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snapixel magazine

Special Edition

Worldwide Moment 2010


WWM 10.10.2010 10:10 GMT 02

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africa 08 asia 12

australia 22 europe 26 north america 36 south america 46

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napixel’s decision to partner with Worldwide Moment was an easy one. When we heard the idea that photographers all over the world would be shooting at the exact same moment in time, our imaginations went wild with the possibilities of the event. We’re happy to present to you what did happen on that day, October 10, 2010 at 10:10 AM GMT (for us locally, 3:10 in the morning!) The issue is arranged geographically. From each continent, there are participants from multiple countries. In addition, we have interviews from participants all over the world—letting us know a little bit about themselves and why they chose to participate in the event. All in all, there’s a nicely pieced portrait of the globe! Cheers, The Snapixel Team

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Andy Mellon Brett Brownell overlooking Ground Zero at the World Trade Center in New York City

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eorge Clooney plays frequent-flyer Ryan Bingham in the movie Up In The Air. Ryan is forced by his land-locked sister Julie to travel with a cumbersome cardboard-cut-out engagement photo of her and fiancé Jim, with the mission to take pictures of the cut-out in front of various places around the United States. It’s a ridiculous burden for him, but he does it. In the end, the little photo project reveals itself to be so charming, necessary, and reasonable to Ryan, that it drives him from selfishness to generosity. After organizing the Worldwide Moment event annually for four years with limited to no budget, I’m beginning to feel like Julie and Jim—a humble, frugal entity with good intentions and nothing but faith in a concept and a community. I’m asking people to wake up at 3:10, 4:10, 5:10, 6:10 AM on a weekend just to take a photo? What? Why? I think this special issue of Snapixel magazine will finally help answer those questions. Worldwide Moment is a very simple concept: everyone around the world takes a photo at the same instant. It’s a brief reminder and perspective experiment to help us grow and continue learning about our shared home in a peaceful manner. In this issue you’ll find more than just photos and captions from one moment in time. We’ve interviewed some of our photographers to learn about their stories and their world. Though it’s a world you and I may never be able to physically visit, we’re always connected to it. Unfortunately, we could only choose a select number of photos from our 10.10.10 event for this issue, so I apologize if your photo was not selected. But I encourage you to visit or re-visit our web gallery at worldwidemoment.org. There you’ll find all the photos and stories from a single moment in time. Each year I wonder if I’ll have the tenacity and energy to host this event again. But it’s because of supporters like Lizabeth, you, and the Snapixel team that I find the drive. I encourage your suggestions and ideas for the future. Please feel free to email me at worldwidemoment@gmail.com. Cheers, Brett Brownell Founder of Worldwide Moment

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Identity Through

a Worldwide Moment

by Lizabeth Meuse

Lizabeth Meuse, Executive Producer of Worldwide Moment, Shares her thoughts on Worldwide Moment 2010

A couple of months ago, a friend told me that I reminded him of a Russian Doll. As I daydreamed about myself on the set of fashion photographer Mario Testino’s shoot, I soon realized that my friend meant ‘Russian Nesting Doll,’ an object with many layers that’s a little bit different every time. A Russian nesting doll is reliable in nature. You always know what you’re going to get. And yet, for some reason, we always feel the need to get to the bottom and find the very last layer inside. We think, how small will the last layer be? Like a nesting doll, each of us is a multi-layered vessel. It would be foolish and irresponsible to define ourselves without the much needed perspective in relation to one another. Identifying with another begs self-scrutiny, a difficult task that most of us struggle with daily. Thus, Worldwide Moment asks the question, “Where do we intersect? How does photography as a community-driven art project represent lives around the world with one collective click? How do we see ourselves when we take that one shot, and what story does it relate within the cultural context? At its worst, a nesting doll is unmatched, scattered, fractured, and incapable of fitting together. At its best, it is lined up, orderly, one inside the other. As we try to fit our parts together we realize that some will never fit because they have become warped, broken, and untethered. Sometimes in the attempt to fix something, we have to break it down and start anew, building from a clean slate. Worldwide Moment is a lesson for some to see how hard it is for many of us to update our real lives with true human intersection. Our culture has drifted so far from the reality of ourselves that we fail to even know who we are, and who we want to be. If we aren’t actively paying attention, we have to wonder who we become and how others see us. 06

