Issuu on Google+

FREE, WEEKLY, LOCAL... Only the good stuff!

www.sneakpeakvail.com

Thursday, Apr. 11 - Apr. 17, 2013

Going out with a

SPLASH Spring Back to Vail closes season with pond skimming championships, concerts and more

O.A.R and Jimmy Cliff

Rock, folk and reggae hit the Vail stage

Springtime on the Eagle River

Local anglers talk about fishing’s lesser known high season

Mountain mama gear

Everything for baby, from cloth diapers to yoga Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

1


Winter Kids Gear Blowout Sale up to % winter goods off

70

Get your kids ready for next years winter season

Hurry! Sale ends Sunday, April 14th

** Mention this ad for an extra 10% off already marked down items

122 E. Meadow Dr. Vail 970-476-1666 www.kidsportvail.com ** This sale is not good for previous purchases

2

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013


The Rebirth of Jimmy Cliff Jimmy Cliff, one Jamaica’s reggae pioneers, makes his Vail debut on Sunday, April 14. His newest album, “Rebirth,” evokes sounds from his early career. Photo special to SneakPEAK.

Jamaica’s reggae legend makes Vail debut at Spring Back concert. By Melanie Wong.

A

fter 50 years of bringing reggae music from Jamaica to the masses of the world, Jimmy Cliff isn’t done yet. The Grammy Award-winning artist is best known for songs such as “Wonderful World, Beautiful People,” “The Harder They Come” and “You Can Get It If You Really Want,” as well as famous versions of Paul Simon’s “Mother and Child Reunion,” “The Lion King” hit “Hakuna Matata” and Cat Steven’s “Wild World.” Last year, nearly 45 years after the release of his first album as a teenager, Cliff released “Rebirth,” his first studio effort in seven years. True to its name, Cliff sees the album as his own artistic revival. “’Rebirth’ is a nostalgic album. It’s looking back to the roots of the music, with all the sounds and instruments. It’s like a summary of some of the reggae work in my past,” says Cliff, who makes his debut in Vail on Sunday to close out the mountain’s Spring Back to Vail festival. While the album might be the start of a new musical chapter for Cliff, the reggae pioneer points out that he’s never really been away. Over the past couple decades, he’s worked with a long list of bona fide rock legends, including the Rolling Stones, Elvis Costello and Annie Lennox, and Cliff’s songs have been covered by the likes of Willie Nelson, Bruce Springsteen, Cher, New Order and Fiona Apple. His tenor voice is one of the most recognizable in the genre, second only to fellow Jamaican Rock and Roll Hall of Fame member Bob Marley. A boy from the countryside While Marley’s became the household name, Cliff was alongside him in bringing reggae to the world’s attention, and he was one of the country’s first artists to garner international acclaim. Cliff found his love for music at a very young age before moving to Kingston, Jamaica to pursue a musical career at age 14. He remembers trying to find someone to produce his music without success, until he met famed Jamaican pro-

If you go...

Who: Reggae legend Jimmy Cliff, with opener Eminence Ensemble What: Spring Back to Vail’s closing concert When: Sunday, April 14 at 4 p.m. Where: Solaris Plaza in Vail Village How much: Free

ducer Leslie Kong in 1962. “I left the countryside with some songs I had written in my pocket and was looking for some producers to record,” Cliff says. “One night I was frustrated after going to many different producers, and I looked up and saw a sign (for Kong’s studio). I had a half-written song and thought if I finished it I might have a chance. I sang the song to him and he said, ‘That’s the best voice I ever heard in Jamaica,’ and I said, ‘Great.’” A true all-around entertainer, Cliff starred in the 1972 movie “The Harder They Come,” and also wrote the songs “You Can Get It If You Really Want,” “Many Rivers to Cross” and “Sitting in Limbo” for the soundtrack. This foray into the big screen, something Cliff hopes to do again, was something the musician stumbled into. “The producer (of the movie) met me at the recording studio and said, ‘Do you think you could write a song for a movie I’m making?’” Cliff remembers. “I said, ‘What do you mean? Of course I can. I can do anything.’ Then two or three months later he sent a script and said, ‘I want you to act in it. You said you could do anything, right?’” Leaving a legacy Perhaps the key to the longevity of Cliff’s music is his interest in growing with the reggae scene and staying current with newer trends. As a reggae pioneer, he’s seen the genre change and evolve – in his opinion, that’s a very good thing. “There are a lot of good things about taking reggae music into different forms,” Cliff says. “Now we have danceable reggae, for example, and then that will evolve into something else in a short while. The social and political con-

[See JIMMY CLIFF, page 22]

YOUR LOCAL SOURCE FOR AT&T EDWARDS CORNER

56 Edwards Village Blvd. #127 Mon-Sat 9-6 | Sun 11-5 970.926.3811 www.visitactive.com

EAGLE

LIVE MUSIC

Every Tuesday: Sean Healey 10 p.m. Fri. 4/12 @ 10 p.m.

Skin the Rabbit Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-6 pm

97 Main St., W101 Riverwalk in Edwards 926-2729 this weeks painting

Raise Your Brush Cocktails and Canvas

332 Grand Ave. on Hwy 6 & Washington Mon-Fri 9-6 | Sat 9-5 970.328.9200

210 Edwards Blvd. Edwards • 970-926-2732 (c) 2013 AT&T Intellectual Property. AT&T, the AT&T logo and all other marks contained herein are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.

www.alpineartscenter.org Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

3


The most

wonderful time

of the year

Local anglers show why springtime on the Eagle River is a remedy for mud-season blues. By Phil Lindeman

Colorado trout from the Eagle River. Zach Mahone photo.

D

uring an early-April ski vacation, Anthony Mills stumbled upon the best fishing of his life. And he found it within steps of Interstate 70.

For the past few years, Mills and his family have come to Eagle County with friends from their Atlanta-area neighborhood. This season’s trip was cut short when Mills’ son hurt his tailbone on the first day, and with a full week remaining, he scrambled to find off-hill activities. They’d been snowmobiling and dog sledding in the past, but fly fishing along the Eagle River seemed unorthodox with the slopes still covered in snow. On a quiet Wednesday morning, Mills took a break from casting to soak up the sun along the river’s rocky banks. Two of his friends waded through the chilly water, led by guides from Minturn Anglers who know the best places to find local trout and bass. It wasn’t hard: Within the first few minutes, all three first-timers had reeled fish to shore, including an 18-inch trout. “This is the first time we’ve fished out here, because honestly, we didn’t even know they did springtime trips,” Mills says. “I’ve never even thought of doing this before, but this sort of saved our trip.” In the distance, the occasional semi-truck broke the serenity and reminded Mills he was no more than five minutes from Edwards. The three-mile stretch of river was privately owned for 100 years until two seasons ago, when Minturn Anglers worked with the Wolcott Rod and Gun Club to take small, guided tours throughout the year. Despite the unlikely locale, it’s an angler’s dream, with calm pools and clumps of high shrubs for nesting insects. Not far from mills, guide Anthony Mazza helped another learning angler perfect his casting technique with midge bait. Mazza has fished along the Eagle River for seven years, and he believes access to the private strip has been a bless-

is our backyard. You have fishing all over Colorado, and here you have this wonderful variety of fish, not just in size, but species. They know to concentrate in these calmer, private waters, and spring is when they really start biting.” And Mills saw the benefits firsthand. Not only was the longtime bait fisherman learning to cast, but the first two hours of his five-hour excursion had yielded some 15 fish, all on a river he never expected to be lucrative. “I’ve caught fish before, but nothing like this,” Mills says. “I was shocked. Here we are, fishing in people’s backyards and catching enormous fish. You could’ve walked across the river and knocked on the front door of one of these gorgeous homes.”

Guided fly fishing

The Vail area is packed with fly-fishing guides, and most offer a variety of trips for groups of every size. A few of our favorites: - Minturn Anglers, 970-827-9500 - Gore Creek Fly Fisherman, 970-754-5400 - Eagle River Anglers, 970-328-2323 - Vail Valley Anglers, 970-926-0900 - Fly Fishing Outfitters, 970-845-8090

A fly fisherman looks for caches of trout on the Eagle River last week. Fish-dense stretches of river can be found just minutes from Edwards and Interstate 70 during the spring months. Zach Mahone photo. ing for springtime travelers. Not only do people overlook the environment – they also assume April is far outside of the normal fishing season. “It comes down to accessibility,” Mazza says. “This place

Know the land Just a mile downriver from Mills and Mazza, the river is publically accessible, and a handful of lone fisherman struggled to get a nibble. It wasn’t impossible – the guided group didn’t have a monopoly on fish – but their empty nets highlighted the benefits of a guided trip, particularly for novice fly fishermen. Like many guide outfits, Minturn Anglers supplies all the necessary gear, from waders and poles to flies and line. They also know where fish like to congregate – invaluable knowledge in spring, when fish are hungry but stay in tiny portions of the Eagle River. “It’s really good like this every spring, and I think a lot of

[See FLY FISHING, page 22]

Wednesday Night is Gyro Night

Gyro & Fries

Wine of the Week

Beer of the Month

Cousino Macul Antiguas Reserva

Cabernet Sauvignon

$

12

99

Ska Modus Hoperandi 6 pack cans

regularly

$

18

99

Starts Friday Save 6.00 $

8

$ 49

4

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

10

Save 2.50 $

Located inside City Market in West Vail • 970.479.8116 Home of Mickey “The Wine Wizard” Like us on facebook

regularly

$

99

5

$ 95

Happy Hour Drink Specials till 7 pm Breakfast Served ALL DAY! Lunch 11am-3pm

Dinner Mon-Sat 5pm-close

!CROSSFROMTHE0OST/FFICEIN%DWARDSs 


Best of Spring Back to Vail Your insider guide to the resort’s end-of-season bash By Phil Lindeman

Cover photo by Zach Mahone For faithful skiers and riders, closing weekend in the Rocky Mountains can be borderline depressing, and Spring Back to Vail is the only remedy. The annual late-season event is a celebration of all the resort does well: mountainside parties, off-kilter sports and eclectic live music. The recent rash of storms even brought a few inches of fresh snow, and Vail will reward those faithful powder hounds by opening 4,600 acres through the final day on Sunday – roughly 85 percent of its total acreage. Spring Back to Vail begins today with après parties at a handful of Vail Village’s must-visit bars. But the celebration truly kicks off with Friday night’s free concert at Ford Park – improv rockers O.A.R. return to Vail for the first time since 2010 – and ends on Sunday afternoon with the onetwo punch of reggae legend Jimmy Cliff at Solaris Plaza and the storied World Pond Skimming Championships at Golden Peak. Wedged between are enough slopeside diversions to keep locals and visitors on their toes. Best thing is, all concerts, events and parties cost nothing

Spring Back schedule

Vail’s 50th anniversary season ends in spectacular fashion with five full days of concerts, parties and diversions, both on and off the slopes. All après parties are free to enter and have specials on Budweiser, Bud Light and select house drinks. Check the below schedule to never miss a second. Thursday, April 11 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. – Après parties at Pazzo’s and Los Amigos, Vail Village 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Late après party at Red Lion, Vail Village Friday, April 12 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. – Expo and demo tents, Mountain Plaza (bottom of Gondola One) 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Après party at Red Lion, Vail Village 6 p.m. – Free concert by O.A.R. and opener Patrick Dethlefs, Ford Park (music at 6:30 p.m.) 10 p.m. to midnight – After-dark party with live music at Vail Ale House, West Vail (behind Qdoba) Saturday, April 13 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. – Expo and demo tents, Mountain Plaza (bottom of Gondola One) 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. – Après party at Los Amigos, Vail Village 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. – Late après party at Vendetta’s, Vail Village 6 p.m. – Free concert by Sublime with Rome and opener Air Dubai, Ford Park (music at 6:30 p.m.) 10 p.m. to midnight – After-dark party with DJ Jon Nedza at Samana Lounge, Vail Village

A pond skimmer clears the jump at last year’s Spring Back championship. The annual spring event returns to Golden Peak this weekend. Zach Mahone photo.

Thanks  for  a   great   season.   We  will  be   closing  with   the  mountain &  reopening   memorial   weekend.

Sunday, April 14 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. – Expo and demo tents, Mountain Plaza (bottom of Gondola One) 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. – World Pond Skimming Championships, Golden Peak base area 4 p.m. – Free concert by Jimmy Cliff with opener eminence Ensemble, Solaris Plaza in Vail Village

to enter. Most also boast plentiful opportunities to snag complimentary swag from GoPro, Red Bull, Budweiser, Helly Hansen and more. With so much happening, SneakPEAK dug through the jam-packed schedule to shine a light on the weekend’s mustsee events. For last-minute changes and updates, visit www. resort-wide races were the norm for decades, pond-skimvail.com or follow the resort on Twitter at @vailmtn. ming is one of the few holdouts from a bygone era. The setup is simple: Skiers and boarders straightline down Golden World Pond Skimming Championships Peak, hit an intimidating large kicker, skim across a strip of In a town where snowbound softball games and raucous, [See SPRING BACK, page 13]

See  You   Then!

20 YEar annivErSarY % all in stock

30

off left

over bikes

Stop in for special deals on NEW BIKES

- First come, First serve - Great Sushi Menu Daily 11:30 - 10 pm 122 Beaver Creek Plaza 970-949-4321

Minturn 161 Main St. 827-5522 | Eagle 101 E2nd St. 328-3478 Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

5


many

buildings one family Vail Mountain School celebrates 50 years and bids farewell to a groundbreaking headmaster. By Phil Lindeman

Pictured right: In 1976, students from Vail Mountain School’s first graduating class stand with teachers beneath the entrance sign to the school’s former Minturn location. Vail Mountain School photo.

