vail grooming has helped the resort blossom since 1962

American Ski Classic

Legends reminisce at Vail pro-am bash

The state of snowpack

What does it mean for summer?

5 ideas for family fun

Easter-egg hunts, night skiing and more Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

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Photo special to SneakPEAK.

When the quality of service matters...

Music in any language From Mali to New Orleans, Toubab Krewe draws inspiration from sounds found all over the planet. By Jenna Stecker.

D

espite society’s insistence on labeling, there are some things that just defy classification.

can get a crowd moving. Even the band name is a fusion of contemporary and roots. In several West African languages “toubab” means “foreigner.” The spelling of Krewe is homage to the city New Orleans and it’s style (krewe refers to a group that puts on a carnival or ball for Mardi Gras). It’s a city that holds a special place in Toubab Krewe’s hearts. “We all are drawn to music with history and roots, so even Asheville, N.C.-based Toubab Krewe is just one of those before we started playing in New Orleans, we knew that we things. Uplifting, enjoyable and eclectic, this five-piece in- wanted our music to be like the city itself, taking a bunch of strumental ensemble fuses the originality and roots of West styles and genres and putting them together and coming out Africa with the drive and panache of contemporary music. with something completely new and unique.” Quaranta says. Toubab Krewe’s music is mainly instrumental. There are challenges when your main influence comes from countries where you don’t speak the language. What: Toubab Krewe, a West-African inspired “None of us were fluent in any dialect,” admits Quaranta. band At first the group just played reworked traditional West Where: Agave, Avon African tunes. When: Thursday, March 28 at 9 p.m. “We were drawn to the percussive side of the songs at first. Tickets: $13 presale at www.agaveavon.com But then we picked up more on the melodic side of the music,” Quaranta says.

If you go...

Toubab Krewe consists of Terrence Houston (drums), Luke Quaranta (percussion, djembe), David Pransky (electric bass, guitar), Drew Heller (electric guitar and soku), and Justin Perkins (kamale ngoni, kora, electric guitar). Some of these members have known each other almost since birth. The group solidified in college after meeting at a drum and dance group and discovering they all had a shared love for the traditional music of West Africa. During those formative college years, the group began traveling to West Africa, particularly to Guinea and the Ivory Coast to study and participate in the music of the region. But it was one specific trip to Mali that energized Perkins and Heller to form a band. “Mali was the heart of what used to be the Mali Empire. Right from the start, we related to Mali. Its music is so diverse and all encompassing,” says Quaranta.

Strife overseas Over the years, the band has incorporated many different styles into their play, with rock and surf style sensibilities swirling amid this melting pot of genres. The band has expanded their reach, both in their appeal to the mainstream American audience and within each of their own personal musical practices. Toubab Krewe’s second studio album, “TK2,” was released in 2010. The band had plans this year to travel back to Mali and record their third album with many of the friends and musicians they first learned from. However, Toubab Krewe has been forced to change gears thanks to civil strife in the country. In January 2012, a Tuareg rebellion began in Northern Mali. Rebels quickly took control of the north, declaring its independence. However, some Islamic groups who had helped the rebels defeat the government then turned on the A new musical language Tuareg and seized the north. Finally at the beginning of this Mali is certainly at the heart of Toubab Krewe’s music. year, French Armed Forces intervened with Malian troops Many of its members play traditional West African instru- and claimed to have retaken control of the last strongholds ments, and the vibe is laced with the history of the West Af- in the north. There is still much instability and unrest in the rican countries. However these are American men, and their [See TOUBAB KREWE, page 13] sound is a contemporary one infused with everything that

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Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

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tracking with the

Big Cats As Vail expanded over time, the resort’s snow cat fleet has set an industry standard for grooming. By Phil Lindeman. Cover by Susi Thurman.

C

ome 3 p.m. on any given day during ski season, Larry Knoll is a ridiculously busy man, and last Friday was no different. As other managers wrapped up their work and eyed happy hour, Knoll took at least five cell phone calls in five minutes. In that period, the supervisor of grooming operations at Vail patiently balanced his foreman on the cat crew, his boss at mountain operations, the manager of Game Creek Club and a handful of other mountain personnel, all making last-minute requests before the weekend. “I guess I’m dealing with projects throughout the day, but these ones always seem to be the most important,” Knoll says, pausing briefly to look at his phone as it buzzes once again across a conference table in the cat yard just west of Lionshead. “Sometimes, procrastination makes them that way.” In terms of on-mountain jobs at North America’s largest ski resort, Knoll’s workload represents the best – and worst – of Vail Resort’s ever-expanding reach, with one foot in the relatively romantic world of the ski industry and the other

in a corporate environment rife with emails, phone calls and manager meetings. Knoll’s dress attire consists of jeans and a plaid shirt, yet it’s telling that his smartphone sits holstered on the same leather belt as a battered two-way radio. He knows the ins and outs of the snow cats – such as which ones drift to the left and which ones drift to the right – but hasn’t made regular rounds on the hill in more than a decade. After 33 years in the department, Knoll has a feel for the intangibles that go along with supervising snow cats, and he’s quickly adapted his skills to groom more terrain than any resort in the U.S. Since he came to Vail as a fresh college graduate in 1980, the nightly grooming workload has expanded from 400 acres to roughly 1,000 acres today – just less than one-fifth of the resort’s overall acreage. At the same time, the mountain was spreading in every direction: Blue Sky Basin, China Bowl, and both Inner and Outer Mongolia bowls have added close to a combined 1,000 acres in the past 30 years. The multi-million dollar cat fleet expanded to cover nearly seven miles of trails, bowls and cat-tracks, swelling from just five cats and a dozen operators to 30 cats with a mid-season team of 70. And if growth means more machines and manpower, then naturally, it also means more expectations and phone calls. Last Friday, everyone wanted pristine snow, and Knoll was the guy to call. After all, it’s the middle of March – prime time for spring vacationers and what groomers dub “cat sea-

(left) Snowcat drivers head out for late afternoon grooming on Vail Mountain. (right) Cat operator Connor Mathews on his route. Susi Thurman photos. son.” His first shift of 14 machines was just heading out for 10 hours of work, followed by a second and third shift of roughly the same size. Together, the crews run constantly from 3:30 p.m. to 9 a.m., seven days a week. (Don’t even ask about the now-defunct “day” grooming schedule – it’s not coming back.) “That’s one thing Vail is known for, the good grooming,” Knoll says after fielding a quick, to-the-point call. “People come here because they expect the best of the best – even on trails that would otherwise be difficult to maintain – and we do our best to deliver.” From Kristi Kat to Pipe Dragon The grooming operations in Knoll’s first season seem somewhat quaint today, but when Vail first opened in 1962, they didn’t exist. At the time, grooming was almost wholly manual, if it happened at all. Ski patrol would track up-anddown steeper slopes like Pepi’s and International to keep snow from sloughing off, while resort co-founder Earl Eaton slowly dragged a hand-rigged pipe behind his Kristi Kat, a rudimentary machine more like a snowmobile than today’s

[See SNOW CATS, page 24]

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Getting a new chance on the slopes

Five Mississippi students get first Colorado ski experience By Melanie Wong

Ski vacations to Colorado aren’t uncommon as a spring break trip. For five students who visited the slopes of Vail last week, the trip was a potentially life-altering event. It’s not everyday that you not only get to see snow for the first time, but spend an entire day skiing on it. That was the chance several students from Jackson, Miss., got last week as they spent a week learning to ski and tromping around the Colorado mountains. Tiffany Porter, 16, Tamishia Porter, 14, Tyreese Porter, 6, Travon Owens, 11 and Angel Stubbs, 12, were selected by The Wisdom Foundation, a Jackson-based nonprofit designed to expose at-risk students to new environments, people and ideas through hands-on learning. Past trips have included Washington, D.C., the American Southwest, New York City, and Farms for City Kids in Reading, Vt. The foundation partnered with Avon-based youth nonprofit SOS Outreach. To help make the ski trip a reality, the outdoor organization provided the group with snow gear and skis, plus lift tickets, lessons and meal vouchers via Vail Resorts. “This was a perfect fit for us to get involved,” says SOS Outreach Development Director Seth Ehrlich. “Taking these kids from Jackson, Miss. – some of whom had never stepped foot on snow – and providing them with a ski experience is a perfect example of our introductory program, and we were very excited to partner on. We were so excited to see how Students from Jackson, Miss., enjoy a day on the slopes they were just grinning to pick up their gear. It really brings at Beaver Creek. They were among five kids who had their first-ever ski experience last week thanks to a you back to how valuable the experience is.” partnership between nonprofits The Wisdom Foundation and SOS Outreach. Photo special to SneakPEAK. A life-changing vacation The five children were chosen to attend the all-expenses- Foundation Director Adam Sievering. “We try to reinforce paid trip based on academic performance, community ser- that learning takes place everywhere, not just in the classvice and need. room. They also support by volunteering in events. Their “They have just shown a pretty remarkable sense of com- commitment distinguishes them from many of the other kids mitment to learning outside the classroom,” says Wisdom we work with.”

Four of the kids on the trip were siblings and came from a troubled family life. They were taken from their mother’s care for abuse and ended up with a caring woman who worked to redirect their lives, and that included getting them involved with the Wisdom Foundation. Besides learning to ski at Beaver Creek, the kids learned about mountain safety and team building, visited hot springs, bird watched, visited a yurt, had lunch on Tennessee Pass, ice skated, and enjoyed pizza at Blue Moose (they had never “had pizza out” before.) All were new activities for the kids, none of whom had been to Colorado. In fact, six-year-old Tyreese had never seen snow prior to the trip. Wisdom Foundation Executive Director Elizabeth Keller says the experience, while commonplace or merely a fun vacation for the average person, positively changed the kids’ lives. “There are many reasons this is important,” she says. “Our five students are from one of our country’s poorest and most underserved communities. Their ability to see a world beyond Jackson is essential to their future. The expense of snow skiing would have prohibited our selected students from participation. Together, Wisdom and SOS are providing what is truly a first-in-a-lifetime experience.” Keller adds that while standing at the base of a bustling Beaver Creek, she spoke to the kids about how everyone there had to make good choices, work hard and make sacrifices to be able to enjoy skiing. “I said that if coming back to Beaver Creek is something they want in the future, they will have to work hard and sacrifice, too,” she says. “I said that drugs and teenage pregnancies don’t make for ski vacations, that failing grades and school drop-out don’t make ski vacation.” The skiing bug The experience had its challenges, but as Tyreese, says,

[See SOS O, page 13]

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Flashbacks on Vail Mountain

Actor Giancarlo Esposito cruises past the gates at last year’s Korbel American Ski Classic celebrity race. Photo special to SneakPEAK

The legends of the American Ski Classic remember their finest moments on Vail’s slopes. By Melanie Wong

T

amara McKinney has done some of her best racing on Vail Mountain.

The California-based ski racer was the first American woman to ever capture the World Cup overall title, and won a gold medal at the 1989 World Alpine Ski Championships in Vail. This week, she will be among many other retired pros pulling out their racing boots for the 31st annual Korbel American Ski Classic. The pro-amateur race brings together ski racing legends and celebrities of all kinds for five days of racing and events, beginning Wednesday, March 20.

Joining the legends McKinney’s prolific career earns her a spot as this year’s Legend of Honor. She’ll be joining the ranks of Pepi Gramshammer, President Gerald Ford, Billy Kidd and Jimmie Heuga. “Watching Tamara throughout the course of her career, she certainly embodied the true spirit of competition,” says Ceil Folz, president of the Vail Valley Foundation. “When you consider all that she accomplished, becoming not only one of the best ski racers this country has ever produced, as well as one of the greatest ski racers in the history of the sport, she is extremely deserving of this very special honor.” McKinney was raised on skis, with a ski instructor mom and a horse jockey father. She joined the U.S. Ski Team in 1977 and took her first World Cup win in 1981 in Switzerland. Two years later, in 1983, she stunned the world by winning the overall World Cup title, courtesy of seven victories during the season. No other American woman had ever taken the title, and only one other non-European racer, Canadian Nancy Greene, had ever managed the feat.

McKinney went on to claim World Championships combined bronze medals in both the 1985 and 1987 events, but faced several challenging years battling injuries. Vail and Beaver Creek became the sites for her comeback in 1989. At the World Championships, McKinney reclaimed her title as the best American woman on skis, taking the combined gold medal and the bronze in slalom. McKinney, not known as a speed specialist, was trailing Swiss superstar Vreni Schneider by 0.12 seconds following the combined slalom, when the American laid down the third fastest downhill run to secure the win. At the post-race press conference, she told reporters that her feet had been completely frozen from the negative-24 degree temperatures during the slalom, and that she was still suffering from frostbite on two toes on her left foot. McKinney retired from competitive skiing in 1990 with a total of 18 individual World Cup wins, three World Cup Giant Slalom discipline titles, the 1983 Overall World Cup crown and four World Alpine Ski Championships medals. Homecoming weekend McKinney isn’t the only American Classic skier with fond memories of Vail. Retired U.S. Ski Team member Terry Aloha will return for his 17th year racing the Ski Classic. In many ways, the annual race is a bit of a homecoming for Aloha, who moved to Vail in 1980 to train at Ski and Snowboard Club Vail (then Ski Club Vail), and spent nearly 14 seasons there. “Vail is close to my heart, and I consider it my second home,” Aloha says. Besides logging more than 1,000 training runs on Golden Peak, the slope was also the site of one of Aloha’s best races. In 1981, he had a string of 10 wins and wrapped the Denver Bank Elbert Series with a win on Golden Peak. Vail was also the site of his first World Cup race, held on Giant Steps in 1983.