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I have a confession to make. Last year, I found out about Worldwide Moment right before the event. At the last minute, I decided halfheartedly to take a photo at the assigned time. It was a defining moment for me. As an illustration of my own life and of myself, I didn’t identify with it one bit. I thought, “This isn’t a moment from my life; this moment belongs to someone else. How is this me?” I failed to actually load my photo online last year because I felt misrepresented. Or so I thought. But as I looked through the gallery I realized that a woman in Australia took a photo that represented ‘me,’ and a guy in Japan took a photo that represented ‘me.’ In every culture, I found a shot that was a layer of ‘me.’ I also failed to realize that my shot represented someone else. Worldwide Moment is the conduit for us to look to one another and identify with the many layers of our own Nesting Dolls. Photography illustrates our love, technique, self-worth, hatred, narcissism, and beauty. We identify with certain themes that represent a glimpse of our culture and ourselves whether it is the ocean, the concrete jungle, the sublime, and the surreal. Looking in the mirror we have a singular perspective. Looking at ourselves through another lens is empowering and through this exercise we realize we are not alone. I distinctly remember seeing a photo recently in a magazine of a person lying in bed, an image depicting exhaustion. Were they sick, tired, bored? We have all been that person, if only for one moment. This is the essence and core of Worldwide Moment, a moment in ourselves that we acknowledge through someone half way around the world. Or right next door. This realization can come through an image of someone’s mother, a gun-toting soldier in Afghanistan, a child’s hand, the sweet kiss of a lover, a dog in the kitchen, the light through a bedroom window, or a mud hut in Africa. Worldwide Moment is an illustration of humanity. One layer at a time. When we die, we all become one. Or at least I’d like to think. If your perspective differs, I wish you the best of luck controlling your final destination. What we do know is that we are made from the same blood, cells, organs, and reptilian brains. We all laugh, cry, fear. Soon, we are all ashes to ashes and dust to dust. It doesn’t matter how much money we have, what shoes we wear, who we become, who we impress, or what God we worship.

I” realized that a woman in Australia took a photo that represented ‘me,’ and a guy in Japan took a photo that represented ‘me.’ In every culture, I found a shot that was a layer of ‘me.’ “

In my own effort to face my own reality, I moved forward with a new social experiment: going without makeup for sixty days. Thirty days in, people started to notice. They cocked their heads and said, “Something is different about you. Did you cut your hair? You look younger, you look older, you look tired, you look tan.” And yet, this is just what I look like. Like my driver’s license me. Light brown hair, blue eyes, olive skin like my Italian grandfather. If we all set aside our Bibles, Qurans, hate, religions, fears and mascara for one moment, we would see that we are all just human. Raw, unfinished. Or to quote the poet Rumi, “We come spinning out of nothingness, scattering stars like dust.” At night, many of us discard our daily lives, enjoying the closest state to birth we will ever experience, makeup and clothing-free, eyes closed, breathing, dreaming. Waiting to come back into the world, new again. For me, Worldwide Moment is a chance to dream again. My moment at 3:10 am was spent following a wild buck down the street in San Francisco. In this fleeting moment marked by the clip-clop of hooves, it was chasing tasty rosebuds down one of the city’s majestic garden paths. It fled at the sound of my boots and left me standing directly beneath a white angel of stone. Although this angel will never sport a single wrinkle over time, I think it represents me perfectly. I identified with the strength, the survival through the storms, the raw, unfinished quality. She will stand forever. When I walk down Baker Street, I will see my Moment again and again, forever a layer of strength inside my Russian doll. I like to think that Worldwide Moment will eventually become the outside layer of a modern Russian doll that will delight each of us. Hopefully, like a child, each of us will be enticed to open it up to view every last intersection of our expanding, yet shrinking world. And hopefully, like our perspectives, as we break them down and take them apart, we will always know how to put them back together.

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Jarrod Mouton

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South Africa


caz

South Africa

Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. People call me Caz - I live in Cape town, South Africa, and love it! I am an ex-teacher, currently a stay at home Mom to two gorgeous boys, and I have started a small photography business. Share something about your country that others may not know. A special food, social custom, religious custom, or activity that is unique to where you live. National Braai day! 24th September. Braai is the South African word for barbecue. We use wood [not gas] or charcoal, and it is the most wonderful way to spend the day with friends or family. Our National Heritage day has become a “braai day” - as all cultures in South Africa enjoy a good braai. Each culture has their own variation, but mostly, it’s the same concept. People braai prawns, and whole lamb, and make maize meal [pap] and toasted sandwiches and braaied mushrooms and vegetables. It’s amazing. Diversity in similarity! What drew you to participate in Worldwide Moment and how would you describe the connection you feel towards other people participating? The whole essence of grabbing bits in time, around the world is too cool not to participate! It is why I take photographs, and to be part of so many people doing the same thing, at the same time – goose bump moment. :) If you could shoot a picture of anything in the world what would it be? I wish I had been able to attend the many World Cup Soccer events here – those photographs would have been amazing. I am still more inclined to not want to capture anything big and amazing, but rather small moments. Life goes by so quickly, that the little things are often glossed over and forgotten. A grandparent and grandchild moment, where their eyes sparkle, and they both just enjoy each other thoroughly – playing scrabble, walking, smelling flowers. That would be my ideal image. What prevents peace? Both personally and between nations? I think pride and an unwillingness to understand where each side is coming from prevents peace. Placing oneself in the other persons’ shoes for five minutes could change many things. Thank you for an amazing opportunity to chat about my country and my views!