O

n an afternoon in 1979, around the time Vail Mountain School’s first permanent building was beginning to take shape, Dave Schindel realized he might be in over his head.

valley 15 years after VMS hosted its first students. The school opened as Vail Country Day School in 1962, just a few weeks before the resort sold its first lift tickets. The county had denied financial support for a public school in the fledgling town, and parents (including resort co-founders like Pete Seibert and Earl Eaton) banded together for a makeshift school. The inaugural class had four students – mostly the young children of resort employees – but blossomed to 14 by the next year. As Vail’s only school, basics like math and social studies were held wherever volunteer teachers could find free space, beginning in a Vail Village apartment before moving to Seibert’s basement and finally the local firehouse – all within the span of three years. Before Vail Associates donated the East Vail plot where VMS has been since 1979, longtime students like Vali Pulis-Wilcox studied in eight different locations. At the celebration, Pulis-Wilcox chats casually with fellow alumni and former teachers. She was part of that original four-person class, and she jokes lightly about being valedictorian in 1976, or as she says, “The entire 25th percentile.” Like many VMS graduates, Pulis-Wilcox has stayed intimately connected with her alma mater. It began with her favorite memory, the end-of-summer orientation trips attended by all students, no matter their age. In the early ‘70s, the trips were little more than weekendlong backpacking excursions – “You never get to know someone as well as when you’re filthy and stinky,” she laughs – and fondly remembers exploring Piney Lake, Game Creek Bowl and other local spots with her peers. Although the modern-day orientation trips are larger – not unlike VMS itself, which now boasts more than 350 students – Pulis-Wilcox saw shades of those early trips when her daughter attended in the late 2000s. It’s a refrain given in one way or another by just about everyone at the celebration: The look and location may change, but VMS remains a family. “The fact this school has remained the same as a community and family is just incredible,” says Pulis-Wilcox, who left Vail Resorts in 2000 to spearhead a capital campaign for the current school building. “Getting this building meant we could offer the Mountain School experience to more people. It was about growing that community we love and giving people someplace beautiful and memorable.”

Schindel, an English teacher by trade, found himself in the school’s basement with Peter Abuisi, the recently-hired headmaster and driving force behind the new building. With free dinner and boundless charm, Abuisi had lured Schindel away from Florida to teach a mishmash of ski racers, farm children and other Colorado transplants in the fast-growing resort town. Along with the entire staff – teachers, secretaries, even the occasional parent – the two had become de facto contractors during the construction, pitching in for odd jobs like sweeping debris and painting classrooms. “When we built that first building, everyone had a hand in it,” Schindel says. “I not only watched this school grow, but had the chance to be an essential voice and hand in that growth.” On this particular afternoon – Schindel can’t quite remember the exact day – it was time to lay the foundation. Pouring concrete wasn’t a problem, but flipping the massive cover tarp was just a little outside of his comfort zone, particularly when the construction worker told Schindel and Abuisi it could seriously injure them if it they didn’t communicate. After some nervous looks, the worker counted to three, and they flipped the tarp with a sigh of relief. It was an unexpectedly tense moment in Schindel’s young career as an educator, but he remembers it with characteristic good humor during last weekend’s anniversary celebration for Vail’s oldest school. While sitting in the attractive, book-lined library at VMS’s current $26 million building in East Vail – still located on the same seven-acre plot of land where Schindel laid concrete some 30 years prior – his thoughts automatically turn to Abuisi. That experience in the basement stuck with Schindel for decades, and he sees it as a perfect illustration of the headmaster and the school as a whole. “All my life I’ve been a risk taker, and what appealed to me about coming to Colorado was the opportunity to work with Peter,” says Schindel, who spent 28 years at the school and now works with Native American students in Arizona. “He’s a courageous educator, and he From mountain school to college prep has really built this school into what it is today. It was exciting to come here and not know The history of VMS is intricately tied to Vail Mountain. The resort made a school necanything or anyone, but know we were doing something special.” essary, and as the slopes expanded further into the woods, VMS extended its reach in the valley community. The two share an anniversary this year, not to mention notable names: Apartments, cabins and firehouses Locals like the Seiberts, Donovans and Gorsuches sent children to the school, and many Despite plentiful cocktails and a subsequently buoyant mood, the anniversary celebration went on to shape the town during a period of rapid growth in the ‘80s and ‘90s. had a bittersweet undercurrent. It doubled as a farewell party for Abuisi, who retires this Yet when Abuisi arrived in 1977, the school was locked in a mountain-town mentality – summer after more than three decades as headmaster. The professor-turned-administrator the curriculum was lenient, and ski racing often beat study time. As a private school, funding is credited by many for pioneering independent schools in the Vail area, but he came to the [SeeVMS, page 14]

LUNCH SPECIAL 6” Sub with Drink and Chips

5

$

49 + tax

Mon-­Fri 10 am -­ 2 pm *Basic Sub Menu Only

Edwards Location Only Edwards Across from Shell Station

6

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

~„‚ÛDYafÛJlÛÝÛ<\oYj\kÛIan]joYdcÛÝÛ~‡¤ƒÛDgf¤JYlÛÝۆ„‡¤†ƒ¤„††‚


Networking for mothers Mountain Mama Care connects moms with resources By Melanie Wong â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am bountiful. I am beautiful. I am bliss. I am, I am.â&#x20AC;? The mantra is softly chanted in the yoga room of Uma Fitness in Edwards, and on this particular morning, the yogis are a group of expecting mothers in varying phases of their pregnancy. Nicola Farrer, the instructor and a mother of three, leads the group through a sequence of relaxing poses and breathing exercises. While she certainly doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t promise that prenatal yoga makes a delivery any easier, she says that breathing and relaxing come easier when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve practiced. As the classâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; chosen mantra hints at, the class is also about mindfulness and focus. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have one lady that kept repeating that in her birth,â&#x20AC;? says Farrer, who has taught prenatal yoga for eight years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She had a totally natural delivery and afterward she said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m so glad you taught me how to breathe.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Farrerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class, along with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mommy and Meâ&#x20AC;? yoga classes for mothers and infants, are among a host of services catering to new-and-expecting mothers found right in Eagle County. (Find out more about prenatal and baby yoga at www.umafitness.com.) The services have been brough together by the fittingly dubbed Mountain Mama Care, which lists activities at www. mountainmamacare.com and holds quarterly meetings. The next meeting on Tuesday, April 23 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Synergy in Avon provides a place for moms and momsto-be to find out more about their care options. Think of it as a small expo for all things baby-related. Some services are more obvious â&#x20AC;&#x201C; medical care, massage and childcare â&#x20AC;&#x201C; while some are more specific, like cloth diapers, yoga and life coaching. Mountain Mama Care is the brainchild of founder Marcy

Mountain Mama Care

The groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next meeting will be on Tuesday, April 23 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Synergy Center for Wellness in Avon. Meet local baby service providers, get information and ask questions. For a full list of the businesses in the group, see www.mountainmamacare.com.

Tracy, an EagleVail-based doula who wanted to provide a comprehensive spot for pregnant and post-partum women in the community. The meetings also serve to help the different service providers network among themselves, she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mountain Mama Care is in its third year now,â&#x20AC;? Tracy says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free for anyone who has services, and we do quarterly meetings that are open to the public so we can network.

*()!+(&' '"()& +)!)( %+"))"&%(&'  "% ( !&,'( !%#&*.( !'($ "%%'(



Mommy and Me yoga classes, taught by Uma Fitness yoga instructor Nicola Farrer, give moms a chance to exercise with their new babies while meeting other moms. Farrer, who also teaches prenatal yoga, is among a group of providers who offer services for mothers in the Vail Valley. The network of providers, Mountain Mama Care, holds their quarterly meeting on April 23 in Avon. Kent Pettit photo. I really want to get the word out there about whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being offered right here in the valley.â&#x20AC;? Read on for a spotlight on some of the unique resources for moms in the area. Doulas offering a hand What new mother doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want the help and advice of someone who knows all about the process of pregnancy, birth and caring for a new infant? Much like a baby instruction manual for new parents in living form, doulas offer expert support and instruction for women, from pregnancy to post-partum. Doulas such as Tracy are certified by international organizations and are often seasoned experts when it comes to babies. Tracy worked for years in women and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s services, and sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a certified doula for seven years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doula comes from the Greek word meaning â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;woman servant,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Tracy says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doulas provide emotional support, comfort for the mom, and advocacy and education if necessary.â&#x20AC;? Birth doulas accompany the moms into the delivery room, acting as support and a liaison between the mother and medical staff. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not uncommon for the doula to help calm anxious fathers as well, Tracy says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m there through the whole thing, whether your labor is 3 hours or 36 hours,â&#x20AC;? she says. Doulas also help new moms through the post-partum phase, going to the home after the birth to help the new family transition. The doula helps the sleep-deprived parents with everyday

 -,'("$$ %)'

Best Happy Hour in Avon Mon. - Fri. 2:30 - 6:30 p.m.

2-for-1 Drinks on select drafts, house wine & wells

5 wings

$

5 8 inch Pizza

$

Late night food menu available 240 Chapel Place. AVON 970-748-1010

CELEBRATE SPRING with the VAIL VALLEY PARTNERSHIP

[See MOUNTAIN MAMA, page 19]

Blue Jeans

& Lobster Serving the vail valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite pizza, pastas, calzones, subs, salads and more since 1990! %BJMZ)BQQZ)PVSt"MM-PDBUJPOT avon Vail eagle 476-9026 949-9900 337-9900 Village Center Mall Across from Solaris open 11A.M. daily

benchmark shopping ctr. across from christie lodge open 11A.M. daily

eagle crossing shopping ctr. above the bowling alley open 11A.M. daily

www.pazzospizza.com

ENJOY LOBSTER DINNER, COCKTAILS, MUSIC & NETWORKING! WHEN: Tuesday, April 16, 2013, 5:30 - 9pm WHERE: Beaver Creek Chophouse COST: Members $70 â&#x20AC;˘ Non-Members $80 Group discounts - 5 tickets for $300 RSVP: Contact Jennifer Weintraub jweintraub@visitvailvalley.com 970.477.4001 PRIZES: Vote for your favorite basket & have a chance to win! SPONSORED BY:

Vail Daily, A Great Time DJ, Crazy Mountain Brewery, Denver Post, KZYR, SneakPEAK, TV8 - Vail

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

7


O.A.R. plays a free headliner concert in Ford Park on Friday, April 12 as part of the mountainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s closing bash, Spring Back to Vail. Danny Clinch photo.

The most likeable guys in rock O.A.R brings 17 years of solid, infectious improv to opening night at Spring Back to Vail. Interviewed by Phil Lindeman.

T

he modern music industry has few success stories like O.A.R.

While other bands burn bright, break up and grudgingly reunite for overpriced comeback tours, O.A.R. (short for Of a Revolution) has been a reliable presence on the summer concert circuit since 1996. The Maryland-based quintetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core lineup is still the same (lead vocalist Marc Roberge, drummer Chris Culos, guitarist Richard On, bassist Benj Gershman and saxophonist Jerry DePizzo) with the addition of a reliable, eager brass section for electrifying live performances. And it shows: From Red Rocks Amphitheatre to Madison Square Garden, improvisation-heavy concerts are arguably the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s forte, even as it has notched a number of radio-friendly hits like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love and Memoriesâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shattered (Turn the Car Around).â&#x20AC;? Yet O.A.R.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s continued success and uncommon serenity have never made the band seem dull or boring. Since officially forming as students at Ohio State University, the members have been wildly dedicated to their music and fan base. In the vein of other improv masters like the Grateful Dead and Phish, O.A.R. is known for rarely playing the same show twice. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live on Red Rocksâ&#x20AC;? album from 2012 showcases this trait with nearly two hours of music, including the first-ever live recording of horn players. When O.A.R. comes to Ford Park as the free opening concert for Spring Back to Vail on Friday at 6 p.m., the band will surely bring its trademark sense of fun to a venue they know well: In 2010, the band rocked Vail for Snow Daze with Weezer and Mix Master Mike of the Beastie Boys. This spring, though, all eyes are on O.A.R. as it ushers in the final weekend of celebration for Vailâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 50th anniversary. During a recording break for the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s untitled new album, SneakPEAK chatted with Gershman about his groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infectious energy, the importance of Red Bull on tour and how his creative best is yet to come. SneakPEAK: Vail isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a dive bar by any means, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also not a massive venue. What do you enjoy about doing smaller shows like this? Benj Gershman: Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all about showing the fans a good time. It has come to pass on multiple occasions in our career that it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really matter if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing a set venue â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

[See O.A.R., page 11]

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss Patrick Dethlefs, Coloradoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own up-and-comer For most of his childhood, folk artist Patrick Dethlefs remembers wanting to be a musician. Hailing from Kittredge, Colo., Dethlefs (pronounced DET-lefs) grew up in a musical home. His father played the drums and guitar and wrote his own songs as a hobby. Dethlefs started with the trumpet in elementary school, then graduated to playing in a punk band with his neighbor in middle school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once I started, I thought, this is what I want to do. Even when they asked you in middle school, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;What do you want to be when you grow up?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; My first answer was always, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Musician,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? he says. Now, at the tender age of 22, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doing just that, touring Colorado and the nation with his guitar and occasionally a band. He plays for Vail audiences on Friday, April 12 as the opening act for O.A.R., beginning at 6:30 p.m. at Ford Park. He released his sophomore album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rise and Fallâ&#x20AC;? in 2012, a project that showcases his melodic, mellow brand of folk. The music ranges from the guitar-driven, melancholy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Done and Doneâ&#x20AC;? to the whimsical, toe-tapping â&#x20AC;&#x153;Will I Ever Find a Way?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like to use folk as a genre because folk can be a very wide genre,â&#x20AC;? he says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This album was a different approach (than my first, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Stays the Sameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;). I felt like my writing had really improved.â&#x20AC;? As and up-and-comer in the Colorado music scene, Dethlefs is one to keep an eye on. You can catch him traveling the state for shows at venues like Aspenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Belly Up and opening for everyone from Elephant Revival to O.A.R. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be different playing in an outdoor setting to a crowd like that,â&#x20AC;? he says of his Spring Back performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hopefully people can have as much fun as we do when we play live.â&#x20AC;? By Melanie Wong

Our Menu Rocks nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rolls

Vail Villages Finest Sushi & Japanese inspired cuisine  %AST 'ORE #REEK $R s 6AIL 6ILLAGE Call for reservations 970.476.7332

8

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013


52 WEEKS VAIL VALLEY of the

SKI WITH PASSION AND INSURANCE

sneakPeak wants you to send in your photo submissions that capture what makes living in the Vail Valley great. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll feature one photo each week, so send in images from your latest adventures and other captured moments from around town, along with a short caption, to melanie@sneakpeakvail.com. 220 EPC SSO

SHOP | COMPARE | APPLY ONLINE

MOUNTAINHEALTHINSURANCE.COM

970.845.8910 BRILL INSURANCE AGENCY | AVON, CO

4x5 FILM

Spring is in the air... %##!&+#(%$'&  "#*'### !#)%$$'

Taylor Duel, 9, ends the season right, and in style, at Ski Cooper.