Event highlights All races take place at Vail’s Golden Peak Wednesday, March 20 Conway Cup at 11:30 a.m. – Four-member teams of local racers compete in dual race format. The winning team advances to the Korbel Ford Cup celebrity team race on March 22 and 23. Thursday, March 21 Volvo Legends Giant Slalom finals at 6 p.m. – The final four women and men of the race will compete in a head-to-head single-elimination race. North Mississippi Allstars at 6:30 p.m. – Free concert follows the race at the base of Golden Peak. Friday, March 22 Hold ‘Em for Hope at 7:30 p.m. – Dinner and casino night benefiting the Vail Valley Foundation. Held at the Sebastian in Vail Village. Saturday, March 23 Ford Cup Finals at 2:30 p.m. – Teams of five racers, made up of legends and celebrities, ski head to head (with handicaps). Battle of the Legends relay at 3:45 p.m. – A North American and an international team, each made up of five legends, will compete in a nonstop, dual-format, no-handicap relay.

“I didn’t ski well, but was happy to race in front of friends and family,” Aloha says. “I also have fond memories of the local Town Series races. Back in those days they were restaurant sponsored, and winning dinner vouchers was the only way I could afford eating at Vail’s great restaurants.” When not racing, you might find Aloha tearing down his

[See SKI CLASSIC, page 25]

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A look at the state of the snowpack Experts say current snowfall totals could mean questionable summer conditions By Michael Suleiman He jumped the 35-foot cliff past the landing, making it a 50-foot drop instead. The second he landed, the avalanche broke to the ground as the rest of us watched in horror. Fortunately, he was a phenomenal skier and skied away from it. We were in East Vail Chutes, and the avalanche danger was high. We were lucky that day, but such situations weren’t uncommon this season across the state. The snowpack has been tricky to read and full of surprises. Inconsistent snowfall and

Track the snow

Colorado’s snowpack level continues to be lower than normal and behind last year. Eagle River Water and Sanitation District tracks the “snow water equivalent” at the Vail Mountain SNOTEL site. See www.erwsd.org to view weekly graphs to see how much water is in the snowpack and what that means for summer water supply.

wavering temperature gradients contribute to avalanches, low water levels, and of course decreased visits to the resorts. Believe it or not, Colorado is a water state and relies heavily on snowfall for tourism in the winter as well as the summer. This past summer, thanks to a dry winter, was one of the worst boating seasons Colorado has seen in quite some time. Unfortunately, this season and last we have been far from record snowfall. And yes, enthusiastic guy on the lift, your nostalgic comments about how some guest “should have been here two seasons ago” because it was “epic” are valid, but miss the point. This season has proven to be dramatically more enjoyable than last, and there’s still more to come.

Skier Michael Suleiman points out an unstable layer of snow on Vail Pass. Avalanche conditions have persisted throughout the winter, thanks to wild fluctuations in temperature and snowfall. Michael Suleiman photo. The snow-pit test In order to get a good look at this year’s snow pack, we dug a full snow pit on Vail Pass at an elevation of roughly 11,000 feet. The current snow-pack depth around the Vail Pass area is 55 inches or roughly 4.5 feet. Currently the avalanche conditions are high, due to a firm ice layer six inches below the fresh snow. After performing the basic shovelshear test, among others, it was easy to see our current layer of instability is due to the warm weather the Vail area had one week ago. The warm temperatures formed a sun crust that the new snow is having a difficult time bonding to. Because of the new snow on top of the old frozen layer, there is a considerable avalanche danger, and these conditions will continue to be hazardous if the weather fluctuations persist.

When it comes to snow, meteorologist Joel Gratz is the man to talk to. As founder of www.opensnow.com, Gratz spends his time attempting to gauge exactly how much snowfall certain areas, especially ski areas, will get. Opensnow.com debuted a little over two years ago, and the website has become increasingly popular among powder junkies. As a knowledgeable and passionate skier, he takes his snow predictions seriously. “So far, this season is actually below last season in terms of snowfall at mid Vail. However, it’s not just about the total amount of snow, but when it falls and what the temperatures are between storms. This season has seen snow fall somewhat consistently since the last part of December, and temperatures have stayed cold enough to preserve the snow. This will not go down as a big snow season, but conditions have been good and there were plenty of powder days to be had,” says Gratz. Although Gratz generally predicts the shorter-term weather, he gave SneakPEAK a few ideas about what we could have in store this spring. “March will be far snowier this season compared to last season, when we received very little snow and experienced exceptionally warm temperatures. There will be at least a few storms for the second half of this March, and the additional snow should ensure that coverage on the slopes stays pretty good,” he says. Looking to spring and summer The National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is another group that keeps a watchful eye on how the water accumulation has been in comparison to previous years. The snowfall and snowpack are good indications of how Colorado’s watersheds will look in the spring. However, there are other aspects that play a role in Colorado’s spring and summer water levels. Not all snowstorms hold the same water content. Sometimes a 6-inch snowstorm will bring a snow water density of 20 percent, if it is a wetter storm. Often,

[See SNOWPACK, page 24]

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A gourmet restaurant, dressed down

Private chef Marc Rouse bring his in-demand home cooking to Avon with Food! by Marc. By Phil Lindeman.

F

or a chef, Marc Rouse finds inspiration in the most unlikely places. Take the catalyst for his latest venture, Food! by Marc: windows.

And this doesn’t mean the cuisine coming from Rouse’s kitchen at the Four Seasons building in Avon is airy or transparent. When the longtime private chef and restaurateur was looking for a new space to prep meals for his catering business, the ground-level units just outside of the town center seemed like a perfect match – close to his clients in Bachelor Gulch, large enough to house his equipment and small enough to not demand a full restaurant. But those windows still posed a problem. Hidden on the north side of the Four Seasons, the space is surrounded by windows looking out at a nearby pedestrian walkway. Rouse knew he either had to black them out and move forward with a strict catering kitchen, or take an unorthodox approach and turn Food! by Marc – which has been around since 2006 – into a culinary studio. In typically ambitious fashion, he chose the latter, using the same fresh and organic items from his other ventures to craft dishes for diners who can’t quite afford the in-house experience. “We’re using the same ingredients as Sweet Basil or Larkspur or Splendido,� says Rouse, whose past experience with restaurants includes the popular Frisco-based Italian joint Bagalis. “We’re just trying to make that type of fresh, inventive, good food affordable.� Rouse’s new space and concept was unveiled a little more

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than three months ago, with seating for 12 at lunch and dinner service. (Lunch and dinner are available Monday through Friday, with dinner service only on Saturday.) Unlike most restaurants, where the majority of dishes are prepped in the back of the house, everything at Food! by Marc is made in the open – truth is, there’s nowhere for Rouse and his team of chefs to hide. “Anywhere you’re at in this restaurant, you can see the kitchen,â€? Rouse says. “It’s really the ultimate experience for people who like cooking – people can talk with the chefs and learn what they’re doing, hear about our experience. This is so different than a normal kitchen experience.â€? As Rouse alludes to, he takes the idea of an open kitchen one step further, encouraging his crew to chat with diners while they prep catered meals for Bachelor Gulch, private dishes for clients at the Solaris in Vail and the signature small plates his in-house visitors adore. It’s an extension of the approach that has made him such a popular private chef at nearby resorts, where he tweaks meals to fit any request, from Mexican fiestas for quinceaĂąeras to seven-course meals paired with wine. Today, he admits that his roster of high-end clients is so large, he can’t even estimate how many there are. “For us, it’s about creating an experience for our clients, no matter where they are,â€? Rouse says. “That is all we do, and working directly with people is really the key.â€? Small plates, big flavor Although the kitchen at Food! by Marc churns out every flavor and style imaginable, Rouse says the in-house menu skews toward contemporary cuisine. It’s his favorite style to work with, and as a very, very small restaurant, it lets his dishes dazzle without becoming pretentious or overdone.

Chef Marc Rouse prepares casual lunch and dinner dishes with a gourmet flair at the recently opened Avon restaurant. The concept spawned from his longrunning private chef service, which he now runs in the same space as the restaurant. Kent Pettit photo. “Everything we do is homemade,� Rouse says. “We make our own flatbreads, desserts, sauces – just about anything. You name it, we have it, and we really try to base our items off customer interest.� Take the studio’s weekday happy hour menu, filled with the tapas-style dishes so popular at many restaurants: braised lamb bruschetta, crispy lemon-basil shrimp, mahi-mahi cakes and various types of flatbread. The food sounds intriguing enough, but at $5 per plate, it’s delectable gourmet

[See FOOD! BY MARC, page 25]

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Musical family comes to Vail

North Mississippi Allstars play free Golden Peak show By Laura Lieff Growing up in a musical household, brothers Luther and Cody Dickinson were surrounded by the music of their father, Memphis legend Jim Dickinson, who played with Bob Dylan, Aretha Franklin and the Rolling Stones, among others. Clearly influenced by the authentic music of the South, Luther (guitar, vocals) and Cody (drums, vocals) formed the North Mississippi Allstars in 1996 and pioneered their own brand of blues-infused rock and roll. At this weekend’s Korbel American Ski Classic, the North Mississippi Allstars will showcase their talent by playing a free show on March 21 at 6:30 p.m. at Golden Peak in Vail. Concertgoers can expect high-energy, foot-stomping music that will keep the crowd on their feet all evening long. Released in 2000, the North Mississippi Allstars’ debut album, “Shake Hands With Shorty,� earned them a Grammy nomination for “Best Contemporary Blues Album.� After earning

If you go... Who: North Mississippi Allstars When: Thursday, March 21 at 6:30 p.m. Where: Golden Peak, Vail How much: Free. The concert is part of the Korbel American Ski Classic’s lineup of events.

leased two albums since then. In 2012, Luther formed The Wandering, a five-piece folk band featuring Shannon McNally, Amy LaVere, Valerie June and Sharde Thomas and released their debut record “Go On Now, You Can’t Stay Here.� He also recorded and released a solo acoustic album, “Hambone’s Meditations,� which earned a 2013 Grammy nomination for “Best Folk Album.� Meanwhile, Cody expanded his musical career as a producer working with a wide range of musicians, including Lucero, Cisco Adler and Les Claypool. He also produced British blues guitarist Ian Siegal’s last two albums, “The Skinny� (2011) and “Candy Store Kid� (2012), both of which were nominated for “Best Contemporary Blues Album� at the annual Blues Music Awards. Despite all his work as a producer, Cody continues to be one of the industry’s premier drummers, demonstrated by his 2013 Blues Music Awards nomination in the “Best Instrumentalist/Drums� category. The Dickinson brothers reunited in 2010 to record “Keys to the Kingdom� after the passing of their father. Most recently, Luther and Cody have toured extensively with Robert Plant and The Band of Joy, headlined major festivals and have spent time on the road internationally as a headliner and with Ian Siegal as part of The Mississippi Mudbloods. They also released two live bootleg records, 2011’s “Live in the Hills� and 2012’s “Live in the Hills Volume II,� both recorded at the annual North Mississippi Hill Country Picnic in Potts Camp, Miss. Always welcoming collaboration, the North Mississippi Allstars are at times joined by Lightnin’ Malcolm, Alvin Youngblood Hart and the legendary Chris Chew, among other talented musicians.

two more Grammy nominations in the same category for “51 Phantom� (2001) and “Electric Blue Watermelon� (2005), the band earned a reputation as one of the most intriguing acts to emerge from Southern blues and roots rock. In 2008, after five studio albums and more than a decade touring together, the Dickinson brothers decided to pursue other projects. In 2009 Luther teamed up with Alvin YoungSneakPEAK writer Laura Lieff can be reached at blood Hart and Jimbo Mathus to form the South Memphis info@sneakpeakvail.com String Band. The trio has toured across the country and re-

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5

springtime Family activities

When parents and kids are mountain-bound, the Vail Valley has little something for everyone. By Phil Lindeman.

Thursday Night Lights cap off the evening with lights and fireworks every Thursday at dusk throughout the season. Intermediate to advanced skiers can participate in a glow-stick parade down the front of Beaver Creek Mountain. Younger kids can watch the spectacle from the base. Dan Davis photo.

S

pringtime in the Rocky Mountains can be tricky.

One day you’re making turns in 8 inches of fresh powder, and the next you’re struggling along mashed-potato catwalks. But throw a slew of kids into the mix, and the snow conditions on a ski trip seem like a minor detail. Yet Eagle County is an ideal setting for families in March and April, even after the lifts stop spinning for the day. Vail and Beaver Creek host dozens of activities crafted for the entire brood, and the surrounding towns are teeming with diversions to give everyone a break from the snow. SneakPEAK compiled a list of fresh ideas to entertain local and visiting families alike, taking into account rambunctious youngsters and eye-rolling teens. As for those finicky spring conditions, well, Mother Nature doesn’t listen to temper tantrums.

