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Thursday, Jan. 24 - Jan. 30, 2013

Riding the

X

factor Up-and-coming pros who call Vail their training grounds, head to Aspen’s X Games

SSCV’s Zack Black, pro snowboarder

In the kitchen

With the Food & Wine festival’s visiting chefs

Redefining wine in a box

A drink at Gypsum’s home brew shop

Paddling for a cause

SPiN pingpong tourney returns to Vail Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

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The Shook Twins Musicians tell the story of how they invented “quirk folk” and the discovery of a golden egg. By Jenna Stecker.

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s siblings go, Katelyn and Laurie Shook get along well, and that’s an understatement.

They are two of those sisters who really enjoy being around each other. The fact that they are 28-year old identical twins that play music on the road together seems to intensify that bond. “We aren’t best friends,” Laurie says. “It’s something more than that. There are some twins who love being twins, and there are some who hate it. We just happen to be on the former part of that equation.” Growing up in the small town of Sandpoint, Ida., the girls say that they have been singing since the womb. It was choir in high school, in fact, that encouraged both girls to pick up the guitar at age 17. Soon after Laurie began dabbling with the banjo and standup bass. Feeling like she needed to have more diversity like her sister, Katelyn began playing the mandolin and ukulele to even the field. Then they found The Golden Egg. At a show in Seattle, the girls walked outside and found a gentleman leaning up against a wall with a large golden egg under his arm. “I was the only one who seemed to find this odd,” says Laurie, who immediately approached the man to inquire about the egg. As it turns out the man had been given the egg by a lady with the instructions to sign it and pass it on. Laurie seized the opportunity to be the egg’s newest owner. She turned it into a member of the band, putting popcorn kernels in the egg and transforming it into a percussion instrument to use during their shows. “I realize that I must pass the egg on at some point, because that is the egg’s destiny, but I am not quite ready to let it go yet,” she admits. She adds that once she releases the egg, she still holds onto the hope that she will one day find the person who started the journey of The Golden Egg. The sisters, who now live in Portland, Ore., have been playing music alongside each other for seven years and now seem to be finding their niche. “Quirk folk” was the

name they came up with to succinctly describe their unique style of music, and the moniker really seems to fit them. The Shook Twins music easily falls into the category of folk music, and the girls’ lilting and haunting harmonies can easily be compared to the sounds of Colorado’s own Elephant Revival. Their guitar playing melds into the myriad of instruments they play, including the banjo, guitar, mandolin, glockenspiel, ukulele, and djembe. All of these sounds are underscored by the standup bass of Kyle Volkmann who ties their music together. Their instrumental sound could almost be compared to a softer, acoustic version of DeVotchKa. It is the small things in their overall sound that puts the “quirk” in their folk. One particularly quirky touch is the addition of clucking sounds to the song they wrote about a befriended chicken. Also, with the help of a repurposed telephone microphone, Laurie adds depth with a looping machine and spontaneous bursts of beat boxing. You don’t find that too often within the folk-music world. The girls are getting serious this winter, focusing on creating more material to use when they begin recording their

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Who: The Shook Twins What: Self-described “quirk folk” When: Thursday, Jan. 24 at 7:30 p.m. Where: The Vilar Center at Beaver Creek Tickets: $20 at www.vilarpac.org

third album this April. Laurie points out that Katelyn is more of the writer, while she usually just comes in after and adds “percussion and noises.” They admit that the act of writing itself is sometimes a barrier to their music. “Sometimes it is hard for us to just sit down, focus, and write,” Laurie says. But when inspiration hits, the girls work, like they do almost everything else, in tandem. The Shook Twins will be quirking up the Vilar Center for the Performing Arts on Thursday, Jan. 24, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 and can be purchased at www.vilarpac.org.

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Kitchen Talk Gail Simmons, Alex Seidel among celebrity chefs at Beaver Creek’s Food & Wine fest. By Melanie Wong

Gail Simmons: Television personality, author, trained chef and food writer SneakPEAK: You’ll be teaming up with Beaver Creek chefs for several events this weekend. What can audiences expect? Gail Simmons: Thursday evening we’ll have a welcome reception with the local chefs and visiting talent. Friday I’ll be doing a “lunch and learn” with chef David Walford (of Splendido). We’ll be doing a three-course lunch to a group of 22 people, so you’re really in the kitchen with me. I’ll be doing recipes that are some of my favorites from Food & Wine, and all of them are ski-hill appropriate – pot-roasted lamb shank, a side salad of escarole,

Alex Seidel, chef and owner at Fruition restaurant in Denver, is one of the visiting chefs at this weekend’s food festival. Photo courtesy of www.platephotography. com.

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sually the slopes are for powder hounds and corduroy speedsters, but this weekend at Beaver Creek, they’ll be for foodies.

Beaver Creek Food & Wine Weekend highlights

For a full listing of events and details, see www.beavercreek.com. Friday, Jan. 25 - Snowshoe Gourmet Lunch – 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Beaver Creek Nordic Center and Grouse Mountain Grill - Cooking demo and lunch with Gail Simmons – 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Splendido - Dinner at Allie’s Cabin with guest chef John Besh – from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26 - Ski. Eat. Ski – 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the mountain, with lunch at the RitzCarlton - Grand Tasting – 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. in Ford Hall Sunday, Jan. 27 - Celebrity Chef Ski Race & Brunch -- 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Haymeadow race course followed by lunch at the Beaver Creek Chophouse.

Beginning on Thursday, Jan. 24, well-known chefs, food critics and food lovers will converge at Beaver Creek for the second annual Food & Wine Weekend. Throughout the weekend, various Beaver Creek restaurants will play host to different seminars and dinners, and celebrity chefs will pair up with local chefs for events. Visiting chefs will come from far and near to dazzle taste buds at Beaver Creek, and we caught up with two before they got cooking. Alex Seidel, owner of Fruition restaurant in Denver, was named one of the “Top 10 New Chefs of 2010” in Food & Wine magazine. He’s no stranger to the mountains, having learned his chops at Vail restaurants before he opened his own establishment. Gail Simmons, a longstanding judge on Bravo’s “Top Chef,” Food & Wine magazine’s which is a twist on the classic Caesar, and Swiss chard with pancetta. special projects coordinator and the author of “Talking With My Mouth Full,” hails from On Saturday, I’m doing another dinner with chef Christian Apetz (of Mountainside Bar New York City. While this will be her first Beaver Creek visit, Simmons knows a thing or and Grill) at the Vilar, and we’ll be on stage cooking together. We’ll make a Venetian fish two about skiing and the good food that can go with it. She grew up in Canada skiing with stew, and a pear and hazelnut dish. her family, and has spent years visiting Aspen for its food festival. SneakPEAK chatted with Seidel and Simmons, and urged them to share some of their [See FOOD & WINE FEST, page 23] kitchen secrets and what they’ve got in store for festival attendees this weekend.

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Elite youth hockey in Vail Tryouts planned for AAA program, debuting this spring By Melanie Wong For the past few years, Luke Grimaldi’s parents have been going to great lengths to get the 10 year old to hockey practice. Some kids have a never-ending schedule of soccer, skiing, track, basketball and more, requiring multiple trips several times a week up and down the valley. In Luke’s case, his commitment to hockey means driving to Denver several times a week to play in an elite youth league, the Thunderbirds. All that will change this spring when the AAA program, the highest level of under-18 hockey, comes to the mountains. Players from mountain towns that include Eagle County, Summit County, Aspen, Telluride, Steamboat Springs and Glenwood Springs will have a chance to play in a six-week program dubbed the Mountain Thunderbirds. Players will receive professional coaching, get 25 hours of total ice time and end the program with an international tournament in Canada. “AAA hockey is the highest level of hockey for juniors,” says Cheryl Grimaldi, Luke’s mother. “They will be selecting top players from mountain towns, and this will give the mountain kids an opportunity of a lifetime. This will really

Eagle resident Harry Green (in white), playing for the Thunderbirds, battles for the puck in a game against the Colorado Roughriders. The Thunderbirds AAA hockey program, based in Denver, plans to bring its elite youth programs to the mountains this spring. Tom Green photo. elevate our players and give our kids opportunities they wouldn’t have had otherwise.” Parents can find out more at an informational meeting on Monday, Jan. 28 at Dobson Ice Arena, and tryouts for the program will be held on March 23 at Dobson for players born between 1999 and 2005.

The best in the state While Vail affords world-class opportunities for young athletes to excel at many winter sports, hockey is an exception. The Vail-Eagle Hockey Association provides leagues for kids who want to learn the sport and compete, but it isn’t designed for players who want to take the sport to the next level. As Eagle-based hockey parent Tom Green explains, AAA hockey offers players intense practices, structured coaching and an outlet to play against the best players in the state. His

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Find out more about the AAA youth hockey program coming to the mountains this spring. An informational meeting will be held on Monday, Jan. 28 at 5:30 p.m. at the Dobson Ice Arena in Vail. Also see www.vaileaglehockey.com or www.tbirdhockey.org for more info.

two sons, ages 11 and 14, have played in the Denver Thunderbird league for years, a commitment that means driving to the Front Range three times a week. “One of the issues with a typical mountain team is that you’ve got some kids more into it than others – some really strong kids and some others just having fun. You mush it all together,” Green says. “With the Thunderbirds, everyone is strong. Between the intensity of the coaching and the kids and families you meet, it’s an overall great experience.” The program yields results, too. While some AAA players participate simply for the high level of competition, others have gone on to play college or professional hockey. In fact, the Front Range program has sent more than 30 kids to play Division I collegiate hockey, with seven of those players currently making up the bulk of the powerhouse Denver University team, says Thunderbirds’ Director of Operations and Coach Angelo Ricci. He points out that one of those players, Daniel Daremus, is an Aspen kid who eventually made the move to the Front Range to pursue hockey. Another promising AAA player drives regularly from Breckenridge to play in Denver. The new mountain program could help find more players with talent who can’t make the grueling trip. “Over the years, we’ve had a lot of mountain kids come down here,” Ricci says. “I think they feel like they almost need to challenge themselves to go to the next program, and there aren’t that many AAA or even AA programs in the mountains.” Luke, who plays center and has dreams of playing professional hockey someday, explains it more simply. “Down there, all the kids are good,” he says. “You should try out if you want to become a better player, if you want to play with kids your own level. The coaching down there is really good and improves your sticking and skating (skills).”

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Mountain Thunderbirds take flight Ricci isn’t sure how the first year of the Mountain Thunderbirds will look. The Denver program offers five-to-sixweek training camps similar to what is coming to the mountain towns, as well as a full-on league with regular-season play. Depending on the turnout at the mountain tryouts, Ricci says they’ll divide the players into as many teams by

[See AAA HOCKEY, page 21]

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The

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Young and hungry Vail athletes hunt for gold at Aspen’s X Games this weekend. By Phil Lindeman. Cover by Zach Mahone.

Pro snowboarder Zack Black looks over Beaver Creek’s slopes a few days before the commencement of Aspen’s X Games, where he was invited to compete this year. The Breckenridge native is one of a handful of top riding talent who have been training with Ski and Snowboard Club Vail. Zach Mahone photo.