"#('*-&"#'

RUFF CUTS

Credit: Dudley Duel

!+#&!#%%'%+###!      , $'# ' , 

Custom Metal Work Including:

           

Because you deserve it!

970-949-0961     

Sledding is great fun for kids. Sledding through life without your insurance with a great local agent might not be so much fun when a bad thing happens!

Call Mike, Ana or Debbie today!

20 50 % to off

%

off

STOREWIDE *in-­stock & orders

Call Michael Neff Insurance

949.5633 www.michaelneffagency.com Located in the Slifer, Smith & Frampton Building in Avon

    949-0153 Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

9


The

tastiest secret in Edwards

Desserts take center stage at Last Course, but savory dishes steal the show. By Melanie Wong.

Whitney Armistead of Last Course in Edwards displays a plate a cake pops, among the sweet specialties at the dessert bar and restaurant. The restaurant has built its reputation on its desserts, but is slowly gaining popularity for its savory breakfast, lunch and dinner dishes. Zach Mahone photo.

I

f anyone ever took the concept of “dessert first, dinner later,” to heart, it’s Last Course in Edwards.

A sweet beginning The restaurant began as Whitney Armistead’s cake business, Babycakes. She’s still a sought-after baker for wedding and specialty cakes, but she always wanted to have a restaurant of her own. “Even in culinary school, Whitney wanted to have her own shop and also offer an outstanding menu,” Chris says. “I wanted to start my own business, so this worked out well.” The couple built the place on Whitney’s reputation as a pastry chef, but also focused on incredibly fresh, local ingredients. The restaurant closes for a couple weeks through early May, but once summer hits, diners can expect a dynamic blackboard menu based on the latest finds at local farmer’s

SneakPICKS at Last Course

Last Course serves breakfast and lunch seven days a week and dinner from Wednesday through Saturday. For special events and more information, see www.lastcoursedesserts.com. Butternut squash soup –One of the most popular menu selections, this savory soup is infused with herbs. Try the lunch portion with pear-and-brie grilled cheese. ($11) Pan-roasted pork chop – Succulent and slathered in a bourbon glaze. Don’t forget the sides: sweet and buttery Brussels sprouts slaw and slices of twice-baked sweet potato. ($22) Pumpkin bread pudding – Last Course often has some sort of bread pudding concoction on the menu or in the pastry case. Moist but not too mushy, it’s great with a cup of coffee after dinner. ($9)

That’s not to say that the little boutique restaurant, tucked away in the western corner of the Edwards Riverwalk shopping center, doesn’t take its first and second courses seriously. On the contrary, its ever-rotating menu includes breakfast favorites such as pear-stuffed French toast, the popular Croque Monsieur sandwich for lunch and an equally delectable dinner selection. It’s just that they rope you in with the sweets. Enter the cozy restaurant, and one of the first sights will be a glass case filled with colorful cupcakes, slices of bread pudding, dainty cookies and slabs of cake. And then there’s the sit-down dessert menu, creatively plated and portioned for two to share. Owners Whitney and Chris Armistead like to think of Last Course as one of the best-kept culinary secrets in the area. “Some people think we’re just a dessert place and don’t know that we do breakfast, lunch and dinner,” Chris Ar- markets. In a town that has become known as a bit of a foodie hamistead says. “People are surprised that our entrées are so good, too. The idea has always been to do a small, high- ven, boasting everything from seasonal fine dining to sushi to beloved dive bars, Last Course fits perfectly into the mix. quality menu, and do everything on it very well.” You’ll find menu items that you won’t find elsewhere, such

10

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

a different kind of specialty bread pudding every week, or Colorado-made spirits at the bar. The Armisteads also enlisted the help of co-chef Michael Irwin, who comes from years of cooking experience with restaurants such as Sweet Basil, Larkspur and Juniper. He says he loves the personalized approach that a smaller restaurant affords. “The best thing is the appreciation you get when you talk to a table,” Irwin says. “You get to come out and talk to people and serve them. You’re making 50 covers instead of 250 a night. It’s an intimate, boutique setting.” Fitting into the town’s culinary niche hasn’t always been easy, especially since the Armisteads juggle the restaurant with raising their three young children. “The hardest part is you never know how the crowd is going to be,” Whitney says. “It comes and goes with the snow, and it’s hard to tell when people will be in town. However, the most rewarding thing is watching people enjoy what you make.” The savory side While Last Course might have a reputation as a dessert bar, it’s gaining a following for more savory dishes. The butternut squash soup, flavored with sage oil and served with a herb focaccia bread, started off as a fall and winter item, but quickly became one of the top dishes. “We had people call in the summer and ask about it, so we might just keep that on the menu all year,” Whitney says. For a memorable dinner, start the meal out with the soup or a salad, such as the mixed greens with sweet beets, goat cheese and tangy wine vinaigrette. Move on to the pan-roasted pork chop, which the chefs claim as one of the most popular dishes in the house. Pork chops don’t tend to be the most sophisticated of culinary offerings, but Last Course manages to create a dish that will have you licking the plate. The pork is cooked just right, keeping it succulent and tender, and given a sweet finish with a bourbon glaze. The sides are show stealers: twicebaked slices of sweet potato and a buttery, warm Brussels sprouts slaw.

[See LAST COURSE, page 13]


O.A.R. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more about where your audience wants to be. Just give us a stage and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll come, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to think people follow. Being in an environment that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t formal keeps it spontaneous and fun. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be an experience for us as much as putting on a great show for everyone else.

[From page 8]

sense of fun â&#x20AC;&#x201C; everyone in the audience can tell that you enjoy being where you are, playing the music youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re playing. Where does that energy come from? BG: For some of us, Red Bull really helps (laughs). But I think we generally love what we do. As we get older, we all understand we only have so many shows left, and we never know when that last show is going to be. We all love the opportunity we have to do what we do. When I look over and see my sax player wailing away, I get that energy. When I see our drummer crashing away at cymbals, I get that energy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infectious.

SP: As a band that relies heavily on improvisation, how do you prep for a show when traveling and touring? A hectic schedule must not leave much time for practice. BG: A lot of times we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work things out ahead of time. We have good communication on-stage, in the moment, and that makes us the band we are. Someone will have an idea and we might work it out during sound check, then work it SP: O.A.R. is big on the summer concert circuit and at into the show after going over it two or three times. Really, college campuses. What do you enjoy about those eclectic, music to musicians is like talking to a talker. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just some- wide-ranging crowds, where not everyone is a fan of your thing we do, and it comes naturally. music? BG: I think the most attractive part of a festival or Spring SP: When you have a really great performance â&#x20AC;&#x201C; everyone Back to Vail environment is the unknown. When you play just clicks â&#x20AC;&#x201C; do you try and capture that vibe the next night formal events that are your own concert, you know your auor next week? dience will attend. With things like the Vail show, it makes BG: You always want to come together and give your best you think a little harder. We might come up with a set list, performance at every show. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really the sum of what but we call audibles on stage quite a bit by adjusting our we do â&#x20AC;&#x201C; all of us have to come together onstage, and even set-list to incorporate a new idea or play off the vibe of the though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s impossible to be perfect, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just open to tak- crowd. ing each other in new directions. One of the ways we work around that is just having fun and bouncing back from little SP: The bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core lineup is exactly the same, even after hiccups, and I think our audience appreciates how weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re able 17 years. How has everyone managed to stay at the same to laugh things off when they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go right. level of personal and creative energy? There mustâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been rough spots. SP: For Colorado fans, the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live on Red Rocksâ&#x20AC;? album is BG: As far as interpersonal energy, I think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more a milestone, recorded on the same stage graced by U2 and creativity than ever. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all coming to the table with more The Beatles. Talk about what that album means to the band. ideas than we ever have before. We almost want to stick BG: That album is special to us because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just an incred- more songs on an album than weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re actually able, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ible, incredible venue. It was such an energetic crowd and a good problem to have. Onstage, that creativity helps diverbeautiful place to be, and even though the pressure was on sify what we play for the crowd. You can explore new segues us to be on top of our game â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we also had a live feed going and instrumentals and intros between each song. Even inside on â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we really came together and had a great show. Now, if a song people already known, we can go an entirely new diyou listen to that album, there are mistakes in there, but we rection with the bridge, taking that song places where people chose to leave them in. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who we are and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who we who have seen us a dozen times will be surprised. are as a band, so why try to hide it? SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com SP: One thing you guys always have going for you is a

2

$ 50 off 1

$

Any two sandwiches

off

Any one sandwich

Sandwiches, wraps, soups, salads & more!

exp. 4/17

970-926-1796

 %DWARDS 6ILLAGE "LVD #s %DWARDS Mon-Fri 8am to 4pm | Sat & Sun 8am to 3pm

Get Creative! Art Supplies

Paints, brushes, pastels, over 30+ sizes of canvases, great selection of greeting cards, creative gifts for kids, scrap booking, gifts, and more! !RT s /FlCE s 3CRAPBOOKING s 'IFTS

M-Th 9-6, Fri 9-5, Sat 10-2, Sun Closed

845-7650

EagleVail between Vail & Beaver Creek

Monday Night

Tuesday Night

Wednesday Night

We Have the Best RACK....

And the Hottest BUNS...

For all you can FISH IN THE SEA

95

$10 95 $16

Served with k c a R Half mac & cheese and sweet potato fries Full Rack

95

$6.

1/2 lb handmade burger with your choice of cheese & sides

95

$9.

Check out

Fish & Chips

our Mon -

LUNCH SP

Fri

ECIALS!!!

Open daily for lunch and dinner â&#x20AC;˘ 295 Main St. Edwards â&#x20AC;˘ 970.926.4080

What Were You Expecting? Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

11


Consumers, meet your food Taste of Vail seminar explores how Americans settle for shoddy eats By Phil Lindeman Near the end of his presentation at last weekend’s Taste of Vail, Pete Marczyk, a Denver-based gourmet grocer, raised a glass of wine to the audience. “Once we leave here, we’ll spend a whole weekend swirling this, tasting this and occasionally spitting this out, just to figure out why it’s so special,” Marczyk said. “Yet we’ll shove anything in our mouths that’s cheap and doesn’t taste awful.” The large and talkative crowd was silent for a moment before Marczyk moved onto his next point while everyone enjoyed the juicy, delicately rich lamb sliders prepared by the Terra Bistro kitchen. The brief silence proved Marczyk had hit a nerve with his simple comparison. The Saturday morning seminar, alluringly titled “Where Does Our Food Come From?” was hosted by Marczyk, owner of Marczyk Fine Foods. Joining him were two handpicked sustainability proponents from the Front Range: Amanda Seastrom from the Colorado-based Niman Ranch partnership of organic farms, and Tyler DuBois, a former butcher form Marczyk and owner of Denver’s artisan pickle company, The Real Dill. Together, this group promised to talk about “food politics,” an increasingly complicated subject that’s at once important and somewhat pretentious – just think of the furor over New York City’s recent ban on oversized sodas. In search of flavor Marczyk, an energetic foodie, has a knack for turning simple observations into profound ideas, with the help of his wife and business partner, Barbara Macfarlane. Marczyk asked the crowd to remember a sublime meal or flavor. For him, it was a loaf of bread in Italy. “Think of it this way: Anywhere you go in the world – Italy, France, even South America – you come across a flavor that sparkles, and you want to find that taste again when you return home but can’t,” Marczyk said. “It’s not because it’s elusive. It’s because we’ve been taught that the integrity of the base ingredients loses out to what’s economical.” Marczyk used the bread – a humble, old-fashioned staple of diets everywhere – to introduce his food philosophy: “Eating is an agricultural act,” a quote borrowed from essayist and food advocate Wendell Berry. It’s the foundation for an ever-growing number of smalltime grocery stores returning to pre-WWII roots, including Marczyk Fine Foods. In 12 years, the store has become a staple for residents in the Capitol Hill neighborhood, offering local meat, vegetables, fruits, wine and more. He and his wife now have two locations in Denver proper, and they plan to add more options like seasonal, house-made ice cream, all while staying true to Marczyk’s vision for conscious eating. “Eating may be an agricultural act,” he said, repeating his