SpringFest’s marquee event is arguably Thursday Night Lights, a long-standing tradition hosted by the ski school. Every Thursday at dusk, intermediate and advanced skiers cruise down the front face of Beaver Creek with glow sticks, making for a whimsical show unlike anything throughout the year. It’s ideal for older kids to participate and younger kids to watch, and the skiing is capped off with a fireworks display. Registration for the glow-stick portion is free by calling the ski school at 970-754-5464, but a lift pass is required. Down-valley egg hunts Eagle and Gypsum take pride in crafting events for the community, and springtime brings the much-loved Easter egg hunts. The Eagle version, held on Saturday, March 30 in Eagle Town Park, begins at 10 a.m. and boasts hundreds eggs, all filled with prizes and candy for kids under 10 years old. At the same time, older brothers and sisters (up to 12 years old) can test their engineering skills with the annual Eggernaut competition. The concept is straight from a science fair: Craft a structure from any material, nestle an egg inside and see if it survives a 30-foot drop from the top of a fire engine ladder. Down the road in Gypsum, the Easter Eggstravaganza at Lundgren Theater Park on March 30 stays true to its wild name. From 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., families can enjoy a free breakfast, egg hunt, kid-friendly games and photo ops with the Easter bunny. Next door at the Gypsum Recreation Center, the ever-popular underwater egg hunt is perfect for swimmers between 5 and 10 years old. The events take place at various times throughout the morning, so be sure to arrive early and stay until the end. Of course, Mother Nature is a constant unknown, but Eagle and Gypsum both carry on unless conditions are extreme.

Beaver Creek SpringFest At a resort known for free afternoon cookies and a bunnyhill gondola, Beaver Creek’s late-season highlight is SpringFest, an annual celebration built just for families. From now Teen Trick Classes at the Edwards until April 6, the village atmosphere is half Disneyland, half Anti-Gravity Center winter wonderland: There are the kid’s parades at 4 p.m. On vacation, teens occasionally get lost in a sea of youngeach Saturday and Sunday; the game and food-filled carnier siblings. Beaver Creek has partnered with the Edwards vals every Saturday afternoon; the themed ice-skating nights Field House for a round of freestyle boot camps, held every on Mondays at 6 p.m.; and a village-wide Easter-egg hunt at Thursday evening until April 4. The field house’s Anti-Grav10:30 a.m. on March 30.

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5

4

ity Center is a den of trampolines where skiers and riders can hone inverts and spins, sans broken bones. During the threehour event, teens get 45 minutes of training with local instructors, followed by open time on the tramps and ice cream at the nearby Marble Slab. Best part: Teens won’t be stuck brooding once the slopes close. Registration is $50 (plus a $4 service fee) and includes trampoline time, ice cream and transportation from Beaver Creek. Registration and schedule details are online at bcteens2012.eventbrite.com. Foodie families The Vail Valley culinary scene is one of the richest in Colorado – if not the entire Rocky Mountains – but the intricacies of braised lamb with cherry compote can be lost on a kiddo who craves Lunchables. A handful of restaurants find a comfortable middle ground between quality dining and family-friendly fare, all while keeping prices reasonable. Blue Moose Pizza, found in the Lionshead and Beaver Creek villages, is the sort of pizza place locals gladly recommend – and not because they’re hiding other secrets. You could splurge for one of 16 specialty pies, but this is a New York-style joint, and the 18-inch cheese ($17.95) is simple, scrumptious and easily feeds four or five famished skiers. Good luck doing the same for so little on the mountain. Blue Moose is also one of the few valley-based shops that sell pizza by the slice ($2.95 to $3.95), and both locations appeal to weary parents with nearly a dozen rotating microbrew taps. A bit further down-valley, the newly opened Yummy CafÊ on the east end of Eagle is fast becoming a go-to breakfast and lunch spot. It might soon catch on with families, thanks to a kid’s menu with only one option more than $5, from a breakfast quesadilla with scrambled eggs to the pint-sized version of scratch-made mac and cheese. Adults eat just as well, choosing from a massive breakfast menu with no items past $10 (the Rocky Mountain Benedict with steak is stellar) or equally impressive and affordable lunch menu, with dinner service soon to come. Fun, fast and free Forget spending even $10 on a family activity. Plenty of

[See FAMILY FUN page 13]

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52 WEEKS VAIL VALLEY of the

sneakPeak wants you to send in your photo submissions that capture what makes living in the Vail Valley great. We’ll feature one photo each week, so send in images from your latest adventures and other captured moments from around town, along with a short caption, to melanie@sneakpeakvail.com. 220 EPC SSO

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At your service

Beaver Creek Ski Patrol’s avalanche dogs are on patrol. From left: Digby (handler Kara Levine), General Leigh (handler Matt Sargent), Ellie (handler Eric Blitzstein), Dixie (handler Jeff Thompson), and Meeka (handler Dave Martin). Photo special to SneakPEAK.

Events to raise funds for Beaver Creek’s avalanche dogs. By Nell Davis.

D

ogs may be man’s best friend but, for Beaver Creek’s ski patrollers, skiers and snowboarders, their role extends much further than that.

The mountain’s avalanche dogs serve an important purpose on the mountain, executing search-and-rescue operations. These intelligent lifesavers and their dedicated handlers train and work hard to prepare to assist victims caught in avalanche slides. The nonprofit organization BARC (Beaver Creek Avalanche Canines) started in 2012, and benefits the education and training of Beaver Creek’s avalanche dogs and patrollers for rescues in Eagle County. Two upcoming fundraisers will aim to raise money to support BARC on March 26 at the Coyote Cafe in Beaver Creek and April 3 at ETown in Edwards (6 p.m. to 9 p.m. both nights). There will be a silent auction, with loads of items up for bid, including gift cards to local restaurants, Lakota Guides raft trips, and a monthly pass to Manic Training. Raffle tickets and ski patrol merchandise will also be for sale. Think of it as raising funds for canine scholarships. Beaver Creek Ski Patrol’s current roster of avalanche dogs include General Leigh and Mica, sisters who are Australian cattle dog/border collie mixes; Digby, a German Shepard; and two labs, Ellie and Dixie. Digby and Ellie are still in training, while the other three are CRAD (Colorado Rapid Avalanche Deployment) certified. Training potential CRAD candidates involves a process called “4 phase training.” First, a handler will tease their dog with a toy and then run into a snow cave. The dog is released to follow the handler with a command to “search,” and it receives a reward upon entering the cave. In phase two, the handler hides inside the cave and the door is blocked with snow. The dog must dig into the cave to receive the reward. In phase 3, the handler in the cave ignores the dog, and a second person in the cave rewards the dog. In the last phase, the dog must sniff out a random person buried in the cave. If dogs are able to find one burial in a 100-square-foot area within 20 minutes, they pass the initial test. But even then, there is much more training to do before they become CRAD certified. “Basically, the dogs just need to learn that going in the cave and finding people is the cool-

est thing in the world,” says Kara Levine, a Beaver Creek ski patroller and Digby’s handler. “It’s all about practice. We dig holes all over the mountain and just keep working on it.” The dogs mainly train at an area of the mountain called “BARC Park.” Four-to-five foot holes are dug in the snow, and volunteers (mainly rookie ski patrollers and yellow jackets earning their stripes) are placed inside, and the dogs and handlers practice searching, alerting and probing to find them. “We also practice with scent articles,” says Levine. “I’ll sleep with a wool blanket and then hide it in the snow. Digby has to find it just based on the human scent.” Well-trained avalanche dogs are an important and highly valued asset when responding to slides. Recently, a Flight for Life helicopter flew to Beaver Creek from the Front Range specifically to pick up General Leigh and her handler, Matt Sargent, to respond to a slide hundreds of miles away. Although the avalanche-dog program saves lives, it’s not particularly well funded. “We don’t get a lot of financial support,” says Levine. “Digby cut her foot recently at work, which is just one example of why it would be nice to have some kind of workman’s compensation for the dogs.” The dogs are frequently relied on as informal mascots for Beaver Creek and participate in meet-and-greets and photo opportunities with guests, but training them for their real jobs as members of search-and-rescue teams requires lots of time, energy and funds, which is where BARC and fundraisers come in. According to the Colorado Avalanche Information Center, more than one million acres of Colorado are considered avalanche terrain, and Colorado is number one in the nation for fatalities caused by avalanches. The Vail area is a haven for skiers and snowboarders to have fun, but the reality is that a slide can quickly turn a good time into a life-or-death situation. It’s crucial to have well-prepared teams in place to respond. Trained dogs and patrollers give a victim trapped in snow a much better chance of recovery and survival. So come out to ETown and Coyote Cafe to eat, drink, mingle with Beaver Creek Ski Patrol and support the BARC program. Digby, General Leigh and the rest of the canine gang will thank you. SneakPEAK writer Nell Davis can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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FAMILY FUN â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; diversions cost nothing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; walking down Bridge Street in Vail, trekking along the Eagle Valley bike path, sunning on an après deck â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but sometimes structure is key to keeping the gang entertained. Walking Mountains Science Center just north of Avon hosts guided walks every afternoon (except Sundays) at 2 p.m., led by naturalists who describe the local ecosystem in kid-friendly detail. Snowshoes are supplied when needed, but be ready for the elements and bring boots, warm clothing and sunscreen. Friday Afternoon Clubs are held on many a sun-drenched deck in the mountains, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re occasionally too rowdy

[From page 10]

for youngsters. In typical Beaver Creek fashion, the Park Hyattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s answer is a family-friendly version, complete with a free sâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mores bar, live music and, yes, beer for parents. The FAC is held every Friday afternoon until April 5 on the mountainside deck. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no shortage of ways to get the whole family engaged, for a variety of price ranges. Get that family outing started.

4HURS 3UN 12-4 pm

[From page 5]

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all five back to Jackson richer in many ways,â&#x20AC;? Keller says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is our belief that these experiences will bring greater opportunities for Wisdom children in the future â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it gives them a leg up, taught them coping and resilience, and brought stronger literacy and social understanding.â&#x20AC;? To find out more about both organizations, see www.sosoutreach.org and www.wisdomfoundation.co. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

TOUBAB KREWE â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; area, and Toubab Krewe has decided to postpone the recording of their new album and rework their original plan. Fans shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to wait too much longer for new music released by the group. They hope to record and release new music late this summer. If you cannot wait until then, come see the unique sounds of Toubab Krewe at 9 p.m. next Thursday, March 28 at Agave in Avon. $1 of the ticket fee goes to Toubab Kreweâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;School House Krewe Project,â&#x20AC;?

12

$

SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

SOS OUTREACH â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lots of things in life are hard if they are good.â&#x20AC;? All the students say they want to ski again and want to find a way to come back to Colorado in the future. Another participant, Tiffany, says she hopes to work for the mountain next winter so she can ski again. Without hesitation, all the kids said the thing they enjoyed most about the week was skiing. There were tears at the end of the trip, but Keller says she hopes the experience will help the youngsters go beyond Jackson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This Colorado experience, filled with all the vocabulary, images, physical stimulation and intellectual growth, sent

Lunch Buffet

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[From page 3]

benefitting the nonprofit Instruments 4 Africa. These donations will specifically go toward building a music school in the Bamako, Mali area. Tickets are $13 before the day of the show and can be purchased at www.agaveavon.com. SneakPEAK writer Jenna Stecker can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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Young chefs get taste of success

Battle Mountain High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s culinary team heads to nationals By John Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill

knife skills, sanitation, teamwork, appearance and how they cost the items on their menu. The BMHS team settled on a menu of a crepe with sautĂŠed mushrooms and ricotta cheese as an appetizer, almondcrusted lamb as the entrĂŠe and a savory chocolate cake for the dessert.

Beyond the storied sports boards of Battle Mountain High School is another type of team whose presence is feared across the state and, in some years, across the nation. The Battle Mountain High School ProStart team, a culinary squad of four people and one alternate, brought home another state championship this year. As a matter of fact, this will be the eighth state championship the team has won in the last 10 years. The win this year, as with those in the past, qualifies the team for the ProStart national culinary championship held in Baltimore on April Mushroom Crepes 21. Served with crème fraiche and a Pinot Noir There are four members to this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s culinary team: sereduction ($13) niors Rocio Martinez and Alex Ruben, and juniors Melissa Almond-crusted rack of lamb Bosworth and Lucas Kern. Junior Slaten Forbes is the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Served with potatoes Anna, kale with apple alternate. and fennel, and cherry demi-glace ($29) The teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head coach, Sharon Wible, says the team looks Chocolate cake with orange strong, despite edging out the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second place culinary Served with cardamom and pistachio truffle team by .125 points at the state competition on March 1. and whipped cream ($8) â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just barely came through,â&#x20AC;? Wible says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are a great team. They really worked well together and balance each other out. There were some struggles in practice, but The team practiced for the competition twice a week for they came together when it counted.â&#x20AC;? several weeks and, the week leading up the state competition. Culinary chops â&#x20AC;&#x153;The hardest thing is probably the timing of it all,â&#x20AC;? says The culinary competition may not be the most typical high Bosworth, who took charge of the dessert as her specialty. school extracurricular. The small team spends two to three â&#x20AC;&#x153;You could get these things perfect in any amount of time, days a week practicing the dishes they will present in com- but in the competition you only have an hour to make two of petition. In addition to cooking, the team is also judged on each. That is what makes it stressful.â&#x20AC;? kitchen skills. In fact, Bosworth says that she didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get the timing right The culinary competition calls for students to prepare two on her chocolate cake until three practices before the state servings of the same three-course meal: an appetizer, an en- competition. trĂŠe and a dessert. The competition limits the teams to one â&#x20AC;&#x153;We work on everything in steps,â&#x20AC;? Bosworth says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hour, and judges score the team based on taste, presentation, had to change things around a lot. We changed the dessert a

Battle Mountainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winning ProStart menu

lot, and I was cutting it pretty close at the end of practices.â&#x20AC;? The team now looks forward to the national competition, where they will represent the state of Colorado by cooking the same dish. In addition, the team takes on a new task unique to the national competition: sectioning and cutting a chicken. The judges will approach the team with two raw chickens, pick two of the four members to cut the chickens, and then give them 15 minutes to divide the bird into wings, legs and breast. They will also be given vegetables and fruit to cut. At the end, the judges will analyze the pieces for precise cuts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are preparing for nationals right now,â&#x20AC;? Wible says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nationals is much more intense. The judges check over the ingredients much more thoroughly. They watch over you to monitor how perfect your cuts are. We have six weeks between states and nationals. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll use what we learned at states and then add in the extra components. It is a step up in the competition.â&#x20AC;? Upholding a legacy In addition to winning the title of state or national champion, the ProStart competition allots winners scholarships to various culinary institutions, such as Johnson and Wales in Denver. From Battle Mountain, the ProStart team has sent many kids down the path to chefdom. In a way, the culinary team sends students to culinary schools and then out to the professional world much like prep sports teams groom their athletes for collegiate athletics and then professional sport. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I guess it is comparable,â&#x20AC;? Wible says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How many times do you produce a team of kids who goes on to compete at a national championship? How many of those kids get to compete at a national level, representing their state and getting money for college? How many of those kids go on to do it as a profession?â&#x20AC;?