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ro snowboarder Kaitlyn Farrington must have a vendetta against the bones in her hand.

boy. Those down-home roots nearly clash with her pro snowboarder persona: She’s short – even for a pipe jock – with blonde hair, a nose ring and a weakness for the “Twilight” series, not to mention a spot on Maxim magazine’s 2012 “hottest snow bunnies” list. When Farrington takes to the X Games halfpipe this Saturday night, it’ll be the second time she competes in Aspen with broken bones. Last year, she made finals with her left wrist in a cast – the same side she brutalized in Quebec. “These injuries have been the story of my career, but I keep coming at it,” Farrington says. Since bursting onto the women’s halfpipe scene with a surprise gold medal at the Eu“I just enjoy snowboarding too much.” ropean X Games in 2010 – she beat longtime Australian powerhouse Torah Bright for the title – Farrington has notched numerous podium finishes across the world. The 23-year-old Ski and Snowboard Club Vail (SSCV) athlete took second at the U.S. Open in Vermont the The changing face of SSCV same year, and recently bested Olympic gold medalists Bright and Kelly Clark for a win at For nearly 50 years, SSCV has long been a breeding ground for stellar alpine racers, from Breckenridge’s Dew Tour. international superstar Lindsey Vonn to current slalom phenom Mikaela Shiffrin. The club Farrington is fast becoming a bona fide star, all while her sport is growing bigger and often finds these athletes at a young age – EagleVail native Shiffrin is just 17 years old – and faster. When Bright won Olympic gold in Vancouver, her run included a cab 720 and switch hones their skills from the ground up before (hopefully) turning them over to the U.S. Ski backside 720 – revolutionary at the time. Now, competitors like Farrington are pushing the Team. women’s field in a new direction, inverting the majority of 540s, linking back-to-back 900s But snowboarders like Farrington are a bit different. In the past few years, SSCV has and throwing occasional backside 1080s, which she just learned in the past month. And bolstered its freestyle program through athletes with pro-level experience already under their belts. This doesn’t just happen – the key has been high-level coaches with competitive that’s where those ill-fated bones come in. Roughly a week before this weekend’s X Games competition at Aspen, Farrington was experience of their own, including skier Elana Chase (coach for X Games gold medalist Jen in Quebec for the FIS Snowboard World Cup Championships. During a training run on Jan. Hudak) and Australian native Ben Boyd. “Boydy,” as his prodigies lovingly refer to him, took over SSCV’s snowboard program in 18, she fell and broke her thumb, a clean break she calls “pretty mellow” that nonetheless 2011 after working with pipe riders and Olympians like JJ Thomas and Faye Gulini. Boyd requires surgery and a metal pin. She qualified second in her heat the next day and barely worked intermittently with Farrington as she moved into snowboarding’s upper echelon, missed the podium in the finals, all while nursing the precariously splinted thumb. and his laid-back approach jived well with her personality. After barely missing the U.S. Not that Farrington seems to mind, at least when it comes to pain. She grew up raising livestock on her family’s ranch outside of Sun Valley, Ida., and describes herself as a tom-

[See X GAMES, page 18]

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Pingpong bounces back

SPiN Vail Tournament comes back for a second year of paddling By Nell Davis World class skiing, snowboarding, hiking, kayaking... and ping pong? It’s true. As the SPiN Tournament returns to Vail for a second year this Saturday, Jan. 26, the quirky sport of pingpong is finding a home in the mountains. Last January, the Vail Symposium tried out a new form of fundraising by bringing SPiN Galactic to Vail for a two-day tournament. SPiN, based in New York, is a growing collection of clubs meant to combine socializing and pingpong playing, and bringing it to Colorado for a standalone event was an experiment that proved to be successful. “I was surprised by last year’s turnout. I guess there is an appetite for pingpong in the Vail Valley, just like the rest of the world,” says Alby Segall, president and CEO of the Vail Symposium. There’s even talk, if all goes well, of opening a permanent SPiN facility in Vail next summer, he says. “There is nothing else like this in Eagle County and we believe there is an even greater audience of people who want to learn to play this international game,” says Segall. Paddling for a cause It’s fun for a good cause, as well, with the funds raised going toward bringing thought-provoking programs and speakers to Vail’s residents and visitors. Last year’s event raised $8,000, and this year organizers hope to bring in around $10,000 for the nonprofit. Segall sees Vail as an ideal spot for the event. “There are plenty of ping pong players from

tress Susan Sarandon, co-founder of SPiN. She won’t be in attendance this year, says Segall, but there will be pros available to give demonstrations and meet players. For Terbush, watching the professional players was another highlight What: a fundraiser for the Vail Symof last year’s event. posium “I’d never seen pros play up close. That was When: Saturday, Jan. 26 from 10 a.m. pretty fun,” he says. This year, Terbush, like many to 10 p.m. of the entrants, is mainly looking forward to SatWhere: Holiday Inn in Vail urday “for the competition, and to have a good Tickets: $50 individual, $75 doubles time.” tournament entry and $15 for spectaThis year’s event will take place at the Holitors. day Inn in Vail. Previously held at The SebasSign up for the A League (competitian, the new locale will provide a wider range of tive) or B League (noncompetitive) at food, with The Westside Cafe and Bearfish Bar www.vailsymposium.org. and Grill opening their doors to the players and spectators. For newcomers to this year’s tournament, TerEast Vail to Gypsum. This is a chance for them bush has one piece of advice: Show up and have all to get together, play their sport and hang with fun. other players,” he says. “Anybody, young or old, can do it,” he says. One such player is Dave Terbush of Eagle, an avid “paddler” who grew up playing pingpong. A sport for everyone He even has a table at home for get-togethers The accessibility of the sport is one reason why with friends, and he competed last year in both paddling is gaining momentum across the nation. the singles and doubles tournament. He and his Once reserved for rec center basements, events partner, Chris Speigal, won the amateur doubles like SPiN are helping pingpong rebrand itself as a competition. Terbush isn’t expecting a repeat win, hip, fresh and entertaining activity. but he’s hoping for it. Pingpong may have found new popularity, but “I was surprised last year at the level of compe- it is certainly not a new sport. It is commonly tition,” he says. “I didn’t realize how many good believed to have originated in China, but it was players there were in this valley. The best thing actually formed in Victorian England by upper about the event is the atmosphere. It’s unique, be- class gentlemen wishing to mimic outdoor tennis cause it’s set up like a club or a bar. You can drink for after-dinner entertainment, according to www. and play pingpong. They do a great job of incor- tabletennismaster.com. porating the social aspect.” They started by improvising with household A highlight for Terbush was getting to meet ac-

SPiN Vail Pingpong Tournament

[See PINGPONG, page 21]

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Lending a Helping Hand (Top) Volunteers cheer upon completion of water filtration systems they built at a Kenyan orphanage. The systems clean and pump clean water, an amenity the orphanage did not have before. (Right) Visitors are greeted my music and dances during a recent aid trip to Kenya. Local resident Val Woodbury was part of a group of 17 volunteers to went to build water systems, visit villages and teach local women how to sell their specialty crafts. Photos special to SneakPEAK.

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Local Val Woodbury shares tales of traveling to Kenya’s poorest areas. By John O’Neill

ooking into her Bhakti chai tea at the Bookworm in Edwards, local Val Woodbury’s eyes weren’t focused on anything present, but were recalling memories of a trip to Africa recently ended. Looking up, at the same time refocusing on papers in front of her, she began to tell her story.

physical. “What broke my heart was that you could still see the warmth in their eyes,” Woodbury says. “They had gone through so much and live in such a hard way, but they were still delighted that we were there to see how they lived. They thought that they lived well.” Over the course of the day, Woodbury and the other volunteers worked with the women, teaching them how to sell the goods they produced for food. The women then showed the volunteers how they made jewelry, bags and baskets. “By the end it wasn’t as hard to see,” Woodbury says. “They had been shunned with disabilities, or because they were unwed or pregnant. But what we saw by the end is that they have the initiative to make better for their lives. Despite what was God-given, they aren’t resolving to prostitution. They are doing something to make better for themselves.”

“I’ve always wanted to go to Africa,” Woodbury says, smiling. “It was sort of a desire. I wanted to do something that gave back, something that could help people.” The opportunity would present itself through an organization called the Manifest Foundation, a nonprofit subsidiary of the travel company World Ventures. The Manifest Foundation’s mission is to “manifest socioeconomic change on a global scale,” and this trip to Kenya would be the foundation’s first trip to Africa. She left Vail at the end of September, meeting up 17 other volunteers for the two-week trip. “I was expecting to be able to meet incredible but impoverished people,” Woodbury says of her preconceived notions on the trip. “The other volunteers and I were going to show the people that they are capable of doing whatever they can in their life even though they are limited in how they live. We were going to show them how to do that.”

Next stop: Kibera Kibera is a special kind of hell, as Woodbury describes it. Located in the middle of Nairobi, Kibera is recognized as one of the most destitute slums in the world. The minute the volunteers arrived to tour the slum – escorted by a minimum of three armed guards – their tour bus was swarmed with people selling or begging. But what caught Woodbury’s attention beyond the products waved in her face was a little girl who had been knocked off the bridge where the car was parked. It wasn’t a high bridge, so the fall didn’t do damage. But she fell into water that was diluted by feces, urine, rotting food and garbage. “It’s not like she could run home and take a shower, either,” says Woodbury. “The worst thing about the place is that people are just thrown away,” Woodbury says. “They are outcasts. Some are workers. They get up at sunrise and work past sunset to make a few dollars, if they are lucky. This is the only place they can afford to live.” Metal sheds stretched for miles, Woodbury recalls. The group was constantly on the lookout for “flying purses.” There are few toilets in the slum and so the residents resort to defecating in a bag and then tossing it as far away as possible – a flying purse. The group was meeting a social worker from World Ventures and the Manifest Foundation named Esther. Esther worked in one of the metal sheds, a building roughly half the size of The Bookworm where we chatted. However, the shed housed 20 people. The inside was like the setting for a horror movie. Esther deals only with the disabled --

Woman’s Hope The team congregated outside of Nairobi’s city limits, and their tasks were explained. Woodbury and the other women would be working with another group, Woman’s Hope, at a shelter for women affected by HIV. The women’s shelter was extremely basic, with dirt floors, no electricity and tattered clothing pinned to lines hung up to dry. Their lives shattered by HIV, the women in the shelter work together to make it through their days. Some of them have children, almost undoubtedly carrying HIV as well. Other women had disabilities, some mental and some

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Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

[See HELPING HAND, page 16]


52 WEEKS VAIL VALLEY of the

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Around the world with Leonara Mediterranean dishes get the international treatment at The Sebastian’s new restaurant. By Melanie Wong.

(Top) Lemon tart and beignets at Leonara restaurant, located in Vail’s Sebastian hotel. (left) Executive Chef Sergio Howland (center) chats with diners at Leonara. The tapas and wine bistro features dishes and flavors from Howland’s world travels. Kent Pettit photos.

A

glance at the menu at Vail’s Leonara gives the impression that The Sebastian hotel’s newest restaurant pays homage to Spanish and Italian culinary traditions.