refrain once again, “But it is also something sensual. I mean, this is a sensual pleasure we get to enjoy three times a day. What other sensual pleasures can you say that about? Not nearly enough.” But Marczyk is more than an idealist. He’s also a shrewd businessman, and he realizes people who see food as a philosophy – not just fuel – are fighting an uphill battle. As he pointed out, he and the rest were preaching to the choir: Just about everyone in the room came with concerns about modern food production – nutritionists, farmers, parents, Johnsons and Wales students. “In America, we eat the worst food in the world, but we have access to the best food in the world,” Marczyk said, giving the example of Colorado’s Palisade peaches. “Every time you eat a peach or a salad or anything else, you’re making a decision about the future of the producer who made that food.” Experts from Niman Ranch and Marczyk Fine Foods talk to audiences at last week’s Taste of Vail culinary Changing the tide festival about the origins of what we consume. Zach This idea of voting with your dollar became a recurring Mahone photo. theme, and Seastrom of Niman Ranch showed how difficult it is to truly know food producers, even in a label-intense pickle,” with brine made the same way as beer. grocery store aisle. She showed several humbling slides, in“Pickling has been around for centuries, but with the adcluding side-by-side comparisons of production farms and vent of refrigeration, you had all these wonderful family family farms, like the 700 in her company’s network. The recipes passed down through the years that are now gone,” photos and conditions of the animals were sobering, but the DuBois said. “We’re really trying to tap into that comforting, most shocking revelation was unexpected. The group had childhood taste we’ve almost lost to time.” seen photos of atrocious farms before, but few knew that The seminar was obviously a push to buy the presenter’s only 18 percent of one million “Colorado” lamb is raised in food, but each presenter genuinely seemed to care about the the state. future of agriculture and farming. From wine to bread to “On the retail side, breaking into the consumer market has those delicious lamb sliders, it was more than a sales pitch been very difficult,” Seastrom said of Niman’s slow growth – it was a search for something delicious for the palate and over the past 40 years. “We were really able to get the food- conscience. service industry right away, because chefs are taught to apBut occasionally, good intentions aren’t enough. After the preciate quality ingredients. But we have a seen a ground- seminar, former farmer Bruce Sparrow explained the tug of swell of average buyers wanting to know where their food war between ethics and reality. comes from, and that’s promising.” “I believe in what they’re doing 100 percent,” Sparrow Sadly, Seastrom credited recent food recalls and contami- said. “The only trouble is, there’s no way we can produce nation woes for this newfound interest in food production, all the food we need in this country the way they want to but she’s glad to see the tides changing. This new wave of produce it.” “mission-based foodies,” is young, active and willing to pay Marczyk isn’t blind to this battle – again, he’s a businessjust a bit more for food raised beyond factory-farm walls. man, and he’s grateful to be one of few grocers to thrive in Tyler DuBois of The Real Dill definitely fits the mold. The recent years. He explains his only solution in characteristi20-something culinary school graduate worked in several cally simple and vivid terms. high-end, hipster-friendly kitchens before arriving at Marc“Talk to your purveyors, talk to your chefs, talk to the servzyk. He made the move to have time for his pickle business, ers who bring your food,” Marczyk said. “Anywhere you go, but he bought into Marczyk’s philosophy. As a butcher, he find out what’s on your plate and where it came from. We could literally see the difference between truly superior meat don’t need this movement to become a Goliath – we just and the cuts he thought were quality in gourmet kitchens. need a million Davids.” The Real Dill continues this tradition, with small-batch jars brined with whole chunks of garlic, peppers and dill. SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at This summer, he’s taking the local angle one step further by philip@sneakpeakvail.com partnering with Denver’s Great Divide Brewery for a “beer

EDWARDS | 970-926-4455 | WWW.CAFEMILANOCO.COM BREAKFAST

Mon-Fri 8am-11am | Sat-Sun 8am-3pm

12

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

LUNCH

Mon-Sat 11am-3pm

DINNER

Mon-Sat 5pm-10pm


SPRING BACK ––––––––––––––––––––– water without falling, and emerge in (hopefully) one piece on the far-side snow. Of course, it all takes place in front of literally thousands of spectators, and the success-to-failure ratio is wonderfully skewed. Then again, winning isn’t really what the championships are about – even the name is a bit of a misnomer, as the sport has no official governing body – but each year brings a handful of die-hard pond skimmers. The afternoon is more about catching wild costumes, rooting for the loser and enjoying one-of-a-kind fun. It’s the sort of event Vail has somewhat phased out over the years, and a fitting close to the 50th anniversary season. The field is limited to 75 competitors, and as of press time, registration was closed. But it never hurts to ask announcers about last-minute registration. The venue opens at 1:30 p.m. for spectators, and competition begins at 3 p.m.

[From page 5]

least one afternoon party during the celebration, featuring specials on Budweiser and Bud Light. The late-night events are a bit more involved, with live music and more drink specials. The Friday night party at Vail Ale House in West Vail includes a to-be-determined band, and Saturday night at Samana Lounge in Vail Village brings the retro sounds of Denver-based DJ Jon Nedza. Drink specials are for the 21-and-over crowd only, and entry to the late-night parties is restricted.

Expo area Beginning Friday morning and running through Sunday, the Spring Back expo at Mountain Plaza near the bottom of Gondola One is an ideal place to find free goodies. Event sponsors like GoPro and Red Bull will be on hand – no doubt with stickers and energy drinks aplenty – as well as local ski shops, gear manufacturers and alpine outfitters. If Après parties the snow is good enough, try a pair of demo skis or bindings Vail boasts dozens of patios and bars for après indulgence, to prep for a summertime purchase. but the lineup of official Spring Back venues touches almost SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at all of Vail Village’s iconic hangouts, along with a handful of new ones. Pazzo’s, Red Lion and Vendetta’s each host at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

LAST COURSE ––––––––––––––––––––– Another favorite is the braised short ribs, covered in a demi-port barbecue sauce and served with cheesy polenta and sautéed greens. As summer comes around, watch the blackboard menu for items such as melon salad and rhubarb dishes. “We like to just work with whatever we find at the market that particular day,” Irwin says. “The growing seasons here are so short that sometimes we’ll only have an ingredient for a couple weeks before it’s out of season.” Let’s not forget the last course. The chefs almost always keep a selection of specialty bread puddings on hand, crafted from mouth-watering ingredients like cinnamon buns and toffee. We tried the pumpkin version, served with a scoop of crème fraiche ice cream, and the empty plate spoke for itself.

• I n c lu d e s •

Scenic Tram Ride, unlimited Alpine Coaster, 4D Motion Theater & Laser Tag! add cave tour for $5! Spring Hours: Mon - Fri, 10am - 5pm Sat & Sun, 10am - 6pm *VALID THRU 5/10/13

800-530-1635 • GlenwoodCaverns.com

bl

Ha

ol

sp aE

[From page 10]

Keep an eye on Last Course this summer for new events and the opening of a sunny patio. Over the winter, the restaurant hosted some trunk shows and pairing dinners in partnership with Crazy Mountain Brewery. Whitney says she’s working on organizing a poker night, complete with gourmet “dude food” like ribs and mac and cheese. “There are all these events for ladies, but not too many restaurants do events for guys,” Whitney says. “We’ve got quite a few ideas we’re working on for the summer, so keep an eye on our website.” SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

“We Help Injured People” "VUP.PUPSDZDMF"DDJEFOUTt4MJQ'BMM 0UIFS4FSJPVT*OKVSJFTt4LJ4OPXCPBSE"DDJEFOUT 'SFF$POTVMUt1FSDFOUBHF'FF

VailJustice.com - Riverwalk at Edwards Edwards/Denver Offices -Emerald Building Suite G-1 970.926.1700

All You Can Eat Spring Special

19

$

Looking for Spring Break FUN ?

95

BBQ Ribs or Ruby Red Trout or Roasted Chicken

25% OFF STEAKS

Aprés/Happy Hour Daily

Beer & 2 tacos 6 $ Big Margarita 5 $

Vail Village • 476-5100

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

13


Love to Ski: Prepare for the next ski season Remember the best of this year and prep your gear for the next Editor’s note: Palmer Hoyt is a Vail-based skier and the director and head coach of the University of Colorado at Boulder Freestyle Ski Team. He writes about all things skiing – improvement, its impacts on his life and most importantly, how to have more fun on the slopes. This ski season is drawing to a close, but it is never too early to get a jump on making next season great by taking care of a few end-of-the-season tasks. Here are two tips to cap off this season and get ready for the next.

Palmer Hoyt

1. Begin your preparation for the approaching winter by first taking stock of the season that just ended. It is always exciting to anticipate what the upcoming season might bring. But before you start fantasizing about the subsequent winter, give yourself a few moments to audit and appreciate the ski season we’re currently laying to rest and how it can help you with the next. Looking back on the current ski season can help you clarify the correct mentality for capturing what you want out of next year. If you’re like me, you always want more skiing from the next winter. No matter how far I’m able to push my ski limits in a season, or how many days I bag in a winter, each ski season always seems to leave me hungry and ready for more. We’ve had a great winter in Vail. It wasn’t the best snowyear on record, but we have had tons of opportunities to take away wonderful memories. While it is tempting to disregarding this season and default directly to delusions of what next season could be, allow yourself a few moments to consider some important questions: What was your best day this last season? (Did you catch the surprise Thursday, Jan. 31 powder day?) How about your favorite run? Most spectacu-

lar crash? Your standout memory? How many days can you compressed. count from 2012/2013 among your lifetime top 10 ski days? WARNING! Make sure to turn your DINs back up before the ski season starts. You might want to leave a sticky note 2. Collect, pack and condition your gear so it is ready on them to remind yourself of the adjustment for the coming to go next fall. fall. It is tempting to just cram your gear into a corner of the -Boots: Buckled and fresh. garage at end of the season and think to yourself that you’ll You want your boots to fit, function, and smell good when take care of it “sometime.” The reality is that unless you you re-enlist them. have definite summer skiing plans that will keep you acTo start, pull your liner and foot bed out and set them in tively on the slopes, you’re going to forget about doing the the sun for a few hours on a warm day. This will ensure they things that prolong the life of your gear and make starting are fully dry and ready for storage without molding. Before next year easy. you put your liners back in your shells, throw a scented dryer - Skis: Get a summer tune. sheet in. This will help to absorb moisture and improve their Preparing your skis before you put them away will protect “natural” scent. them over the summer and make them poised to rip when Ski boots should be stored with the buckles secured and you’re ready. You can take them to any local shop and ask fastened to the same setting you use when you’re skiing. for a summer tune, or if you’re feeling ambitious, you can This will help the high-density plastic retain the shape you do it yourself. Here’s what your skis need to endure the ap- want when you ski. proaching hiatus. - Outerwear: Wash, dry and condition it. Bases: Clean with a soft brush or rag. Fix any damage Take the time to clean your ski outerwear. Usually this (gouges, deep scratches or core shots), and put on lots of means a gentle cycle in the washing machine using cold wawax. My favorite place to learn about ski care and purchase ter and a technical cleaner/detergent. Make sure each piece tuning products is www.tognar.com. of outerwear is hung dry. Before storing, apply a high-perEdges: Don’t put your skis away with any rust showing. formance conditioning product, specific to the garment, such A proper sharpening should do the trick, or you can run a as Nikwax TX Direct water repellant spray to waterproof gummy stone over any oxidized spots. gear. Top sheets: If the tops of your skis are full of chips and - Organize the rest of your gear cuts, clean them up and protect them by cutting away the Before they go missing, collect your gloves, goggles, heldamage with a razor and filling in the scars with super glue. met and other accessories and put them them all one place. Strap: If you don’t regularly use a ski strap to keep your Make sure each item is properly dried and in working sticks together, start now. Secure your skis together any time condition, and then pack the collection away together in a you’re not using them, especially during storage, at their common storage container. You can use a travel ski duffel, contact points (where the bases touch when together). a plastic bin or a garbage bag, as long as the container in -Bindings: Turn the DINs down. which you choose to pack your ski stuff will keep it safe, When you store your skis over long periods of time, such contained, and dry. Then, next season when you’re pumped as during the summer months, release all the pressure on to go, it’ll all be ready and waiting for you. your binding springs. Here’s to a great season that was full of fun times, snow Reduce the DINs of your bindings to their lowest set- just when we most needed it and great memories. We’ll see tings by turning the individual binding DIN screws counter- you out there next season. clockwise. The spring that controls your binding’s function will retain its resilience longer when not kept continually

VMS –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– was also a concern, and monetary woes gave rise to traditions like the VMS Home Tour and Holiday Gala and Auction, then dubbed “The Desperation Derby.” Sally Johnston, who had two children attend VMS and now sits on the board of directors, saw the laudable impact Abuisi had on the school. “I believe the kids here really show a love of learning, and it has made this school special,” Johnston says. “It’s also an extended family. Even as the town has grown, this school has remained a place where people feel connected.” Along with spearheading the school’s first permanent home, Abuisi brought in a handselected crop of teachers – Schindel included – and made education a top priority. Today, all students are required to be accepted at a four-year university before graduation. This intense focus on college prep was fully formed in 1993, when Johnston’s son, Mike, was a senior. Mike Johnston took over as emcee for the anniversary evening – a perfect fit

14

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

[From page 6]

for the trim, well-spoken former principal and current Colorado State Senator. “This school is like the giant family room of our house,” he said before entering the auditorium for Abuisi’s presentation. “You come out and see all your brothers and sisters and moms and dads.” As people filter into the auditorium, Abuisi stands by the library entrance, talking with grandfatherly charm to a group of former students and teachers. The evening is his farewell party, but for the headmaster of nearly four decades, it’s about the future of a school and community built from the ground up – sometimes quite literally. “To see several hundred students come in as 5 year olds and exit as college freshmen is something I love, and I’ve seen it happen hundreds of times,” Abuisi says. “Good people are drawn to this town, and I’ve enjoyed being a part of it the entire time.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com


CELEBRATE SPRING with the VAIL VALLEY PARTNERSHIP

Blue Jeans &

Lobster BEAVER CREEK CHOPHOUSE | 4.16.2013

ENJOY LOBSTER DINNER, COCKTAILS, MUSIC & NETWORKING!

win BASKETS from these VVP members!

sket, in a Ba ers! W o t Enter Memb y VVP b d e id rov

P

Beaver Creek Lodge Brooke Heather Photographer Decypher Technologies East West Resorts Foster Construction Four Seasons Resort Vail Nova Guides NRC365 Mountain Broadcasting Vail Daily Vail Racquet Club Mountain Resort Vail Valley Foundation West Vail Liquor Mart

details: WHEN: Tuesday, April 16, 2013, 5:30 - 9pm WHERE: Beaver Creek Chophouse COST: Members $70 â&#x20AC;˘ Non-Members $80 Group discounts - 5 tickets for $300 RSVP: Contact Jennifer Weintraub jweintraub@visitvailvalley.com 970.477.4001 PRIZES: Vote for your favorite basket & have a chance to win!

