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Thursday, Apr. 25 - May 1, 2013 www.sneakpeakvail.com

Plan your

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Detox with yoga

Poses to get tuned up for summer

Fired up

DIY tips for an inspired barbecue night

Getting the green thumb

Planting-and-gardening season arrives Thursday, Apr. 25, 2013 -Wed., May 1, 2013

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Sowing Seeds, giving back Fifth grade greenhouse program to donate harvest to community. By Phil Lindeman

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Students tend the strawberry patch at Brush Creek Elementary School’s greenhouse. As part of the local Sowing Seeds program and Global Youth Service Day, students will grow fruits and vegetables this summer for a nearby food pantry. Photo special to SneakPEAK.

O

utside of Brush Creek Elementary School (BCES) in Eagle, a modest greenhouse is prepped for the summer growing season.

The translucent building is 11 years old and similar to those at garden centers across the country, with rows of wooden troughs holding rich soil and green, budding plants. Not far from favorites like squash and tomatoes is a strawberry patch, lined with irrigation pipes and the occasional garden ornaments. The 75 fifth graders at BCES have been tending seeds and plants for the past few months in anticipation of Friday afternoon, when roughly 75 more students from Eagle Valley Elementary School and Edwards Elementary School will join their peers for a day of heavy-duty planting. The greenhouse extravaganza is part of Global Youth Service Day, one of the world’s largest volunteer events, with nearly 1,160 projects in the United States and roughly 450 more across the world. In Colorado, the BCES planting day is one of just nine service projects and the only one in the Central Rocky Mountains. But it’s more than a single day of digging through dirt. After all, the majority of plants won’t be ready to harvest until summer, and that’s when the real work begins. As the cornerstone of Sowing Seeds – a joint program between founder Sandy Story, local chef Kelly Liken and The Youth Foundation – the greenhouse teaches students to care for plants long past the final bell. Much of the produce will eventually be donated to the local Eagle Valley Community Food Ministry, a food pantry down the street at the United Methodist Church of Eagle Valley. “One thing that’s cool about this is it will last all summer,” says Story, who also teaches classes on botany and horticulture at the three elementary schools. “The kids get to give back even beyond one day of planting.”

then shows the young gardeners how to make fresh, healthy meals with ingredients they grew at school. The program has been wildly successful, with the addition of an outdoor garden at Edwards Elementary in 2010 and a summertime camp. The students are so good at their new trade that each harvest brought enough food to sell at local farmers markets. But Story wanted to add a new, community-minded element. “We always have a bounty of food, but selling at the markets started to be too much,” Story says. “Donating the food just makes sense, and it gives back to the community in a meaningful way.” Along with Story and Liken, the service day was spurred by fifth grade students Anna Zuckerman and Margaux Stavney. The two wrote a proposal in early February – about a month after the first seeds were planted – and won a $500 grant for soil and plants. Story says the Sowing Seeds program has inspired students beyond the garden and kitchen. Waste from the school cafeteria is composted for soil, and the idea to donate produce came directly from the children. Throughout the summer, Zuckerman and Stavney will personally deliver produce to the food ministry. “The kids are eating better, they’re learning about composting and recycling, and now they’re spreading that into the community,” Story says. “It’s an entire-lifestyle sort of program, not just planting vegetables.” For Liken, Sowing Seeds has come full circle with the service day, showing how the humble greenhouse has evolved to become a fixture at BCES. She lives near the school, and for a few years, she’d drive by and wonder if the garden could ever be used. The long-term goal was to inspire a sense of ownership in the students, from the youngest seeds to sprawling strawberry patch. “They’re giving all that knowledge and bounty back to the community,” Liken says. “It makes me proud to see them take it upon themselves.”

Growing and growing At the food ministry, director Louise Carter is eager for the summer harvest. She occasionally sees fresh vegetables Feeding the neighbors from farmers markets, but the majority of donations are typiAlthough the greenhouse at BCES is more than a decade cal nonperishable fare – pasta, canned beans, cereal and the old, it has found new life in the past four years as the home like. base for Sowing Seeds. Throughout the week, Story visits “When we have fresh produce at the pantry, our clients the schools to teach students how to grow seeds and tend [See SOWING SEEDS, page 17] for budding plants. Once the garden blossoms in full, Liken

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5 patios

Top

mud-season

When ski resorts shut down, follow the locals to sundrenched decks, fit for any crowd. By Phil Lindeman The best of the rest Jarrett Panzera (left) of Steamboat Springs and Michele Moore of Eagle enjoy a beer at Bonfire Brewing in downtown Eagle. As the weather warms up, the brewery’s deck is a local hotspot. Cody Downard photo.

F

ew activities say spring skiing like taking in the sun on a slopeside deck.

Yet Mother Nature had more devious plans for Colorado this year, and the final few weeks of the ski season saw precious few days to lounge in alpine leisure. The weather may still be unpredictable – take the foot or two of snow covering much of the valley last week – but summer is fast approaching, and warmer nights mean larger crowds at in-town patios and decks. As the majority of resort-based restaurants and bars close until Memorial Day, cheap drinks and good company abound in Edwards, Avon and Eagle, where locals welcome spring in laid-back style. The trick during mud-season, then, is finding a crowd you’ll enjoy – just because a deck is open doesn’t mean anyone will be there. SneakPEAK scoured the valley for the finest outdoor hangouts, each guaranteed to have a little something for family outings, impromptu get-togethers, nopressure date nights and everything in between. We’ll save you a seat. Bonfire Brewing tap room, Eagle Eagle’s fast-growing hop-heads headquarters at Bonfire Brewing recently expanded full-scale production to a nearby

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When the resorts turn into ghost towns, there are still plenty of patios for sunny dining and drinking. A few up-valley standouts include: Castle Peak Grille, Avon – Hidden from major roadways at Traer Creek Plaza, the concrete patio is relatively quiet and plenty entertaining, with corn hole, ladder ball and barbecue on Sundays, when the weather cooperates. Gore Range Brewery, Edwards – The Vail area’s only true brewpub also boasts a stellar deck, tucked beneath a grain silo and surrounded by trees. It’s either secluded or bustling depending on the day, but it pairs well with brewery’s trademark Fly Fisher Red. Zino Ristorante, Edwards – Views of the Eagle River compliment fresh, comforting Italian for daters on a budget. Visit on Tuesday evenings for $6 mussels on the heated patio, complete with bocce ball. Crazy Mountain Brewery, Edwards – This local favorite is more of a parking lot than a patio, but wooden picnic tables, yard games and a rotating selection of seasonal drafts make up for the asphalt. Weekends are always bustling. Kirby Cosmo’s BBQ Bar, Minturn – A small, homey patio right off Main Street Minturn brings out the best of smoked brisket, killer beef ribs and a rotating micro-brew taps. Once the sun goes down, turn inside for occasional live music on the weekends. Wolcott Yacht Club, Wolcott – The back deck is nearly unbeatable for live music on Fridays and Saturdays, but Sunday brunch is the bestkept secret. Join kayakers and cyclists for salmon hash or cinnamon-roll French toast, not to mention mimosas and Bloody Marys.

warehouse, but the downtown taproom remains a go-to hangout for local beer lovers. You’ll often find co-owner Andy Jessen behind the bar, pouring pints from one of 18 rotating taps, while his business partner and brewmaster, Matt Wirtz, occasionally pops by to check on his latest experiment. And those frequent experiments set Bonfire aside from just about everyone else. They’ve crafted nearly two dozen different brews in just less than three years, and the current selection includes a hoppy brown ale (the Karate Hop), a gluten-free raspberry beer (the Glutart), a red ale (the Fire Bush) and a rye pilsner (the alluringly named Pregnant Panda). For the Bonfire faithful, the patio is nothing short of sacred ground on Friday evenings. With plenty of seating and lawn games, it’s the ideal place to catch live music on an outdoor stage and chuckle at the suggestively titled brews. It also sees plenty of sun – it occasionally gets a bit too hot in summer – and it’s one of the few area patios with the feel of a mining-town watering hole, located just off the Eagle’s main strip. For Jessen, one of many perks is biking to work. He suggests swinging by on Sunday after tackling the impressive local singletrack. “When people are out riding their bikes, it’s a nice place to stop and relax,” Jessen says. “Sunday afternoons can be unexpectedly busy.” Dusty Boot, Eagle Ranch Decks can be hit or miss with children. The scene is either too rowdy or too proper, and very few restaurants cater wholly to young appetites outside of a kid’s menu. It’s fitting that the down-valley Dusty Boot, found in the family-friendly center of Eagle Ranch, caters to both parents and their progenies. The large patio fits 50 people comfortably, and it’s situated directly next to a grassy opening for kids to run, play and, well, be kids. “We’re definitely a family-friendly sort of place,” Dusty

[See MUD-SEASON PATIOS, page 17]