That much is true, but what isn’t apparent is that the menu is a fusion of tastes from all over the world, reflecting Chef Sergio Howland’s own travels. There are the classic Spanish tapas dishes, some of Howland’s favorites from his time living in Barcelona. There are the ceviche dishes, featuring Latin-inspired seafood reflective of Howland’s native Mexico City. Then there are the mix-and-match ingredients from different cultures thrown into one dish, such as caviar found on the same plate as Sriracha sauce and scallops. “When we were thinking about the menu, I said, ‘I want to be creative and incorporate some of the trips I’ve done,� Howland says. “Some of the tapas are from my time spent in Barcelona and San Sebastian (in Spain), and I love Italian food. Mediterranean food is my real love.� Casual and gourmet You might recognize the restaurant if you ever went to Block 16 in previous seasons. The Leonara sits in the same space, the result of a complete makeover of Block 16, an alpinethemed fine dining restaurant. Howland and The Sebastian’s staff wanted to replace Block 16 with a more casual environment, and Leonara was born. “Before, you came and everyone had five or six courses, and meals would last two or three hours,� Howland says. “Leonara is a place you can have tapas, a glass of wine and leave if you want.� Leonara was designed to be a wine, bistro and tapas bar, and it is still marked by intimate booths and a centerpiece wine tower in the middle of the dining room. Leonara might be the only place in Vail you can find authentic, unadulterated Spanish tapas. The patatas bravas are simply a dressed up version of the Spanish staple – crisp-onthe-outside, soft-on-the-inside potatoes served with tomato sauce and a creamy garlic sauce. Croquetas – fried nuggets of potatoes, Serrano ham and cheese – are a classic Spanish tapas dish and comfort food. Howland doesn’t mess with a good thing here, and the little bites of goodness will melt in your mouth. There’s even a nod to the northern Spanish cuisine of Galicia, with Howland’s version of the pulpo de Gallego. Traditionally, the tiny octopi are seared and served on a hot pan, then dusted simply with paprika and olive oil. At the Leonara, the octopus gets a little bit crisped, and the spice is offset with capers and lemon juice. This dish is worth a try, even if you aren’t normally an octopus fan. Unique appetizers and artful desserts Howland throws some surprises in there as well. The crudo dishes, a selection of raw

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seafood, are easily the most inspired section of the menu. He says he didn’t like the idea of standard seafood appetizers like shrimp cocktails and oyster shooters. Instead, he opted for a selection of ceviche dishes swimming in leche de tigre, a Peruvian term for the citrus-based marinade used to cure the seafood. The method leaves ample room for interpretation, and Howland chose to infuse some of his crudo dishes with ingredients from across the world. The tuna dish, for example, is more Asian fusion than Latin, bathed in tamarind, wasabi and lime juice. Also try the scallops, topped with caviar and resting in a broth of tart yuzu sauce, white truffle and Sriracha aioli. The Maine scallops are sweet and tender, and the blend of flavors lends food for thought with every bite. For a more Pacific-inspired crudo dish, try the salmon in coconut milk and avocado sauce – and you can munch without guilt, since Leonara uses sustainably raised salmon. That said, the crudo selection changes often at Leonara, depending on what fresh shipments arrive in the kitchen. Those looking for hearty meat dishes won’t be disappointed either, with main courses that

SneakPICKS at Leonara

See the full menu at www.thesebastianvail.com. - Croquetas – Fried nuggets of potatoes, pork and cheese, a classic Spanish tapas dish. - Salmon crudo – Fresh salmon cured in coconut milk and avocado sauce. - Lemon meringue tart – Part sculpture, part dessert, served with ice cream.

include pan-seared tuna, steaks and braised veal. Howland plans to debut a classic French duck dish on the menu soon. However, if you aren’t looking for a full dinner, it’s worth stopping into the Leonara just for a glass of wine and dessert, a course that challenges the main dishes for center stage. Pastry chef Dale DeSimone is a showman and culinary whiz who learned some of his trade working at The Savoy in London during the Olympics. His vanilla risotto is a deceptively simple take on rice pudding, mixed with berries and chocolate bits. Other showstoppers include eye candy such as the molten chocolate ball – the server pours liquid chocolate over the ball until it collapses into a heap of cocoa and fruit sauce that comes spilling out the center. His version of beignets are satisfying as well, although who doesn’t like fried dough? The most well-crafted dessert, however, has to be the lemon tart. It’s a different take on lemon meringue pie, using flavors such as yuzu, a pistachio crust and about 50 tiny spires of meringue on the top. “It’s a bit of a competition,� jokes Howland of DeSimone’s desserts. “I always say that people come for my dishes and he argues that people come for his desserts. We’re always trying to outdo each other.� SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

      

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SneakGEAR: Atomic Tracker bindings The newest burliest touring binding gets put to the test on Vail’s toughest terrain By Michael Suleiman Backcountry ski bindings have been around longer than downhill bindings. The functional purpose of a modern backcountry binding is allowing your heel to fully release so that you can skin uphill. The perfect backcountry binding is not only light, but also comfortable to hike in, easy to switch to downhill mode, and secure enough to take some solid impact. For now, though, we live in a world where all these elements can’t exist in perfect harmony. This is why alpine touring (AT) bindings have various roles for certain backcountry purposes. A lightweight aluminum touring binding is probably not the best binding for, say, jumping big cliffs. Starting this season, Atomic and Salomon stepped into the backcountry game by releasing a durable, high performance AT binding. The Atomic Tracker and the Salomon Guardian both retail for around $450. The low profile design allows for closer snow contact than other similar bindings. After talking with a few professional skiers and testing out the Tracker for myself, it became pretty clear that this may just be the best new binding for inbounds and out-of-bounds skiers. Tested by the pros Living in Whistler, British Columbia, professional Atomic skier Mike Shaw spends many days on his powder skis and relies on the durability and convenience of the Tracker to provide him with his backcountry needs. “The only reason you think you are on an AT binding is because you know you are on an AT binding,� says Shaw. “If you were told that this is just a regular alpine binding, you wouldn’t know the difference until you were ready to hike. One of the Tracker’s strongest points is its durability. Compared to a regular AT binding, the Atomic Tracker is lower to the ski, has a higher torsional stability due to its materials, and has a wider screw mounting plate.� It all sounded pretty good, so after talking with Shaw, it was time to go out and see what this beast of a binding had to offer. We tested the tracker in East Vail, a terrain full of burly cliffs that make for the perfect playground for this binding. Even though it was a bluebird day, temperatures hovered around -15 degrees. Luckily, the Mongolia Poma lift wasn’t running, which provided some additional hiking time to warm up. Whenever skiing any out of bounds areas, it is absolutely imperative to have backcountry experience and to never ski alone. Local professional skier, and 4FRNT athlete, Palmer Hoyt, joined me for the ski test to provide binding insight.

The Atomic Tracker bindings offer a sturdy, solid binding for hitting big cliffs and navigating backcountry powder, as well as easy-to-use functions for the hike up. Michael Suleiman photo The Tracker comes in at 1482 grams each (roughly 3.25 pounds per binding), which is about three times the weight of some of the smaller touring bindings. However, the Tracker is comparable to the similarly sized Marker Duke. What separates these from the Duke’s, however, is the force these bindings can take. I have witnessed more than a handful of broken Marker AT bindings (including my own), and I believe the Atomic is onto something by designing an easy-to-use binding with a lift track made out of durable metal. As Hoyt points out, some people get overly concerned with the weight of a binding as opposed to its performance going downhill. He’d gladly trade a pound or so of weight difference for better performance, he says.

[See ATOMIC TRACKER, page 22]

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Searching for the

elusive win The Battle Mountain Huskies (white) fell to Aspen High School in a narrow home game held at the Eagle Ice Rink earlier this week. Zach Mahone photo.

T

he Battle Mountain High School hockey team does not have a winning record, but players and coaches on the team know that their win-loss column hardly tells the caliber of the team. The Huskies have only won three games and tied one so far this year – losing six – and suffering heartbreaking losses within the final few minutes. Last Monday’s game against Aspen High School was typical of how things have been going for the Huskies. Battle Mountain struck first and played most of the game neck-to-neck with their opponents, until Aspen put away their final goal in the last five minutes of the game, resulting in a 2-3 loss for the Huskies. “We’re there, we are right on the cusp of getting these big wins,” says head coach Gary Defina. “We are still optimistic that our season will turn around. We just need to start winning some games and make a more determined effort to get to the net.” The goal for the team is to turn their season around and make the playoffs. In order to do so, they’ll have to be above .500. They can’t afford to lose many more close games, says Defina. Ben Hymes, a senior captain on the team, has played since his sophomore year. It has been a tough couple seasons that he can remember, but this season things are once again optimistic. Last year the team won just one game and finished at 1-17, beating only Dakota Ridge High School. The year before that, the team made it to the playoffs but was beaten in the first round by Lewis Palmer High School. This year, the team has already picked up wins, with one coming against rival Summit High School. “We’re doing better than last year,” Hymes says. “We are playing really good teams and staying with them the entire game. We just need to start getting wins.” The team recently played Resurrection Christian High School, a school in northern Colo-

Battle Mountain hockey team “still in it” despite a strong of close losses. By John O’Neill rado that draws from a base of student-athletes from the around the area. Known for being a strong team, the BMHS Huskies knew they had a tough game ahead of them. “They are a really good team, and the game was really physical,” Hymes says. “But our shots were pretty much even. They just came away with more goals than we did. We’re still in it.” The first wins the team picked up came before the winter holiday and before some of the players took a trip to China to face international competition with the Vail International Hockey Team. The International Hockey Team is not run through BMHS, but many of the players on the team also play for the Huskies. Hymes was one of them. “We played some teams in Beijing and then went up north and played some much better teams,” Hymes says. “We played teams with kids our age, and they were some of the best kids in their country.” Hymes says the game was played a little differently, too. The referees were much more lenient on things like chopping, so the games got physical. “It was a little strange,” Hymes says. “We also did home stays when we were in Beijing with players from the other teams. So we’d be on ice playing these dirty games, and then after we would all go out for meals together.” Now back at home, it is time for the Huskies to shake their jet lag and get back to work. “Our goal for the season was to make playoffs, and we’re still in it,” Hymes says. “Right now we are only halfway through the season. We have a really deep team – we have lines of good forwards and a strong defense and a great goalie.” In order to make the goal of playoffs happen, Defina will have the boys practicing stronger offensive systems over the next few weeks. “As soon as we start generating a little more offense, we’ll start winning games,” Defina says. “Before the break we were pretty strong, but things have gone flat on us. But we are improving, and that is what you want to see.”

SneakPEAK writer John O’Neill can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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Whole body skiing

Train your body to improve your skiing with Pilates have a good Pilates practice, whether you are an avid skier, golfer or biker, the Pilates training will translate from one sport to the next giving you the best overall performance.

Many people ski with a stiff upper body, losing balance, quickness and edge control. Pilates is an unusual but incredibly effective indoor cure.

Liz Ziegler Wellness expert

After years of skiing, I’ve had clients tell me they didn’t think they’d learn anything new. We’ve all heard the same things time and time again; We balance over our feet, edge with our ankles, point our knees in the direction we want to turn and keep the upper body quiet. And we do all this while sliding on snow.

When I started training my clients with Pilates, a whole-body exercise, they soon became convinced that they could improve on the snow. Pilates reeducates and trains the body to move more effectively. It’s a process of training the brain to remember better movement patterns. And by adding Pilates into your indoor repertoire you can focus on learning how to make a change without falling on the snow. When we ski, we need to think about skiing from the whole body. By creating a strong core, you can ski with less effort. If you learn how to twist your torso around a central axis, this will enable you to rotate your legs more quickly through ski turns. Through Pilates, we teach you how to find greater balance through the body and that directly translates onto the snow. You

With one of the best studios in the Vail Valley, we pride ourselves on really taking a focused approach to training our clients. Our classes are small in size so you get the best attention and our studio has amazing views of the Eagle river, inviting natural elements from the outside in. Join us for a Pilates challenge. 30 days of endless effort to a more efficient body and mind. There is no doubt after training with us this way, you will feel stronger, longer, re-aligned and balanced. We look forward to seeing you.

can take your Pilates skills onto the snow by practicing how to balance on the inside ski, while lifting the outside ski off the snow at the start of your turn. You will quickly gain appreciation for those training hours you’ve put in with us in the Pilates studio.