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Battle Mountain High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ProStart culinary team earned the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eighth state championship title in a decade earlier this month. The team will head to national competition on April 21 in Maryland. Photo special to SneakPEAK. The BMHS team has created a namesake in the state for turning out these state champion teams. What constantly sets BMHS apart, says Wible, is experience and the help they receive from mentor chefs, along with tireless practices. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think it comes down to spending time practicing with someone who really knows what they are doing,â&#x20AC;? Wible says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The experience the mentor chefs pass on to the kids along with practicing repetitiously is what sets us apart.â&#x20AC;? This year, the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mentor chef is Heather Weems â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a culinary expert from Colorado Mountain College. Weems has worked with the team to put together the menu, helped them work within the competition timeframe and taught

them to present food capable of winning championships. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She is incredible,â&#x20AC;? Wible says of Weems. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She has great patience with the kids, and she is so passionate about what she does and that helps inspire the team. She donates a lot of time to work with the students, and they are succeeding because of it.â&#x20AC;?

     

         

SneakPEAK writer John Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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Shamrock Shuffle results

Second annual snowshoe run returns to Vail Nordic Center

The 2013 Krueger Family Shamrock Shuffle kicked off on March 16 at the Vail Nordic Center, bringing hordes of green-clad runners out for some St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekend fun. The day brought sun, rain and snow, but the second annual event still drew double the participants compared to last year, says Beth Pappas of the Vail Recreation District. 10K Snowshoe - Male Place Name Hometown Age Time 1. Matt Johnson Eagle 45 35:05 2. Nick Fickling Edwards 62 38:26 3. Karl Krueger Avon 45 40:37 4. Gavin Richardson Avon 44 43:05 5. Matt Scherr Minturn 45 47:23 6. Rob Hamina Avon 49 54:39 10K Snowshoe - Female Place Name Hometown Age Time 1. Heidi Vosbeck Glenwood Sprgs 51 40:27 2. Pavan Krueger Avon 44 43:09 3. Danielle McNair Avon 35 45:09 4. Kate Allen Avon 34 45:10 5. Robyn Bryant Eagle 49 50:55 6. Kristina Sappenfield Eagle 42 52:27 10K Other Device - Male Place Name Hometown Age Time 1. Courtney Gregory Gypsum 35 34:31 2. Mark Pribramsky Vail 44 34:38 3. Dan Chavez 32 40:08 4. Mike Hilmer Eagle 44 40:45 5. Tim Tordoff Basalt 55 1:02:02 10K Other Device - Female Place Name Hometown Age Time 1. Molly Harrison Edwards 35 31:34 2. Kristi Miller Eagle 32 39:51 3. Taylor Evans 30 41:48 4. Gabrielle Scherzer Minturn 28 42:07 5. Stephanie Ehlert Minturn 24 42:20 6. Jess Schmierer Carbondale 28 50:08 7. Karie Watts Denver 38 1:04:08

Hip Pain

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f you ever had hip pain you know how agonizing it can be. Several years ago I developed hip pain without sustaining any significant trauma or injury. I received various treatments without seeing any improvement. I was told I had bursitis and having surgery done could correct the problem. In searching for a conservative solution. I met a sports injury specialist who was developing a dynamic new treatment for soft tissue (muscles, tendons, etc) injuries. This tretment is called Active Release Treatment (ART). Dr. Daniel Chesney, DC Dr. Tina Bragg, DC Active Release Technique (ART) Functional Dry Needling Available Benefit from the same techniques the PGA & NFL use.

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He examined my hip and found a muscle that had gotten so tight it created a â&#x20AC;&#x153;false hip arthritisâ&#x20AC;?. After three treatments, my hip pain was gone and I have been running pain free ever since. Generally, we see this very common type of muscle imbalance in runners and skiers. Over the last thirteen years I have developed expertise in using ART as a treatment. If you are having hip pain, make an appointment to come and see us. By the end of your appointment, you will know what is causing your pain and also see some significant relief. One exam and treatment will tell us whether this progressive treatment of sports injuries will be a solution to your problem.

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5K Snowshoe - Male Place Name Hometown Age Time 1. Colin Szuch Evergreen 11 24:58 2. Pete Szuch Evergreen 40 28:48 3. Irwin Ray Eagle 59 32:10 4. Rob Oertel Avon 57 34:28 5. Jack Albuts 41 35:17 6. Parker Rodeen Vail 13 37:29 7. Porter Middaugh Vail 7 38:18 8. Sullivan Middaugh Vail 9 41:07 9. Hayden Krueger 8 41:49 10. Marlin Smickley Edwards 73 43:04 11. Leo Rothenberg 8 54:35 12. Andy Goulet Fort Collins 36 55:08 13. Jordan Kohler Avon 27 56:09 5K Snowshoe - Female Place Name Hometown Age Time 1. Alayna Szuch Evergreen 9 27:11 2. Jennifer Sewall Gypsum 30 27:59 3. Melanie Boock Minturn 42 29:34 4. Ingrid Middaugh Vail 36 32:07 5. Stephanie Lewis Vail 27 32:20 6. Valerie Watts Avon 53 34:29 7. Sue Bardsley Gypsum 51 38:03 8. Kari Mueller Sterling 28 38:05 9. Kristen Adams Denver 43 41:45 10. Kelley Graham Wheat Ridge 49 42:08 11. Jen Hammond 42 42:43 12. Debbie Brill Avon 54 42:55 13. Kelly Hovet Gypsum 37 45:11 14. Diana Scherr Minturn 47 48:58 15. Erin Waitley Iliff 38 50:34 16. Patty Thompson Fort Collins 54 52:55 17. Deb Deverill Vail 55 52:56 18. Ann Wilson Vail 65 54:24 19. Katie Rothenberg Vail 40 54:37 20. Katherine Sanford Fort Collins 55 55:05

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5 21. Stacy Anderson Avon 22. Cassandra Macumber Avon 5K Other Device - Male Place Name Hometown 1. Jeff Morgan Vail 2. Keith Thrasher 3. Davis Krueger Edwards 4. John Krueger Edwards 5. Scott McClarrinon Vail 6. Cameron Hammona Avon 7. Chad Dorn Minturn 8. Pete Seibert Edwards 9. Jack Morgan Vail 10. Jean Claude Moritz Edwards 11. Brian Diffley Avon 12. Bern Krueger Avon 5K Other Device - Female Place Name Hometown 1. Amy Lange Eagle 2. Sharon Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Grady Vail 3. Jody Morgan Vail 4. Claire Krueger Edwards 5. Terri Krueger Avon 6. Samantha Neale Lonetree 7. Sarah Casaletto Avon 8. Ellen Moritz Edwards 9. Nikki Neale Lonetree 10. Michaela Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor Vail 11. Melinda Tierney Vail 12. Kim Fuller Vail 13. Melisa Krueger Avon 14. Celynn McClarrinon Vail 15. Katie Krueger Avon 16. Carol Krueger Edwards 17. Christine Albertson Vail 18. Natia Luck Eagle 19. Lara Dunn Avon 20. Deanna Henry Vail 21. Alana Doughty Edwards 22. Lindsay Lemon Eagle

33 28

ANNIVERSARY R E U N I O N

55:06 56:08

Age Time 40 26:14 44 30:39 10 30:56 48 31:12 43 31:52 11 32:38 35 33:49 57 34:38 7 35:00 45 35:18 25 37:15 50 42:06 Age Time 40 28:16 40 29:03 39 29:32 12 30:07 47 30:42 32 30:46 32 31:14 45 31:57 28 32:12 24 32:36 41 32:47 26 33:17 12 33:22 42 33:42 13 33:44 51 36:22 39 36:25 26 36:25 44 37:22 50 43:04 36 45:27 30 55:07

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On the road with a vet Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s roaming animal doctor celebrates 20 years By Melanie Wong Whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a sick horse, a pup with a knee injury, or a cat that simply disappears under the bed when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for shots, Eagle veterinarian Sheila Fitzpatrick has seen it all. Most mornings, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traveling up and down the corridor of Eagle County, visiting homes to give cats and dogs check-ups and shots. When the police or state patrol have an on-road emergency involving animals, Fitzpatrick is often brought in to help. Fitzpatrick is on-call 24/7, ready to come to her patientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; homes in the middle of the night if necessary. She remembers one night being called to a car accident in Dowd Junction in the midst of a blizzard. A truck pulling a horse trailer had overturned, and Fitzpatrick helped get the horses out of the truck and tended to the injured ones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of hours,â&#x20AC;? Fitzpatrick admits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I take calls 24 hours a day. When I used to take care of horses up in McCoy, I could be up there for a couple days because I would never leave a sick horse. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m one of the old-time doctors. There arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that many like us anymore.â&#x20AC;? On the road Fitzpatrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clinic, Mountain Mobile Veterinary Service, celebrates its 20th anniversary this year, distinguishing itself as the longest-running mobile vet service in the valley. Contrary to its name, Fitzpatrick has had a physical clinic on Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Broadway for 12 years, but still spends about half her week making house calls. Her SUV carries a mobile pharmacy, X-ray equipment and everything she needs short of a surgical procedure. Originally from New York, the veterinarian moved to Colorado for vet school and ski racing. The mountains lured her to Vail after she graduated, and to her surprise, the vet business took off. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I came out here to ski and practice veterinary medicine. I thought Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d ski and do a few house calls on the side,â&#x20AC;? Fitzpatrick says, laughing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that many vets at the time, and everyone was in offices. I thought a mobile service was great because no one had cars here.â&#x20AC;? The business grew, and soon Fitzpatrick realized that in order to do surgeries and other procedures, she needed a clinic. She opened the animal hospital in Eagle, but kept the catchy name and continued making house calls. She sees it as an integral part of her job, not to mention that she was inspired to go into the profession as a child after watching a vet come to her home to treat her familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s animals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think pets are a lot more relaxed in the home than in the clinic,â&#x20AC;? Fitzpatrick says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also, I do a lot of work with

When is it an emergency?

When it comes to your dog or cat, how do you know when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an emergency? Veterinarian Sheila Fitzpatrick of Mountain Mobile Veterinarian Clinic advises pet owners to look for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three Bs.â&#x20AC;? These three symptoms indicate a life-threatening emergency, and you should take your pet to the vet immediately. Blue: Check your petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gums. If theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re blue, or you press them and color doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t return in about three seconds, this means theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having trouble breathing. Bloated: This indicates digestion and intestinal trouble. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not uncommon for a pet to have some vomiting or diarrhea in reaction to something they ate. However, owners should be concerned if their animal isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t eating, drinking or going to the bathroom. Bleeding: If a cut has gone through the skin, clean the wound, apply pressure and bring the animal to a clinic. If the animal needs stitches, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best if itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s done within four hours of the injury. Fitzpatrick says you can also check your petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s temperature, which for dogs and cats should be between 99 and 102.5 degrees. In the mountains, dog owners can help their pup prevent injuries and common diseases. Like in humans, Fitzpatrick sees many torn ligaments in active dogs, as well as cut pads and tendons caused by skis. Dogs can also suffer from heat exhaustion and dehydration on long excursions, so make sure to offer the dog water throughout the outing, not only at the end. For cat owners, Fitzpatrick says the most important health tip she can offer is to watch their diet, especially in male cats. Many commercial cat foods contain ingredients that can cause stones in catsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; urinary tracts, so look for food that say â&#x20AC;&#x153;no ash.â&#x20AC;? Finally, both dogs and cats should get regular dental cleaning and care. The bacteria that form on animalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teeth and gums lead to a slew of diseases, including heart problems, plus liver and kidney disease.