The art of alpine gardening

Give your plants the best chance with tips from local green thumbs By Phil Lindeman

High-country gardening can be a frustrating pastime. On Monday, green thumbs across the country celebrated Earth Day by planting trees and prepping gardens for the fast-approaching summer season. In Eagle County, the sun was hidden behind clouds most of the day, and come nightfall, temperatures dipped below 30 degrees for intermittent snow showers – par for the course in April. It’s the sort of unpredictable weather most plants just can’t handle. “As excited as we all are, you have to let April go by,” says Stacey Jones of Colorado Alpines and Wildflower Farm in Edwards, a combination greenhouse and landscaping business. “You never know what you’re going to get with weather, especially up here.” As a longtime mountain gardener, Jones has learned to pair patience with her wide knowledge of local flora. She says many first-time gardeners are foiled when they plant too early, even if they have years of experience growing vegetables and flowers in other climates. Between a three-month growing season and wildly changing environment – the elevation changes some 3,000 feet between Vail and Eagle – springtime planting takes an entirely new set of skills. “It’s funny how many opinions people have about gardening,” Jones says. “It’s not bad to have multiple opinions, but some of them can be way off base.” Potted plants One of the biggest stumbling blocks for burgeoning gardeners is underestimating the weather. No matter how hearty the veggie or flower, chilly nighttime temperatures can kill a plant before it has a chance to mature. Jones says potted varieties – think patio-friendly herbs and flowers – can be planted as early as May, but she recommends pulling them inside until at least June 1. For people

Lisa Kraft of Colorado Alpines and Wildflower Farms in Edwards displays the nursery’s new tomato plants. Tomatoes are notoriously tricky to grow in the mountains, because they need to be planted early, yet need warm temps and plenty of light. Kent Pettit photo.

without a garage or other warm space, she suggests wrapping the pot in bubble wrap or cloth blankets. This protects the roots, easily the most valuable portion of a fledgling plant. People can also buy breathable frost blankets (about $20), which are draped directly over the plant and let in early-morning sunshine for late risers. Jenny Lorch, a master gardener with the Colorado State University Extension office in Eagle, agrees with Jones. Lorch also recommends waiting until June to really let plants blossom, although she says the timeframe changes based on where you live along the valley. Even seemingly benign factors like a nearby stream can affect planting. “You can still have frost right now, and it all depends on your physical location,” Lorch says. “If you live near a creek, the air can be colder than if your plants are kept right next to the house. ‘Too early’ varies from Eagle to East Vail this time of year.” If you started seeding and were caught off-guard by snow, Lorch says all hope may not be lost. Depending on the variety of plant, the seeds may still be dormant, especially if pots were protected at night. They need to be watched carefully, but regular watering and careful attention can salvage your grow. If you’re unsure, Lorch suggests calling a local greenhouse owner like Jones. “Even if a plant looks dead, it may still be alive beneath the surface in the roots,” Jones says. “If it just doesn’t grow, it may be dead, and there’s nothing you can do, but don’t assume.” For flowers, Jones says about a dozen varieties do well in the mountains, including annuals like verbena, lobelia and calibrachoa (like petunias, only smaller). All do well when mixed together, and with constant tending, they’ll flower throughout the summer. Lorch likes the biennial hollyhock (alcea), which she calls a “traditional barnyard flower.”

[See SPRING GARDENING, page 16]

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Summer excursions at 10th Mountain huts. 10th Mountain photo.

Choose your

COLORADO

Summer Plan a vacation in your own backyard with affordable, high-adventure trips. By Phil Lindeman

T

his summer, there’s no place like home. Thanks to grueling cases of cabin fever, a healthy chunk of resort-town residents flit off to exotic locales for the dreariness of mud season. Yet from midMay to late September, Colorado is a one-of-a-kind playground, and the Vail area is in the middle of it all. It’s an ideal base camp for multi-day mountain adventure, with towering peaks, streamside campsites and the nation’s most grueling bike routes a short drive away, not to mention all the amenities of a ski resort. Of course, this sort of “staycation” can translate as boring – the term is cliché to the point of painful – so get inventive and splurge. Guided rafting and fly-fishing trips seem expensive on the surface, but outfitters occasionally offer discounts for residents, even during the peak summer months. Either way, you save on travel, food and sheer mental exhaustion. With a few weeks left in the dead season to plan, SneakPEAK spoke with local adventurers and athletes to get the scoop on top-notch getaways in the Colorado High Country. Summer could be the new winter.

Backpacking the 10th Mountain huts When to go: July 1 to late September (a few huts are open year-round) For the uninitiated, backpacking can be intimidating. The 10th Mountain hut system – 19 well-kept shelters spread between Aspen and Vail – makes the learning curve less so. Almost all of the huts have beds, cots, fireplaces, kitchen areas and running water, not to mention a roof you don’t have to carry on your back. The system is known as a haven for powder hounds in the winter, but reservationist Jennifer Blomquist claims summer is custom-made for families and novice backpackers. You still need to carry all your food and gear, but a handful of huts – including the posh Shrine Mountain Inn complex, three buildings near the summit of Vail Pass – are accessible by car come opening day on July 1. “We really encourage non-motorized trips, but in summer, a support vehicle for food and supplies can make planning much easier,” Blomquist says. “It’s the sort of thing that can introduce a family to the backpacking experience without a lot of expense or headache.” Along with other simple treks like Point Breeze Cabin and the Continental Divide Cabin (both found one mile from nearby parking), Shrine Mountain is open to foot traffic yearround. Most of the remaining huts aren’t, however, and Blomquist recommends calling the hut system association to review trip plans. Reservations are required for all trips, and prices vary. For more info or to reserve a hut, call 970-925-5775.

the way, cyclists are treated to sweeping views of 14ers from Fremont Pass, pulse-pounding descents into Leadville and Minturn, and legendary aid stations with brownies and watermelon. “It’s one of those rides I go back to year after year,” says local cyclist Nadine Davis, who has tackled the race three years in a row. “It’s well-supported and comes at a perfect time of year, when the weather is great, and you’ve had enough time to train. It’s known for being consistently good.” The race, organized by Colorado Cyclist, is still open for registration, but Davis notes last year filled quickly. The cost is $135 until July 14, and a portion of race fees go to the Boulder-based nonprofit Davis Phinney Foundation for Parkinson’s, named for the Tour de France stage-winning cyclist. Like many road bike events, competitors also have the option

Fun in the sun

Looking for a single day of off-kilter fun? Mark your calendar now for these signature Eagle County events and activities. • Rafting, late May to September -- with multiple guide companies offering trips on the Colorado and Eagle rivers. • GoPro Mountain Games, June 6 to 9 – Vail’s first big bash of the summer, with biking, kayaking and more open to spectators and competitors. See www.mountaingames.com for details. • Tough Mudder, June 15 and 16 – A high-energy obstacle race, held at Beaver Creek (spots only free for Sunday). Register online for $90 to $200 at www.toughmudder.com. • Dirty Dozen Mud Run, July 13 – A mud-splattered 5K sponsored by the rec district in Gypsum. Price not yet set. Register by calling the Gypsum Recreation Center at 970-777-8888.

to sponsor a hand-picked charity. Although the Copper Triangle only lasts a day, Davis enjoys spending Saturday night in Copper Village, relaxing with fellow riders and friends. In-town condos are relatively cheap, and a crowd of 3,500 cyclists makes for a happening scene. As Davis mentions, the lateseason start leaves time for training on grueling routes like Vail Pass and Battle Mountain. Get started now. To register, visit the race site at www.coppertriangle.com.