In Health,

The other awesome benefits to Pilates and skiing is the use of less effort. Pilates trains the whole body to help out in all situations, so you aren’t isolating muscle groups. When you work the whole body, it’s actually much more efficient and relaxed. It feels as though you are putting out less energy. Therefore you can either ski longer without burning out or not get as fatigued at the end of the ski day. When I train Pilates clients we are constantly focusing on better supported muscle patterns. We lengthen and strengthen the muscles to perform with flexibility and solid strength. Once you

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Homemade brews and vino

Wine or Wort helps bottle a popular pastime in Gypsum By Melanie Wong

ambitious, the shop also sells whole grains and barleys, which adds a few steps and more time to the process. One visit to Gypsumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Wine and Wort will make you Each kit comes with a concentrated bag of grape reconsider the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;boxed wine.â&#x20AC;? juice, and Reed says that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t compromise the qualThere are some who might turn up their nose at the ity of the wine. The grapes for the kits are grown in concept, or maybe you associate â&#x20AC;&#x153;wine in a bagâ&#x20AC;? with camping trips and hut excursions. But for Beth Reed and Bit Hood, co-owners of the Gypsum home-brewing shop Wine and Wort, wine â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and beer, for that matter â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in a boxed kit is tasty, a worthy hobby and a great Join the Wine or Wort home-brewing shop in way to spend an evening with friends. Gypsum for wine and beer making. The next The shop, which opened last March across the parkwine night is Friday, Feb. 8 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., ing lot from Costco, specializes in home-brewing and the next beer brew is Saturday, Feb. 9, beequipment and kits, offering everything from boxed ginning at noon. Events are free. Zinfandel sets to easy-to-make pale ale cases. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Check out www.wineorwort.com for more inonly supplier of its kind between Grand Junction and formation or call 970-524-BEER. Denver, according to the owners. The concept is simple and perfect for every beer lover whose wife wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let him turn the garage into a brewery, or every wine enthusiast who canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford her California or Washington, and the end product is natuown vineyard. The boxed sets contain either grape or ral, not using any ingredients you wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t normally grain concentrates (for wine or beer, respectively), the find in wine. yeast and accompanying liquids needed to complete As Reed explains, the kits simply speed up the natuthe fermentation process, and step-by-step directions. ral process. A winery would crush the grapes and let The equipment needed is sold separately in a set that the wine sit for a year to clarify and ferment before itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s can essentially all fit into a large bucket. ready to be drunk. With the kit, the juice is ready to go, and the fermentation process is sped up with the help Deceptively simple of yeast, manual stirring and transferring of the wine. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest in these do-it-yourself libations, too. These â&#x20AC;&#x153;interruptionsâ&#x20AC;? stop the fermenting process at a At Januaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s monthly winemaking demonstration, a certain time, remove carbon dioxide, and help sift out free event the shop hosts, a small crowd milled around sediment from the wine, all in a matter of weeks. Then, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;kitchenâ&#x20AC;? area of the shop, snacking on finger like any wine, the longer itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s left to age in the bottle, foods, sampling Hood and Reedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s homemade wines, the better it tastes. and watching the shop owners get a jug of Washington Perhaps the best part is that one $80 to $100 kit proColumbia Valley Riesling started. The shop did a simi- duces 29 to 31 bottles of wine. lar demo with beer the next day. The process is a science in some ways, but also an The process seems simple enough and is relatively art. Winemakers can add their own touches to their crequick â&#x20AC;&#x201C; both wine and beer take about an hour or two to ations with fruit or different flavors. Hood shows the mix and get started. At the wine demonstration, Reed group several specialty batches sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made â&#x20AC;&#x201C; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pours the grape juice into a huge bucket, carefully stir- deliciously rich orange-chocolate port, a curious bluering in filtered water, yeast and clay powder, which gets berry wine and a current batch of beer sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s working the fermentation process started. Some specialty tools on. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bit-o-Honey,â&#x20AC;? and is her rendition of allow her to measure the sugar content, and then the the citrusy Shock Top. wine is left to sit for four to six weeks, during which itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s checked, stirred or transferred occasionally. Nearing a year in business â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s takes about 15 to 30 minutes every ten days. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s The shop is very much a labor of love for the ownthe perfect lazy personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hobby,â&#x20AC;? Reed says, showing ers, both of whom have â&#x20AC;&#x153;otherâ&#x20AC;? jobs. However, they the audience how the sediment from the juice settles to donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind spending their evenings and time off from the bottom of the jug. work talking about brewing, winemaking and putting Beer only takes about two to three weeks, and for the together concoctions with friends.

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The beginnings of Wine or Wort actually took root at a family reunion, where Reed says her cousin introduced them to the concept of homemade wine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He brought wine to family reunions year after year, and kept talking about how easy it was to make,â&#x20AC;? Reed says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We$stopped by their place$to see their wine cellar and were just amazed.â&#x20AC;? So Reed and Hood$ started purchasing winemaking kits from Denver and began meeting other enthusiasts on the $ Front Range. Pretty soon, they discovered beermaking kits as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We started out making some wine as gifts for friends. We made a couple batches of wine, which takes four to six weeks, so we decided to make some beer while we waited for that,â&#x20AC;? Hood laughs. Eventually, another friend became interested and the idea for a supply shop was born. Part of the shopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, â&#x20AC;&#x153;wort,â&#x20AC;? derives from the name of the liquid extracted from the grains during the mashing process of beer making. The shopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one-year anniversary is on St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day, and the owners plan to hold a beer-making contest to commemorate the birthday. Entries are due by March 1 and will be judged by a professional panel. Besides wine and beer kits, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also started carrying locally made wine cases and racks, other gift accessories and do-it-yourself cheese kits. Their goal, really, is to share their passion for their hobby with the valley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going well,â&#x20AC;? Hood says of the business. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some people are just finding us and getting curious. Others who have been doing this for years come in and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thank God youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here!â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?

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Vail Veterans Program celebrates 10 years Injured vets take to the slopes this week on Vail Mountain SneakPEAK staff report

years,” says Harvey Naranjo, an occupational therapist at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. “Vets are returning with multiple limb losses and secondary medical issues.” The four-day snow sports program at Vail offers men and women who have been severely wounded while serving overseas the opportunity to reconnect with family and to reestablish physical function and self-esteem. Throughout the week, the veterans will be skiing, snowboarding and cross country skiing. The program is made possible by generous individual donors, as well as many businesses, including Vail Resorts, Frontier Airlines and Safeway. “We’ve been able to share the program with more than 400 wounded warriors since starting in 2004. It is a tremendous opportunity for the community far and wide to extend its gratitude for those who’ve selflessly served our country,” says Cheryl Jensen, Vail Veterans Program founder and executive director. The Vail Veterans Program is a Colorado nonprofit providing rehabilitative sport programs to recently wounded United States military personnel who have been severely injured while serving in Iraq or Afghanistan, and to the troops who support those efforts. The Vail Veterans Program aims to rebuild wounded warriors’ confidence and give hope for the future. For more information on the program, see www. vailveteransprogram.org.

This year the Vail Veterans Program commemorates 10 years of transforming military injured and their families through individualized world-class outdoor recreation programs. Tuesday marked the beginning of the 22nd event hosted by the Vail Veterans Program for the veterans and their families, all provided free of charge. Since 2004, more than 400 veterans and hundreds of their immediate family members have participated and experienced the healing effects of outdoor recreation therapy at Vail Veterans Program events. This week, 24 wounded U.S. veterans and 60 of their immediate family members are attending. That family experience is essential to getting wounded vets back on their feet, says Tiffany Smith, a therapeutic recreation specialist at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. “Normally, this type of family bonding would never happen without support from outside sources due to wounded warriors’ financial strains, physical limitations, or lack of encouragement to coordinate events for themselves,” she says. Most of the injured warriors attending are currently undergoing treatment and rehabilitation at Walter Reed in Washington, D.C., Brooke Army Medical Center in Houston and the Naval Medical Center in San Diego. Some attending veterans may not appear to be wounded physically, but have been diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries or posttraumatic stress disorder. “We’ve witnessed an increase in the number of wounded warriors and their levels of injury over the past couple of

A wounded warrior gets a hand from Vail Ski Patrol during a Vail Veterans Program ski day on Vail Mountain. Photo special to SneakPEAK.

HELPING HAND ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– someone with a clubbed foot and many with cleft lips, all disfigured in some way. Distorted from the people around them, they were considered freaks. The mood lifted when the shed’s residents greeted the group warmly. Woodbury recalls them being exceptionally resourceful – there was an old bike reconfigured into a knifesharpening tool. They also made jewelry, and one man busked as a musician. “Esther works with World Ventures as a social worker,” Woodbury says. “That is how we were able to get in there and see how these people lived. We wouldn’t have seen it otherwise.” Water for orphans If there is ever something that outshines the darkness of poverty, it is youthful joy. For the remainder of the first week of their trip, Woodbury and the volunteers would work with an orphanage setting up water filtration systems. “There were 67 children in the orphanage,” Woodbury says. “And all 67 of them greeted us on the first day. They sang songs and danced. Some of them had skits.” The volunteers go to work building two filtration systems, each one working off the 500-gallon tub collecting rainwater that the orphanage previously used as a “safe” water source. Before the filtration system, the water was cloudy. Woodbury says that the kids would walk around with stomachaches constantly, their body trying to fight off bacteria in

[From page 8]

the water. The first system worked like a centrifuge. The machine took a cup of dirty water, creating a spoonful of something similar to chlorine. This would be dumped back into the main reservoir of water, sanitizing it into something drinkable. The second worked like hand pump, pushing water through a charcoal filter. “Now that they have clean water, they will have better health,” Woodbury says. “They can also sell the clean water to buy more food for the orphanage.” The group ended their trip with something very different, a trip to the safari habitat Masumari. They would stay in first-class lodging and spend the mornings and evenings watching the animals roam. But even later, after the long-haul flight home, the exposure to African poverty is something Woodbury won’t forget. “I said that when I left I was expecting to see people dealing in poverty,” Woodbury says. “We saw that. But it wasn’t how I was expecting to see it. What we really saw was how people don’t give up. They do the best they can with what they have or the situation they have been put in. What stands out after all of this is that they really are like you and I. They just live in a different kind of world.” SneakPEAK writer John O’Neill can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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X GAMES –––––––––––––––

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[From page 6]

Snowboarding Team in 2010, she was invited to train with its members, but found the highstrung sessions almost overwhelming. A mellow, calming energy is the hallmark of her best results. “There are just so many girls on U.S. team, I felt I could find a more relaxed environment at the club,” Farrington says. “Riding with all the young kids keeps things laid-back and not serious, because really, I’m not a serious person.” Paint it Black Like Farrington, 22-year-old pipe rider and fellow Boyd recruit Zack Black works best under his own brand of relaxed pressure. The Summit County native – a near-doppelganger for fellow pro snowboarder Danny Davis, sans burly beard – was on skis at 18 months old, and began competing professionally as a high school freshman. Since 2007, he has made regular final-round appearances at FIS World Cup events, and was an alternate at last year’s X Games in Aspen. At Breckenridge Mountain – the birthplace of pipe riding and one of Black’s sponsors – he set himself apart with switch backside spins and massive amplitude. Marquee riders like Shaun White and Louie Vito have made inverted spins the norm, but Black has always gone against the grain. His birth name is “Zachary,” but “Zach” never looked right, and he unofficially changed the spelling in elementary school. “For me, the key to progression is always about enjoying snowboarding and where I’m at,” Black says. “If I’m trying too hard and thinking about winning at all costs, I just can’t make it happen. You see so many guys who go out with the same perfect run over and over, but I just like to go with what feels right.” Black’s philosophy sits in stark contrast to someone like White, who is notoriously competitive. Black admits that White’s track record is foreboding – “You don’t want to assume he’s always going to win, but he’s at such a high level,” Black says – but still enjoys the chance to learn from near-unbeatable rivals. He’s an alternate again at this year’s X Games, and that’s just fine: He likens Sunday evening’s halfpipe final to a dry run for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Russia – the podiums could easily be the same. “These are the top riders in the world,” Black says. “It’s tough to make it to that top rung, especially as an American. Even on practice runs I see things that blow me away, and as someone fighting for that top position, it’s important not to let your riding go stagnant.” Although Black was cut from the U.S. Olympic team right before Vancouver, he’s already qualified for the 2014 team with a fifth-place finish at Copper’s World Cup even in midJanuary. Farrington has done the same, and like Black, sees X Games as a reflection of the tough field she’ll face in Russia – hopefully without a cast. “The vibe of the pipe comp is so much fun because you have a bunch of incredible girls going out and learning to throw new tricks,” Farrington says. “We’re all pushing ourselves – these are the top riders coming together in one place and we can really put on a show.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013


Beat the bug: Fight the flu now Or avoid it completely when you’re already in the thick of the season By Phil Lindeman It’s no secret that the flu has hit Eagle County, and hit it hard. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report Colorado is in the midst of widespread contamination by the virus, with nearly 30 percent of people across the state showing symptoms. In an average year, only about five to 20 percent of residents in each state come down with the flu, making 2013 one of the harshest in nearly half a decade. But numbers and reports are hardly needed when fever, coughing, sneezing and chills are ubiquitous across the valley. For people who have to be outside – resort employees, construction workers, nearly anyone who has to warm their car up in the morning – the past two or three weeks of subzero temperatures have made staying healthy even more difficult. Luckily, the weather has taken a turn for the warmer since this weekend, but it’s only January, and the CDC claims flu season generally runs until the end of March. The Rocky Mountains still have a long way to go before the threat dissipates – for both locals and visitors alike. “We are bombarded with so many viruses, and when you combine that with the other challenges our immune systems face every day, it can be very hard to stay healthy,” says Deborah Wiancek, a certified naturopathic physician and owner of Riverwalk Natural Health Clinic in Edwards. “You really can’t wait too long to deal with the symptoms, because if you sit on it, they can develop into serious health issues – pneumonia, bronchitis, that sort of stuff – that can lead to hospital visits.” Before the flu As Wiancek notes, even the lucky few who haven’t yet contracted the flu aren’t quite out of the woods. Prevention can be difficult when so many others are sick or just beginning to feel better, and the virus is especially hard on people under the age of 6 and over 65, who are more likely to de-

The flu or cold?