SPONSORED BY: VAIL DAILY

A Great Time DJ, Bacchus Wine Company Crazy Mountain Brewing Company, Denver Post, KZYR, NRC365 Mountain Broadcasting SneakPEAK, TV8 - Vail

Chophouse Lobster! Blue Jea ns & Lo bster Network ing Party !

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

15


(CafĂŠ located by City Market)

Chicken & Beef Pot Pies, Quiche, Breakfast Pastries & Pies 970.331.4632

Mon.-Fri. 8 am-6pm Sat. 9 am-12 pm

www.magpiesco.com

Thicker,  fuller  hair  is  yours!

Studio  B

308  Broadway  Eagle 970-­328-­4042

Free  samples   while  supplies  last

Protection is a family tradition. Since 1927, families like yours have trusted our Family to protect them from unexpected losses. Call me today to discuss your needs. Marcella R. Sandoval Agency

970-328-4370 msandova@amfam.com 200 Capital Street #205 Eagle, CO 81631

A Moab riderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guide to Eagle The top bike rides for those heading West this spring By Melanie Wong

Fr Live id M ay u â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s sic 69p DINNER m

GYPSUM

ANIMAL HOSPITAL

APRIL IS NATIONAL HEARTWORM MONTH

20off %

HEARTWORM TESTING

20 off ALL PREVENTATIVES %

CALL NOW TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT! STEPHEN SHELDON, DVM GYPSUM ANIMAL HOSPITAL 970-524-3647 www.gypsumah.com

16

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Haymeadow Trails approved

When April 15 rolls around, the chairlifts will have inched to a stop, and the ropes will be lifted on a whole new kind of A new mountain bike trail is in the works terrain â&#x20AC;&#x201C; singletrack. for Eagle after the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board of trustees apApril, with its varying spring weather, sends many mounproved $60,000 toward the project on Tuesday. tain denizens further west to the deserts of Moab. However, The Haymeadow trail will be built south of trails a bit closer to home in Eagle are ready to ride as well. the existing town boundaries, just north of The townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s western trails â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Boneyard, Redneck Ridge and Brush Creek Road and east of the pool and ice the Pool and Ice Rink trails â&#x20AC;&#x201C; are already open, and on April rink, says the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open space coordinator 15, the rest of the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open space trails will be ready for John Staight. public use. Until then, hikers and bikers are asked to stay off The land was donated by developers to the the trails, says Town of Eagle Open Space Coordinator John town as open space, and will be the site of the Staight. 2013 Colorado high school mountain biking â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seasonal closures were established six or seven years ago state championships. to protect wintering wildlife and the deer and elk who come â&#x20AC;&#x153;The trail will be four to six miles long with down into town in the wintertime. They are low on energy multiple loops that can provide a different ridreserves, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a possibility of them being spooked by ing experience for riders of all levels,â&#x20AC;? Staight says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll hire a professional trail-building hikers and mountain bike riders,â&#x20AC;? Staight says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the consultant to design it, and eventually it might primary reason for closures, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also to protect the trails tie into the Pool and Ice Rink trail.â&#x20AC;? from people riding them too early when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re muddy. Otherwise, trails get torn up.â&#x20AC;? If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re one of many Colorado riders planning to migrate to Utah this spring, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also like the sprawling network percent, and you can extend the ride with several trails that of trails in Eagle. Both mountain biking hotspots have op- loop out from the main road. The start is located a short way tions for every kind of rider, so read on for a few suggestions out of town on Kane Creek Road. you may be familiar with and few new routes to try out this In Eagle: Second Gulch to Pipeline to Wolverton spring. This ride, which starts from the Arroyo Drive trailhead in Eagle Ranch, starts off on a deceptively mellow doubletrack The challenging climb road that winds gently up into the hills. However, as the trail In Moab: Amasa Back enters the woods and turns into singletrack, be prepared for This ledgy, jeep-road climb is 3.8 miles of steep climbing the grade to get significantly steeper and the path rockier. and step-ups on rock and sandstone. The climb averages 10 A short walk might be inevitable as you near the top. After

SAMPLINGS

s "RAISED #OLORADO ,AMB 3HANK s 'REEN #HILI 0EPPER *ACK "URGER s !SIAGO #RUSTED #HICKEN 0ENNE

,UNCH   s $INNER  #LOSE  'RAND !VE (WY  s %AGLE s  

GREAT GARDEN GOODIES New items arriving weekly... Bird feeders, wind chimes, garden stakes & more!! Eagle Store Only!

~

321 Broadway Riverwalk Edwards Downtown Eagle Across from the Movie theater 328-4888 926-5888

www.alpineambiance.com

New & Used Tires and Wheels No appointment necessary! Open 8am-6pm 24 Hour Mobile Service

Down Valley

Tires and Wheels 970-777-8473 (TIRE)

Behind Shell Station/Beside carwash Off Hwy 6/I-70 Bertroch Lane in Gypsum

CRAZY ALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

FREE Estimates

(VBSBOUFFEt*OTVSBODF8PSLt"VUP(MBTT $FSUJÄ&#x2022;FE$PMPS.BUDIJOHt-BUFTU.PEFSO&RVJQNFOU $PNQMFUF6OJCPEZ$POWFOUJPOBM'SBNF3FQBJST  'FBUVSJOH$IJFG&;-JOFS'SBNF&RVJQNFOU

24 Hour Towing

970-904-1912

970-524-7339 Miles West of Eagle on Hwy 6 Gypsum


Going ape on size & freshness! few challenging rock features and sharp switchbacks. In Eagle: Eagle Ranch loops This may be one of the flatter rides found in the entirety of Eagle County, but that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make it any less fun. From the Arroyo Drive parking area, hop on the bike path and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll soon head up a short climb on a wide dirt road. From there starts a rollicking, roller-coaster descent on smooth singletrack through sagebrush fields that can loop back to the parking lot.

Boneyard Trail in West Eagle. Cody Downard photo. the singletrack, continue climbing the dirt road to a newer section of fun, roller-coaster singletrack called Wolverton. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be rewarded with smooth riding before you head back down Pipeline for the descent. Fun and twisty In Moab: Pipe Dream According to Moab bike guide Michael Carlson, so many new trails have popped up all over Moab in the last couple years that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to keep track of them all. One newer trail, Pipe Dream, is a short ride from the townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main street, starting at the south end of the Hidden Valley Trailhead. The trail surface features dirt, rock armoring, shale bench cuts, blackbrush slopes, rolling terrain and sharp, twisting turns. In Eagle: Boneyard and Redneck Ridge This ride provides much of the same rolling and twisting action of Pipe Dream, but with less technical difficulty. Park and ride from the Boneyard Trailhead or from the Mill Creek parking lot. Boneyard is a smooth, twisting climb that opens up into dramatic views of the New York Mountains. The Redneck Ridge descent is gradual, with manageable rock beds, fast turns and a steeper, loosely packed final portion that keeps you on your toes. Family riding In Moab: Bar M trails These trails have something for everyone. New singletrack loops have sprung up around the mellow Bar M road, creating a crisscrossed network of rides. Beginners and kids will like the meandering EZ and Lazy trails. Intermediate riders will like Circle O and Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; A, the entirety of which is on slickrock. Unlike the famed Slickrock trail itself, these routes are mostly flat with many dips and turns. You could call it â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slickrock Lite.â&#x20AC;? For more advanced riders, Deadmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ridge offers a climb with a number of steep spots, a

coupon

Super Saver

The extended tour In Moab: The Whole Enchilada This is one of Moabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s marquee rides, and it requires a shuttle. Get dropped off in the La Sal Mountains and take a 25-mile descent back into Moab on a combination of six trails. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll start on alpine trails through aspen and oak meadows, roll over rocks, roots and ledges, and put your shocks to the test on the rocky Porcupine Rim before ending at the Colorado River. In Eagle: Abrams Ridge, Cat Walk, Easy Rider, School House Rock The premier tour of Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s singletrack doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t require a car or driver. The ride starts near Brush Creek Elementary School and kicks off with a steep, lung-busting uphill. Expect some loose portions and exposure along the way. At the top, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be welcomed into Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backcountry and open meadows before diving into the shaded path of Cat Walk. This relatively flat, twisting trail dumps riders out at the top of Easy Rider, a fast descent through open fields on Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trademark dirt with a serious whee-factor. From there, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have a short, steep singletrack climb up School House Rock before ending back in town. Skinny tires In Moab: Arches National Park â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moab is becoming a pretty popular road biking destination,â&#x20AC;? bike guide Carlson says, adding that the fat-tire centric town has added a skinny tire festival to its event lineup. One of the most popular rides takes cyclists through Arches National Park. Bikes pay a $5 entrance fee. Head up a short, steady climb, then enjoy rolling hills while surrounded by sandstone arches. Ride out to Devilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Garden and back for a 41-mile roundtrip jaunt. In Eagle: Brush Creek Road toward Sylvan Lake This is the go-to stretch of pavement for Eagle road cyclists. The two-lane road sees light traffic, and the climb is barely noticeable for more than 10 miles before turning to dirt and ending at Sylvan Lake State Park. Along the way, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll pass ranches, barns, livestock, Adamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Rib Country Club and views of the surrounding mountains. For more details on Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trail network, see www.eagleoutside.com or pick up a guidebook at a local bike shop. If you head west this spring for Moabâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storied trails, make sure to stop in at Eagle on the way for some of best underthe-radar singletrack in the state. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

131 Chambers Ave, Eagle 970.328.2425

Winter Special NAPA 15W-40 Diesel Oil 9 /gal. $ 4899/5 gal. buckets $ 99

Locally Owned & Operated Since 2007

524-6060t11126 Hwy 6, Gypsum, M-F 7-6, Sat 8-5, Sun 9-4

dy To GO? a e R

Quilez Luxury travel & Voyages Your local Travel Agency     a 8>C<

HIGH ALTITUDE SPA A Full Service Salon

New Tanning Bed & Bulbs Get ready for Spring and Summer 970-328-2887

105 Capitol Street #1 | PO Box 486 | Eagle, CO 81631

Serving Breakfast & Lunch

Eagle Only

~Serving the Vail Valley since 1990~

23 !

95 $ Only

@E< @E Only

Greek Salad, 18â&#x20AC;? Pizza (House Combo or 3 toppings) and a Pitcher of Soda or Domestic Beer!! Valid Sun. through Wed. Only Expires 04/17/13 9FM< K?< 9FNC@E> 8CC<P @E 8>C< a  

www.pazzospizza.com

50% off

with this ad

Dinner Entree

Happy Hour! 2:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Now Serving Dinner! Tues.-Sat.

Right Across from the Post Office â&#x20AC;˘ Eagle 970-328-6060 â&#x20AC;˘ eagleyummycafe.com

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

17


SneakSPORTS: Swinging doors of seasons

Ski season is ending, but spring and the off season are waiting Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note: Minturnbased sports fan Patrick Whitehurst writes for www. fanrag.com. Read his musings on the site or in SneakPEAK.

A wiser fellow than me once said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;When one door is closed, another is opened.â&#x20AC;? I try to think about that whenever my life takes an Patrick Whitehurst expected or surprising turn. Switching career paths can be a scary endeavor, but it can also be extremely rewarding from both a financial and personal perspective. Anyone who lives in our happy valley knows the doors that signal the end of the ski season are closing at Vail and Beaver Creek. Skiers and snowboarders alike can rejoice that the snowfall this season exceeded last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s subpar totals. We can enjoy the last few days of the season by taking our final turns or hanging out on the multitude of sunny decks with good friends. When the lifts close at 4 p.m. on Sunday, the door to another season is opened for area residents -- off season! I know that I am not the only one who loves the off season. Sure, I will miss ripping through the Back Bowls on what seems to be a bottomless powder day, but some down

time is all right with me too. Maybe you work in the service industry and the mountain closures signify an opportunity to visit family and friends that you were unable to catch up with during the busy season. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re lucky enough to have a trip to the beach or somewhere warm planned, the off season canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come quickly enough. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re sticking around the valley, another door is opening before our eyes -- spring! Area golf courses will soon be open and all of the activities or hobbies that accompany our rivers await. Local hiking and biking trails are starting to thaw, soon the majestic beauty of the Rocky Mountains can be witnessed even more fully following a short trek into the woods. When one door is closed, many more open... As a fan and writer, I recall those words at the conclusion of every major sporting season. After the door closed on the college basketball season and the Louisville Cardinals stood victorious, coaches and players from every university and small school in the country got back to work with the goal of improving next season. Michigan may have lost on Championship Monday, but their program will receive a huge boost due to the Wolverinesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; success in the tournament; top recruits will visit and commit to Ann Arbor with the hopes of winning a national title. Louisville and head coach Rick Pitino wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t lack motivation entering the 2013-2014 season, as the defending champs will most likely be ranked behind in-state rival and perennial powerhouse Kentucky. The Wildcats werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even granted a bid to the 2013 NCAA Tournament, but landed the top re-

Fan Videos & Fun Analysis

Be Seen, Be Heard, Be a Fan at fanrag.com

cruiting class in the country once again, so expectations will be sky high. Play ball! The door just opened on the Major League Baseball season. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell Cubs fans that their beloved team doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a puncherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chance to compete for either the NL Central crown or a wildcard spot in the National League. In FanRag.comâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Baseball Preview, I predicted the Cubbies will not lose 100 games in 2013 -- 98 or 99 sounds about right. A new season brings new hope! This season the Colorado Rockies celebrate 20 years in the big leagues. Coors Field is an incredible venue, and the Rockies roster is stocked with veteran leadership and young talent. Get down to Denver and â&#x20AC;&#x153;root, root, root for the home teamâ&#x20AC;? or catch some of the best players in the world today. Still on the brain While there is officially an offseason in the NFL, football fans can always get their fix by following the moves their favorite team makes. The regular season schedule will be released soon, and the NFL draft is only two weeks away. As a Packers fan, I was disappointed to see the door close on wide receiver Greg Jenningsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; career in Green Bay, but I know the team will look to add younger weapons through the draft. Broncos fans have to be excited at the prospect of Peyton Manning throwing to Wes Welker. Already lofty expectations will only increase when Denver drafts talented defensive players to shore up that side of the ball. Championship doors are wide open As the regular season winds down in the NBA and NHL, fans know that simply qualifying for the postseason is a great start. Last year the Los Angeles Kings were the eighth and final seed in the Western Conference. All the Kings did was steamroll every team in their path and take home Lord Stanleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cup. There are front runners and favorites, but the postseason is a clean slate. Will the Heat repeat? Can the Blackhawks seal the deal as hockeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best team? The doors are wide open for legendary drama unfolding in the sports world, and I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait.