Fly fishing with a twist When to go: Late May to September Ride the Copper Triangle Fly fishing is a year-round sport in the Rocky Mountains – local anglers swear by the “seWhen to go: Saturday, Aug. 3 cret season” of early April – but summer is a near-perfect time for beginner and intermediate Touted as “truly an epic day in the saddle,” the beloved Copper Triangle charity ride on fisherman to catch trout. Thanks to pristine sunshine and a healthy local ecosystem, the next Aug. 3 lives up to its reputation. The 78-mile route winds from Copper to Leadville to Vail four or five months are high time for guides at Minturn Anglers, one of several Vail-area and back, covering three high-mountain passes and some 5,600 feet of elevation gain. Along [See SUMMER ADVENTURES, page 16]

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Mud season can be the best season

Top 10 spring activities for the year-round mountain dweller By Laura Lieff

April 15 through Memorial Day equals mud season, right? It depends on how you look at it. Although it is no secret that locals strive for 100 days of snowboarding or skiing, and then look forward to a few months of hiking, biking and rafting, many overlook what goes on during the six weeks in between the seasons. For those who haven’t already caught a plane to Mexico, or haven’t jumped in their cars for a trip back home to the Midwest or the East Coast, here a few options that will keep you busy through Memorial Day. 1. Go out and enjoy a five-star meal We have some of the most deliciously creative restaurants in the country right here in our backyard, but sometimes we are too busy (or cash-strapped) to check them out. You can walk in the door of some of the most impressive fine dining establishments in the Vail area and find a great deal during off season. Make sure to call ahead of time to make sure they’re open or find out if you need reservations. 2. Take a drive The off season is perfect for visiting some of Colorado’s most popular non-mountain destinations. Go to a Rockies game in Denver, enjoy the distilleries and wineries in Palisade, take a walk down Pearl Street in Boulder or mountain bike around Moab. For an in-town scenic option, take Interstate 70 past Vail to U.S. Hwy 24, where you can roll through downtown Minturn, drive through Red Cliff and then go up and over Tennessee Cruise the town - while trails are still muddy, grab your bike and take to the valPass where Mount Massive emerges as you drive south through Leadville. ley’s bike paths. Kent Pettit photo. 3. Encourage friends and family to come to you Since some of the area’s best hotels offer deals that aren’t available any other time of year, deserve some R&R at an affordable price and with a variety of spas to choose from, so you off season is a good time for out-of-towners to take an affordable vacation and experience can treat yourself and decide what’s best for you. Massage therapists around town are also where you live. Kick back in the hot tub, go out to dinner and play tour guide to your friends offering their off-season specials, so check in with individual businesses for the latest. and family. 8. Get your deck or patio ready for barbecue season 4. Play a few rounds of golf Now that the winter season has come to an end, take some time to work on your deck or The Vail area has some of the most exciting courses in Colorado, so take advantage of the patio for all the barbecues you’ll be hosting this summer. Memorial Day weekend marks early-season prices. April and May can offer some sunny days, which make for great golfing the Blues, Brews and Barbecue Festival at Beaver Creek, so you want to make sure you’re weather. With the discounted prices, playing a round a golf can be a great way to spend a ready to show off for the chefs who will be attending or have questions ready to ask the morning or afternoon that doesn’t break the bank. Check out the Gypsum Creek Golf Course professionals. and Eagle Ranch Golf Course for early-season openings. Eagle Ranch’s “value season” rates are available through May 24. For 18-hole play, guests 9. Play disc golf are $66, Eagle County residents are $58 and Eagle residents are $51. For nine-hole play, With a concept similar to golf, the sport uses discs instead of clubs and balls. Players guests are $43, Eagle County residents are $38 and Eagle residents are $33. For twilight (af- throw the discs at a basket for “par” and, for the most part, golf rules apply. Disc golf is a ter 3 p.m.) play, guests are $43, Eagle County residents are $38 and Eagle residents are $33. popular sport because it’s a relaxed activity that doesn’t require expensive gear or extensive The Gypsum Creek Golf Course offers spring season rates through May 23. For weekdays training. (Monday through Thursday), cost is $39 with cart/$32 walking for 18 holes, and $30 with Check out the Flying Eagle Disc Society, a group that promotes disc golf in Eagle County cart/$25 walking for nine holes. Weekend rates are $49 with cart/$39 walking for 18 holes, and the Colorado Rocky Mountain region. Their 2013 season is already off and running with and $37 with cart/$30 walking for nine holes. the next event taking place at the Eagle County Fairgrounds disc golf course on April 29. The $20 registration fee covers your 2013 membership in the society, and includes a custom, 5. Go fishing numbered bag tag and a club-logo stamped mini disc. With reservoirs thawing and pre-runoff conditions in effect, it’s a great time to be fishing - especially with a guide to help you prepare for the upcoming fishing season. The water is 10. Start training for the summer races not yet on the rise, making fishing a popular activity for those who are looking to trade fly Colorado loves its summer races and Vail is no exception. The Tough Mudder at Beaver rods for skis and snowboards. Creek on June 15 to 16, the GoPro Mountain Games from June 6 through 9, and the Vail Recreation District’s mountain biking and running series are just a few examples of the 6. Cruise around various competitive events going on this summer. Hit those trails and roads and get an early Borrow or buy a cruiser bike and check out the resort town everyone loves and talks start on your training. about. With so many paths around the area you can see everything from locals on patios to wildlife hanging out on the side of the road. 7. Go to a spa for some mud treatments Enjoy a mud wrap, mud facial or mud massage. After six months on the mountain you

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SneakPEAK writer Laura Lieff can be reached at info@sneakpeakvail.com

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Detox withYoga S

Poses to clear out the cobwebs, physically and mentally, for spring. By Melanie Wong. Photos by Zach Mahone.

Twisting lunge

pring cleaning usually means a thorough scrub of the house and a sorting of the garage and storage areas, but fewer people consider spring cleaning for the body.

of all illness and emotional imbalance, and freedom in the spine benefits our movement, respiration, and ultimately unlocks our rightful sense of joy.� As Clarke describes, twisting poses compress the digestive system, effectively “wringing� out toxins and waste. As an added bonus, twists release tension on the spine, creating movement our bodies don’t normally get from day to day.

According to Julia Clarke, yoga director at the Vail Vitality Center, the winter can leave our bodies carrying tightness, stress and toxins – and that’s why she suggests a physical and mental spring cleaning through yoga, meditation and nutrition. “After winter, we’ve worked too much, played too much and carry too much stress,â€? Clarke says. “We’ve had lots of après beers, and even if you enjoy winter, it can take a toll on your body.â€?

What: Spring Detox Flow, a two-hour class focusing on twists, breathing and flowing movements, all designed to detox the body. When: Saturday, April 27 from 10 a.m. to noon Where: Vail Vitality Center How much: Cost is $15 in advance for members and $20 the day of the workshop. Cost for guests is $25. More info: Visit www.vailvitalitycenter.com or call 970-476-7960.

Forward bend The Vitality Center hosts a Spring Detox Flow yoga class on Saturday, April 27. The workshop, led by instructor Tara Goike, is designed to cleanse the body and clear the mind through twists and core-centered poses. “Twists and core poses were designed to release the spine and digestive tract from toxic blockages,� Goike says. “The toxins that get lodged in the digestive system are the root

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The movements of yoga also help create flow in the lymphatic system, a network in charge of our immune systems. For those looking for a nutritional and mental detox as well, Clarke suggests using concepts from Ayurveda, an Indian medicinal system that can act as the nutritional complement to yoga. For a day, eat easily digestible fruits and veggies, either in juice or smoothie form, or lightly cooked. Make lunch your biggest meal of the day, and sip hot water, boiled with gingere, to stoke the digestive system. “The idea is to give your digestive system a break so that it can focus on getting rid of all the fat-soluble toxins,� Clarke says. “If you’re active, you might throw in a more substantial meal, such as some boiled red lentils.� To incorporate some mental detox, Clarke recommends metta meditation, roughly translated as “loving-kindness� or forgiveness meditation. “In this practice, you offer loving kindness to all other beings and rid yourself of residual resentment and bitterness,� Clarke says. To practice metta meditation, get in a comfortable position of your choice and start thinking of someone you love, offering them love, safety, peace, happiness and health. Transfer those thoughts toward someone you have differences with, and then move on to offering those feeling toward all beings. So whether you’re tight from too much skiing or your back hurts from carrying trays and shoveling snow, get start-

Bow pose ed with yoga for detox. Clarke showed us a few poses aimed specifically at spring cleaning. Twisting lunge 1. Start in downward dog. 2. Step the right foot forward. 3. Reach hands to the sky in a high lunge. 4. Place palms together and twist to the right, with your left elbow on the outside of your right knee. 5. Hold for five deep breaths, using the exhale to twist deeper. Repeat on opposite side. Tip: For all twists, start with a long spine and then twist from the bottom up, starting with the belly, followed by the chest and finally the head. Bow pose 1. Lie facedown on your belly. 2. Bend both knees and reach back with your hands to hold the outside edge of your feet. 3. Press your pelvis into the floor for a solid base, and using the strength of your back, lift your chest and thighs off the ground. 4. Hold for five breaths, pressing your feet back into your hands for a deeper pose. Forward bend 1. Stand with feet hip-width apart. Soften your knees, with hands on hips. 2. Fold forward, placing hands on the floor. 3. For a deeper stretch, work your fingers and palms under your feet. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

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From group ride to legendary event The 25th annual Triple Bypass rides into Avon this July By Melanie Wong Nobody was prepared for the snow. Evergreenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sue Meinerz remembers riding up Loveland Pass during the first annual Triple Bypass road ride 25 years go, along with about 100 other unfortunate cyclists. Meinerz and the rest were wholly taken by surprise by the snow during the Evergreen-to-Vail ride (it now ends in Avon) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; after all, it was July â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and they were frozen by the time they reached the bottom of the pass, with still another major climb to go. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was a tough one,â&#x20AC;? Meinerz remembers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My fatherin-law was in a van at the bottom of the pass and he handed us ski jackets. We didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even care, we were so cold. We grabbed them and kept going.â&#x20AC;? Some may find it amazing, but Meinerz returned the following year for the ride, and the next, and the next, and she has been joined by thousands of other riders from all over the country who ride the 120-mile tour of the mountains