There’s a good deal of overlap between flu symptoms and cold symptoms. Identifying what virus you have can help with treatment – not to mention ease your mind – but ask your doctor for a simple “rapid flu diagnostic test” if you aren’t sure. Here’s a quick breakdown of both bugs: The flu - Stuffy or runny nose - Moderate to severe body aches and chills - High fever (over 101 degrees, although not everyone runs a fever) - Persistent dry cough (wet cough can indicate pneumonia) - Persistent fatigue - Vomiting or diarrhea (more common in children) Common cold - Stuffy or runny nose (more common with colds) - Mild body aches and chills - Mild fever - Dry cough Information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

velop serious health issues. The key to prevention, Wiancek claims, is to be vigilant with everything you do, from regularly washing your hands to keeping a close eye on your diet. Cleanliness seems simple enough – soap and water should be part of the daily routine for everyone – but Wiancek claims it goes further than the bathroom. If you share a computer

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or workstation, disinfect all surfaces (the keyboard, mouse, doorknobs, file cabinets and the like) when shifts change. Saying “no” to fried foods and sweets may also seem simple, but the indulgences of the season can slowly creep up on you. Although Christmas and New Year’s are nearly a month past, the downsides of revelry can exacerbate seasonal illnesses.

Homemade flu tea

An aromatic tea of herbs and spices can help relieve congestion and clear your sinuses. Try this quick remedy based on a recipe from Deborah Wiancek of Riverwalk Natural Health Clinic. -1 garlic clove, diced -1 thumb-sized piece ginger, diced -juice from one small lemon -½ teaspoon cayenne pepper (optional) -12 ounces water Directions: In a small saucepan, add water and all ingredients. Bring mixture to a boil for 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool slightly before drinking.

“A lot of people who come down with the flu are nutrient deficient,” Wiancek says. “This time of the year, we indulge in bad eating habits, taking in lots of sugars and drinking lots of alcohol, and it’s no surprise a rash of illness To make up for holiday eats, try replacing your morning coffee with tea – black varieties still have a good amount of caffeine for that early jolt – and add a multivitamin to your daily regimen. Wiancek recommends a pill with vitamins A, C, D and zinc, all of which can be missing from the diets of even healthy people. Vitamin D can be especially hard to find in the wintertime.

[See FIGHT THE FLU, page 22]

Hip Pain He examined my hip and found a muscle that had gotten so tight it created a “false hip arthritis”. After three treatments, my hip pain was gone and I have been running pain free ever since.

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SneakSPORTS: Plenty of blame The sports world and the fans sure turn quickly on its heroes Editor’s Note: Minturnbased sports fan Patrick Whitehurst writes for www. fanrag.com. Read his musings on the site or in SneakPEAK. It’s a crazy sports world we’re living in. I’m not talking about the wild upsets or fantastic finishes recently, and I’m not discussing maPatrick Whitehurst niacal superstitions by fans and players. I mean the actual definition of crazy that implies “deranged, demented, impractical, senseless, completely unsound, and totally infatuated” actions and responses. The athletes are crazy. The fans and media are crazy. And our appetite for more success followed by dramatic controversy has become insatiable. Fans and the media often hold sports figures up to an impossible standard. Players and coaches become larger than life while the media and television executives only add fuel to the fire by giving these compelling figures more airtime and lucrative endorsement deals. It’s only natural for athletes to look for an edge. It’s a wicked cycle, and everyone plays a role, large or small. For years Lance Armstrong was the subject of speculation regarding his unprecedented success. A cancer survivor turned world’s greatest cyclist, Armstrong was an incredibly inspirational story and equally polarizing figure. The cycling world (specifically his opponents and the French) cried foul, yet Armstrong and his team remained steadfast in the denial that performance-enhancing drugs (PEDs) played any role.

Armstrong racked up seven consecutive Tour de France titles and his organization, The Livestrong Foundation, dedicated to “inspire and empower” cancer survivors and their families, received more than $500 million dollars in donations. Lance Armstrong’s world came crashing down in October when the International Cycling Union stripped him of his Tour titles and banned him for life. The 24/7 social media age we live in built Armstrong into an iconic, heroic figure for his perceived courage and devotion, then tore him to shreds once it was confirmed that he did in fact use PEDs. I am certainly not condoning his actions; Lance bullied his accusers and ruined plenty of careers. He ruled his team with an iron fist and threatened defamation suits against anyone that crossed him. But would everybody in the world know the name Lance Armstrong if he hadn’t taken PEDs, hadn’t won the Tour de France, and hadn’t raised hundreds of millions of dollars to help cancer victims and their families? What Lance Armstrong did was wrong in every way, but to classify and label him as one of the most reviled figures in history is in a word -- crazy! Forgive him for lying to his fans and cheating his sport, but remember him for creating Livestrong and providing hope to thousands. As a society and as sports fans we often turn a blind eye to the method or path in which outstanding performances present themselves. Instead we focus on the heroics and become enthralled with their immediate impact. Lance Armstrong isn’t the first athlete to use PEDs to gain an advantage, and he definitely won’t be the last. Major League Baseball had labor issues in 1994 and in August canceled the remainder of the season including the World Series. When baseball returned in April of 1995, many of the fans and a huge percentage of television viewers didn’t come back. Baseball nearly died in much of America during the mid-

‘90s. Attendance dropped to record lows and our national pastime was in real danger of becoming obsolete. Beginning in 1997, baseball started making a comeback, and it was due to one sensational act -- the home run. Balls were flying out of parks at record paces. Stadiums were full again with fans eager to see the game’s best sluggers launch pitches into orbit. Even leadoff hitters like Brady Anderson (whose previous career high was 25 home runs) hit 50 in a single season. Baseball was back, and its players were bigger than ever. The home run race in the summer of 1998 captured the nation’s interest, and every plate appearance by Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa seemed televised. Both players broke Roger Maris’ 37-year-old record of 61 homers and became megastars. Owners, players, fans and even the commissioner of baseball didn’t ask questions -- they all reveled in the achievement. It wasn’t until three years later (when Barry Bonds broke McGwire’s record by hitting 73 homers) that people started putting two and two together and realized that PEDs were behind these incredible numbers. The Baseball Writers of America are responsible for electing members into the Hall of Fame. Not a single player from a class that includes Bonds, Sosa, McGwire and Roger Clemens (all suspected or admitted PED users) earned enough votes this year. Simply put, the writers have their own agenda. And while they sit in judgment, their statement has been heard but generally not accepted. How can the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown (which is supposed to be a museum telling the history of baseball) not include the greatest pitcher, home run hitter, and the two players that saved the game? It’s crazy.

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PINGPONG â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; objects, using a row of books as a net, bottle corks as balls and cigar box lids as rackets. They called it â&#x20AC;&#x153;pingpongâ&#x20AC;? after the sound the ball made being hit back and forth, an apt title somewhat catchier than previous incarnations like â&#x20AC;&#x153;wiff waffâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;flim flam.â&#x20AC;? Today pingpong is a popular competitive sport in Asia and Europe and is continuing to grow as a sport and a hobby here in the States. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an Olympic event and has shown up in pop culture (Forrest Gump comes to mind.) Events and places like SPiN, which has expanded out of New York and into Los Angeles, Toronto and other metropolitan areas, are

helping the sport to attract a new, eager audience. Vail may soon join these larger cities in providing a home for current and potential pingpong enthusiasts. Similar to last year, this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tournament will consist of A (competitive) and B (noncompetitive) leagues. Prospective players can sign up for either league, and all ages and abilities are encouraged to enter. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tournament will be one day instead of two and will introduce round-robin style play, which allows for more playing time in the various rounds. Singles A and B and Doubles A and B will be organized into tiers, with each tier having the full run of the

[From page 7]

tables for the designated time. Each match will be best of three games, followed by a round robin of play. Whether you are a beginner wanting to learn, a veteran paddler wanting to try your hand against the competition, or a spectator just wanting to watch the action, the Holiday Inn this Saturday is the spot to be. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect place to socialize, eat, drink, and immerse yourself in all things pingpong. As Segall says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is very little more fun that ping pong on a Saturday.â&#x20AC;? SneakPEAK writer Nell Davis can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

AAA HOCKEY â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; age group and location as is appropriate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is our first year, so we hope to build a few teams and expand on it next spring,â&#x20AC;? Ricci says. Girls are welcome to try out as well, he adds. Cheryl Grimaldi, who says Luke will definitely be trying out for the mountain program, says she wanted to help bring the Thunderbirds to Vail after seeing how much her son benefited. Even getting the chance to try out for such a program is a building experience, she says.

[From page 5]

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know there are a lot of kids here who would want to do that, but they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drive to Denver,â&#x20AC;? Cheryl Grimaldi says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I told (Ricci), â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re crazy not to be up here,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and he said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do it.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so much talent in the mountains. We want to give our kids the same opportunity the Denver kids have. We want to make all our leagues better and stronger. The fact that they want to come to the mountains is huge.â&#x20AC;? SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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ATOMIC TRACKER â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

[From page 11]

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to go out and put myself in a situation where Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m taking the risks in order to achieve the rewards that the mountain has to offer, I need to be in shape physically, mentally and emotionally. The same thing goes for my equipment. If I take out equipment that is lighter, but isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to perform as well, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m putting myself at risk,â&#x20AC;? says Hoyt during the final chair lift before the East Vail hike.

The hike up We made our way to the bottom of the Poma lift, threw on our skins, and began the hike. Initially, the binding was slightly finicky to put into hiking mode. However, if the binding switched too easily between hiking to skiing modes, it could result in an unwanted release while skiing down. Unfortunately, the heelpiece of the binding may have been designed slightly too close to the hiking-mode release tray, which makes it difficult to push on it from the appropriate angle with a ski pole. With that being said, most AT bindings take a bit of time to figure out. After discovering that the handle of my pole made for the best release â&#x20AC;&#x153;pusher,â&#x20AC;? the process became much smoother. The tracker has two different hiking modes, one for hiking up steep hills with ease and another for taking smoother strides on flatter ground. The binding requires very little pressure to go back into fully locked alpine mode, which is perfect for longer expeditions with uphill and downhill sections. This allows the user to keep his skins on and be able to glide down portions while remaining locked into the binding. When the next hill presents itself, a quick push with the pole is all thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needed to go back to hiking mode. This smooth transitioning is easily one of the best features of the binding. Other bindings require the skier to step fully out and flip a switch in the middle of the binding, making it difficult to go back and forth between hiking and skiing mode, not to mention the time youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll waste removing jammed snow. At the top of East Vail, I took off my skins and prepared to ski some untouched powder. Despite their size and bulky nature, the Trackers exceeded all of my binding performance expectations. After dropping smaller cliffs and making hard-cut turns all day, there was no play or movement in these bindings, and I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to get back on them.