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Left Page Chrisna Herbst Pretoria, South Africa “The lady in the photo is called Mavis, and she is holding my birthday present - which is a Pilchard’s clock. Pilchards are tinned Sardines in a tomato sauce. It’s an old time favourite in South Africa! Best eaten mashed up on toast.”

Right Page, Above Razafindralambo Hery Nirina Madagascar “This picture was taken near my home in Anosy Antananarivo, a poor market where people can buy used clothes and shoes, as life is very hard and very expensive in Madagascar (72% of the population live in poverty.) Most people can’t afford new things bought in shops.”

Right Page, Below Molly Hart Milroy Gulu, Uganda “I am here working with Invisible Children, an organization that improves the quality of life for war-affected children by providing access to quality education, enhanced learning environments, and innovative economic opportunities for the community.”

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Africa Asia australia Europe North America South America Tiziano Nienyu Hsieh Taicheng, Taiwan “2010/10/10. This day is Taiwan’s National Holiday. Taiwan is now 99 years old and the next year we will celebrate the 100th birthday. Me, I’m a 20-year-old girl who was born here, grew up here, and still lives here in Taiwan. I love this country. After twenty years with the Taiwanese, I am still impressed by the people who live here. This city, Taichung, is full of energy, hope, and joy.

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Yudit Ilany Jaffa, Israel

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Hamad AlSarraf Kuwait “There are moments in our lives, that echo through eternity, with a click from the camera. On October 10th, 2010 at 10:10 GMT along with photographers from all over the world, that moment was taken to echo the view of Kuwait City, taken from the Free Trade Zone.�

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Shokoofeh

iran

Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. My name is Shokoofeh. I am twenty five years old and last year I finished my BFA in Visual Communication at the University of Art in Tehran, Iran. Now I work as a freelance graphic designer, take photographs and write a blog. Tehran is my hometown. What drew you to participate in Worldwide Moment and how would you describe the connection you feel towards other people participating? I believe in Global Village. So saying yes to Worldwide Moment would be my first reaction. I think events like this force us to become more involved with one another and give us more knowledge about our global duties. How will did you decide what to shoot for the event? My subjects for photography always resemble the concept of simplicity in my life. That how little things can bring joy and happiness to our daily lives. That how something very small can express a priceless thought. A beautiful flower intends kindness, and kindness makes for peace. If you could switch places with someone and live in any country where would you live? Currently I dream of living in Iceland. And that is for now. If you ask me next week, my answer would be South Korea or maybe a little town in France. I am such a dreamer! If you could speak another language fluently what would it be? German, certainly.

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Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. I am Deepesh Kumar Singh, working in clinical research industry and I live in the garden city of India, Bangalore. What is your experience/inspiration with photography? When I was a kid I use to think how magazines or books got the lovely pictures of birds, places and people. And that’s how my inclination towards photography started. Till now I use point and shoot camera, even though I have done enough research about DSLR cameras (over internet), I think more exposure to the photographic techniques is required before I jump to any DSLR camera. I am still learning photography and there is a long way to go. If you could switch places with someone and live in any country where would you live? A country where I could move around without being worried and it has got lots and lots of green cover. I think locality and surroundings are just the added elements to your living, so any place would be the best place if you can live in peace and harmony with your friends and family. If you could speak another language fluently what would it be? I think communication can open all the closed doors and being able to communicate is a blessing hence we should use it in the most constructive way. I think the most spoken languages are Spanish, English and Hindi. Out of these three languages I have no clue about Spanish and I would love to learn it. What is your biggest fear about the world today?