Ride Eagle County Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make the Triple Bypass on July 13 and 14? Check out these other rides rolling through town this summer. - GoPro Mountain Games Vail Pass Time Trial on Sunday, June 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Race the course from Vail Village up the storied route. Info at www.mountaingames.com. - Colorado-Eagle River Ride on Saturday, July 27 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 100 miles of rolling terrain, including hardpacked dirt sections, to benefit SOS Outreach. Search www.sosoutreach.org under â&#x20AC;&#x153;River Ride.â&#x20AC;? - Copper Triangle on Saturday, Aug. 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 78 miles, over three scenic climbs. A portion of entry fees supports the Davis Phinney Foundation for Parkinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

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each year. In fact, Meinerz, 52, holds the distinction of having ridden in all 24 of the rides since it started, and this year will be her 25th. The ride has become so popular that registration is capped at 3,500 people, and space often fills up within hours of opening. Ride organizers Team Evergreen tried to accommodate the eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popularity by starting a second day of riding that goes from Avon to Evergreen, which has a capacity of 2,500 and still has spots available. For those looking at

Triple Bypass, by the numbers

120 miles in the one-day ride 5,000 riders doing the one-way route over two days 1,000 riders doing the Double Triple Bypass 30 percent of riders who finish the Double Triple 11,990 feet â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the highest point of the ride on Loveland Pass $1.1 million â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the total amount donated to nonprofits from ride proceeds 5 hours and 35 minutes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the fastest time on record for completing the Evergreen to Vail course, set by professional cyclist Rich Gangl of Golden in 1995.

even more of a challenge, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the Double Triple Bypass, where riders go from Evergreen to Avon, then return to Evergreen the next day for a total of 240 miles. The Triple Bypass has also become one of the largest cycling fundraising events in Colorado, using a unique format to raise money for charities around the state. The nonprofits help run the ride as volunteers, and the majority of proceeds goes back to the groups. To date, Team Evergreen has do-

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nated $1.1 million to charities through the Triple Bypass This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s event is slated for July 13 and 14. Entry fees are $150 for early registration for the one-day, and $290 for the Double Triple. Small beginnings The Triple Bypass didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t begin with any intentions of becoming one of Coloradoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marquee cycling events â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it started out as a group ride among friends. Meinerz says a small core of friends who often rode, skied and traveled together thought it might be a good idea to organize a big group trip. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Someone put an ad in the paper and said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do a century,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and we said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hey, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s start a bike club,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how Team Evergreen started,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back then it was a lot less serious, and biking has gotten much more popular

[See TRIPLE BYPASS, page 12]

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Cyclists summit Loveland Pass in the 2007 Triple Bypass bike ride. The charity event, which draws thousands of cyclists each year, celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. Ellen Nelson photo.

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Thursday, Apr. 25, 2013 -Wed., May 1, 2013

For horse enthusiasts, this weekend’s Rescue Rendezvous event in Eagle is the equivalent of a dream day on the farm. It’s also a sobering wake-up call for animal lovers of any order. Now in its second year, the free two-day gathering is hosted by Mountain Valley Horse Rescue (MVHR), a local nonprofit dedicated to abandoned and abused animals throughout the Central Rocky Mountains. It mixes sessions on equine dentistry and saddle fitting with live demonstrations using horses from the rescue – the same animals written off as too far gone. “There’s a lot of stigma out there about rescue horses, that they’re broken or will never be saddled again,” MVHR Executive Director Shana Devins says. “We want to change that perception, and there are lots of groups out there that do incredible work with these horses to train them for people again.” Devins claims last year’s event was a major success, drawing nearly 300 people from across the area. She expects an even better turnout at this weekend’s informal seminars and presentations. “Even in our first year, it was such an incredible time,” Devins says. “There is so much positive, creative energy flowing through that building during the weekend. Everyone is coming together to solve the problem of the unwanted horse.” Healing through horses This dedication to all things equine is at the heart of Saturday morning’s opening event, a demonstration of MVHR’s signature Destination Rescue program. Led by program director and founder Alecz Adams, it’s a way for humans to connect with horses – and vice versa. Students from the local SOS Outreach program will begin with basic chores like feeding, then move onto more intricate tasks like grooming, guiding and gentle massage. Over time, the horses – many of which came to the rescue afraid of humans – learn to trust people. It’s a valuable step for animals that Devins and Adams believe can find owners, even after incredibly stressful lives. “Our catchphrase is, ‘We’re closing the circle of healing,’ where the people heal the horses, and the horses in turn heal the people,” Adams says. “It’s a very restorative program.” The Saturday demonstration is just a small glimpse of the overall program, built in concert with the Steamboat Springs training facility Rescued to Ride. Since starting last June, Adams has brought 60 people from Eagle County groups to work with rescue horses. The half-day sessions have proven incredibly popular, and a handful of the SOS students par-

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All events are free and held at the Eagle County Fairgrounds, found just outside downtown Eagle on Fairgrounds Road. Saturday, April 27 Held at arena 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. – Destination Rescue demonstration with Alecz Adams 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. (on Saturday and Sunday) – Colt starting/training with Rescued to Ride 2 p.m. 3 p.m. (on Saturday and Sunday) – “What Can a Rescue Horse Become?” with Tina Wright Held in classroom 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. – Equine dentistry with Dr. Courtney Diehl 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Rescue case study with Gene Ferraro 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. – “Lameness: Natural Prevention, Treatment and Wellness” (part 1) with Janet Crow 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. – Equine nutrition with Lisa Rasmussen and Allen Gentry 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. (on Saturday and Sunday) – Saddle fitting with Tiger Adams 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. – Equine acupuncture with Dr. Silvia Stocker Sunday, April 28 Held at arena 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. – “Yoga on Horseback” with Alecz Adams Held in classroom 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. – “Lameness: Natural Prevention, Treatment and Wellness” (part 2) with Janet Crow 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. – Rescue case study with Duane Adams 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. – “Holistic Horse Keeping: What Is It and How Do I Get Started?” with Robin Davis 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. – Equine first aid with Dr. Liz Chandler 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. – Rescue case study with Aimee Chappelle

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Mountain Valley Horse Rescue Executive Director Shana Devins (right) and her son, Grady, feed Annie and her foal, “Baby Buffalo,” at the Harris Ranch in Whitewater. Kent Pettit photo. ticipating on Saturday have already worked with the horses before. “We hear people say things like, ‘The horse actually looks taller now that we’re done,’” Adams says. “The people themselves feel more relaxed and comfortable. Some even admit they were afraid at first. It’s a pretty incredible thing, to see these people and horses let go of suffering.”

In a similar vein to Destination Rescue, the intriguingly titled “Yoga on Horseback” takes a different approach to healing for horses and humans. Led by Adams on Sunday morning, the hour-and-a-half class doesn’t require yoga experience or a horse, although owners are welcome to bring their animals. The rest of the group can use the same welltrained rescue horses SOS students worked with the previous day. From yoga to adoption Adams has led similar yoga classes for individuals and Devins says the weekend is made for anyone interested groups in the past, and she tends to opt for slow, core-intense in horses, but she and other organizers included sessions to [See RESCUE RENDEZVOUS, page 16] grab the attention of tentative attendees.

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TRIPLE BYPASS –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

now. I remember people riding in old corduroy shorts, and there was one guy would stop at the bottom of Loveland for a cigarette.” Historically, the ride ended in Vail, with riders crashing at the Holiday Inn and finishing with a pool party, but as the number of riders grew, organizers moved the finish line to Nottingham Park in Avon. There was never much thought to raising money through the ride, either, until the event began growing. About 15 years ago, the ride became a benefit, with fundraising truly taking off after 2005. “In the early days, we were running on a shoestring,” says George Rooney, vice-president of the Team Evergreen board and a Triple Bypass veteran. “We’d put a checkbox on the registration that allowed people to donate money. We started doing the charity thing, and now we have about 20 volunteer groups that benefit from it. I don’t think enough attention goes to how great that is.” In 2006, the Colorado State Patrol asked that the ride be capped at 3,500 riders, a development that made the ride all the more popular. “I think that motivated people to sign up for the ride” Rooney says. “We used to have 300 to 400 riders sign up the day of the ride. The next year, spots filled up in February. The next year it filled three days after registration opened, and the next year (2009) registration closed in 45 minutes.” In some ways, the ride’s popularity also helps spread goodwill between the community and cyclists. “So many people and businesses are involved in the ride,” Meinerz says. “People have the idea of ‘those darn bikers on the road,’ but it’s different when people realize that these are friends and neighbors.”