Skier Palmer Hoyt slashes through some powder turns in East Vail using Atomic Trackers. Our gear testers found that the AT binding withstood the conditions and aggressive skiing like no other on the market. Michael Suleiman photo. Atomic set out with the goal of making a heavy-duty, durable alpine binding that also functions as an AT binding. I believe they have succeeded, also making the perfect binding for shorter backcountry expeditions. SneakPEAK writer Michael Suleiman can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

FIGHT THE FLU â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Most people glean it from direct exposure to the sun â&#x20AC;&#x201C; its unofficial nickname is â&#x20AC;&#x153;the sunshine vitaminâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and cold, dreary winter days can make snagging even 30 minutes of rays tough. Since the flu took hold a few weeks back, Wiancek has been visited by more than a few ski patrollers and instructors â&#x20AC;&#x201C; folks who spend upwards of eight or nine hours per day in the sun. For them and everyone else, she recommends the multivitamin and foods with the nutrient added, such as orange juice. For people with livelihoods directly tied to the ski resorts, Wiancek says the cold itself shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be an issue â&#x20AC;&#x201C; healthy folks can ward off sickness by layering and drinking hot fluid. When the immune system is compromised by bad habits or other problems, the flu may not be far behind. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If your body is already compromised â&#x20AC;&#x201C; say, weak lungs from smoking â&#x20AC;&#x201C; you can bring on problems with asthma or

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bronchitis,â&#x20AC;? Wiancek says.

After the flu After you come down with the flu, the following five to seven days can feel like hell. The CDC claims that symptoms of the virus vary wildly â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in both severity and frequency â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but in general, the virus always causes body aches, chills, runny or stuffy nose, and persistent coughing. A high fever above 101 degrees is also common (although not always present), while small children are susceptible to vomiting and diarrhea. As a naturopathic physician, Wiancek is inclined to recommend remedies beyond cough syrup and antiviral medicine. (Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still a good idea to ask your doctor about all options, especially if symptoms havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t waned after a week or so.) These natural aids trace back to all-important diet:

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Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

Dishes as simple as chicken noodle soup and miso soup are not only comforting â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they can also relieve sinus congestion and, in turn, nasty headaches. For additional relief, try kicking up dishes with other healthy herbs and foods: ginger, elderberry, horseradish, wasabi, licorice root and anything heavy in Omega-3 fatty acids, like fish and flaxseed. When combined, many can boost your immune system while also tackling symptoms. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With the onset of flu symptoms, you need to get on the antiviral type of herbs,â&#x20AC;? Wiancek says, noting she can help sufferers find the right kind of herbs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The flu is a virus, so antibiotics arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to help. Identify what herbs and foods can help â&#x20AC;&#x201C; nothing can hurt if taken wisely.â&#x20AC;? SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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[From page 19]

970-949-1404


FOOD & WINE FEST –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– SP: Are you skiing in the Celebrity Chef Ski Race? (The people in the city who need our help. If people in Colorado charity event has chefs heading up teams of four. Spots are want to help out and give to our community, this is a way to open to the highest bidders.) Do you ski? do it. GS: Oh yes, I ski. I’m from Canada, and I skied every single weekend my entire life from age 4 to 21. I’m excited SP: Tell readers a little more about your recently published memoir, “Talking With My Mouth Full,” which is about how you came to be a food critic, television personality and writer. GS: It came about because people would ask me the same 20 questions over and over about how I got to where I was. I started writing them down, and it became this book. I didn’t imagine this back when I graduated from college. I got the job of my dreams without even knowing that the job existed. My life has followed that parallel of the collision of food and popular culture. While it is a story about food, it’s also a story on another level. It’s a story about coming out of college and realizing that the world was very different than when our parents are younger. It’s about the hard work of working towards a goal and the excitement of finding your niche. It’s a hopeful story that I think will resonate with many people today. SP: What are some of your favorite post-skiing meals? GS: You’re cold, you’re chilly, you want to warm up. After skiing in general, I’m really a soup and stew person. I’m big on veggie stews, slow-braised meats and anything piping hot, like mac and cheese. There’s a classic Canadian ski chalet dish called poutine – it’s crisp, chunky fries with gravy and cheese – that was the ultimate après-ski dish.

Gail Simmons, author, food critic, “Top Chef” judge and chef comes to Beaver Creek this weekend. Melanie Dunea photo. about the race. Together my team will dominate! All the money raised from my team will go to City Harvest, a New York-based food rescue. Right now there are still so many

Alex Seidel: Owner of Fruition in Denver and named one of Food & Wine magazine’s best new chefs in 2010 SneakPEAK: Fruition has be gaining attention in Denver. Tell us more about your restaurant. Alex Seidel: It’s a neighborhood restaurant serving sophisticated comfort food. It’s a menu that changes eight or nine times a year, and it has an atmosphere where people can enjoy food without the pretension and the high price. We have people who come in wearing shorts and flip flops and people who come in to celebrate their 50th anniversary.

[From page 4]

We opened it six years ago with the idea that we’re inviting people into our home. We focus on close relationships with clientele, and going above and beyond to make people happy. SP: What events will you be part of at the festival? AS: On Friday I’m doing a snowshoe luncheon at Grouse Mountain Grill, so we’ll be cooking for that. I’ll also be at the “Meet the Chefs” on Thursday, Saturday night’s Grand Tasting, and I’ll be in the celebrity chef ski race to benefit Project Angel Heart (a nonprofit that provides meals for people with life-threatening illnesses.) For the Grand Tasting, we’re going to do a spin on French onion soup – it’ll be a braised short rib served with a French onion puree served with carrots, bone marrow and Gruyere cheese. SP: One of the unique projects you’ve taken on as a chef is buying your own farm, and then using some of the crops and animals you’ve raised in the restaurant. What led to the farm, and what kind of experience did you have starting something like that? AS: Zero. But it went pretty well, looking back. A farm is very similar to the kitchen, just working backwards. There’s a lot of organization in being a chef, and the same goes for being a farmer. We’d never made cheese on that scale and we’d never raised animals. It’s been a learning process. A lot of what we do is about education and continuing to learn about food and where it comes from. SP: You used to live and work in the Vail area. How does it feel to be coming back, and are there any restaurants you look forward to eating at up here? AS: I’m excited to be back to the old stomping grounds and back to the mountains. My favorite place to eat was Sweet Basil, but Larkspur was a favorite and I like La Bottega, too – it’s fun to have a glass of wine there. Then of course there’s Eat! Drink! and Dish! in Edwards. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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Across from the Post Office in Edwards • 970-926-1163 Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

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Calendar of Events

Monday, Jan. 28 AAA hockey meeting at Dobson AAA youth hockey is coming to the mountains. Denverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thunderbird League, responsible for producing a string of Division I collegiate players and other elite puckmasters, will be holding tryouts for a new program, the Mountain Thunderbirds, a six-week training camp for mountain communities this spring. The program is for kids born between 1999 and 2005. Find out more at a parents informational meeting at Dobson Ice Arena beginning at 5:30 p.m. Tom Green photo.

Submit your event to SneakPEAKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weekly community calendar by sending information to info@sneakpeakvail.com.

Thursday, Jan. 24 Live music with Peter Vavra

Join pianist Peter Vavra at Splendido at the Chateau in Beaver Creek every Thursday night. Music goes from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Food and drink costs apply.

Thursday, Jan. 24 Vail 50th Anniversary Film

Witness the history of Vail and its founding in an original film honoring Vailâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th anniversary, made by Roger Cotton Brown, Vailâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original filmmaker. This fascinating show is free but does require tickets that can be reserved online at www.vail.com/events/50th. Tickets are also available at the Lionshead Welcome Center the day of the show starting at 9 a.m. and are offered on a first come/first serve basis. Doors open at 5 p.m., and show starts at 5:30 p.m.

Thursday, Jan. 24 to Sunday, Jan. 27 Beaver Creek Food & Wine Weekend

The second annual food festival returns to Beaver Creekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slopes and restaurants. Celebrity chefs, including Gail Simmons, Tim Love, Spike Mendelsohn and others team up with Beaver Creekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local talent to bring foodies a variety of seminars, special dinners and ski/dine events. For the full schedule or tickets, see www.beavercreek.com.

Thursday, Jan. 24 The Shook Sisters at the Vilar

Thursday, Jan. 24 Town Series ski race at Golden Peak

Vail-Summit Orthopaedics presents a fun ski/snowboard/ telemark competition in Vail at the Golden Peak race course. Race starts at 1 p.m., and after party is at 5 p.m. Party has free drinks, free food and great prizes. The race is open to skiers, snowboarders and telemarkers, and no experience is necessary. Cost is $10 per race. Find out more at www.skiclubvail.org

Self-described â&#x20AC;&#x153;quirk folkâ&#x20AC;? artists, identical twins Laurie Friday, Jan. 25 and Katelyn Shook, along with bandmate Kyle Volkman use Live music at Old Forge a variety of instruments to create an eccentric and eclectic Enjoy live music every Friday from Jason Wallace from 6 blend of pop, roots folk and fun. Show is at 7:30 p.m. at the p.m. to 8 p.m. at Edwardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Old Forge. Happy hour is 5 p.m. Beaver Creek Vilar Center. Tickets are $20 and can be pur- to 9 p.m. on Fridays. chased at www.vilarpac.org.

Friday, Jan. 25 Historic Vail Village tour

Take a historic Vail Village walking tour with an expert guide. Vail locals and tourists alike learn the history of Vail Villageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s past and present landmarks and stories about its first generation of residents. Meet at the Colorado Ski and Snowboard Museum on the Vail parking structure. Tour goes from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. and donations are appreciated.

Friday, Jan. 25 Wine Makers Dinner at Last Course

Edwardsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Last Course hosts a wine pairing dinner featuring wines from around the world. Dinner starts at 6:30 p.m. with four courses. Get tickets and more info by calling 970-9261979 or going to www.lastcoursedessert.com.

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Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

Vail 2121 N Frontage Road W Vail, Colorado 81657 970.476.3292

Dillon 265 Dillon Ridge Rd. Dillon, Colorado 80435 970.468.2800

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Friday, Jan. 25 10th Mountain Fireside Chat

The Colorado Ski Museum presents veteran Sandy Treat talking about his World War II experiences as a ski trooper and training at nearby Camp Hale. Event is held in the Colorado Ski and Snowboard Museum, located on the third level of the Vail Village parking structure. Talk goes from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. and is free.

Friday, Jan. 25 Rocky Mountain Grateful Dead Revue

West Vail’s new Ale House hosts a special concert featuring Rob Eaton. Music starts at 10 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 26 Snowflake Ball at Arrowhead’s Vista

The Battle Mountain High School Super Boosters hold their annual fundraising gala benefiting BMHS athletics. Event includes dinner, live music, auction and more. The Snowflake Ball is from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Vista at Arrowhead. Tickets are $62.50 for individuals or $450 for table

plete with games, prizes, a bouncy house, caricature art, music and more.

Saturday, Jan. 26 SPiN Pingpong Tournament

Vail Symposium’s fundraiser returns this winter for its second year with a pingpong tournament of epic proportions. Get in on the game, or just come to hang out and check out the action. The one-day tournament will be have four-tiers, and all ages and abilities are invited to enter. The tournament will be held at the Holiday Inn Vail from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Tickets: $50 singles tournament entry, $75 doubles tournament entry, ans $15 spectator entry. To learn more, see www.vailsymposium.org.

Sunday, Jan. 27 Winter Farmer’s Market in Edwards

of eight. Call 970-306-2388.

Come to the Colorado Mountain College campus in Edwards for the first annual winter farmers market, held weekly on Sundays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Shop for fresh produce, storage fruit, eggs, jams, grass-fed meat, salmon, artisan food, prepared foods, bakery items and more.