Need help? Call Your Mental Health Professional Do you want toâ&#x20AC;Ś. Lose weight? Tobacco Cessation? Anxiety? Sleep Problems? Increase Concentration? Improve Memory? Improve performance?

Find out how Hypnosis can help!

Increase Independence Catherine Zeeb, PhD, CACIII

Spiritual, Addiction, Family, Individual and Teen Counseling 9 Week Intensive Recovery Program,6 Week Teen Program Foot Detox, Ear Candling

Call for appointments and information  

       

ANDREA K. ULIANO, MSW 970.471.9312 andreakuliano@gmail.com www.iheartolderpeople.com

CONSIDERYour THIS local, affordable in home care What if you become forgetful and wander out of your home?

forcaregiver your aging loved ones What happens if your needs care or your spouse passes away? Is-We nursing what you want yourself your future? canhome do incare 2 hours what willfortake you and 2 weeks.

Stacey Horn, LCSW, CHT Hagen Kuhl, MA, CH

Appointments- 970-926-HELP (4357) Offices in Edwards and Eagle

18

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

-WeOFFERING help you when the â&#x20AC;&#x153;what ifsâ&#x20AC;? turn into â&#x20AC;&#x153;now OUR Medication Reminders Companion Care whatâ&#x20AC;? Respite & 24/hr care Light Housekeeping Errands and Transportation Call for a complimentary 15 minute consultation

Meal Preparation

Non-Medical Home Care: Keeping you at home and in the mountains!

- Paperwork & Application Assistaince - Daily Money Manager - Vocational Support - Health, Life, Medicare Life Resources, LLC Gail Shannon, PMSA 970-390-0689 lifesourcesllc@gmail.com

Dr. Jill Squyres is pleased to announce the opening of her new clinical psychology private practice in Eagle. Counseling, Coaching & Psychotherapy    

     

 

 403 Broadway St., Eagle 970-306-6986 drjsquyres@mac.com www.drjillsquyrespsychologist.com

Jill Squyres PhD. Clinical Psychologist


MOUNTAIN MAMA â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C;â&#x20AC;&#x201C; tasks, cooks meals, looks after other siblings, and teaches the mom about breast feeding and caring for the new baby. Find out more at www.vailvalleydoula.com. Memories in photos In generations past, pregnant ladies hid away in their homes during the third trimester, and they certainly didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seek out professional photographers to document those months. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I get comments from older people that you used to run and hide when you were pregnant, and now you want photos,â&#x20AC;? says photographer Bex White of the EagleVail based White Starfish Photography, who specializes in pregnancy, baby and family portraits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think people finally realize that women, when theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re pregnant, are very beautiful.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a treat for moms as well, who have probably been wearing baggy clothes for months and may feel less than beautiful. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right now, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m five months pregnant and starting to feel fat and bloated,â&#x20AC;? White says with a laugh. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nice to be able to dress up and feel like youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re beautiful. About 36 weeks is a peak time to get photos.â&#x20AC;? Clients can opt for studio shots, but many also like to get their photos taken outside. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s becoming increasingly popular for dads to join in on the photos as well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really like shooting in the outdoors because we live in such a beautiful town,â&#x20AC;? says White. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve taken photos in 3 feet of snow with pregnant women and in aspen meadows. Women here tend to be more adventurous and not too shy about hiking in the woods at 36 weeks pregnant.â&#x20AC;? Another popular time for photos is in the few weeks after the baby comes home. Of course, the timeframe comes with challenges, since most parents of newborns are more focused on getting through sleepless nights and feeding the baby than on setting up photo sessions. White believes it just takes some advance planning and patience. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think with maternity, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s such a short period of your life,â&#x20AC;? she says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize until you look back how quickly your baby has progressed from being an infant. It gives parents a memento to remember.â&#x20AC;? Find out more at www.whitestarfish.com.

Diapered up Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one item that new parents are sure to have plenty of: diapers. Where parents have a choice, says Katie Crofton of Pee Wee Natural Baby Products, is what kind of diaper goes on baby. Crofton, a local nurse and mother of three, started her business as a cloth diaper distributor last January after using the products with her three sons. She considers herself an expert on the topic by experience, she says, and wanted to be a resource for local moms interested in forgoing disposable diapers. Cloth diapers take some getting used to and you have to find the right kind for your baby, but Crofton says that cloth diapers can save money (about $2,500 per child) and keep disposable diapers out of landfills. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to get the word out there that cloth diapering is easy,â&#x20AC;? Crofton says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are not the cloth diapers our moms used.â&#x20AC;? Pee Wee Natural Baby Products carries three brands of diapers that Crofton has tried with her own sons: Thirsties, Rumparooz and GroVia. The business is mostly onlinebased, and also carries baby and diaper accessories. A little guidance goes a long way with cloth diapering, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an area where Crofton wants to help other moms. She suggests trying out different brands to see what works best instead of springing for a full set, which can cost upwards of $400 or $500. She also points out that parents can use both cloth and disposable diapers according to their needs. Crofton first tried cloth diapers with her son Ian, now 6 years old. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I asked around and nobody seemed to really know much about it, so I bought the cheapest thing I could on the Internet and failed miserably. I had to change them more often, and Ian always smelled like a bum,â&#x20AC;? Crofton says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With my second child, I got something fleece-lined that absorbed a lot, and a friend showed me how to wash them correctly. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a meticulous process, but once you get it down, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a problem.â&#x20AC;? Find out more at www.peeweenaturalbaby.com. SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

     

          

[From page 7]

*APANESE 3TEAKHOUSE (IBACHI  3USHI "AR

(APPY (OUR   PM

$INE IN  4AKE /UT

   s 7EST OF 3OLARIS s 6AIL 6ILLAGE

    

  

    

   

     - Using the combined buying power of 1000 Carpet One stores, we have been able to stock up on incredible deals. We are passing Huge Savings on to our customers.    - With 140 wall-to-wall Carpet and Hardwood Floors In Stock, You will be sure to find one that is just right for your home. We can install your new floor right away.



        

     - While Supplies Last, you will find incredible deals on quality carpet and hardwood floors. Mill close outs, roll ends and remnants at close out prices. You can buy beautiful new carpet and save a ton of money.

Serving the Vail Valley since 1972 810 Nottingham Road, Avon â&#x20AC;˘ 970-949-5390 â&#x20AC;˘ www.ruggsbenedict.com

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

19


Calendar of Events Submit your event to SneakPEAK’s weekly community calendar by sending information to info@sneakpeakvail.com.

Thursday, April 11 to Monday, Dec. 2 Can Do MS Rolex Raffle tickets on sale

Thursday, April 11 to Saturday, April 13 Segovian pig roast at The Leonora

Leonora, Vail’s newest bistro, wine and tapas bar in The Sebastian hotel, hosts a Segovian pig roast every Thursday, Friday and Saturday afternoon through April 13. Event will include live Latin jazz guitar, a sangria and mojito bar, plus a selection of tapas, crudo and ceviche, as well as craft beer and wine on the terrace outside of Leonora.

Friday, April 12 Family Friday Afternoon Club at Beaver Creek From 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., enjoy music, snacks, games, and activities on McCoy’s deck, with special appearances by Riperoo, Snow Cats and the Beaver Creek Ski Patrol. Event is free.

tion between Eric Wilson of Sublime, celebrated drummer Josh Freese and lead vocalist and guitarist Rome Ramirez. Together the trio treats fans to Sublime favorites as well as original material from the 2011 album, “Yours Truly.”

Sunday, April 14 Spring Back concert: Jimmy Cliff

The ski season closes with a free concert by Jimmy Cliff, with opener Eminence Ensemble at Solaris Plaza in Vail Village. Venue opens and music starts at 4 p.m. Jimmy Cliff is a Grammy-winning musician, actor, singer, songwriter, producer and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee.

Monday, April 15

Enter the Rolex “100” Raffle for a chance to win a Rolex Town of Eagle trails open Oyster Perpetual Explorer II, valued at $8,100. All raffle All Town of Eagle open space trails open for the season proceeds benefit Can Do MS’s lifestyle empowerment until Dec. 15. Please respcet the winter trail closures to programs, which equip people living with MS and their protect wintering wildlife and to avoid damage to roads or support partners with the knowledge, skills, awareness and Friday, April 12 trails during wet conditions. confidence to become active co-managers of their health. Skin the Rabbit at Main St. Grill Tickets are on sale now for $100 each and can be purchased Eagle County band Skin the Rabbit plays bluegrass with a Monday, April 15 online at www.mscando.org/raffle or by calling Can Do MS twist at Eagle’s Main St. Grill. Music starts at 10 p.m. Gypsum Public Library book discussion at 800-367-3101. Tickets can also be purchased in person at Join the Gypsum Public Library for a book-discussion at Can Do MS’ offices in Edwards, CO or by mailing a check Saturday, April 13 6:30 p.m. centering around the “One Book, One Valley” directly to Can Do MS (27 Main St. Suite 303, Edwards, 9Health Fair in Gypsum initiative. One Book, One Valley is a valley-wide reading CO 81632). The drawing will be on Monday, Dec. 2, at The 34th annual 9Health Fair will have blood chemistry and discussion program that encourages all residents to read 12:30 p.m. Winner need not be present to win. screenings, colon cancer screening kits, blood count tests the same book at the same time to create a community book and more for affordable prices. Free screenings available club. This years’ book selection for One Book, One Valley Thursday, April 11 for weight/body mass index, blood pressure, vision and is “Into the Beautiful North” by Luis Alberto Urrea. hearing. Event is sponsored by the Eagle Lions Club and Live music at Vail Ale House Vail Valley Medical Center. The 9Health Fair is being Thursday night brings free, live music with local rockers Tuesday, April 16 The Olora Brothers and Drunken Hearts. Music starts at 10 held in Gypsum at Eagle Valley High School from 7:30 Blue Jeans & Lobster networking party a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Cash or check only. Register online at p.m. The Vail Valley Partnership’s annual Blue Jeans & Lobster www.9healthfair.org. For more 9Health Fair information, networking party is an end-of-ski season event to celebrate see the website or call 1-800-332-3078. Thursday, April 11 the local business community. Join the VVP for a lobster Spring Back concert: O.A.R dinner, drinks, a DJ and the chance to win great basket Saturday, April 13 The mountain’s closing festival presents O.A.R. with prizes. Party is at the Beaver Creek Chophouse from 5:30 opener Patrick Dethlefs at Ford Park at 6:30 p.m. Short for Spring Back concert: Sublime with Rome p.m. to 9 p.m. Cost is $70 for members, $80 for nonmemOf a Revolution, O.A.R. is an alternative rock band wellThe mountain’s closing festival presents a free concert by bers, and a group discount of $300 for five tickets. See known for rocking the stage at their live performances and Sublime with Rome and opener Air Dubai Saturday begin- www.vailvalleypartnership.com for more info. extensive summer touring. ning at 6:30 p.m. Sublime with Rome brings a blend of reggae, ska, punk and surf-rock. The band is a collabora-

A longtime Vail favorite with a new look! 2 for 1 Entrees with the purchase of a bottle of wine

Make your own jewelry!

Men’s Haircuts

17

$

The Barber’s Den 970.476.5828

Dinner 5:30pm-close Reservations Accepted Next to Children’s Fountain, Vail Village

Edwards Edwards Plaza Plaza Bldg. Bldg. 970-926-8091 970-926-8091

Check out our e-edition weekly • Link directly to our • Read and share your advertisers website by favorite stories clicking on our e-edition

20

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

• Be up to date on everything going on in Vail with one click from anywhere.

 240 Chapel Place, Avon 970-949-1404


l 13 pri gA sin Clo

SSCV flying high Vail freeskiers take national podiums

American Steakhouse with a

Pacific Rim Flair Ski and Snowboard Club Vailâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s John Leonard flies to the podium at the USASA National freeski competitions in Copper. Michael Suleiman photo.

SneakPEAK staff report Vail hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always been known for its park skiers, but that perception is changing, thanks to a handful of freeski athletes, who took top honors at last weekendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s national competition at Copper Mountain. USASA Nationals is the premiere competition for up-and-coming park and pipe skiers and snowboarders. Snowboarders wrapped up their national event last week, and this week from April 7 to April 9, it was the skiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time to shine. More than 1,000 athletes of all ages came out for the event, including park and pipe skiers from Ski and Snowboard Club Vailâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freeski program, who grabbed their twin tips and headed to Copper to compete in halfpipe, slopestyle and skier cross. Aaron Milligan took third place on Sunday in the menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 13-to-15 age class slopestyle competition with a smooth run. Meanwhile, over on the skier cross course, young Izak Little won the boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10-to-12 age class group. Broby Leeds and John Leonard continued their success streaks for the season and both landed podium spots in the open menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s halfpipe competition. Leeds recently placed second in Junior Worlds in Italy, and Leonard has won numerous USASA events this season. After runs with technical 900s and huge amplitude, Leeds ended in third and Leonard ended in second. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All of these guys have been working super hard this season, be it hiking the halfpipe to get that trick dialed, hiking the airbag on Golden Peak, or just skiing from 9 to close. They have put in the work, and it has showed,â&#x20AC;&#x153; says SSCVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s freeski coach Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien. In Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s competition, Leeds once again placed third in slopestyle. Leonard was close behind in fourth.