Double or nothing Two years ago, Team Evergreen began offering the Double Triple, and a few thousand or so riders have taken them up on the challenge. However, it’s a tough ride, even for the strongest riders, and the results show it. Of the 1,000 people who have ridden the Double Triple, only about 30 percent have finished it, compared to the 75 percent who complete the single-day ride. “Coming back is a whole different ballgame,” says Rooney, 53, who had been riding back from Avon on the second day long before it became a sanctioned ride. “You get the biggest climb at the end of the day. (The climb is) 16 miles, and you’re more susceptible to afternoon thunderstorms that tend to be more common near the Front Range.” Rooney advises riders braving the Double Triple for the first time to dial it back the first day – Rooney rides at about a 45-minute slower pace than he would the single-day ride. He also eats and drinks plenty throughout the day, gets a massage at the finish village, eats a good dinner that evening, and goes to bed early. “On the second day, it helps to have a bigger cassette on your wheel,” Rooney says. “Don’t cook yourself going over Loveland Pass, because you have a big 30-mile downhill, and after that you’ll have to climb again. Also, have your vitamin I, which is ibuprofen.” Getting to the finish Whether your finish line is at 240 miles or at 120 miles, seasoned riders Rooney and Meinerz have advice to offer. Meinerz says the key is to ride the course at your own speed. Too many people try to stay tight with a group and end up wearing themselves out before the end. Getting kitted up is just as important as the riding itself

– Meinerz says she’s seen too many riders take off in short sleeves and a banana in their pocket not finish. Her small water pack always includes a rain jacket, a Gore-Tex jacket, surgical gloves (for makeshift liners or for mechanical work), a trash bag (as a rain jacket she can lend out) and some of her own favorite ride foods. “I will eat lunch at the Loveland station where they have food, but otherwise, I eat the things I’m used to so I don’t have stomach problems,” Meinerz says. Rooney’s go-to piece of clothing is a headband or hat. “That’s probably the first thing on my list. You want to keep your head warm,” Rooney says, citing the unpredictable weather and cold temperatures in the early morning when riders set out. “You can stay pretty warm in all kinds of weather if your head stays warm.” Training for the Triple Bypass varies – Rooney has prepared for his rides by commuting 50-plus miles each day to work, while Meinerz simply does a lot of consistent, shorter rides. Beyond that, it just takes a little dose of crazy. “I always say, ‘Death before sag,’” says Rooney, referring to the sag wagons that pick up bailed riders. “In 2006 it rained and snowed all day, and I had a cold three days before. I woke up and felt terrible, and thought, ‘I don’t know if I’m going to ride today.’ But I rode that miserable son of a gun all day, and I finished. It’s just a fun ride that’s wellorganized, and that’s what keeps people coming back.”

SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

RESCUE RENDEZVOUS –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– movements good for riding. She compares the class to slower, more detailed forms of yoga, as opposed to the flow-based variety that’s faster and potentially stressful. And yes, many of the poses are performed on the horse. “Any time you connect with an animal is good for you,” Adams says. “Animals tend to reflect what their human handlers are feeling, and when you relax and find your focus, it can help do the exact same thing for the horse.” The hands-on sessions at the outdoor arena are paired with presentations by veterinarians, trainers and law enforcement. Of the 13 horses currently housed at the rescue’s 35-acre property in Eagle, several were seized after reports of abuse and neglect. These animals are often the most difficult to handle, but with time and patience, their lives can be saved. “One of the biggest challenges we face is retraining these horses for adoption,” Devins says. “During that time, it can be especially difficult to get them to a place where training is beneficial.” Devins hopes real-life success stories can undo the negative opinion of abandoned horses.

[From page 11]

It takes an average of one year to retrain a horse, and during that time, costs can reach $3,000 for food, care and vaccines. Along with recent grants from national and local groups, the MVHR is funded almost solely by private donations. Devins admits a few of the animals will never leave the rescue – they’re either too old or too frail for new owners – but she hopes at least one or two will find new homes. The majority of horses at the event are up for adoption, including young colts. “It takes a lot of care to get these horses trained and comfortable around humans,” Devins says. “We have one little guy who is highly adoptable, but he really needs that one person he can trust for the rest of his life.”

SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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Calendar of Events

rock from the Steamboat Springs group String Board Theory the Eagle cleanup only, call Taylor Slaugh with the Eagle at Main Street Grill. Music begins at 10 p.m., with drink and Chamber at 970-306-2262. food specials throughout the night. The concert is free, and Saturday, April 27 entry is 21 years old and up once the music starts. National Drug Take Back Day

If your medicine cabinet is bursting with expired or unused prescription drugs – not the recreational kind, of course – drop by the Vail Municipal Building from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for the Eagle County branch of National Drug Take Back Day. Local law enforcement officers will take the drugs at Submit your event to SneakPEAK’s weekly community cal- The annual garage sale at Vail Mountain School is a highno charge and dispose of them properly. Vitamins, suppleendar by sending information to info@sneakpeakvail.com. light of the spring, with clothing, furniture, toys, sports ments, lotions and prescription medications are all allowed, equipment and more, all donated from VMS families. The but officers will not take needles or compressed-air canispublic event kicks off with early-bird shopping on Friday Thursday, April 25 from 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the East Vail campus. Things ters. Outside of Vail, pick-up is also at Battle Mountain High Live It Lecture Series: “Finding Your In- kick into high gear the following day for the “official” sale School in Edwards and Costco in Gypsum. Drop-off is toner Athlete” from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. If you visit, be sure to bring cash and tally confidential. Join Olympic sports psychologist, Diana McNab, for an keep an eye out for ski gear. The finds are always topSunday, April 28 interactive and informative workshop on “Finding Your notch. Inner Athlete.” McNab will guide attendees through the inEagle Community Gardens kick-off dividual characteristics of your inner athlete and how to get meeting “in the zone.” Learn the latest sports psychology research, Saturday, April 27 Members of Eagle Community Gardens are invited to ring skills, strategies and techniques that she has used with in the growing season with a kick-off party at 2 p.m. on SunTown of Eagle tree planting athletes from the 2012 London Olympics and Paralympics. Missed Earth Day? The Town of Eagle is sponsoring a day- day. The meet-and-greet party gives involved green thumbs Event is held at 6 p.m. at the Eagle County Ambulance long tree planting event for residents. Participants meet at a chance to meet each other, exchange seeds and gardening District in Edwards. Event is free, but call Dogma Athletica Brush Creek Pavilion throughout the day, and volunteer tips, go over rules for the summer harvest and do minor prep at 970-688-4433 to reserve your spot. groups will leave periodically the plant trees along the creek. work at the Brush Creek Pavilion site. The 40-plot garden Some tools and supplies will be provided, but anyone is wel- still has spaces available and organizers will accept applicaThursday, April 25 come to bring equipment. The event is open to all ages, and tions until every plot is taken. For more information or to Toddler Bear Gymnastics in Vail be sure to bring plenty of water, a jacket and sunscreen. Call apply, email Dawn at dawn@alpineestategardens. To learn more, visit the website at www.eaglecommunitygardens.org. Youngsters learn to control their bodies and have active the town at 970-328-6354 for more info. . fun at Toddler Bear Gymnastics, a parent-and-child class at the Vail Gymnastics Center. Beginning at 10:15 a.m., Sunday, April 28 Saturday, April 27 the 45-minute class uses basic obstacles and movements Open Mic Night at Loaded Joes in Avon Volunteer highway cleanup to boost motor skills in a safe environment. Children from Dream of being the next Mitch Hedburg? Have a soft spot It’s time for spring cleaning of every variety, and the walking age to 3-and-a-half years old are invited, and for slam poetry and want to share it with the world? The County Highway Cleanup and Eagle Chamber of Comthe class is limited to one parent per child. Older siblings talented, wacky and just plain bizarre are all welcome at merce have joined forces with local towns to pick up trash should also stay home. Cost is $15 for a single class, and Loaded Joe’s Open Mic Night, held every Sunday from 9 frequent visitors should ask about center memberships. Call on local highways. The event, held from 8 a.m. to noon, p.m. to midnight. It’s free to perform on the small, cozy will traverse throughout the valley along portions of Inter970-479-2287 for more details. state 70, U.S. Highway 6 and U.S. Highway 24. It’s perfect stage, and look for rotating drink specials and a stellar latenight menu featuring bacon. volunteers of every age, and participation includes a free Friday, April 26 barbecue at Broken Arrow Ranch in Arrowhead from noon String Board Theory in Edwards to 2 p.m. To volunteer for the valley-wide cleanup, contact Shake off mud-season blues with eclectic, dance-infused Eagle Watershed Council at hwycleanup@erwc.org. For Monday, April 29