Saturday, Jan. 26 Live music at the Minturn Saloon

Sunday, Jan. 27 Brandon Heath and Matt Wertz concert

Every Saturday night during the ski season, Scotty Kabel and friends will be rocking the bar at the Minturn Saloon starting about 9 p.m. Scotty has been the lead guitarist and force behind such successful bands as Little Hercules, Bonfire Dub, and Min’urn Express. There is no cover charge and the Minturn Saloon has a late night happy hour.

Saturday, Jan. 26 Family FunFest at Beaver Creek

Watch the village come alive with music, magic, food and fun from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.. Get your caricature drawn or face painted, partake in some fun games and activities, or just sit back and listen to the music. The afternoon is com-

Christian singers Heath and Wertz come to the mountains for a free concert at Calvary Chapel Vail Valley, held in the Vail Christian High School auditorium in Edwards. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and concert starts at 7 p.m. For more info see www.ccvv.org or call 970-926-3880.

Tuesday, Jan 29 River North Dance Chicago at the Vilar

Knock-out dancers, bold music and commanding choreography are the hallmarks of this jazz-based contemporary company led by Artistic Director Frank Chaves. Founded in 1989 by four visionary dancers/choreographers, River North Dance Chicago has established itself as one of Chi-

cago’s leading dance companies, and one of country’s most popular repertory companies. Tickets are $58 and are available online at www.vilarpac.org or by calling 888-920-2787 or in person at the VPAC Box Office in Beaver Creek. There are shows at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

Wednesday, Jan. 30 Elisabeth Perry’s 5,000 mile hike

Come to the Vail Public Library for a fascinating presentation from Elisabeth Perry about her 5,000 mile hike through the Pacific Coast Trail to raise awareness for the nonprofit CASA. Event is from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and admission is free.

Wednesday, Jan. 30 to Tuesday, Feb. 5 Nor Am Cup at Vail’s Golden Peak

This men’s and ladies’ slalom and giant slalom event is hosted by Ski and Snowboard Club Vail at Golden Peak. The men’s giant slalom is Jan. 31 and Feb. 1 (Thursday/ Friday), the men’s/ladies’ slalom is Feb. 2 and 3 (Saturday/ Sunday) and the ladies’ giant slalom is Feb 4 and 5 (Monday/Tuesday). ICR and NorAm Cup rules apply. Entry fees are waived courtesy of MacDermid, Vail Resorts and Ski and Snowboard Club Vail. To enter see www.skiclubvail. org.

Wednesday, Jan. 30 Whiskey Grass Wednesday at Route 6

Route 6 Cafe in EagleVail offers live bluegrass and drink specials from 8 p.m. to midnight every Wednesday.

Wednesday, Jan. 30 Minturn Community Jam

Come at 7 p.m. to Minturn Music, located on 122 Main St, bring an instrument and jam. Contact Shawn McGowen at swmcgowen@gmail.com or 970-949-7976 for more info.

Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

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sneakSHOTS | Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Up To What

Nick and Grant at Avon Liquor stand next to Single Barrel Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whiskey, chosen just for Avon Liquor. Find them at 100 W. Beaver Creek Boulevard.

The Ale House in West Vail is â&#x20AC;&#x153; devoted to the craft,â&#x20AC;? as they have 20 Colorado craft beers on tap, free live music every Thursday, and are now open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. Pictured: Ariana and Sam

Discover the perfect way for kids to get creative on school vacation at Alpine Arts Center! Create fun art projects such as canvas painting, crafts, ceramics, sculpture, mixed-media art, mosaics and more! Call 970-926-2732 for more info.

The Tavern on the Square is located in Lionshead Village in Vail just steps from the gondola. Come on in, The Z-Man is serving up the drinks.

Have you been to Lancelot lately?

Ray and Shawna at the new Red Mountain Grill in the Chapel Plaza in Avo n welcome you. They have a great happy hour Monday through Friday from 2:30 p.m . to 6:30 p.m.

Need a sandwich before your long flight home? Stop at Heidiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Gypsum and see Susan, Luz, Melissa and Shelby, some of the best sandwich artists in town.

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Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

Mountain Living, Mountain Learning... in the heart of the Vail Valley

www.coloradomtn.edu/edwards


Meals served

Agave | 1060 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.8666 Avon Bakery & Deli | 25 Hurd Lane | 970.949.3354 Cima | 126 Riverfront Lane | 970.790.5500 Blue Plate | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.2252 Bobâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.8566 Carniceria Tepic | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.6033 China Garden | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.4986 Columbine Bakery | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.1400 Dominoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.3230 Fiesta Jalisco | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.8088 Genoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sandwiches | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.0529 Gondola Pizza | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.6000 Loaded Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.1480 Montanas Cantina and Grill | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.7019 Northside Coffee and Kitchen | 20 Notingham Rd. | 970.949.1423 Nozawa Sushi | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.0330 Pazzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.9900 Subway Avon | 47 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.1312 Red Mountain Grill | 240 Chapel Pl. | (970) 748-1010 Swiss Hot Dog Company | 101 Fawcett Rd. | 970.467.2013 Taqueria No Se Hagan Bolas | 91 Beaver Creek Place | 970.845.7959 Ticino | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748-6792 Vin 48 | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.9463

Mexican & Tex/Mex

LD

Organic Deli

BLD

Contemporary Latin

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Chinese Cuisine

LD

$

European Cafe & Bakery

BLD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Italian Sandwiches

LD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Southwest Grill

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Sushi & Asian, Thai

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Contemporary American Taphouse

BLD

$

Hot Dogs & Soup

L

$

Mexican

LD

$

Italian Food & Pizza

LD

$

Rustic American

D

$$

8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill | Park Hyatt Beaver Creek | 970.949.1234 Beanoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cabin | 210 Plaza Way | 970.754.3463 Beaver Creek Chophouse | Beaver Creek Lodge | 970.845.0555 Black Diamond Bistro | 120 Offerson Road | 970.949.1251 Blue Moose Pizza | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.8666 Coyote Cafe | 210 The Plaza | 970.845.9030 Dusty Boot Saloon | 210 Offerson Rd. | 970.748.1146 Flying Pig Sandwich Shop | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.0333 Foxnut Asian Fusion and Sushi | 15 W. Thomas Place | 970.845.0700 Golden Eagle Inn | 118 Beaver Creek Plaza | 970.949.1940 Grouse Mountain Grill | 141 Scott Hill Rd. | 970.949.0600 The Metropolitan | 210 Offerson Road | 970.748.3123 Mirabelle Restaurant | 55 Village Rd. | 970.949.7728 Osprey Lounge | 10 Elk Track Ln. | 970.754.7400 Rimini Cafe | 45 W. Thomas Place | 970.949.6157 Rocks Modern Grill | 27 Avondale Le. | 970.845.9800 Saddleridge | 44 Meadow Ln. | 970.754.5450 Spago | The Ritz Carlton, Bachelor Gulch | 970.343.1555 Splendido at the Chateau | 17 Chateau Ln. | 970.845.8808 Toscanini | 60 Avondale Ln. | 970.754.5590

Organic/Local American Cuisine

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

D

$$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

American Comfort

LD

$$

Pizza & Sandwiches

LD

$

Tex-Mex

BLD

$

Steakhouse & Saloon

LD

$$

BBQ & Deli Sandwiches

LD

$

Asian Fusion & Sushi

LD

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$$$

Seasonaly Focused Fine Dining

D

$$$

Coffee/Breakfast/Wine/Tapas

BLD

$$

French Cuisine

D

$$$

Tapas Bar and Lounge

D

$$

Gelato, Chocolate & Wine

LD

$

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

AVON

BEAVER CREEK

Get Creative! Art Supplies

Paints, brushes, pastels, over 30+ sizes of canvases, great selection of greeting cards, creative gifts for kids, scrap booking, gifts, and more! !RT s /FlCE s 3CRAPBOOKING s 'IFTS

Pricing

Type of food

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

$ $

Classic American Grill

BD

$$

Contemporary Colorado Cuisine

D

$$$

Seasonal American

D

$$$

Rustic American & Seafood

D

$$$

Italian Pasta Grill

D

$$$

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Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Dining Guide

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We Help Injured Peopleâ&#x20AC;? "VUP.PUPSDZDMF"DDJEFOUTt4MJQ'BMM 0UIFS4FSJPVT*OKVSJFTt4LJ4OPXCPBSE"DDJEFOUT 'SFF$POTVMUt1FSDFOUBHF'FF

M-Th 9-6, Fri 9-5, Sat 10-2, Sun Closed

845-7650

EagleVail between Vail & Beaver Creek

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VailJustice.com - Riverwalk at Edwards Edwards/Denver Offices -Emerald Building Suite G-1 970.926.1700 Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

|

sneakpeak

27


4 Eagle Ranch | 4091 Highway #131, Wolcott | 970.926.3372 Adam’s Mountain Country Club | 1094 Frost Creek Drive, Eagle | 970.328.2326 Baboune’s | 0131 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2425 Bonfire Brewing | 0127 W. 2nd St., Eagle | 970.422.6258 The Bowlmor Café | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.BOWL Brush Creek Saloon | 241 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5279 Dietrich’s Cafe | 313 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.5021 Dog House Grill | 10663 Highway 6, Gypsum | 970.524.1660 Dusty Boot | 1099 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.7002 Eagle Diner | 112 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.1919 Ekahi Grill and Catering | 500 Red Table Dr. Unit 1E, Gypsum | 970.524.4745 El Pariente Mexican Restaurant | 0050 Chambers Ave. #E, Eagle | 720.289.8782 Fiesta Jalisco | 0701 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9300 Gourmet China | 0212 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.0866 Grand Avenue Grill | 678 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.328.4043 Gypsum Grill Steakhouse | 686 Trail Gulch Rd., Gypsum | 970.524.7365 H.P.’s Provisions | 1160 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5280 Heidis Brooklyn Deli | 150 Cooley Mesa Rd., Gypsum | 970.777.3663 Luigi’s Pasta House | 1143 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5400 Manto’s Pizza | 106 Oak Ridge Ct., Gypsum | 970.524.6266 Moe’s Original BBQ | 630 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.337.2277 Old Kentucky Tavern | 225 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5259 Paradigms | Corner of 4th and Capital St., Eagle | 970.328.7990 Pastatively Roberto’s Italian Cuisine | 94 Market St., Eagle | 970.328.7324 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.337.9900 Red Canyon Cafe | 128 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2232 Strecker’s Market and Cafe | 925 Greenway Unit 103, Gypsum | 970.524.2728 Yeti’s Grind | 330 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9384

EAGLE-VAIL

Ristorante Ti Amo | 40982 US Highway #6 | 970.845.8153 Route 6 Cafe | 41290 US Highway #6 | 970.949.6393

L

$

Eclectic American & Sunday Brunch

LD

$$

Omelets, burritos and more

BL

$

American Cuisine/ Bowling

LD

$$

TexMex

BL

$

Coffee, Sandwiches, Soups, Ice Cream

BL

$

LD

$

Steakhouse/American Cuisine

LD

$$

Traditional American Diner

BLD

$

$

Rustic Home Brew Pub / Music / Patio

Hawaiian Style Food

LD

$

Authentic Mexican

LD

$

Mexican

LD

$

Chinese

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

Steakhouse

LD

$

BLD

$

Soups & Sandwiches

BLD

$

Pasta & Pizza

LD

$$

Pizza

LD

$

Barbecue

BLD

$

Southern Eclectic

BLD

$

Creative American

LD

$$

Classic Italian

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches

BLD

$

German and European market cafe

LD

$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

Italian, Pasta

LD

$$

Eclectic American

BL

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Homemade Bakery & Soup

BL

$

Coffee & Crepes Sandwiches

BL LD

$

American

B LD

$

Contemporary Italian

BLD

$$

High End Tapas

D

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Tasting/Wine Bar, Paninis

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

EDWARDS Balata | 1265 Berry Creek Rd | 970.477.5353 Bonjour Bakery | 97 Main St. | 970.926.5539 Bookworm | 295 Main St. | 970.926.7323 Belmont Deli | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1796 Cafe 163 | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1163 Cafe Milano | 429 Edwards Access Rd. #A208 | 970.926.4455 Dish | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.3433 E town | 295 Main St. | 970.926.4080 Eat! Drink! | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1393 Fiesta’s Cantina | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.2121

35 Fondue for two

$

Every Friday Night. Your new Friday Night Tradition!