India

The biggest fear about the world today is, exhausting all available natural resources and not doing enough to conserve what is still available. We are inventing ways to utilize natural resources or exploit nature but very few efforts in conserving what is left. We as human beings have over done everything around us. There are so many things to be worried about, take the example of Tigers, now if we don’t do anything seriously for their conservation soon we’ll have their pictures and videos only for the next generation. Then in the name of urbanization/development we are eating up the hills and mountains. We cannot just go on blaming government bodies for their ignorance about the nature/wildlife/cleanliness. How many of us can say proudly/confidently that at least I do practice clean and green policy? We have to take action at the individual level and then only these actions together will have a greater impact at a global level.

Deepsh

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Yaelle David Tel Aviv, Israel “My neighbor and I photographed each other through the window of my door, with a peace flower on our heads.”

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Toni Handoko Yogyakarta Indonesia “Tugu Yogyakarta is one of the historical monuments in Yogyakarta Indonesia, also known as ‘student city’. The monument is located in the middle of major crowded intersections. Even as night falls, the school and university students gather in the surrounding courtyard just to come together, joke, take pictures, or even touch the monument - because there is a myth that if a student touches the monument, he or she will be able to finish his or her studies.”

Gaurab Raj Pant

Nepal

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Twinkle Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. I am Twinkle De Los Reyes. I am a writer living in Manila, Philippines. I own a small, independent branding and design studio, and when I’m not working I spend my time writing, reading and taking photographs.  Share something about your country that others may not know. A special food, social custom, religious custom, or activity that is unique to where you live. We Filipinos have a way of greeting our elders as a sign of respect. It’s called “mano”, where we take the elder’s hand and place it on our forehead. We do this to our parents, grandparents, uncles and aunts, and other older relatives or elders, and especially when we arrive at and before we leave their house. How did you decide what to shoot for the event? I went into this project unplanned. I wanted to be completely spontaneous. Last year the Worldwide Moment came to me while I was making lists early in the morning, such a banal thing to do but actually brings a semblance of order in an otherwise chaotic life. This year, I was on my way home from a trip with two of my closest friends, and have probably spent the best weekend yet. My photo was nothing spectacular, but the significance of taking it was: because I was in the company of people I love and because I have never been happier than at that moment. If you could switch places with someone and live in any country where would you live? I would like to trade places with Frances Mayes in her past, even for just one day, so I can feel the warm Tuscan sun on my face and work on her Bramasole. What prevents peace? Both personally and between nations? The belief that power and money can solve our problems, can satisfy us, and can fulfill our needs. We have to dare to dream of a world where people come first before greed and politics. Here in my country we are trying to do that now, but the journey is long. I have big dreams and I know I can’t be deterred by people who say that times are hard for dreamers. After all, my philosophy has always been sung by John Lennon: “You may say that I’m a dreamer but I’m not the only one”

Phillipines


Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. I’m Solomon Freeman, aka Wise Freeman (Solomon stands for Wisdom, in other words Wise, hence the moniker “WiseFreeman“). I’m a lifetime entrepreneur and freelance professional documentary photographer, now living my lost youth after bankruptcy in 2007. For more details please kindly visit my official autobiography: http://I.Am.WiseFreeman.com Share something about your country that others may not know. A special food, social custom, religious custom, or activity that is unique to where you live. I’m currently living in Malaysia, a country that is divided into two distinct regions, Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia. It’s a beautiful country where it’s summer all year round which also is a multi-racial, multi-cultural and multi-religious country. Malaysia’s racial mixture gives rise to cuisine as diverse as it is delicious, it’s simply a culinary delight. What is your experience/inspiration with photography? When I was little, our family was poor and we didn’t have the luxury to own a proper camera. The world of photography totally strange to me. I didn’t had the opportunities to take any photos of what happened around me. Even though I owned a humble digital camera back in my high school days, I didn’t have the urge to press that shutter button that often. Much later I suffered lacunar amnesia, resulting from financial misfortune in my businesses. I realized how big of a memory puzzle I had lost and couldn’t recall what the happiest moment in my youth was, and that sparked my need for a proper digital camera in 2008. My first inspiration with photography was through the National Geographic magazines that I picked up from a second-hand bookstore. There were stunning photographs that could tell story even without any word, and that truly opened up my curiosity to the world. Now I’m very grateful for my new job as a documentary photographer, and that the “decisive moments” that I photograph have received so much praise from the public. What drew you to participate in Worldwide Moment and how would you describe the connection you feel towards other people participating? I first read about Worldwide Moment last year from my friend in Austria. After learning what it is all about, I just knew that I had to be part of this worldwide phenomenon for world peace. It’s really simple to participate, all you have to do is to take a photo of what you’re doing and where you are at exactly the specific time. The feeling of being able to be part of a worldwide event, creating positive awareness and contributing to world peace, it really pulled a lot of people from all walks of life around the globe to get involved in 1 same goal toward the greater good. It’s very exciting and I’m already looking forward to next year WWM 11.11.11 ;-)

Malaysia

If you could switch places with someone and live in any country where would you live? I will definitely go for Japan. Japan has been a dreamland for me ever since I was exposed to the country. I love their rich culture, social practices, and technologies.