River Report

Friday, April 26 Vail Mountain School Family Garage Sale in Vail

The Eagle

Colorado River

Gore Creek

Roaring Fork

brought to you by

Nymphing with baetis and The Fork is still running pretty midge patterns is still the most The Colorado has been very good both in the upper and Please bear in mind that the low, but is fishing very well. productive tactic, but during lower portions. Much like the Gore is on it’s second season Recommended Patterns: #16 the warmest part of the day Eagle right now nymphing of extremely low flows, so the and #18 Tube Midges in black, fishing dries and emergers is stones, midges and baetis is fish are still very vulnerable olive and purple, #20 and 22 also very effective. most productive. Pat’s Rubber to stress. Most folks agree that Forky Baetis, #18 and 20 Se#16 and #18 Tube Midges in black, olive and purple, #18-22 Leg’s, Kauffman Stones and the sticking to the Eagle is the best renstupidity, and Kyle’s Yellow “Spicy Pickle” Girdle Bug. move right now. Sally in all sizes. Black and Grey Sparkle wing RS-2’s, WD-40’s in Olive

Locally owned and operated

For full fishing report scan

or visit minturnanglers.com

970.827.9500

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Edwards

Health, Life and Dental Insurance HSA’s, IRA’s, Roth’s, Mutual Funds Long Term Care and Disability Insurance Medicare Plans Eagle Valley Rummage Sale Board members Nancy Nottingham (left) and Sue Mott (right) hand a check to Ruth Walk (center) from the proceeds of last summer’s sale for Hospice of the Valley. Donations are now being accepted for this year’s sale, held Aug. 17 to 18 and 24 to 25 at Minturn’s Maloit Park. Don’t toss those clean-and-useable items of clothing, houseware, books, linens, rugs, sports equipment, small appliances and furniture. Instead, donate them to this community sale. All the proceeds of the sale are divided among more than 65 local, nonprofit groups. For pickup of large items, call 970-476-5701. For more information on the sale, call 970-926-0577 or check out the website at www.eaglevalleyrummagesale.com

Toddler Story Hour in Edwards

From “Goodnight Moon” to brand-new releases, the weekly Toddler Story Hour at The Bookworm in Edwards is a perfect way to entertain little ones while their older siblings are away at school. Local children’s literature whiz Franny Gustafson leads children up to age 3 through her favorite tales, combing the written words with energetic songs and dances. The free event begins at 9:15 a.m. and usually lasts an hour.

Tuesday, April 30 Bonfil’s Blood Drive in Eagle

If you have a pint or two to spare, stop by the Bonfil’s Blood Drive at Brush Creek Pavilion from 12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. The 50-year-old organization treats donors right, providing a relaxed environment, trained nurses and snacks for all participants. As with all blood drives, donors must be 18

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years old (16 years old with a guardian), weigh at least 115 pounds, be relatively healthy and wait at least two months between donations. For questions, call the Denver Bonfil’s office at 303-341-4000.

Raise your brush!

Wednesday, May 1 MTB Short Track Series in Wolcott

The Vail Recreation District’s three-race series hits a new course each Wednesday, and this week racers tackle a route through 4 Eagle Ranch outside of Wolcott. Riders as young as 6 years old can compete, and with five divisions to choose from, the series is made for novices and experts alike. Racing begins at 5:15 p.m., followed by an after party at 4 Eagle Ranch Grill. Registration is available online at www.vailrec. com or at the event. Cost is $7 per race for kids ($21 for the series) and $15 per race for adults ($45 for the series). For more info, visit the rec district website or email coordinator

This weeks painting

210 Edwards Blvd. Edwards 970-926-2732 alpineartscenter.org

Vail 476-9026 Avon 949-9900 Eagle 337-9900

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SPRING GARDENING â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Patio gardeners also have good luck with herbs, especially self-contained varieties like thyme, oregano and parsley. Despite its popularity, Jones stays away from basil. The plant doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do well in the cold, and watering is hit or miss. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The key to gardening is to avoid stress on the plants, and too much water can drown basil,â&#x20AC;? Jones says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very common mistake.â&#x20AC;? The thing about tomatoes Fickle weather and the dry, thin air of Colorado play a large part in deciding what goes into your garden. Take tomatoes: Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hugely popular for both patio and in-ground gardeners, but they can be notoriously hard to maintain in the mountains. As Lorch explains, tomatoes need warm nights to really flourish. When the temperature dips wildly early in the growing season, it can result in dead leaves or roots. Another part of the problem is seeding. Jones says tomatoes take a while to fully mature, and if you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t planted by now, the plants may not bloom in time for mid-summer harvest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At this point, you can still seed tomatoes, but you may miss that timeframe for the harvest,â&#x20AC;? Jones says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People really love those plants, but they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize the seeding needs to be done early.â&#x20AC;? As with all plants, though, tomatoes can survive and even thrive with proper care. Most greenhouses have readygrown varieties that just need to be planted, much like trees from a tree farm. If you grow a potted variety, such as cherry

Community gardens

Many local gardeners struggle when it comes to finding space to plant. However, Eagle County is home to several community gardens for apartment dwellers willing to volunteer throughout the summer. â&#x20AC;˘ Avon Community Garden â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Run by the Vail Valley Salvation Army, this small garden is new and filling fast. Three small plots and two large plots remain at press time, with the potential for â&#x20AC;&#x153;plant a rowâ&#x20AC;? options in the future. Apply online at www.salvationarmyvail.org. â&#x20AC;˘ EagleVail Community Garden â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This yearold garden near the golf course was a huge success in its first year, with all 32 plots taken. Space may open in the coming weeks. Apply online at eaglevailgarden.wordpress.com. â&#x20AC;˘ Eagle Community Gardens â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Located at Brush Creek Pavilion, this garden is one of the largest in the valley, with 40 beds, a compost pile and equipment barn. Plots are still available. Apply online at www.eaglecommunitygardens.org. â&#x20AC;˘ West Vail Community Garden â&#x20AC;&#x201C; This 27plot garden is full, but given the turnaround up-valley, the waiting list is a good idea. Apply online at www.westvailcommunitygarden.org.

tomatoes, keep them close to the house and away from the elements. In the garden Beyond the patio, the gardening world opens up to all sorts of plants that can last throughout the summer and into fall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cold cropsâ&#x20AC;? like lettuce, kale, cabbage and onions fare well as underground plants. Lorch mentions lettuce was produced in the Eagle area for years to feed miners in nearby Leadville. However, low-lying vine plants, including squash and cucumbers, are similar to tomatoes and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t handle the cold well. Soil care is important no matter where you garden, and even if you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t begin seeding, Jones says prep work can begin in the next week or two. She recommends mulching the garden bed before adding about one inch of compost. To give plants even more oomph, Jones recommends soil additives like humate. These organic compounds boost root growth by holding onto water â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a must in the dry High Country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If plants get stressed out due to lack of moisture or new planting, those additives can spur growth,â&#x20AC;? Jones says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They unlock nutrients already found in the soil, which is much better than just adding more fertilizer.â&#x20AC;? SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

SUMMER ADVENTURES â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; outfits that arrange fishing excursions on the Colorado and Eagle rivers. Along with half and full-day wading trips, Minturn Anglers is known for inventive combo packages built around small groups. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cast and Blastâ&#x20AC;? package is a true old-school getaway, beginning with several hours of fly fishing in the morning (wade or float), followed by clay shooting with shotguns in the afternoon. Pricing starts at $540 for two people, with equipment and ammo included. For a full weekend, overnight float trips ($395 per person, per day) go along secluded stretches of the Colorado River, and even die-hard anglers can find areas theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never fished before. The horseback/fly-fishing trips ($365 per person, per day) in the nearby Flat Tops Wilderness Area are equally adventurous, but tailored for inexperienced or younger guests looking for a naive trout. Both multi-day excursions include all meals, equipment and shelter, and although camping experience isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a must, proper clothing is. After all, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still the great outdoors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On these trips, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to just camp on the Eagle next to I-70,â&#x20AC;? Logan Johnson of Minturn Anglers says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to get out into the wilderness, heading off the beaten path.â&#x20AC;? For more information, call the Minturn Anglers shop at 970-827-9500. Two days, 28,000 feet When to go: Late June to late August Eagle County is only home to one of Coloradoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s famous 14ers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the 14,002-foot Mount of the Holy Cross outside of Red Cliff â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but the neighboring Leadville area holds several. The towns are also just 23 miles away from each other, and fit, adventurous types can tackle two

Rescue RendezvouS IS THIS WEEKEND | APRIL 26-27 | 9-5PM | EAGLE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

free admission DEMONSTRATIONS EXHIBITIONS LOCAL VENDORS GREAT FOOD

[From page 5]

[From page 6]

peaks in one weekend with the right planning. The easiest itinerary is to hike Mt. Elbert (the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tallest at 14,440 feet) on Saturday and Mount of the Holy Cross on Sunday. To start, stay Friday night at Lakeview Campground ($15 per night), a combo RV/tent site about 20 miles past Leadville in the San Isabel National Forest. The South Mt. Elbert Trailhead is just outside the campground, and a start time of 8 a.m. should leave plenty of time for the 11.2-mile roundtrip hike (be sure to pack your car in the morning). After leaving Lakeview, drive along U.S. Highway 24 toward Minturn and turn left at Tigiwon Road. Drive up the fire road to Half Moon Campground ($10 per night, with no RV spots) and set up camp. The trail begins at Half Moon Pass before linking up to the north ridge of the peak. Since Mount of the Holy Cross is a tougher climb â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a mid-hike pass and a spotty, cairn-marked push to the summit donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help â&#x20AC;&#x201C; start early and expect a long day. During the trip, hikers find mind-boggling scenery, from the gentle rise through forests at Mt. Elbert to high-alpine wildflowers in the meadows of Mount of the Holy Cross. Be prepared for weather of any kind, particularly in August. Fast-moving thunderstorms are common in the afternoon, and if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re caught above treeline, the peaks have no shelter. If you go to either trip before June 20, fire roads leading to the trailheads may be closed to cars and trucks. For more info, call the Holy Cross Ranger District station at 970- 827-5715.

SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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MUD-SEASON PATIOS ––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––

Boot shift manager Amanda Holcomb says. “It’s good because the adults can hang out and visit while the kids go and play. They don’t have to sit down and be quiet – they can have just as much fun.” Mondays are high time for families. Children eat free throughout the summer, and the staff usually shows children’s movies in the nearby parlor when weather forces everyone inside. In case the Dusty Boot sounds like more of a McDonald’s Play Place than a casual steakhouse, think again. The patio also has yard games like corn hole and a tiki bar beginning May 1, plus live music every other Saturday once the sun goes down.

E-Town, Edwards Drive along past the Edwards Riverwalk on a sunny afternoon, and you’re guaranteed to notice the patio at E-Town. Even if you have a laundry list of chores, you’ll likely want to stop in for a drink – it’s just that mysteriously magnetic. The every-popular local’s hangout is ideal for meeting friends. The 100-inch screen is always tuned to a baseball game or occasional soccer match – the restaurant owners are huge fans of the European leagues – and the attractive, bench-lined fire put keeps the party going well past sunset. As a sort of middle ground between up-valley and downvalley, the concrete patio and recurring weekday specials at E-Town also attract a hugely eclectic crowd. You’ll find regulars holding court from their normal seats, and year-round visitors dropping by for a drink on their way elsewhere. And one thing is guaranteed: When the sun is out, the south-fac-

ing deck is sure to be packed. “The diversity we get here is incredible – people on lunch break, people on vacation, friends meeting up for a couple drinks,” co-owner Kevin Egan says. “We have a little bit of everything for everyone.” Beginning in early May, Egan says the restaurant will also host live music every Friday evening. The deck stays open throughout the year, although unlike some, bands and DJs always perform inside.

and can fill up quickly, particularly when everything else is closed. Montaña’s Cantina and Grill, Avon The deck Montaña’s Cantina and Grill in Avon is nothing short of a mountainside locale transported to the town center. The raised deck is made with weatherworn wood, dotted by colorful umbrellas and old-school patio tables, and home to a popular fireplace for after-dark dancing crowds. Did we mention it’s also enormous? “It’s certainly the largest deck in the area, with an absolutely gorgeous view,” says owner Tom Beaver, referring to the corridor looking directly up Bachelor Gulch to Beaver Creek mountain. “People love to come by and hang by the fire, even when it’s chilly. When the sun is out, the deck gets even more popular.” And with sunshine comes fruity, refreshing drinks touting south-of-the-border flair, including the restaurant’s large margaritas. Swing by during happy hour, held from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day of the week. Along with rotating drink special, guests are privy to a free taco bar – yes, completely free – and come weekends in mid-May, happy hour leads directly into stellar nightlife for 20-something crowds. In keeping with the patio themes, the upstairs dance floor is the largest in the area, and everyone from local DJs to members of Wu-Tang Clan has played in the past year.

Up the Creek, Vail Village For a quiet and cozy lunch date, Vail is full of options – once summer begins. During the shoulder season, though, finding a patio to leisurely dine and sip wine can be borderline impossible. Up the Creek Vail, located just steps from Gore Creek in the heart of Vail Village, is a low-key yet pitch-perfect solution. The restaurant reopened on April 20 for lunch and dinner service. During spring, the Village is surprisingly peaceful, and Up the Creek taps into that sense of serenity with an inviting patio, elegant outdoor furniture and a no-pressure atmosphere. Even if the weather turns sour, the indoor dining area is surrounded with large bay windows to let in light and frame views of the creek. The mud-season specials aren’t yet posted, but the restaurant keeps recurring customers happy with fresh seafood, prime rib and plenty of wine – sort of an old-school gourmet restaurant with comfort to spare. Patio dining at lunch SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at is usually a safe bet for drop-in visitors, but be sure to make a reservation for dinner. The small space doesn’t seat many philip@sneakpeakvail.com

SOWING SEEDS –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– just light up,” Carter says. “They can’t believe they’re getting onions or carrots or anything else fresh. It goes straight to their refrigerator, and they’re ecstatic.” And the extra veggies won’t go to waste. Carter claims the ministry regularly fed close to 200 families in 2012, including more than 500 adults and even more children. They distribute an average of 70 bags a week during the height of winter, and despite two food drives in the past few months, the pantry can always use more. Donations from the Sow-

[From page 4]

ing Seeds greenhouse will add needed variety to the weekly bags. “I love the idea that children will learn to grown their own vegetables,” Carter says. “I think every child should know how to do that – every person, really. It’s just a benefit that it’s coming to us in the end.” Story and Liken want the donations to continue far into the future, even if it’s not linked to the service day. Thanks to success at the three elementary schools – EVES was just

[From page 3]

added this week – the two program founders hope it will expand to every area school in the next few years. “The idea all along was to help a generation of kids realize it’s normal to know where their food comes from,” Liken says. “Now that these kids have shown us they want to be part of something bigger, it’s exciting to see them take it into their own hands. I’m thrilled at how this has grown.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

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sneakSHOTS | Whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Up To What

Thinking about getting engaged soon? Jenny can help you find the perfect ring at Portofino Jewelry. The Grand Opening starts on May 1, and there will be huge sales in the store all month! Portofino Jewelry is located in Avon in The Chapel Plaza.

Ben from Lionshead Inn in Vail would like to thank you all for a great season. Call 970-476-2050 today for information on inexpensive summer rates.

Mountain Pedaler has hot deals on bikes! Last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bikes are 30-percent off and this years bikes are 10-percent off! Andy the shop manager would love to see you. Stop by in the Mountain Pedaler in Minturn and get a new bike.

Thirsty for some Colorado beer? Alpine Wine and Spirits has two great beer specials: Ska Brewing True Blonde for $7.99, as well as Ska Brewing Modus Hoperandi for $8.49. Alpine Wine and Spirits is located in the City Market in Vail. Clay will happily help you.

Come in!

Or weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll both starve Open Daily. Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Rooms available! Sleep Sweet in a Sleep Suite $29.95

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Minturn Anglers is having an end-ofseason sale on winter gear! There are also some preseason specials on fly-fishing rods and rails. Stop in and ask Logan to help you find the gear you nee d. Minturn Anglers is obviously located in Minturn. Call 970-827-9500 for more det ails.

Thanks for the great season, Powder Hounds, Annihilators, Slush Sls, Crunch Captains, Windy Pointers and Minturn Milers! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll see yaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll again soon. -Brand

Sledding is great fun for kids. Sledding through life without your insurance with a great local agent might not be so much fun when a bad thing happens!

Call Mike, Ana or Debbie today!