Come in!

50 off all Entrees %

18% gratuity added prior to discount

For Steak & Seafood Lovers The Finest Handcarved Steaks, Seafood, Chicken & Prime Rib

/PEN .IGHTLY AT  s #ALL FOR 2ESERVATIONS   #ALL ABOUT OUR CLOSE IN PARKING s ,IONSHEAD 6ILLAGE

Raise Your Brush

this weeks painting

Or weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll both starve Open Daily. Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner

Cocktails and Canvas

Rooms available! Sleep Sweet in a Sleep Suite $29.95

    

210 Edwards Blvd. Edwards â&#x20AC;˘ 970-926-2732

Health, Life and Dental Insurance HSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, IRAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Rothâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Mutual Funds Long Term Care and Disability Insurance Medicare Plans

www.LFInsuranceGroup.com 970.390.3706

Lori Fennessey

23 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

$

Haircut

Book your appointment today

Great Local Pricing Chair Open for Stylist

www.alpineartscenter.org

Prom and Graduation are right around the corner

99

$

*Whitening ($350 value)

* with exam and cleaning

â&#x20AC;&#x153;28 Years of Serviceâ&#x20AC;? Todd H. Shainholtz, D.D.S.

Open Daily 7 am - 7 pm 970-300-1394 Top of Bridge St. Vail Village.

Synthetic Oil Change 99 $

49

Up to 5 qts. Most Vehicles. Not combined with other offers. See Store for details. Expires 4/30/13 Restrictions apply.

Must present coupon before service.

(970) 328 - 6347

970. 926.2633 Above & behind Fiestaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

www.DentalArtsofEagle.com

Edwards

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We care about people... not just teeth.â&#x20AC;?

(across from the Gashouse)

Best Gourmet Breakfast and Lunch Sandwiches in the Vail Valley

   

328-­9000

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

21


FLY FISHING –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– people who aren’t familiar with the area don’t know that,” says Matt Sprecher, co-owner of Minturn Anglers. “This year, the water is around record low – not a good thing – but when the water is cold, it stacks the fish up in smaller areas. When you find one, you find a lot.” Sprecher boasts 12 years of guiding experience in the county, and he calls the area near I-70 “the most exclusive stretch of the Eagle River.” Combine the limited access with natural springtime activity – ice melt, fish spawning and bug hatching – and his claim is hardly hyperbole. Add two or three guides with decades of combined experience, and the conditions are ideal for fish and fisherman alike. “These guides have many, many years of experience, and they’re trained to give that knowledge to new fishermen,” Sprecher says. “We’ve put a lot of work into finding ways to convey our techniques in a few hours, and the guests leave here like they’ve fished as long as we have.” For fly-fishing newbies, technique is often the biggest stumbling block. Casting looks like no more than a flick of the wrist, but it takes in-depth knowledge of local bugs and river habitats to reel in fish. “I had zero knowledge of fly fishing before we made it out here, and I thought casting would be impossible,” Mills says. “It’s not easy, but it’s a lot simpler than I would expect. These guys at Minturn have been great.” The unknowns of the sport daunted Mills at first, but in a few hours, guide Alex Rachowicz led Mills and the group through the basics. The guide even goes further into other intricacies, like water temperature: In just a few weeks from March to April, it jumps from 38 degrees Fahrenheit to 45 degrees. Soon after, bugs quadruple in size, and fish begin eating more than they have in months.

“The fish right now are feeding at near their heaviest levels of the entire year,” Rachowicz says. “It’s kind of like someone who has been eating rice cakes in Ethiopia for months, then suddenly they go the buffet at the Bellagio.” A river renaissance As the group continues to catch foot-long trout, Rachowicz explains how the Eagle River has recently become one of Colorado’s premier fly-fishing destinations, thanks in large part to the Gilman mine cleanup. Unfortunately, it’s happened at the same time other waters – from the Colorado River to the Blue River in Silverthorne, where he used to guide – are suffering. For Rachowicz, the reason is relatively simple: Upper stretches of the Eagle are heavy with wild fish, while other rivers rely on hatchery animals. A drought in the early 2000s was the turning point, when the Colorado Department of Wildlife was forced to control fish levels. “There aren’t many of these success stories in Colorado, and to see the Eagle River thrive even after one of the worst droughts we’ve had is incredible,” Rachowicz says. “Even these guys who have never fly-fished before can hook three at a time with the first cast.” With a few hours left in his trip, Mills had reaped the benefits of the Eagle River and was already planning for next April. “We’ve had a great time,” Mills says as he begins casting again. “This could be a new tradition.” SneakPEAK writer Phil Lindeman can be reached at philip@sneakpeakvail.com

JIMMY CLIFF –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– sciousness are still part of the music, and there’s room for everyone.” Cliff adds that while he appreciates music from past eras, he likes listening to what’s current in rap, rock, jazz, pop, and rhythm and blues. In an interview with NPR, he even told a reporter he’s a fan of both Katy Perry and Adele. One element that hasn’t changed in Cliff’s music is that sense of social consciousness he mentions. “Rebirth” features the song “World Upside Down,” a song written by late reggae artist Joe Higgs in the ‘70s, with updated lyrics by Cliff. “I made it for the world today,” Cliff says.

[From page 4]

The track “Children’s Bread” addresses the injustices Cliff sees in the modern world, inspired by his tour of African countries like Nigeria, Sierra Leone and Ghana. Of course, this is no surprise coming from a man who penned “Vietnam,” a song dubbed by Bob Dylan as “the greatest protest song ever written.” Cliff’s recording of “You Can Get It If You Really Want” has been used as a campaign anthem by Nicaragua’s Sandinista National Liberation Front in 1990 and adopted by the British Conservative Party at their annual conference in 1997. Probably neither cause was what Cliff had in mind when

[From page 3]

he penned the song, but he has no qualms with the political lives his anthemic songs take on. “I think of music as oxygen,” Cliff says. “Everyone breathes in oxygen, good people and bad people. Music is used in the same way, constructive or destructive. I think whoever wants to breathe it in breathes it in. I think of it as a positive, inspirational thing.”

SneakPEAK editor Melanie Wong can be reached at Melanie@sneakpeakvail.com

Save yourself the frustration of lugging your bikes through a busy airport! Ship to your door with The UPS Store.

Edwards

Consignment Furniture...  New Furniture Daily!

970-949-0989 222 Chapel Place Avon, CO 81620 www.nestvail.com

22

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

0056 Edwards Village Blvd. Edwards, Colorado 81632 970.926.5981

Avon

Vail

2121 N Frontage Rd W Vail, Colorado 81657 970.476.3292

150 E Beaver Creek Blvd. Avon, Colorado 81620 970.949.0615

Dillon

265 Dillon Ridge Rd. Dillon, Colorado 80435 970.468.2800

While vacationing in the beautiful Rocky Mountains, The UPS Store is your office away from home! Computer Rental ∙ Internet ∙ Faxing ∙ Scanning ∙ Copying ∙ Printing & Finishing


Agave | 1060 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.8666 Avon Bakery & Deli | 25 Hurd Lane | 970.949.3354 Cima | 126 Riverfront Lane | 970.790.5500 Blue Plate | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.2252 Bob’s Place | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.845.8566 Carniceria Tepic | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.6033 Castle Peak Grill | 101 Fawcett Road | 970.748.4848 China Garden | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.4986 Columbine Bakery | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.1400 Domino’s Pizza | 51 Beaver Creek Place | 970.949.3230 Fiesta Jalisco | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.8088 Geno’s Sandwiches | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.0529 Gondola Pizza | 240 Chapel Place | 970.845.6000 Loaded Joe’s | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.1480 Montanas Cantina and Grill | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.7019 Northside Coffee and Kitchen | 20 Notingham Rd. | 970.949.1423 Nozawa Sushi | 240 Chapel Place | 970.949.0330 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 82 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.9900 Subway Avon | 47 E. Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.949.1312 Red Mountain Grill | 240 Chapel Pl. | (970) 748-1010 Swiss Hot Dog Company | 101 Fawcett Rd. | 970.467.2013 Taqueria No Se Hagan Bolas | 91 Beaver Creek Place | 970.845.7959 Ticino | 100 West Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748-6792 Vin 48 | 48 East Beaver Creek Blvd. | 970.748.9463

LD

Organic Deli

BLD

Contemporary Latin

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Toscanini | 60 Avondale Ln. | 970.754.5590

970.446.7912 info@sneakpeakvail.com Publisher...Erinn Hoban Editor...Melanie Wong Ad Director...Kim Hulick The Glue...Shana Larsen Reporter...Phil Lindeman Ad Sales...Brand Bonsall ©2011 sneakPeak. All rights reserved.

$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Chinese Cuisine

LD

$

European Cafe & Bakery

BLD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

Italian Sandwiches

LD

$

Pizza

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Southwest Grill

LD

$

Coffee House

BL

$

Sushi & Asian, Thai

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Contemporary American Taphouse

BLD

$

Hot Dogs & Soup

L

$

Mexican

LD

$

Italian Food & Pizza

LD

$

Rustic American

D

$$

Organic/Local American Cuisine

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

D

$$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

American Comfort

LD

$$

Pizza & Sandwiches

LD

$

Tex-Mex

BLD

$

Steakhouse & Saloon

LD

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$$$

BEAVER CREEK

8100 Mountainside Bar & Grill | Park Hyatt Beaver Creek | 970.949.1234 Beano’s Cabin | 210 Plaza Way | 970.754.3463 Beaver Creek Chophouse | Beaver Creek Lodge | 970.845.0555 Black Diamond Bistro | 120 Offerson Road | 970.949.1251 Blue Moose Pizza | 76 Avondale Ln. | 970.845.8666 Coyote Cafe | 210 The Plaza | 970.845.9030 Dusty Boot Saloon | 210 Offerson Rd. | 970.748.1146 Golden Eagle Inn | 118 Beaver Creek Plaza | 970.949.1940 Grouse Mountain Grill | 141 Scott Hill Rd. | 970.949.0600 Hooked | 122 Beaver Creek Plaza | 970.949.4321 The Metropolitan | 210 Offerson Road | 970.748.3123 Mirabelle Restaurant | 55 Village Rd. | 970.949.7728 Osprey Lounge | 10 Elk Track Ln. | 970.754.7400 Rimini Cafe | 45 W. Thomas Place | 970.949.6157 Rocks Modern Grill | 27 Avondale Le. | 970.845.9800 Saddleridge | 44 Meadow Ln. | 970.754.5450 Spago | The Ritz Carlton, Bachelor Gulch | 970.343.1555 Splendido at the Chateau | 17 Chateau Ln. | 970.845.8808

$

Seasonaly Focused Fine Dining

D

$$$

Seafood and Sushi

LD

$$

Coffee/Breakfast/Wine/Tapas

BLD

$$

French Cuisine

D

$$$

Tapas Bar and Lounge

D

Gelato, Chocolate & Wine

LD

$$ $

Classic American Grill

BD

$$$

Contemporary Colorado Cuisine

D

$$

Seasonal American

D

$$$

Rustic American & Seafood

D

$$$

Italian Pasta Grill

LD

$$$

LIVE MUSIC

Every Tuesday: Sean Healey 10 p.m.

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Mexican & Tex/Mex

Pricing

AVON

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The team at Oakson Dentistry is here for you!

Fri. 4/12 @ 10 p.m.