Daily Happy Hour 4-6 pm

10 $ 5

$

cheese plates

wine

Open M-Sat 11 am - 8 pm, Sun 12 pm - 6 pm

970-926-1393 | corner at edwards | eatdrinkinc.com 28

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

dish happiest hour

3- 5

$

$

Daily 5-6:30 pm

Small plates glasses of wine grey hounds sangria tap beer Open Daily 5 - 10 pm 926-3433 | corner at edwards | eatdrinkdish.com

$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Ranch Western Atmosphere

Pricing

EAGLE/GYPSUM

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

2 Wells & Drafts

5 Wines

$

Live Music Thursday’s 9 pm-‐close Serving Lunch and Dinner

Riverwalk in Edwards 970-‐926-‐2756

• •

• • • • • •

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Happy Hour

$ 50

• • •

• • • •


Gashouse | 34185 US Highway #6 | 970.926.2896 Gobi Mongolian BBQ | 69 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.6628 Gore Range Brewery | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2739 Grouse on the Green | 100 Kensington Dr., Cordillera Divide | 970.926.5788 Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinese Cafe | 175 Main St. | 970.926.3050 Juniper Restaurant | 97 Main St. | 970.926.7001 Larkburger | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.9336 Last Course Dessert Bar & Pastries | 275 Main Street C-106 | 970.926-1979 Local Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza | 280 Main St. | 970.926.4444 Log Cabin Sports Bar and Grill | 34500 Highway 6, #B1 | 970.926.9726 Main St. Grill | 97 Main St. | 970.926.2729 Markoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7003 Mirador | 2205 Cordillera Way, Cordillera Lodge & Spa | 970.926.2200 Old Forge Co. | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2220 Sato | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.7684 Smiling Moose Deli | 1170 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2400 Subway Edwards | 439 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7010 Vista At Arrowhead | 676 Sawatch Dr. | 970.926.2111 Woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen & Pub | 27 Main St. | 970.926.2756 Zino Ristorante | 27 Main St. | 970.926.0777

Colorado Wild Game Grill

LD

Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

EDWARDS

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

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$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

$

Rustic Pub

LD

$$

Pub/American

D

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

Contemporary American

D

Organic Gourmet Fast Food/Burgers

LD

$ $$$ $

Tapas/Wine Bar/Desserts

BLD

$

Pizza

D

$

American/Mexican

BLD

$

American Grill

LD

$$

Pizza & Pasta

LD

$

Regional/Seasonal Fare

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Sushi & Japanese Cuisine

LD

$$

Deli

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

Contemporary American

D

Bar & Grill

LD

$

Contemporary Italian

D

$$

Southern BBQ

LD

Traditional American

LD

$

Steakhouse

D

$$

Meditrainian/Greek Cuisine

BLD

$

Coffee and Sandwiches

BL

$

Mexican/American/Western

D

$$

American

BLD

$

Continental

LD

$$

American Brewery

LD

$$

Regional American

BLD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

American

LD

$

American

BLD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

American

BLD

New American

D

$$$

Pizza

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$$

American/Western

LD

$$

Authentic Italian

D

$$

Pizza and Italian

LD

$

American Bistro

LD

$$

Steakhouse, AprĂŠs and Dinner

D

$$$

Mountain Fare/Steakhouse, AprĂŠs,

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

New American

D

American Pub

LD

$ $$$

Happy Hour

3 Drafts $ 5 Selected Glasses Of Wine $ 4 Well Cocktails $ 6 Appetizer Special $

105 Edwards Village Blvd Edwards, CO 970.926.2739

â&#x20AC;˘

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VAIL Alpenrose | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8899 Ale House | 2161 N. Frontage Road | 970.476.4314 Atwater on Gore Creek | Vail Cascade Resort | 970.476.7014 Bart & Yetiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | Lionshead, North of Arrabelle | 970.476.2754 Bearfish | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7596 Big Bear Bistro | 297 Hanson Ranch Road | 970.300.1394 Billyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Island Grill | Lionshead | 970.476.8811 Bistro 14 | Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nest, Top of Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.445.4530 Block 16 | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 Blue Moose Pizza | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.476.8666 bol | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.5300 Bully Ranch | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5460 Campo de Fiori | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8994 Chicago Pizza | 1031 S. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7000 CinĂŠBistro | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.3344 Elwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steakhouse | 174 East Gore Creek Dr. | 970.754.7818 Flame | Four Seasons, Vail | 970.477.8600 Frost | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8050 Game Creek Restaurant | Vail Mountain | 970.754.4275 Garfinkelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | Next to Lionshead Gondola | 970.476.3789

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

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MINTURN Kirby Cosmos | 474 Main St. | 970.827.9027 Magustoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 101 Main St. | 970.827.5450 Minturn Country Club | 131 Main St. | 970.827.4114 Nickyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quickie | 151 Main St | 970-827-5616 Sticky Fingers | 132 Main St. | 970.827.5353 Minturn Saloon | 146 N. Main St. | 970.827.5954 Turntable | 160 Railroad Ave. | 970.827.4164

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

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.

6 Two Tacos

$

BSH

BSJ

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tPSFIPVTFWBJMDPN Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

|

sneakpeak

29


Gohan Ya | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7570 Joe’s Famous Deli | 288 Bridge St. | 970.479.7580 Kelly Liken | Gateway Building, 12 Vail Rd. | 970.479.0175 La Bottega | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0280 Lancelot | Next to Children’s Fountain | 970.476.5828 Larkspur Restaurant | Golden Peak | 970.754.8050 La Tour | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.4403 Left Bank | Sitzmark Lodge in Vail Village | 970.476.3696 The Little Diner | West Lionshead Plaza | 970.476.4279 Lord Gore & the Fitz Lounge | Manor Vail at the base of Golden Peak | 970.476.4959 Los Amigos | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.5847 Ludwig’s | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5429 The Marketplace | One Willow Bridge Rd. | 970.477.4370 Market Café | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 May Palace | Next to City Market, West Vail | 970.476.1657 Matsuhisa | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.6682 Mezzaluna | Lion Square Lodge, next to Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.477.4410 Moe’s Original BBQ | Upstairs from the General Store, Lionshead | 970.479.7888 Montauk Seafood Grill | Lionshead Village | 970.476.3601 Nozawa | Holiday Inn, West Vail | 970.476.9355 Ocotillo | Vail Mountain Marriott Resort & Spa, Lionshead | 970.477.5675 Old Forge Co. | 2161 N Frontage Rd | 970.476.5555 Old Forge Co. | 521 East Lionshead Cir. | 970.476.5232 Ore House | 232 Bridge St. | 970.476.5100 Osaki’s | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0977 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.9026 Pepi’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.4671 Qdoba | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7539 Red Lion | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.7676 Russell’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.6700 Subway West Vail | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.3827 Sushi Oka Hibachi | 100 East Meadow Drive. Suite #4 | 970.476.1588 Sweet Basil | 193 E. Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.0125 Tap Room | Top of Bridge St. | 970.479.0500 The Tavern On The Square| 675 Lionshead Place | 970.754.7400 Terra Bistro| 352 Meadow Dr., Vail Mountain Lodge& Spa | 970.476.6836 The George | 292 Meadow Dr. | 970.476.2656 Up The Creek Bar & Grill | 223 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.8141 Vendetta’s | 291 Bridge St. | 970.476.5070 Vail Chophouse | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.477.0555 Westside Cafe & Market | 2211 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7890 Yama Sushi | 168 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.7332 Yeti’s Grind | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.1515

AFFORDABLE HEALTH INSURANCE

Asian Cuisine

LD

Sandwiches

BLD

Seasonal American

D

Northern Italian

LD

$

Prime Rib/Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Creative American

D

$$$

French and American

D

$$$

French

D

$$$

Classic Diner, Traditional Favorites

BL

Contemporary American

D

INSURER

PRICE

20 M/F

Cigna

$111

25 M/F

Anthem

$143

30 M/F

Anthem

$151

35 Family/4 Cigna HSA

$503

LOWEST RATES IN COLORADO

SHOP | COMPARE | APPLY ONLINE

MOUNTAINHEALTHINSURANCE.COM

970.845.8910 BRILL INSURANCE AGENCY | AVON, CO

30

sneakpeak

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Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

$ $$$

$ $$

Mexican

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$

Family/American/European

BLD

$

International Café

BLD

$

Chinese

LD

$

Japanese/Peruvian

D

$$

Modern Italian

LD

$$

Barbecue

LD

$

Creative Seafood/Meat

LD

$$

Sushi/Asian

LD

$$

Southwestern Steak House

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sushi/Japanese

D

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

BLD

$

Continental/Wild Game

LD

$$

Mexican

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Sushi, Asian

LD

$

Creative American

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Mountian American Grill

BLD

$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Eclectic Pub

D

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Italian & Pizza

LD

$$ $$$

Steakhouse

LD

Casual American

BLD

$

Sushi and Pacific Spices

D

$$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Health, Life and Dental Insurance HSA’s, IRA’s, Roth’s, Mutual Funds Long Term Care and Disability Insurance Medicare Plans

970.446.7912 info@sneakpeakvail.com

MONTHLY HEALTH INSURANCE RATES

AGE

$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

VAIL

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

www.LFInsuranceGroup.com 970.390.3706

Lori Fennessey

80 Cut

$

and Color Book your appointment today

Great Local Pricing Chair Open for Stylist

Publisher...Erinn Hoban Editor...Melanie Wong Ad Director...Kim Hulick The Glue...Shana Larsen Reporter...Phil Lindeman Ad Sales...Brand Bonsall

970. 926.2633 Above & behind Fiesta’s (across from the Gashouse)

Edwards

©2011 sneakPeak. All rights reserved.


EAGLE LIQUOR MART

FAN - tastic Football Specials

9 % 28 % 28 % off

Any Beer

off Any Spirits

off Any Wine

33% off Champagne & Prosecco

Beer sample pricing after discount: Coors Light and Coors stcs $17.99 Miller Lite stcs $17.99 Keystone 30 pkcs $16.99 Coors 12 pkcs 8.99 MGD 12 pkcs $8.99/ Corona & Corona Light 12 Pack Bottles $11.99 Miller Highlife 30 pkcs $18.99 Gennesee New York 30pkcs $14.99. Spirits sample pricing after discount: Svedka 1.75”s $18.99 Patron Silver 375’s $14.99 Jack Daniel 1.75’s $36.99 Jack Daniel 750 $17.99 Buffalo Trace 750 $16.59 Makers Mark 175L $41.99 Makers Mark 750 $21.99 Pendleton 750 $21.99 Stoli 175L $27.99 Ketel One 175L $32.99 Svedka 375’s $5.99. Wine sample pricing after discount: Apothic Red 750 $8.99 Decoy All Varietals $17.99 Marcus James Malbec $4.49 El Cortijillo Tempranillo $4.49 Ensemble Red $6.79 Silver Oak Alex Cab $60.99 Creme De Lys Chardonnay $6.99

Chamagne sample pricing after discount Korbel Brut $10.99 Cristalino Brut $5.79 Ruffino Prosecco $10.99 Vandori Prosecco $7.39 Piper Sonoma Brut $13.99 Veuve Brut $40.99 Moet Imperial $40.99.

FREE bag of ice with every case. Best value in the Valley when you need ice and the coldest beer in the valley.

328-9463

Henry Doss, Owner

Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

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32

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Thursday, Jan. 24, 2013 -Wed., Jan. 30, 2013

SneakPEAK Jan. 24, 2013  

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