Call Michael Neff Insurance

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Thursday, Apr. 25, 2013 -Wed., May 1, 2013

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Thanks for a great winter

Look for our summer menu! For cakes or catered events please call 970-926-1979. 275 Main St. C106, Edwards â&#x20AC;˘ 926-1979 Next to Bookworm 20

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Thursday, Apr. 25, 2013 -Wed., May 1, 2013


Gashouse | 34185 US Highway #6 | 970.926.2896 Gobi Mongolian BBQ | 69 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.6628 Gore Range Brewery | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2739 Grouse on the Green | 100 Kensington Dr., Cordillera Divide | 970.926.5788 Henry’s Chinese Cafe | 175 Main St. | 970.926.3050 Juniper Restaurant | 97 Main St. | 970.926.7001 Larkburger | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.9336 Last Course Dessert Bar & Pastries | 275 Main Street C-106 | 970.926-1979 Local Joe’s Pizza | 280 Main St. | 970.926.4444 Log Cabin Sports Bar and Grill | 34500 Highway 6, #B1 | 970.926.9726 Main St. Grill | 97 Main St. | 970.926.2729 Marko’s Pizzeria | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7003 Mirador | 2205 Cordillera Way, Cordillera Lodge & Spa | 970.926.2200 Old Forge Co. | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2220 Sato | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.7684 Smiling Moose Deli | 1170 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2400 Subway Edwards | 439 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7010 Vista At Arrowhead | 676 Sawatch Dr. | 970.926.2111 Woody’s Bar & Grill | 27 Main St. | 970.926.2756 Zino Ristorante | 27 Main St. | 970.926.0777

Colorado Wild Game Grill

LD

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

$

Rustic Pub

LD

$$

Pub/American

D

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

Contemporary American

D

Organic Gourmet Fast Food/Burgers

LD

Tapas/Wine Bar/Desserts

BLD

$

Pizza

D

$

American/Mexican

BLD

$

American Grill

LD

$$

Pizza & Pasta

LD

$

Regional/Seasonal Fare

BLD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Sushi & Japanese Cuisine

LD

$$

Deli

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Tuscan Grill

D

$$

Bar & Grill

LD

$

Contemporary Italian

D

$$

Southern BBQ

LD

$

Traditional American

LD

$

Steakhouse

D

$$

Meditrainian/Greek Cuisine

BLD

$

Coffee and Sandwiches

BL

$

Mexican/American/Western

D

$$

American and Mexican Cuisine

BLD

$

Continental

LD

$$

American Brewery

LD

$$

Regional American

BLD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

American

LD

$

American

BLD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

American

BLD

$

New American

D

$$$

Pizza

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$$

American/Western

LD

$$

Authentic Italian

D

$$

Pizza and Italian

LD

$

American Bistro

LD

$$

Steakhouse, Aprés and Dinner

D

$$$

Mountain Fare/Steakhouse, Aprés,

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

New American

D

American Pub

LD

$ $$$ $

$$

MINTURN Kirby Cosmos | 474 Main St. | 970.827.9027 Magusto’s | 101 Main St. | 970.827.5450 Minturn Country Club | 131 Main St. | 970.827.4114 Nicky’s Quickie | 151 Main St | 970-827-5616 Sticky Fingers | 132 Main St. | 970.827.5353 Minturn Saloon | 146 N. Main St. | 970.827.5954 Turntable | 160 Railroad Ave. | 970.827.4164

VAIL Alpenrose | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8899 Ale House | 2161 N. Frontage Road | 970.476.4314 Atwater on Gore Creek | Vail Cascade Resort | 970.476.7014 Bart & Yeti’s | Lionshead, North of Arrabelle | 970.476.2754 Bearfish | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7596 Big Bear Bistro | 297 Hanson Ranch Road | 970.300.1394 Billy’s Island Grill | Lionshead | 970.476.8811 Bistro 14 | Eagle’s Nest, Top of Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.445.4530 Block 16 | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 Blue Moose Pizza | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.476.8666 bol | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.5300 Bully Ranch | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5460 Campo de Fiori | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8994 Chicago Pizza | 1031 S. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7000 CinéBistro | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.3344 Elway’s Steakhouse | 174 East Gore Creek Dr. | 970.754.7818 Flame | Four Seasons, Vail | 970.477.8600 Frost | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8050 Game Creek Restaurant | Vail Mountain | 970.754.4275 Garfinkel’s | Next to Lionshead Gondola | 970.476.3789

LUNCH SPECIAL 6” Sub with Drink and Chips

5

$

49 + tax

Mon-­Fri 10 am -­ 2 pm *Basic Sub Menu Only

Edwards Location Only Edwards Across from Shell Station

$ $$$ $

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

EDWARDS

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

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• • •

• •

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• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Spring Special

14

$

95 Entrées

Great locals off season hang out Happy Hour Beer and 2 tacos $6 Big Margarita $5 Vail Village • 476-5100 Thursday, Apr. 25, 2013 -Wed., May 1, 2013

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sneakpeak

21


Gohan Ya | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7570 Joe’s Famous Deli | 288 Bridge St. | 970.479.7580 Kelly Liken | Gateway Building, 12 Vail Rd. | 970.479.0175 La Bottega | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0280 Lancelot | Next to Children’s Fountain | 970.476.5828 Larkspur Restaurant | Golden Peak | 970.754.8050 La Tour | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.4403 Left Bank | Sitzmark Lodge in Vail Village | 970.476.3696 The Little Diner | West Lionshead Plaza | 970.476.4279 Lord Gore & the Fitz Lounge | Manor Vail at the base of Golden Peak | 970.476.4959 Los Amigos | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.5847 Ludwig’s | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5429 The Marketplace | One Willow Bridge Rd. | 970.477.4370 Market Café | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 May Palace | Next to City Market, West Vail | 970.476.1657 Matsuhisa | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.6682 Mezzaluna | Lion Square Lodge, next to Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.477.4410 Moe’s Original BBQ | Upstairs from the General Store, Lionshead | 970.479.7888 Montauk Seafood Grill | Lionshead Village | 970.476.3601 Nozawa | Holiday Inn, West Vail | 970.476.9355 Ocotillo | Vail Mountain Marriott Resort & Spa, Lionshead | 970.477.5675 Old Forge Co. | 2161 N Frontage Rd | 970.476.5555 Old Forge Co. | 521 East Lionshead Cir. | 970.476.5232 Ore House | 232 Bridge St. | 970.476.5100 Osaki’s | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0977 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.9026 Pepi’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.4671 Qdoba | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7539 Red Lion | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.7676 Russell’s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.6700 Subway West Vail | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.3827 Sushi Oka Hibachi | 100 East Meadow Drive. Suite #4 | 970.476.1588 Sweet Basil | 193 E. Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.0125 Tap Room | Top of Bridge St. | 970.479.0500 The Tavern On The Square| 675 Lionshead Place | 970.754.7400 Terra Bistro| 352 Meadow Dr., Vail Mountain Lodge& Spa | 970.476.6836 The George | 292 Meadow Dr. | 970.476.2656 Up The Creek Bar & Grill | 223 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.8141 Vendetta’s | 291 Bridge St. | 970.476.5070 Vail Chophouse | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.477.0555 Westside Cafe & Market | 2211 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7890 Yama Sushi | 168 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.7332 Yeti’s Grind | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.1515

The team at Oakson Dentistry is here for you!

Asian Cuisine

LD

Sandwiches

BLD

Seasonal American

D

Northern Italian

LD

Located in Gypsum since 2001 Gypsum Plaza Suite, 620 D Red Table Drive

524-1105

22

sneakpeak

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Thursday, Apr. 25, 2013 -Wed., May 1, 2013

$

Prime Rib/Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

D

$$$

French and American

D

$$

French

D

$$$

Classic Diner, Traditional Favorites

BL

Contemporary American

D

$ $$

Mexican

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$

Family/American/European

BLD

$

International Café

BLD

$

Chinese

LD

$

Japanese/Peruvian

D

$$

Modern Italian

LD

$$

Barbecue

LD

$

Creative Seafood/Meat

LD

$$

Sushi/Asian

LD

$$

Southwestern Steak House

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sushi/Japanese

D

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

BLD

$

Continental/Wild Game

LD

$$

Mexican

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Sushi, Asian

LD

$

Creative American

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Mountian American Grill

BLD

$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Eclectic Pub

D

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Italian & Pizza

LD

$$ $$$

Steakhouse

LD

Casual American

BLD

$

Sushi and Pacific Spices

D

$$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

LIVE MUSIC

Every Tuesday: Sean Healey 10 p.m. String Board Theory

General Dentistry

$ $$$

Creative American

Fri. 4/26 @ 10 p.m.

Steve Oakson, DDS

$

Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-6 pm

97 Main St., W101 Riverwalk in Edwards 926-2729

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

VAIL

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Clo s S o Op e d 4 r r y e n /2 f or 4/2 6 & an 9 at 4/27 yi nc o 9am nv . en ie n ce . Paints, brushes, pastels, over 30+

Get Creative! Art Supplies

sizes of canvases, great selection of greeting cards, creative gifts for kids, scrap booking, gifts, and more! Art • Office • Scrapbooking • Gifts

M-Th 9-6, Fri 9-5, Sat 10-2, Sun Closed

845-7650

EagleVail between Vail & Beaver Creek


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970-949-0989 222 Chapel Place Avon, CO 81620 www.nestvail.com

Thursday, Apr. 25, 2013 -Wed., May 1, 2013

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sneakpeak

23


2 days of demo s with Niner, Pivot, Ib is, Specialized, Sa nta Cruz, Felt, Wilier, BM C, Ridley, and mo re!

For a full schedule of events, log on to:

EagleOutsideFestival.com 24

sneakpeak

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Thursday, Apr. 25, 2013 -Wed., May 1, 2013

Sneak Peak Vail Newspaper April 25th Edition  
Sneak Peak Vail Newspaper April 25th Edition  

Sneak Peak is the Vail Valley's leading newspaper for what to do, where to go and the latest happenings!

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