Skin the Rabbit Happy Hour Mon-Fri 4-6 pm

97 Main St., W101 Riverwalk in Edwards 926-2729

Steve Oakson, DDS General Dentistry

Located in Gypsum since 2001 Gypsum Plaza Suite, 620 D Red Table Drive

524-1105

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

23


4 Eagle Ranch | 4091 Highway #131, Wolcott | 970.926.3372 Adam’s Mountain Country Club | 1094 Frost Creek Drive, Eagle | 970.328.2326 Baboune’s | 0131 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2425 Bonfire Brewing | 0127 W. 2nd St., Eagle | 970.422.6258 The Bowlmor Café | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.BOWL Brush Creek Saloon | 241 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5279 Creekside | 530 Cotton Ranch Dr. Gypsum| 970.524.5160 Dusty Boot | 1099 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.7002 Eagle Diner | 112 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.1919 Ekahi Grill and Catering | 500 Red Table Dr. Unit 1E, Gypsum | 970.524.4745 El Pariente Mexican Restaurant | 0050 Chambers Ave. #E, Eagle | 720.289.8782 Fiesta Jalisco | 0701 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9300 Gourmet China | 0212 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.0866 Grand Avenue Grill | 678 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.328.4043 H.P.’s Provisions | 1160 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5280 Heidis Brooklyn Deli | 150 Cooley Mesa Rd., Gypsum | 970.777.3663 Luigi’s Pasta House | 1143 Capitol St., Eagle | 970.328.5400 Manto’s Pizza | 106 Oak Ridge Ct., Gypsum | 970.524.6266 Moe’s Original BBQ | 630 Grand Ave., Eagle | 970.337.2277 Old Kentucky Tavern | 225 Broadway, Eagle | 970.328.5259 Paradigms | Corner of 4th and Capital St., Eagle | 970.328.7990 Pastatively Roberto’s Italian Cuisine | 94 Market St., Eagle | 970.328.7324 Pazzo’s Pizzeria | 50 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.337.9900 Red Canyon Cafe | 128 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.2232 Strecker’s Market and Cafe | 925 Greenway Unit 103, Gypsum | 970.524.2728 Yeti’s Grind | 330 Broadway Ave., Eagle | 970.328.9384 Yummy Cafe | 313 Chambers Ave., Eagle | 970.328.6060

L

$

Eclectic American & Sunday Brunch

LD

$$

Omelets, burritos and more

BL

$ $

Rustic Home Brew Pub / Music / Patio

EAGLE-VAIL

Ristorante Ti Amo | 40982 US Highway #6 | 970.845.8153 Route 6 Cafe | 41290 US Highway #6 | 970.949.6393

$$

American Cuisine/ Bowling

LD

TexMex

BL

$

American Fare

BLD

$

Steakhouse/American Cuisine

LD

$$

Traditional American Diner

BLD

$

Hawaiian Style Food

LD

$

Authentic Mexican

LD

$

Mexican

LD

$

Chinese

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

BLD

$

Soups & Sandwiches

BLD

$

Pasta & Pizza

LD

$$

Pizza

LD

$

Barbecue

BLD

$

Southern Eclectic

BLD

$

Creative American

LD

$$

Classic Italian

LD

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

LD

$

Breakfast & Lunch Sandwiches

BLD

$

German and European market cafe

LD

$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

American Cuisine

BLD

$

Italian, Pasta

LD

$$

Eclectic American

BL

$

EDWARDS Balata | 1265 Berry Creek Rd | 970.477.5353 Bonjour Bakery | 97 Main St. | 970.926.5539 Bookworm | 295 Main St. | 970.926.7323 Belmont Deli | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1796 Cafe 163 | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1163 Cafe Milano | 429 Edwards Access Rd. #A208 | 970.926.4455 Dish | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.3433 E town | 295 Main St. | 970.926.4080 Eat! Drink! | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.1393 Fiesta’s Cantina | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.2121

Where are you going for lunch today?

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Homemade Bakery & Soup

BL

$

Coffee & Crepes

BL LD

$

Sandwiches American

B LD

$

Contemporary Italian

BLD

$$

Globally influenced casual dining

D

$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Tasting/Wine Bar, Paninis

LD

$

Mexican

BLD

$

six for 60 $

match any 6 bottles for $60 over 25 tempting wines to choose from every week

MOnday - Friday: $9 lunch sandwich and Soft Drink Monday: 50% off Bottles of wine Tuesday: Kids eat FREE with purchase of Adult Entrees WEdnesday: $10 Fish tacos Traer Creek Plaza • Avon 970-748-4848 Exit 168 24

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

Free 6 wine tote bag for first time wine buyers!

$

Kid’s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

Ranch Western Atmosphere

Pricing

EAGLE/GYPSUM

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

• •

• • • • • • • •

• • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

970-926-1393 | corner at edwards | eatdrinkinc.com

• • • •

dish happiest hour This week’s happiest cocktail:

5

$

PA’s Punch!

A deliciously refreshing fruit, ginger, vodka beverage Only $5 if you ask for it by name!

Open Mon-Sat 12 - 7 p.m.

Bites & Bevy specials 5-6:30 p.m. Dinner 5-9 p.m. Tues-Sat 926-3433 | corner at edwards | eatdrinkdish.com


Gashouse | 34185 US Highway #6 | 970.926.2896 Gobi Mongolian BBQ | 69 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.6628 Gore Range Brewery | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2739 Grouse on the Green | 100 Kensington Dr., Cordillera Divide | 970.926.5788 Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Chinese Cafe | 175 Main St. | 970.926.3050 Juniper Restaurant | 97 Main St. | 970.926.7001 Larkburger | 105 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.9336 Last Course Dessert Bar & Pastries | 275 Main Street C-106 | 970.926-1979 Local Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizza | 280 Main St. | 970.926.4444 Log Cabin Sports Bar and Grill | 34500 Highway 6, #B1 | 970.926.9726 Main St. Grill | 97 Main St. | 970.926.2729 Markoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 57 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7003 Mirador | 2205 Cordillera Way, Cordillera Lodge & Spa | 970.926.2200 Old Forge Co. | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2220 Sato | 56 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.7684 Smiling Moose Deli | 1170 Edwards Village Blvd. | 970.926.2400 Subway Edwards | 439 Edwards Access Rd. | 970.926.7010 Vista At Arrowhead | 676 Sawatch Dr. | 970.926.2111 Woodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar & Grill | 27 Main St. | 970.926.2756 Zino Ristorante | 27 Main St. | 970.926.0777

Colorado Wild Game Grill

LD

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

$

Rustic Pub

LD

$$

Pub/American

D

$$

Chinese, Asian

LD

Contemporary American

D

Organic Gourmet Fast Food/Burgers

LD

Tapas/Wine Bar/Desserts

BLD

$

Pizza

D

$

American/Mexican

BLD

$

American Grill

LD

$$

Pizza & Pasta

LD

$

Regional/Seasonal Fare

BLD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

$

Sushi & Japanese Cuisine

LD

$$

Deli

BLD

$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Tuscan Grill

D

$$

Bar & Grill

LD

$

Contemporary Italian

D

$$

Southern BBQ

LD

$

Traditional American

LD

$

Steakhouse

D

$$

Meditrainian/Greek Cuisine

BLD

$

Coffee and Sandwiches

BL

$

Mexican/American/Western

D

$$

American and Mexican Cuisine

BLD

$

Continental

LD

$$

American Brewery

LD

$$

Regional American

BLD

$$

Casual American

LD

$

American

LD

$

American

BLD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

American

BLD

$

New American

D

$$$

Pizza

LD

$$

Casual American

LD

$$

American/Western

LD

$$

Authentic Italian

D

$$

Pizza and Italian

LD

$

American Bistro

LD

$$

Steakhouse, AprĂŠs and Dinner

D

$$$

Mountain Fare/Steakhouse, AprĂŠs,

BLD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

New American

D

American Pub

LD

$ $$$ $

$$

MINTURN Kirby Cosmos | 474 Main St. | 970.827.9027 Magustoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 101 Main St. | 970.827.5450 Minturn Country Club | 131 Main St. | 970.827.4114 Nickyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Quickie | 151 Main St | 970-827-5616 Sticky Fingers | 132 Main St. | 970.827.5353 Minturn Saloon | 146 N. Main St. | 970.827.5954 Turntable | 160 Railroad Ave. | 970.827.4164

VAIL Alpenrose | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8899 Ale House | 2161 N. Frontage Road | 970.476.4314 Atwater on Gore Creek | Vail Cascade Resort | 970.476.7014 Bart & Yetiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | Lionshead, North of Arrabelle | 970.476.2754 Bearfish | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7596 Big Bear Bistro | 297 Hanson Ranch Road | 970.300.1394 Billyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Island Grill | Lionshead | 970.476.8811 Bistro 14 | Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nest, Top of Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.445.4530 Block 16 | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 Blue Moose Pizza | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.476.8666 bol | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.5300 Bully Ranch | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5460 Campo de Fiori | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.8994 Chicago Pizza | 1031 S. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7000 CinĂŠBistro | Solaris, 141 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.3344 Elwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Steakhouse | 174 East Gore Creek Dr. | 970.754.7818 Flame | Four Seasons, Vail | 970.477.8600 Frost | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8050 Game Creek Restaurant | Vail Mountain | 970.754.4275 Garfinkelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | Next to Lionshead Gondola | 970.476.3789

Maintenance Agreement !  !   !   ! !  

$

149

95

Two Visits

$

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

 %*"# $.)*"#*&,&%

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY SAVINGS



$ $$$

Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

EDWARDS

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

 -$ %+&%#"% &(&-%#&&+(% -''&&!# ''# 

2  High  Life

$

Includes a FREE plumbing check of your home! 2 year parts and labor warranty REAL 24 HOUR SERVICE

479-2981

www.mmphservice.com See Our Ad In

"%!&%!&&)##&&# $"%*+(%.$!+)*&)&$.    Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

25


Gohan Ya | West Vail Mall | 970.476.7570 Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Famous Deli | 288 Bridge St. | 970.479.7580 Kelly Liken | Gateway Building, 12 Vail Rd. | 970.479.0175 La Bottega | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0280 Lancelot | Next to Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fountain | 970.476.5828 Larkspur Restaurant | Golden Peak | 970.754.8050 La Tour | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.4403 Left Bank | Sitzmark Lodge in Vail Village | 970.476.3696 The Little Diner | West Lionshead Plaza | 970.476.4279 Lord Gore & the Fitz Lounge | Manor Vail at the base of Golden Peak | 970.476.4959 Los Amigos | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.5847 Ludwigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | Sonnenalp Resort | 970.479.5429 The Marketplace | One Willow Bridge Rd. | 970.477.4370 Market CafĂŠ | The Sebastian Vail, 16 Vail Rd. | 970.477.8000 May Palace | Next to City Market, West Vail | 970.476.1657 Matsuhisa | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.6682 Mezzaluna | Lion Square Lodge, next to Eagle Bahn Gondola | 970.477.4410 Moeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Original BBQ | Upstairs from the General Store, Lionshead | 970.479.7888 Montauk Seafood Grill | Lionshead Village | 970.476.3601 Nozawa | Holiday Inn, West Vail | 970.476.9355 Ocotillo | Vail Mountain Marriott Resort & Spa, Lionshead | 970.477.5675 Old Forge Co. | 2161 N Frontage Rd | 970.476.5555 Old Forge Co. | 521 East Lionshead Cir. | 970.476.5232 Ore House | 232 Bridge St. | 970.476.5100 Osakiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 100 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.0977 Pazzoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pizzeria | 122 E. Meadow Dr. | 970.476.9026 Pepiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.4671 Qdoba | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7539 Red Lion | Top of Bridge St. | 970.476.7676 Russellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | By the Covered Bridge | 970.476.6700 Subway West Vail | 2161 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.3827 Sushi Oka Hibachi | 100 East Meadow Drive. Suite #4 | 970.476.1588 Sweet Basil | 193 E. Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.0125 Tap Room | Top of Bridge St. | 970.479.0500 The Tavern On The Square| 675 Lionshead Place | 970.754.7400 Terra Bistro| 352 Meadow Dr., Vail Mountain Lodge& Spa | 970.476.6836 The George | 292 Meadow Dr. | 970.476.2656 Up The Creek Bar & Grill | 223 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.8141 Vendettaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s | 291 Bridge St. | 970.476.5070 Vail Chophouse | 675 West Lionshead Place | 970.477.0555 Westside Cafe & Market | 2211 N. Frontage Rd. | 970.476.7890 Yama Sushi | 168 Gore Creek Dr. | 970.476.7332 Yetiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grind | Located in the Solaris | 970.476.1515

Summer Classes Begin Soon Look for your class schedule in your PO Box after April 18! Call Now to Register 970-569-2900 Mountain Living, Mountain Learning... in the heart of the Vail Valley

www.coloradomtn.edu/edwards

26

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

Asian Cuisine

LD

Sandwiches

BLD

Seasonal American

D

Northern Italian

LD

Prime Rib/Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Creative American

D

$$$

French and American

D

$$

French

D

$$$

$ $ $$$ $

Classic Diner, Traditional Favorites

BL

Contemporary American

D

Mexican

LD

$

Contemporary American

BD

$

Family/American/European

BLD

$

International CafĂŠ

BLD

$

Chinese

LD

$

Japanese/Peruvian

D

$$

$ $$

Modern Italian

LD

$$

Barbecue

LD

$

Creative Seafood/Meat

LD

$$

Sushi/Asian

LD

$$

Southwestern Steak House

BLD

$$

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Pizza, Paninis & Salads

LD

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

$ $

Sushi/Japanese

D

$$

Italian/Pizza/Grinders

BLD

$

Continental/Wild Game

LD

$$

Mexican

LD

$

American

LD

$

Steaks/Seafood

D

$$

Sandwiches

BLD

$

Sushi, Asian

LD

$

Creative American

LD

$$$

Contemporary American

LD

$

Mountian American Grill

BLD

$$

Contemporary American

BLD

$$

Eclectic Pub

D

$

American Cuisine

LD

$$

Italian & Pizza

LD

$$

Steakhouse

LD

$$$

Casual American

BLD

$

Sushi and Pacific Spices

D

$$

Coffee & Sandwiches

BL

$

Kidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s menu Reservations Outdoor seating Catering Take-out Live music/Ent.

VAIL

Pricing

Denotes sneakPeak Advertisers $ = $10-$20, $$ = $20-$40, $$$ = $40+ B = Breakfast, L = Lunch, D = Dinner

Meals served

A Quick Peak at Where to Eat.

Type of food

Dining Guide

â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner.

Happy Hour 3-6 pm Nightly Serving Breakfast all day Sundays!      

Next to the Bookworm


Da

il

y

Lu

nc

h

Sp

ec

ia

ls

un

de

r

$1

0

Devoted To The Craft Friday: Dulce Vida Tequila barrel tapping party at 4 p.m. Samples & Giveaways Friday: Live Music with the Drunkken Hearts & The Olora Brothers Saturday & Sunday: Brunch 10 a.m.-‐2 p.m. Monday: Burger and Craft Beer $10 5 p.m.-‐ 10 p.m. -‐ Open Mic Night 9 p.m. Tuesday: Social Hour till 10 p.m. 1/2 off bottles of wine Book your end of season party here: Call 476-‐4314 for details

Check out

www.vailalehouse.com for upcoming events 2161 N. Frontage Rd. West Vail 970-‐476-‐4314

Artful Sol

Says thank you Vail for a great season!!!

Artful Sol is open year round! Located Slopeside to the International Bridge in the heart of Vail Village 970.476.1339 Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013

|

sneakpeak

27


28

sneakpeak

|

Thursday, Apr. 11, 2013 -Wed., Apr. 17, 2013


SneakPEAK April 11, 2013