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people in hotels. I end up having clients from all over the world.â&#x20AC;? Fitzpatrick has gone to family homes to give a new puppy shots, which allows busy moms and dads to save a trip to the vetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office and also brings their kids into process. On the opposite end of a petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, Fitzpatrick also makes house calls to euthanize animals, allowing the pet to die in the comfort of its home. Vail residents Sally Jackle and Guy Ayrault, who have had Fitzpatrick care for their various cats and dogs throughout the years, say the home calls helped them through the death of their dog, Gracie. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for our pets to die, she comes to the house, and we can pet them and love them, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not traumatized in their last moments,â&#x20AC;? Jackle says. Fitzpatrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visits are also helpful with the Jackleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cats, which have all been terrified of traveling in cars, she says. Not all of Fitzpatrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visits are so unconventional. Last

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week, the clinic was buzzing with clients. One French bulldog puppy, Bob, came charging in with his owner, freshly healed from double knee surgeries to correct a birth defect. Fitzpatrick inspects him briefly before putting him back on the floor to play, and announces with satisfaction that he seemed to be doing just fine. Mountain Mobile Veterinary Clinic works with a visiting orthopedic surgeon, who operated on Bob, and a cardiologist. Even with the wide range of work done at the clinic, Fitzpatrick hopes to expand next year and add to the clinicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be pulling you around,â&#x20AC;? she says to Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s owner, chuckling as the sub-10 pound dog lunges on his leash the moment she lets him go. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing very, very well.â&#x20AC;? SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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Love to Ski: Breaking down your boots FIve tips about your most important piece of equipment Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s note: Palmer Hoyt is a Vail-based skier and the director and head coach of the University of Colorado at Boulder Freestyle Ski Team. He writes about all things skiing â&#x20AC;&#x201C; improvement, its impacts on his life and most importantly, how to have more fun on the slopes. I get a lot of questions about ski boots. My athletes complain to me about them, my ski buddies are continually curious to know more, and my most frequent topic of conversation on the ski lift pertains to the mysteries of ski boots. Ski boots are incredible. They make the exhilarating skiing process possible for humans. You could not control long, stiff skis without the key element of modern, hard-shelled boots. Wearing ski boots instantly makes you a skier. Tromping around in rigid, plastic boots with large, silly buckles sets you apart from everyone else in the world. Ski boots are not a fashion statement. You are not going to put those babies on for a stroll on a catwalk. It is against the law to drive a car while wearing them. Putting them on to go dancing is like bringing dynamite to a bonfire. Ski boots are for one thing, and one thing only: to ski. You must be committed to the sport to endure the trial of wearing ski boots. Unfortunately, sometimes the pain of the boots seem to outweigh their potential. But rather than regarding this discomfort as a burden, think of the experience as a priv-

Palmer Hoyt

;>

ilege -- a solemn, sacred right very few people enjoy. You get to be one of them. So, if ski boots are such a pain, what makes them so great? Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the conduits through which you transfer downward and forward pressure to your skis. A ski bootâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary role is to protect your feet, ankles and lower legs with an exoskeleton hard shell. It is like having bionic feet and shins. Your feet, ankles, and legs below your knees become exponentially stronger and more capable of exerting force when wearing boots. Skis are stiff. Your legs and feet are not dense enough to make skis turn on their own, not without serious injury, anyway. You think your feet hurt and get cold in ski boots? Can you imagine somehow being firmly affixed to a ski with your bare feet and trying to make skis turn on a mountain slope? It would be awful. Ski boots maximize the task of getting force from you to your skis, conducting energy from point A (you) to point B (your skis). Your ski boot is the path for force to speed directly from your body to your skis. Here are some tips to help simplify the process of dealing with ski boots, and answer some of the most common questions skiers have. 1. How should the boots fit? There should be zero extra space in a ski boot. This will make the boots feel uncomfortable when they are unbuckled, or when you are walking around in them. But, walking around in ski boots is not what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re meant for. A boot fit is intended to work buckled tightly during skiing, standing in them and leanÂŹing forward. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t judge a bootâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fit until youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve skied in them. If your boots feel great when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re skiing, but you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stand them the rest of the time, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good thing. If you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bear to walk in them, walk in your

shoes to the base of the mountain, hide your shoes someplace, and only put your boots on right before youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re about to ski. 2. They belong inside. Never leave your boots in your car or outside overnight. Make it a habit to ALWAYS BRING YOUR BOOTS INSIDE. 3. Dry your boots. Pull your liners and footbeds out of the shells at the end of the day, or invest in a boot dryer. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t put your shells, liners or footbeds close to a heater or fire. Plastic shells will melt. Heat-molded liners will lose their shape. Custom footbeds will separate. 4. Rebuckle when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not on. Whenever you arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wearing your ski boots, keep them buckled to the same setting as when you are wearing them. The rigid, high-density plastic has a certain amount of memory to it. When they are always buckled they way they are supposed to be buckled, they will fasten more easily and comfortÂŹably when you use them. If you store them loose or unbuckled, the plastic falls out of shape. 5. What kind of socks should I wear? Ski socks should be regarded as a piece of ski equipment. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wear cotton socks in ski boots. Instead, wear a synthetic or wool blend that will keep moisture away from your feet while skiing and retain warmth without adding bulk. Wear just one pair of ski socks. Never two. More than one pair will create rubbing that can lead to blisters. The thinner the ski sock, the better. Your boot liners should serve the primary purpose of insulating your feet. So buckle up and get out there. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of spring skiing to be done! SneakPEAK columnist Palmer Hoyt can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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SneakSPORTS: Last call for brackets

Get a crash course and pointers for March Madness fun

Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note: Minturn- ripe for upsets and which teams are ready to make a run to based sports fan Patrick the Final Four in Atlanta. Whitehurst writes for www. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a crash course on each region and some pointers fanrag.com. Read his mus- for enjoying the entire tournament. ings on the site or in SneakPEAK. Midwest The Louisville Cardinals are the overall top seed for the Have you filled out your entire tournament. Any team that wins the Big East champibrackets yet? Is your excuse onship is a threat to cut down the nets in April, but beware for slipping out of the office -- the Midwest bracket is stacked in 2013. The coaches of on Thursday and Friday in the top three seeds (Louisvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rick Pitino, Dukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mike order to catch the morning Krzyzewski and Michigan Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tom Izzo) have 22 Final Patrick Whitehurst and early afternoon games Four berths and six national titles between them. valid? There is still some Duke always contends for championships, but never fares time left. well as a two seed. In fact only once in the four previous FanRag.comâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College Basketball Bracket Challenge is times the Blue Devils earned a second seed have they adfree to enter. Five minutes of your hard work (this term is vanced past the first weekend of tournament play and never used very loosely) could earn you $1,000 if you are able to beyond the Sweet 16. Michigan State is battle-tested after conquer the field and finish with the top score. Pick the win- playing in the rugged Big Ten, the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top conference ners, find a Cinderella story or two, then sit back and enjoy and the St. Louis Billikens (no. 4) have overcome the death the brilliance that is March Madness. of their head coach and are capable of winning anytime they You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be a college basketball fan, know the take the floor. Colorado State (no. 8) leads the nation in retop coaches and players, or even watch the games to have bounding while Creighton (no. 7) features a prolific scorer success with a bracket challenge. There is a reason the tour- named Doug McDermott that could lead the Bluejays on a nament is simply known as March Madness, because any- deep run a la Steph Curry and Davidson a few years back. thing can and will happen. It has become painfully obvious This region is going to be fascinating! to me -- sometimes itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better to be lucky than good. In 2011, several hundred â&#x20AC;&#x153;expertsâ&#x20AC;? lamented the fact that West Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) was granted an Despite a weak RPI (fancy term for strength of schedat-large bid. The Rams were placed in the First Four, meaning the university played on Tuesday night in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;play-inâ&#x20AC;? game. It was a game that most people deemed meaningless, where the winner would become a sacrificial lamb in the next round -- the real first round. The Rams were anything but an easy out. VCU made the experts look like amateurs and made it all the way to Houston and the Final Four as an 11th seed before falling to the eighth-seeded Butler. This year VCU (no. 5 in the South) and Butler (no. 6 in the East) play the role of favorites in their first game. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always an intriguing story line waiting to unfold as the tournament begins. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to you to decipher which teams are

ule) the Gonzaga Bulldogs are the top seed. The Ohio State Buckeyes (no. 2) won the Big Ten tournament and are playing their best basketball right now, while the New Mexico Lobos (no. 3) match up well with any team in the country. Being a Badger fan, I always hope Wisconsin (no. 5) can make some noise and score more than 50 points, but this region features such parity that I find it the hardest to pick. South Kansas (no. 1) and Georgetown (no. 2) are the early favorites, but Florida (no. 3) and Michigan (no. 4) present dangerous alternatives. San Diego State (no. 7) and North Carolina (no. 8) could bust this bracket wide open. East Indiana earned top billing despite dropping three of their final six games. The Hoosiers are immensely talented, but the Miami Hurricanes (no. 2) have a chip on their shoulder after being the only team to win the ACC regular season and conference tournament in the same season and fail to land a top seed. Marquette (no. 3), Syracuse (no. 4) and UNLV (no. 5) are solid teams, and watch out for no. 11 Bucknell. The lack of superstar players makes this tournament the most difficult to predict in recent memory, but this unpredictability also makes this the most exciting three weeks of sports in the entire year. Enjoy March Madness! Schedule an â&#x20AC;&#x153;appointmentâ&#x20AC;? around lunchtime or act like your kids got in trouble at school. Pretend itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a powder day and catch the action -- itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s better than working. Good luck.

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SNOW CATS ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– monstrous groomers. Morrie Sheperd, the resort’s first ski-school director and longtime Eagle resident, calls the grooming routine in the 1960s hard labor. Simply caring for a run such as Riva Ridge – which now accounts for barely one-percent of Vail’s overall terrain – was a multi-day project, with everyone from every department chipping in to help. “We had a single snowcat in the ‘60s, and it was only a big corrugated pipe with a hitch,” Shepard recalls during an interview last September. “It dragged it over the snow, not doing much. My only memories are just trying to get the thing back on the hitch – I spent more time fixing it than anything else.” Now in his early 80s, Shepard still skies Vail once or twice a week, joining the ranks of other stalwart skiers (and current residents) like 10th Mountain Division veteran Dick Dirkes and retired downhill racer Pepi Gramshammer. Almost without pause, each claim skiing wouldn’t be possible for 80-year-old knees without modern grooming. “Those two have made learning to ski maybe 10 times easier than it used to be when we were teaching people in bumps and rough snow,” Shepard says, reverting years later to his training as an instructor at Vail. “Now, it’s ballroom smooth all the time. I probably wouldn’t still be skiing today if they were the same conditions as in ‘62.”

most an understatement. Take the example of Blue Ox, a black-diamond run on the eastern end of the resort’s frontside, just off of Chair 10. The run is buttressed by Highline, a double black, and both share similar gradients and fall lines. But once per week and occasionally on weekends, the cats groom Blue Ox to a pristine, uniform smoothness. Due to the steep terrain, the crew uses a “winch cat” – a multi-ton groomer with a giant cable boom attached, used to pull the machine up steep gradients. Winching these steep, tricky runs is an all-night task, reserved for a second shift armed with a fleet of six winch cats. The job is reserved for operators with several years of experience, and the result is effortlessly impressive: Blue Ox is a favorite early-morning run of speedsters who loathe crowds, while Highline remains a knee-killing mogul field throughout the season. “Grooming those sorts of trails, along with trails in the back bowls, has really opened terrain to a lot of intermediate skiers,” Knoll says. “It has improved what we can offer guests.” Another, more dazzling example of modern grooming is Vail’s competition-tested superpipe. Nestled at the base of Golden Peak, the monstrosity with 22-foot walls was built using a special cat called the “Pipe Monster,” which has an attachment that forms a half-U and cuts along walls of piled snow. Vail recently bought a brand-new version for the U.S. Burton Open, and with help from Ski and Snowboard Club The slopes as we know it For Knoll, “ballroom smooth” is a compliment – and al- Vail, the resort hopes to make good use of it far into the

future. “Grooming is a crucial part of what we do,” says Bryan Rooney, the senior manager of mountain operations who oversees a terrain-park crew of seven cats. “Without the assistance of that machinery, we wouldn’t be able to maintain our parks at such a high level. Park riding like we know it wouldn’t exist, and I think parks are really a necessity for resorts.” At the cat yard, Knoll and his crew are prepping for another evening on the slopes. The afternoon is warm and blustery, but by the time first shift ends, it will be dark and calm, with the inkling of a storm on the horizon. Everyone is hoping for a coating of four inches – the perfect amount for any groomer. “I think people look at these machines and think of them as tanks, that they can dump anything and go anywhere,” Knoll says after chatting with his guys, many of whom come from backgrounds in farming or construction. “But they can be really touchy. You can dig to China in no time, and that’s what we’re all afraid of, is pulling up dirt. But these guys take a lot of pride in their job. They see it as something out of the ordinary, and I guess everyone else does, too.” And then Knoll excuses himself to take yet another call. When it comes to Vail’s white gold, he’s one of the few who can’t afford to procrastinate. SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

SNOWPACK –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Colorado is blessed with drier snow, which means the density will be closer to 10 percent. So, let’s use an example provided by the NRCS. “Say there is a swimming pool that is filled with 36 inches of new powdery snow at 10 percent snow water density. If you could turn all the snow into water magically, you would be left with a pool of water 3.6 inches deep. In this case, the snow water equivalent (SWE) of your snowpack would equal 3.6 inches.” So if that 55-inch base on Vail Pass had a 20 percent average snow water density, it would be roughly 11 inches of water. According to research from NRCS, Vail Mountain’s current water SWE is 8.8 inches. The average SWE from 1971-2012 for March 1, at the Vail Mountain site was 12.8 inches. This means we are four inches below the average, or roughly 40

[From page 4]

[From page 7]

inches of dry snow below the average. The spurts of warm weather this season have created a thin snowpack and quickly melted what is out there. If snowfall remains scarce through the spring, we will see the residual effects moving into the spring and summer. The Colorado River watershed supplies water to seven western states, and how much water it supplies is directly related to snowmelt. We aren’t out of the woods yet. Keep those snow dances coming for the sake of a few more powder days this season, a great rafting season and a normal water level across the West. SneakPEAK writer Michael Sulieman can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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FOOD! BY MARC –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– on a budget, served in an ever-appealing space that combines the laid-back vibe of a bar with the bustling energy of a full-service kitchen. And the happy-hour drink menu takes things one level further, with all cocktails and select glasses of wine starting at $6. It gives Rouse room to show off his Level II Court of Master Sommelier certification with the perfect wine suggestion, plus handmade cocktails that skew towards classic, not chintzy. As with everything else, the various cocktail mixers – lemon-lime, orange juice, grapefruit juice, bitters – are made in-house, giving traditional libations like a Manhattan added personality. Rouse has also made a point to stock primarily Colorado-made liquors, using whiskey from Denver’s Fireside distillery, plus organic vodka and gin from CapRock outside of Grand Junction. Beyond afternoon eats, Rouse is particularly proud of the studio’s dinner menu. Like the restaurants of Vail Village and Beaver Creek, it changes often to make the most of seasonal ingredients and local produce. He orders the majority of his veggies from Borden Farms, an organic producer on the Western Slope, and sources all his lamb, chicken and

buffalo from Colorado, with fresh fish flown in daily. Rouse’s commitment to the base ingredients shows in something as simple as a grilled kale salad ($6), with apples, celery, walnuts, bleu cheese and a house-made vinaigrette. It has become one of the studio’s most popular dishes, along with a simple New York strip buffalo steak (pricing varies) and the seared scallops (pricing varies), with the seafood served on a bed of beet and horseradish puree with a shaved asparagus salad.

The gym-rat chef The studio concept has also given Rouse room to indulge his other culinary fetish: health food. His newfound tagline is “Healthy Food for Active Lifestyles,” which he admits seems to only target athletes. But as a self-professed gym rat, the chef often found it difficult to track down healthy, satisfying meals after a lifting session, when something odd like sushi or heavy like a full meal wouldn’t cut it. “That tagline doesn’t necessarily mean you have to be an athlete,” Rouse says. “One of the cool things about this market and studio idea is we can have grab-and-go meals for people finishing at places like the Westin or Avon Rec

[From page 8]

Center.” Although Rouse hasn’t yet honed the post-gym menu, he’s thinking about protein and carb-heavy items that will be perfect for recovery, such as grilled chicken or salmon with a quinoa salad. Once a menu is set, the items will be available at the studio’s deli counter for less than $10. Along with a personal interest in health food, Rouse also has numerous other ideas for the new space – cooking classes would make excellent use of the open kitchen – but the same windows that allowed for the studio to work can also be a hindrance. He wants to be open and inviting, but when stuck on the backside of a Main Street area that Avon has yet to develop, he feels a bit stranded. Without pedestrian traffic, the studio relies on word-of-mouth, quality food and, Rouse hopes, an eye-catching concept. “People know my food, but we want to be that place people associate with small plates or contemporary cuisine in Avon,” Rouse says. “We’re looking at crazy crowds one day and absolutely nobody the next, but we’re excited to get people in here for great food.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

SKI CLASSIC –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

favorite runs, Riva Ridge or North Star. He admits he’s partial to Beaver Creek, which he skied the first week it opened. “The Ski Classic for me is about the friends I have made in the valley over the years, as well the folks at the (Vail Valley) Foundation, who run first-class events,” Aloha says. “(These friends) always make me feel like I am home. Like I said, I have always felt like a Vailite.” When it comes to Vailites, there may be no one who fits the bill more than the town’s own Sarah Schleper. The Colorado native and four-time Olympian began skiing with Ski Club Vail at age 11, and made her World Cup debut at Beaver Creek just five years later. “I think that World Cup race was in ’97. I was still in high school, and it was a highlight. My friends got to see what I did, and why I was always gone,” Schleper says. “I was pretty nervous. I was young, and I think I did OK, but it was just fun to race in front of my family and friends.”

Schleper still calls the town home, along with her husband, son and another baby on the way. She won’t be skiing in this year’s Classic, but she has been spectating at the event long before she ever became a legend. “My dad used to take me when I was young. A lot of times in U.S. ski racing, people don’t know who is who. I got to know all my idols really young,” Schleper says. “Tamara McKinney was my role model. I remember seeing her win her gold in Vail.” Like Schleper, two-time Olympian Chad Fleischer will also be remembering some of his career highlights at this week’s event. Fleischer moved to Vail at the age of 10 to train and stayed for 25 years. One of his most memorable career highlights came in his own backyard, with a sixth place showing in Super-G at the 1999 World Alpine Ski Championships on Beaver Creek’s Birds of Prey course. “I was just 0.16 seconds out of first place,” says Fleischer,

[From page 6]

who now lives in Steamboat Springs. “I was leading the race by a large margin in front of a record crowd for about 20 minutes until (Austrian skier) Hermann Maier came down and beat me. I was still on the awards podium in downtown Vail, and it was truly awesome.” Fleischer still skis Vail about once a week, and says the Ski Classic is a “don’t miss” for his family. “Where else can you ski with your heroes of the sport that you grew up idolizing?” Fleischer says. “We have been coming out for nine years now and always have the greatest time. Vail is truly as good as it gets in the ski world – and I have been everywhere and seen it all in the ski world.”

SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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Sneak Briefs SneakPEAK staff reports First Descents holds annual ball First Descents, a nonprofit organization providing outdoor adventure therapy for young adults with cancer, will throw its largest fundraising event of the year -- the 7th Annual First Descents Ball on March 23. The gala event drew more than 400 people last year, raising a grand total of $450,000 to send 450 young adults fighting cancer to a free adventure therapy program. The hat-themed FD Ball includes a five-star dinner from Spago chefs, a top-shelf open bar and live-and-silent fundraising auctions. Attendees can expect a live performance by Funkiphino and inspirational stories from First Descents participants. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not only is this an inspirational evening for staff, donors and volunteers, but we also are fortunate enough to have a number of participants and their families in attendance,â&#x20AC;? says First Descents Founder Brad Ludden. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are our guests of honor, and it is truly special to see how the First Descents community continues to grow. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking forward to another unforgettable night.â&#x20AC;? The event is from 5 p.m. to midnight at the Ritz-Carlton, Bachelor Gulch in Avon. Tickets are $175 per person and can be purchased at www. firstdescents.org.

Jean Richardson exhibits at Cogswell Cogswell Gallery in Vail Village hosts an art show of painter Jean Richardsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s works on Friday, March 22 and Saturday, March 23. Her acrylic paintings are know for their expressive brushstrokes, heavy texture and brilliant colors that make up the abstract horses that dominate the large can-

vases. Her work uses images of horses to convey her main focus of movement and energy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The horse as a real being is lovely in itself, and I enjoy the power, speed, and the physical beauty of the animal,â&#x20AC;? says Richardson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My paintings, however, take this real image and make it a symbol. The horse as a metaphor for the human spirit -- unbridled, striving, sometimes heroic, often restless, full of energy, floating above us, calling us to other realms.â&#x20AC;? Born in Oklahoma in 1940, Richardsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parents exposed her to art through frequent trips to art museums and painting classes at a young age. She received her degree in painting from Wesleyan College in 1963. Returning to Oklahoma after college, she spent an entire year painting abstract dirt roads before beginning to explore the themes of energy and motion, which are still the subject of her work today. Cogswell Gallery is located on 223 Gore Creek Drive in Vail. For more information, call 970-476-1769 or www.cogswellgallery.com.

Registration open for kids art camps Alpine Arts Center has recently announced its summer programs for children and teens. The summer camps take place Monday through Friday throughout the summer, with themed sessions to give each camp a fun and unique creative experience. Kids camps such as Pirateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paradise, Nature Art Camp, Yummy Foods, and Beach Party give children ages 3 to 6 and 7 to 12 a chance to explore all mediums including painting, drawing, ceramics, sculpture and crafts, all based on the weekly theme. Campers will also have the opportunity to venture outside for art excursions in the valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beautiful backyard. For teens, camps are specialized and include offerings such as Clay Hand-Building and Wheel Throwing, Digital Photography and Mixed Media Bookmaking. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With so many sports camps out there, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great to see parents recognizing the importance of art for their childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development,â&#x20AC;? says Alpine Arts Center owner Lauren Merrill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The camps are filling up quickly, and our teachers have a number of special projects planned for each week.â&#x20AC;? Summer camp early registration is going on now through April 15, with locals discounts on session camps and flex-

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ible punch cards. Adult classes offered include plein air-painting workshops, wildflower photography, ceramics, oil painting and drawing. Registration will begin at the end of March for adults. Alpine Arts Center will also continue their Cocktails Series classes on Wednesdays and Saturdays throughout the summer. Alpine Arts Center also provides their facilities for drop-in activities, private parties and special programs in addition to their class schedule. For more information about Alpine Arts Center, or to view their summer schedule and register online, please visit their website at www.alpineartscenter.org or call 970-926-2732.

Vail Athletic Club revamps gym Out with the old and in with the new. After 35 years, the Vail Athletic Club (VAC), part of the Vail Vitality Center, is vaulting into the future of fitness and total wellness with a complete remodel of the gym floor and a brandnew vision. The center will host an open house, open and free to the public, to introduce the community to its new concept on Friday, March 29 from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Most notably, the VACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s machines are being replaced with Cybex machines, which help exercisers maintain biomechanically correct form, get full extension and properly use muscle groups. The gym also got new Woodway, low-impact cardio machines. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think 65 to 70 percent of people donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really think about body positioning,â&#x20AC;? says Jeff Morgan, Vail Vitality Center director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But these help keep your body in position whether the user knows it or not. If something is misaligned, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing repetitive movement, the damage is compounded. All of these machines are based off naturally occurring movement patterns.â&#x20AC;? Beyond the machines, the space layout takes into account human movement patterns, rather than packing equipment into every nook and cranny. The fitness floor encourages personal use, with or without a trainer, by maximizing technology. Each station sports a QR code, which, when scanned with a smart phone, provides the user with an educational video detailing the most effective ways to utilize equipment based upon individual variables like height, weight and age. The fitness floor also features a space for circuit training, in a nod to increasingly popular Cross Fit-style workouts. The gymâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trainers can blend programs and classes with workouts in the open gym â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially during high-movement pattern classes like the VACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Killer X training â&#x20AC;&#x201C; creating more options. Morgan says the gym will unroll some new circuit-type classes geared toward locals in April and May. The Vitality Center also offers yoga, Pilates, massage, a climbing wall, nutrition counsel, regenerative medicine and age management. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In one week we can shift someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s energy, building a platform from

which they can perform better for the rest of their life,â&#x20AC;? says Morgan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to know what your challenges have been â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in health, in life â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and how theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve affected you. And we want to empower you by showing you the best ways you, as an individual, can be healthy throughout your life.â&#x20AC;? For information, or a tour of the new concept fitness floor, contact Jeff Morgan at 970-477-3265 or jeff@vailmountainlodge.com, or visit the new Vail Athletic Club at the Vail Vitality Center at Vail Mountain Lodge.

Opera superstar Anna Netrebko sings at Vilar On Monday, March 25, in a rare American recital appearance, Anna Netrebko joins pianist Brian Seger for a one-night-only performance at the Vilar Performing Arts Center in Beaver Creek. Netrebko will sing both opera arias and songs, some new to the sopranoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s repertoire. Since her triumphant Salzburg Festival debut in 2002 as Donna Anna in Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Don Giovanni,â&#x20AC;? Netrebko has gone on to appear with nearly all of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great opera companies, including the Metropolitan Opera, the San Francisco Opera, Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Milanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teatro alla Scala, the Vienna State Opera, the Paris Opera, the Zurich Opera, the Berlin State Opera and Munichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bavarian State Opera. Netrebko is no longer known just as the darling of the opera world. With her beautiful, dark, distinctive voice and her elegant and alluring stage presence, Netrebko has been enchanting audiences around the world. Her universal appeal has prompted critics to hail the Russian soprano as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Audrey Hepburn with a voice,â&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;a singer who simply has it all: a voice of astounding purity, precision, and scope, extensive dynamic and tonal range, imagination, insight and wit â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all combined with a dazzling charisma that makes it all but impossible to look away when she is performing.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anna Netrebko has taken the opera world by storm,â&#x20AC;? says Kris Sabel, executive director of the Vilar Performing Arts Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The power of her voice is valiant and captivating â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Miss Netrebkoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence and presentation will you leave you in awe.â&#x20AC;? Netrebko appears regularly in concerts and recitals throughout the world, both in revered concert halls such as Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Royal Albert Hall and New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Carnegie Hall, and in arenas in front of tens of thousands of people. In addition, the Russian native boasts an extensive discography that includes her best-selling solo albums, complete opera recordings, and concert repertoire. Tickets for the evening are available online at www.vilarpac.org, by phone at 970-845-TIXS or in person at the VPAC Box Office in Beaver Creek.

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Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

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sneakpeak

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Calendar of Events

Wednesday, March 27 Lord of the Dance at the Vilar Lord of the Dance, created by Michael Flatley, brings a mesmerizing blend of traditional and modern Celtic music and dance that has catapulted Irish dancing into the global spotlight. The story is based upon mythical Irish folklore, played out over 21 scenes on a grand scale of precision dancing, dramatic music, colorful costumes and state-of-the-art staging and lighting. Show is at 7:30 p.m. at Beaver Creekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vilar Center. Tickets are $85 at www.vilarpac.org.

Submit your event to SneakPEAKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly community calendar by sending information to info@sneakpeakvail.com.

Thursday, March 21 to Sunday, March 31 In Your Face skin care charity month

In Your Face skin care studio, located in Dogma Athletica in Edwardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Riverwalk, is offering facials and microderabrasion treatments throughout March, with part of the proceeds benefiting local nonprofits The Youth Foundation and Round Up River Ranch. Custom 60-minute facials are $75, and microdermabrasions (which include a facial) are $90. Call 970688-4433 for more info.

Thursday, March 21 to Sunday, March 24 Korbel American Ski Classic Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original pro/am celebrity ski event returns to Vail Mountain at Golden Peak. Skiing legends, sports and entertainment celebrities and corporate America join together on the slopes for racing action, live entertainment and festive evening events. All the races are held at Golden Peak in Vail and are free for spectators, family-friendly and rich with autograph opportunities. For more information see www.vvf.org.

Thursday, March 21 Free North Mississippi Allstars concert

As part of the American Ski Classic, Street Beat concert series presents a free performance at the base of Golden Peak by country/roots/bluegrass rockers the North Mississippi Allstars. Show starts at 6:30 p.m.

Thursday, March 21 Kathleen Madigan at the Vilar

Touted as one of the funniest women in America, stand-up comedian Kathleen Madigan comes to the Beaver Creekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vilar Center. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appeared on all the late-night shows, Comedy Central and on stages all over the world. Show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $42 at www.vilarpac.org.

Thursday, March 21 Live music at Vail Ale House

Yarn plays at the Vail Ale House, located in West Vail. Show is free and starts at 9:30 p.m.

Sebastian hotel, hosts a Segovian pig roast every Thursday,

30% off boards, boots, bindings, clothing, helmets, goggles & gloves

$20 rentals Boards and Bikes

20% off bikinis & board shorts

   

 www.vailskatesupply.com sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

Friday, March 22 and Saturday, March 23 Jean Richardson art show in Vail Cogswell Gallery in Vail Village will hold an exhibition of works by acrylic painter Jean Richardson, known for her dymanic paintings of horses in motion. For more information call 970-476-1769 or see www.cogswellgallery.com

Thursday, March 21 to Saturday, March 23 Friday, March 22 Segovian pig roast at The Leonora MTHDS at Vail Ale House Leonora, Vailâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest bistro, wine and tapas bar in The

Spring Sale

28

Friday and Saturday afternoon through April 13. Event will include live Latin jazz guitar, a sangria and mojito bar, plus a selection of tapas, crudo and ceviche, as well as craft beer and wine on the terrace outside of Leonora.

Local favorites play at the West Vail Tavern beginning at


9:30 p.m. They’ll play one set of originals and one Beastie Boys set. See www.vailalehouse.com for more info.

Friday, March 22 Bluzilla at Main Street Grill

Sunday, March 24 SFJAZZ Collective at the Vilar

The SFJAZZ Collective is an all-star jazz ensemble comprising eight of the finest performer/composers at work in The Riverwalk restaurant hosts live music beginning at 10 jazz today. Launched in 2004 by SFJAZZ—the West Coast’s p.m. Bluzilla is a blues band, locally grounded and yet styled largest nonprofit jazz institution and the presenter of the anin the vibe and tones of the blues. nual San Francisco Jazz Festival—the Collective has become one of the most exciting and acclaimed groups on the jazz scene. Show starts at 7:30 at the Vilar Center in Beaver Friday, March 22 Creek. Tickets are $58 and can be purchased at www.vilarFamily Friday Afternoon Club Family activities launch the weekend at Beaver Creek. pac.org. There will be music, snacks, games and activities on McCoy’s deck with special appearances by Riperoo, Snow Cats Monday, March 25 and the Beaver Creek Ski Patrol. Event is free. See www. Anna Netrebko at the Vilar beavercreek.com for more info. The Vilar Center at Beaver Creek hosts an evening with the international opera superstar Anna Netrebko. The darling of the opera world has enchanted audiences around the globe Friday, March 22 while continuing to cultivate the respect and admiration of Hold ‘Em For Hope fundraiser in Vail As part of the American Ski Classic, this casino-style fund- opera’s most devoted and demanding fans. Her beautiful, raiser raises money for the Vail Valley Foundation’s educa- dark, and distinctive voice, together with her elegant and altion initiatives. Cocktails, buffet dinner, casino games and luring stage presence, have prompted critics to hail the Ruslive auction are on the agenda for this fun-filled evening sian soprano as “Audrey Hepburn with a voice.” Show starts Event starts at 7:30 p.m. at the Sebastian hotel in Vail Vil- at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $150 and can be purchased at www. lage. For more information, to purchase tickets or bid on vilarpac.org. auction items, contact Arte Davies at 970-777-2015.

Friday, March 22 “Fiddler on the Roof” at the Vilar

The Tony Award winning musical that has captured the hearts of people all over the world comes to Beaver Creek’s Vilar Center. The musical is based on the stories of Sholom Aleichem. The universal theme of tradition cuts across barriers of race, class, nationality and religion, leaving audiences crying tears of laughter, joy and sadness. Show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $98/$78 (based on seating) and can be purchased at www.vilarpac.org.

Saturday, March 23 First Descents Ball at Bachelor Gulch

First Descents, a nonprofit getting young survivors of cancer into outdoor adventure, holds its seventh annual gala at the Ritz-Carlton Bachelor Gulch. The hat-themed ball includes live entertainment, a dinner at Spago and an auction. Event goes from 5 p.m. to midnight. Tickets are $175 and can be purchased at www.firstdescents.org.

Take a stroll in the starlit snowfields with one of Beaver Creek’s guides. Complimentary Atlas Snowshoes provided, while hot cocoa and cookies await your return. Tours depart from the Beaver Creek Nordic Sports Center located in the Strawberry Park building next to the Strawberry Park Express Lift (Chair 12). For families and explorers ages 6 and up. See www.beavercreek.com for more info.

Tuesday, March 26 Make your own sushi set in Edwards

The Alpine Arts Center’s Specialty Series classes are open to children ages 7 and up, teens and adults. Make your own clay sushi set for $20 per class. The finished set will include soy sauce dishes on the pottery wheel, clay handbuilding sushi trays, and more. See www.alpineartscenter.com for more info.

Tuesday, March 26 BARC fundraiser at Beaver Creek

Come to the Colorado Mountain College campus in Edwards for the first annual winter farmers market, held weekly on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Shop for fresh produce, storage fruit, eggs, jams, grass-fed meat, salmon, artisan food, prepared foods, bakery items and more.

Sunday, March 24 Vail Cup at Golden Peak

Wednesday, March 27 Matthew Gurnsey at the Vail Library

The Vail Cup has been Vail’s local youth snowsports compe- “The Kilted Man” brings a rousing, free performance of tratition series since 1963. Sunday’s race is the halfpipe and GS ditional Irish and Scottish music to the Vail Public Library. competitions, followed by a barbecue. For more informa- Performance begins at 5:30 p.m. tion, see www.vailcup.com

Get an "Egg"cellent smile! General Dentistry Cosmetic Dentistry Crown & Bridge Steve Oakson, DDS General Dentistry

Located in Gypsum since 2001 Gypsum Plaza Suite, 620 D Red Table Drive

524-1105

LIFE

STYLE

Tuesday, March 26 Family snowshoe tours at Beaver Creek

The nonprofit organization BARC (Beaver Creek Avalanche Canines) is raising money for the education and training of Beaver Creek’s avalanche dogs and patrollers for rescues in Eagle County. Come to the Coyote Cafe in Beaver Creek from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. for food and a silent auction, with loads of items up for bid, including gift cards to restaurants, raft trips, and a monthly pass to Manic Training. Raffle tickets and ski patrol merchandise will also be for sale

Sunday, March 24 Winter Farmers Market in Edwards

VA I L

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www.musictogethervailvalley.com

Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

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sneakSHOTS | Who’s Up To What

Are you suffering from upper back pain? Or shoulder pain? Call Dan at Alpine Chiropractic for more information on how the ART technique can help you at 970-949-6244.

Erin is a Colorado girl serving up a Colorado whiskey. Come on by Magustos in Minturn for great food, people and drinks.

Petals of Provence has moved their design studio to Eagle. Call Dora and La Vene for your floral needs, including for Easter and Mother’s Day at 970- 926-4233.

Tom just arrived in town from Denver, stopped at his favorite restaurant, Sweet Basil and picked up a SneakPEAK to find out all the “good stuff” happening in Vail.

Late Night

The Easter bunny stopped by Any Occasion in Edwards in the for m of Yuma. Stop by and see Terri and Yum a to fill up your Easter baskets with the best goodies in town.

The finest barbecue chefs in the valley, Cameron, Luke and Ben at Moe’s in Lionshead, are serving up all your favorite Southern barbecue grub.

Health, Life and Dental Insurance HSA’s, IRA’s, Roth’s, Mutual Funds Long Term Care and Disability Insurance

970.446.7912 info@sneakpeakvail.com 9:30 - Close

$

2 off

all drafts, wells, House wines Late night food menu available 240 Chapel Place. AVON 970-748-1010 30

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

Publisher...Erinn Hoban Editor...Melanie Wong Ad Director...Kim Hulick The Glue...Shana Larsen Reporter...Phil Lindeman Ad Sales...Brand Bonsall ©2011 sneakPeak. All rights reserved.

Medicare Plans

www.LFInsuranceGroup.com 970.390.3706

Lori Fennessey

HIGH ALTITUDE SPA A Full Service Salon

Mani & Pedi

50

$

With Free Parafin Hand dip 970-328-2887

105 Capitol Street #1 | PO Box 486 | Eagle, CO 81631


Agave | 1060 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.8666 Avon Bakery & Deli | 25 Hurd Lane | 970.949.3354 Cima | 126 Riverfront Lane | 970.790.5500 Blue Plate | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.2252 Bob’s Place | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.8566 Carniceria Tepic | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.6033 Castle Peak Grill | 101 Fawcett Road | 970.748.4848 China Garden | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.4986 Columbine Bakery | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.1400 Domino’s Pizza | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.3230 Fiesta Jalisco | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.8088 Geno’s Sandwiches | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.0529 Gondola Pizza | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.6000 Loaded Joe’s | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.1480 Montanas Cantina and Grill | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.7019 Northside Coffee and Kitchen | 20 Notingham Rd. | 970.949.1423 Nozawa Sushi | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.0330 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.9900 Subway Avon | 47 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.1312 Red Mountain Grill | 240 Chapel Pl. | (970) 748-1010 Swiss Hot Dog Company | 101 Fawcett Rd. | 970.467.2013 Taqueria No Se Hagan Bolas | 91 Beaver Creek Place | 970.845.7959 Ticino | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748-6792 Vin 48 | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.9463

Mexican & Tex/Mex

LD

Organic Deli

BLD

Contemporary Latin

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Toscanini | 60 Avondale Ln. | 970.754.5590

Now Open in East Vail

“Excellent food at Moderate Prices”

Dinner Nightly at 5 p.m. Breakfast Weekends & Holidays 7:30 - 11:30 a.m.

$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Chinese Cuisine

LD

$

European Cafe & Bakery

BLD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Italian Sandwiches

LD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Southwest Grill

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Sushi & Asian, Thai

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Contemporary American Taphouse

BLD

$

Hot Dogs & Soup

L

$

Mexican

LD

$

Italian Food & Pizza

LD

$

Rustic American

D

$$

Organic/Local American Cuisine

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

D

$$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

American Comfort

LD

$$

Pizza & Sandwiches

LD

$

Tex-Mex

BLD

$

Steakhouse & Saloon

LD

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$$$

BEAVER CREEK

8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill | Park Hyatt Beaver Creek | 970.949.1234 Beano’s Cabin | 210 Plaza Way | 970.754.3463 Beaver Creek Chophouse | Beaver Creek Lodge | 970.845.0555 Black Diamond Bistro | 120 Offerson Road | 970.949.1251 Blue Moose Pizza | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.8666 Coyote Cafe | 210 The Plaza | 970.845.9030 Dusty Boot Saloon | 210 Offerson Rd. | 970.748.1146 Golden Eagle Inn | 118 Beaver Creek Plaza | 970.949.1940 Grouse Mountain Grill | 141 Scott Hill Rd. | 970.949.0600 Hooked | 122 Beaver Creek Plaza | 970.949.4321 The Metropolitan | 210 Offerson Road | 970.748.3123 Mirabelle Restaurant | 55 Village Rd. | 970.949.7728 Osprey Lounge | 10 Elk Track Ln. | 970.754.7400 Rimini Cafe | 45 W. Thomas Place | 970.949.6157 Rocks Modern Grill | 27 Avondale Le. | 970.845.9800 Saddleridge | 44 Meadow Ln. | 970.754.5450 Spago | The Ritz Carlton, Bachelor Gulch | 970.343.1555 Splendido at the Chateau | 17 Chateau Ln. | 970.845.8808

$

Seasonaly Focused Fine Dining

D

$$$

Seafood and Sushi

LD

$$

Coffee/Breakfast/Wine/Tapas

BLD

$$

French Cuisine

D

$$$

Tapas Bar and Lounge

D

Gelato, Chocolate & Wine

LD

$$ $

Classic American Grill

BD

$$$

Contemporary Colorado Cuisine

D

$$

Seasonal American

D

$$$

Rustic American & Seafood

D

$$$

Italian Pasta Grill

LD

$$$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

AVON

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Sledding is great fun for kids. Sledding through life without your insurance with a great local agent might not be so much fun when a bad thing happens!

Call Mike, Ana or Debbie today!

Call Michael Neff Insurance

949.5633 www.michaelneffagency.com 970-476-3113

4695 Vail Racquet Club Dr.

Located in the Slifer, Smith & Frampton Building in Avon Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

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4 Eagle Ranch | 4091 Highway #131, Wolcott | 970.926.3372 Adamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mountain Country Club | 1094 Frost Creek Drive, Eagle | 970.328.2326 Babouneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 0131 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2425 Bonfire Brewing | 0127 W. 2nd St., Eagle | 970.422.6258 The Bowlmor CafĂŠ | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.BOWL Brush Creek Saloon | 241 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5279 Dusty Boot | 1099 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.7002 Eagle Diner | 112 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.1919 Ekahi Grill and Catering | 500 Red Table Dr. Unit 1E, Gypsum | 970.524.4745 El Pariente Mexican Restaurant | 0050 Chambers Ave. #E, Eagle | 720.289.8782 Fiesta Jalisco | 0701 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9300 Gourmet China | 0212 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.0866 Grand Avenue Grill | 678 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.328.4043 Gypsum Grill Steakhouse | 686 Trail Gulch Rd., Gypsum | 970.524.7365 H.P.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Provisions | 1160 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5280 Heidis Brooklyn Deli | 150 Cooley Mesa Rd., Gypsum | 970.777.3663 Luigiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pasta House | 1143 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5400 Mantoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza | 106 Oak Ridge Ct., Gypsum | 970.524.6266 Moeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original BBQ | 630 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.337.2277 Old Kentucky Tavern | 225 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5259 Paradigms | Corner of 4th and Capital St., Eagle | 970.328.7990 Pastatively Robertoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Italian Cuisine | 94 Market St., Eagle | 970.328.7324 Pazzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.337.9900 Red Canyon Cafe | 128 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2232 Streckerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market and Cafe | 925 Greenway Unit 103, Gypsum | 970.524.2728 Yetiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grind | 330 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9384 Yummy Cafe | 313 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.6060

EAGLE-VAIL

Ristorante Ti Amo | 40982 US Highway #6 | 970.845.8153 Route 6 Cafe | 41290 US Highway #6 | 970.949.6393

L

$

Eclectic American & Sunday Brunch

LD

$$

Omelets, burritos and more

BL

$ $

Rustic Home Brew Pub / Music / Patio

$$

American Cuisine/ Bowling

LD

TexMex

BL

$

Steakhouse/American Cuisine

LD

$$

Traditional American Diner

BLD

$

Hawaiian Style Food

LD

$

Authentic Mexican

LD

$

Mexican

LD

$

Chinese

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

Steakhouse

LD

$

BLD

$

Soups & Sandwiches

BLD

$

Pasta & Pizza

LD

$$

Pizza

LD

$

Barbecue

BLD

$

Southern Eclectic

BLD

$

Creative American

LD

$$

Classic Italian

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches

BLD

$

German and European market cafe

LD

$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

American Cuisine

BL

$

Italian, Pasta

LD

$$

Eclectic American

BL

$

EDWARDS Balata | 1265 Berry Creek Rd | 970.477.5353 Bonjour Bakery | 97 Main St. | 970.926.5539 Bookworm | 295 Main St. | 970.926.7323 Belmont Deli | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1796 Cafe 163 | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1163 Cafe Milano | 429 Edwards Access Rd. #A208 | 970.926.4455 Dish | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.3433 E town | 295 Main St. | 970.926.4080 Eat! Drink! | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1393 Fiestaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cantina | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.2121

35 Fondue for two

$

Every Friday Night. Your new Friday Night Tradition!

Daily Happy Hour 4-6 pm

10 $ 5

$

cheese plates

wine

Open M-Sat 11 am - 8 pm, Sun 12 pm - 6 pm

970-926-1393 | corner at edwards | eatdrinkinc.com 32

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Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Homemade Bakery & Soup

BL

$

Coffee & Crepes

BL LD

$

Sandwiches American

B LD

$

Contemporary Italian

BLD

$$

Globally influenced casual dining

D

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Tasting/Wine Bar, Paninis

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

dish happiest hour

3- 5

$

$

Daily 5-6:30 pm

Small plates glasses of wine grey hounds sangria tap beer Open Daily 5 - 10 pm 926-3433 | corner at edwards | eatdrinkdish.com

$

Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Ranch Western Atmosphere

Pricing

EAGLE/GYPSUM

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

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â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

March Madness: $10 Burger and 

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

MOnday: 50% off Bottles of wine Tuesday: BBQ-night - 20% off WEdnesday: $10 Fish tacos Thursday: Lasagna Friday: $13 Fish and Chips Saturday: $15 all you care to eat Fried chicken dinner (5:00) Sunday: Fun day - Happy hour all day   970-748-4848

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘


Gashouse | 34185 US Highway #6 | 970.926.2896 Gobi Mongolian BBQ | 69 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.6628 Gore Range Brewery | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2739 Grouse on the Green | 100 Kensington Dr., Cordillera Divide | 970.926.5788 Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinese Cafe | 175 Main St. | 970.926.3050 Juniper Restaurant | 97 Main St. | 970.926.7001 Larkburger | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.9336 Last Course Dessert Bar & Pastries | 275 Main Street C-106 | 970.926-1979 Local Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza | 280 Main St. | 970.926.4444 Log Cabin Sports Bar and Grill | 34500 Highway 6, #B1 | 970.926.9726 Main St. Grill | 97 Main St. | 970.926.2729 Markoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7003 Mirador | 2205 Cordillera Way, Cordillera Lodge & Spa | 970.926.2200 Old Forge Co. | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2220 Sato | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.7684 Smiling Moose Deli | 1170 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2400 Subway Edwards | 439 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7010 Vista At Arrowhead | 676 Sawatch Dr. | 970.926.2111 Woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar & Grill | 27 Main St. | 970.926.2756 Zino Ristorante | 27 Main St. | 970.926.0777

LD

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

$

Rustic Pub

LD

$$

Pub/American

D

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

Contemporary American

D

Organic Gourmet Fast Food/Burgers

LD

Tapas/Wine Bar/Desserts

BLD

$

Pizza

D

$

American/Mexican

BLD

$

American Grill

LD

$$

Pizza & Pasta

LD

$

Regional/Seasonal Fare

BLD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Sushi & Japanese Cuisine

LD

$$

Deli

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Tuscan Grill

D

$$

Bar & Grill

LD

$

Contemporary Italian

D

$$

Southern BBQ

LD

$

Traditional American

LD

$

Steakhouse

D

$$

Meditrainian/Greek Cuisine

BLD

$

Coffee and Sandwiches

BL

$

Mexican/American/Western

D

$$

American and Mexican Cuisine

BLD

$

Continental

LD

$$

American Brewery

LD

$$

Regional American

BLD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

American

LD

$

American

BLD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

American

BLD

$

New American

D

$$$

Pizza

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$$

American/Western

LD

$$

Authentic Italian

D

$$

Pizza and Italian

LD

$

American Bistro

LD

$$

Steakhouse, AprĂŠs and Dinner

D

$$$

Mountain Fare/Steakhouse, AprĂŠs,

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

New American

D

American Pub

LD

$ $$$ $

$$

MINTURN Kirby Cosmos | 474 Main St. | 970.827.9027 Magustoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 101 Main St. | 970.827.5450 Minturn Country Club | 131 Main St. | 970.827.4114 Nickyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quickie | 151 Main St | 970-827-5616 Sticky Fingers | 132 Main St. | 970.827.5353 Minturn Saloon | 146 N. Main St. | 970.827.5954 Turntable | 160 Railroad Ave. | 970.827.4164

VAIL Alpenrose | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8899 Ale House | 2161 N. Frontage Road | 970.476.4314 Atwater on Gore Creek | Vail Cascade Resort | 970.476.7014 Bart & Yetiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | Lionshead, North of Arrabelle | 970.476.2754 Bearfish | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7596 Big Bear Bistro | 297 Hanson Ranch Road | 970.300.1394 Billyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Island Grill | Lionshead | 970.476.8811 Bistro 14 | Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nest, Top of Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.445.4530 Block 16 | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 Blue Moose Pizza | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.476.8666 bol | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.5300 Bully Ranch | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5460 Campo de Fiori | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8994 Chicago Pizza | 1031 S. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7000 CinĂŠBistro | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.3344 Elwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steakhouse | 174 East Gore Creek Dr. | 970.754.7818 Flame | Four Seasons, Vail | 970.477.8600 Frost | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8050 Game Creek Restaurant | Vail Mountain | 970.754.4275 Garfinkelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | Next to Lionshead Gondola | 970.476.3789

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$

.

6 Two Tacos

$

and a Beer

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$ $$$ $

Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Colorado Wild Game Grill

Pricing

EDWARDS

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

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 all leaks.. Well most of them.

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33


Gohan Ya | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7570 Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Famous Deli | 288 Bridge St. | 970.479.7580 Kelly Liken | Gateway Building, 12 Vail Rd. | 970.479.0175 La Bottega | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0280 Lancelot | Next to Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fountain | 970.476.5828 Larkspur Restaurant | Golden Peak | 970.754.8050 La Tour | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.4403 Left Bank | Sitzmark Lodge in Vail Village | 970.476.3696 The Little Diner | West Lionshead Plaza | 970.476.4279 Lord Gore & the Fitz Lounge | Manor Vail at the base of Golden Peak | 970.476.4959 Los Amigos | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.5847 Ludwigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5429 The Marketplace | One Willow Bridge Rd. | 970.477.4370 Market CafĂŠ | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 May Palace | Next to City Market, West Vail | 970.476.1657 Matsuhisa | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.6682 Mezzaluna | Lion Square Lodge, next to Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.477.4410 Moeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original BBQ | Upstairs from the General Store, Lionshead | 970.479.7888 Montauk Seafood Grill | Lionshead Village | 970.476.3601 Nozawa | Holiday Inn, West Vail | 970.476.9355 Ocotillo | Vail Mountain Marriott Resort & Spa, Lionshead | 970.477.5675 Old Forge Co. | 2161 N Frontage Rd | 970.476.5555 Old Forge Co. | 521 East Lionshead Cir. | 970.476.5232 Ore House | 232 Bridge St. | 970.476.5100 Osakiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0977 Pazzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.9026 Pepiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.4671 Qdoba | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7539 Red Lion | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.7676 Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.6700 Subway West Vail | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.3827 Sushi Oka Hibachi | 100 East Meadow Drive. Suite #4 | 970.476.1588 Sweet Basil | 193 E. Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.0125 Tap Room | Top of Bridge St. | 970.479.0500 The Tavern On The Square| 675 Lionshead Place | 970.754.7400 Terra Bistro| 352 Meadow Dr., Vail Mountain Lodge& Spa | 970.476.6836 The George | 292 Meadow Dr. | 970.476.2656 Up The Creek Bar & Grill | 223 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.8141 Vendettaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 291 Bridge St. | 970.476.5070 Vail Chophouse | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.477.0555 Westside Cafe & Market | 2211 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7890 Yama Sushi | 168 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.7332 Yetiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grind | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.1515

Have you been to Lancelot lately?

Asian Cuisine

LD

Sandwiches

BLD

Seasonal American

D

Northern Italian

LD

$ $ $$$ $

Prime Rib/Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Creative American

D

$$$

French and American

D

$$$

French

D

$$$

Classic Diner, Traditional Favorites

BL

Contemporary American

D

Mexican

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$

Family/American/European

BLD

$

International CafĂŠ

BLD

$

Chinese

LD

$

Japanese/Peruvian

D

$$

Modern Italian

LD

$$

Barbecue

LD

$

$ $$

Creative Seafood/Meat

LD

$$

Sushi/Asian

LD

$$

Southwestern Steak House

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sushi/Japanese

D

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

BLD

$

Continental/Wild Game

LD

$$

Mexican

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Sushi, Asian

LD

$

Creative American

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Mountian American Grill

BLD

$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Eclectic Pub

D

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Italian & Pizza

LD

$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Sushi and Pacific Spices

D

$$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

VAIL

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

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34

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

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Please join us Friday 3/22 and Saturday 3/23 for an exhibition of new works by Jean Richardson.

Jean Richardson, “Sentinel on Red,” 72 x 46, oil on canvas

Native American turquoise and sterling silver cuff

223 Gore Creek Drive Vail 970-476-1769 Open 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Visit our new website, Cogswellgallery.com

James Moore collaboration with Sandy Keller, “Autumn Stroll,” mixed media Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

|

sneakpeak

35


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sneakpeak

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Thursday, Mar. 21, 2013 -Wed., Mar. 27, 2013

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SneakPEAK Mar. 21, 2013