Solomon


Africa Asia australia Europe North America South America

Danielle Kiernel

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Vlado Kekoc Melbourne, Australia “The Melbourne skyline at night is absolutely beautiful, and was an obvious choice for my worldwide moment.�

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Vicky Webb

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Australia

Swan Bay, Tasmania


Naomi Tasmania

Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. My name is Naomi Schindler. I am a photographer living in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia. I moved here around five years ago from Sydney, and adore it. It is small, but breathtakingly beautiful. As much as I miss my big-city home, I love living here. What is your experience/inspiration with photography? I fell in love with photography in high school, and went on to study Fine Arts at uni, where the vast majority of my work was photographic. I feel lucky to have studied in the time of film and the darkroom. There is nothing like time standing still as your work appears before your eyes under the red light, with the vinegary smell of the chemicals. Most of my work at uni dealt with light in some form or another, and looking upwards, looking downwards, looking inwards. The LAST thing I ever wanted to do was photograph people. When I left uni I started work for a photographic studio chain – which was both fabulous and terrible all at the same time. Whilst creativity was severely stumped, I learnt that shooting people was about the relationship between you and the subject – and that everyone deserves a fabulous photo of themselves. I opened my photography business four years ago, and we specialize in shooting people - weddings, families, boudoir, fashion. I have a lot of fun with my clients, getting them comfortable, and capturing their natural selves. How did you decide what to shoot for the event? I fretted over what to take.. I had many discussions about how I had a complete mental blank, a total brick wall between myself and the subject of my WWM. And then I realized that seriously – that wasn’t the point. So I relaxed, sat back, and stopped thinking about it. In the end I took a photograph of a car park. Whist organizing for WWM, Rowena and I spent a lot of time in this car park drinking frozen coke and brainstorming. It is where I park for work, and is a convenient place for a quick meeting between the billions of other things we each do. I would joke that this is where I should take my WWM pic - and the joke became an actuality. But really – it is such a peaceful place at night. So completely unprepared I grabbed the shot – using my car as a tripod, guessing composition, and praying focus hit somewhere near OK. If you could speak another language fluently what would it be? I would say Dutch, for family reasons. Mind you, those clever Dutch mostly speak English so fluently. I wish being bilingual was something that came easily to me, but I am SO bad at learning languages. Five years of German lessons and I am lucky to be able to count to 12! Four years of Japanese lessons and I remember even less. If you could shoot a picture of anything in the world what would it be? My whole family – in the one place, at the one time. Both extended sides. Sappy I know – but honestly how I feel.

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Rik Heijmen Amsterdam, Netherlands “Dries (7) and me (38) on our way to the beach on this beautiful Sunday. Stopped at the roadside at 12:10 local time in Bloemendaal aan Zee, on our way to visit friends. A perfect (worldwide) moment.�

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Africa Asia australia Europe North America South America

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Alex Kontis U.K. “Having only been at university for one week, I wasn’t sure where would be a good place to take a photo, so I walked around campus for about 10 minutes taking random lefts and rights and came across a play area, which is strange to see on a university campus since there are no children to be found anywhere. I took a seat for a couple of minutes until The Moment to think about how there would be people all over the world in the same position as me now, armed with a camera or phone about to take a photograph. Such a simple idea but a great one at that. I then fired up the Hipstamatic app in my iPhone, allowed the app to choose the lens, flash and film settings, and here’s what happened. I couldn’t be happier with the outcome. I hope everyone else that took part enjoyed their Moment. A huge thank you Brett for all his work, and here’s to next year!”

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CloĂŠ Thommelin

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Jorge Artajo Reykjavik, Iceland “This is a photo of the Hamborgara Búllan, one of the most famous and popular spots in Reyjkavik. I went to Reykjavik for the celebration of John Lennon’s 70th birthday, and I thought that it was the right place to take a photos for the morning after the lighting of the Image Peace Tower in Viðey Island. The clock at the top of the building stopped one day, years ago, at five past 4:00, but the photo was taken at 10:10 a.m. on a sunny, still, quiet morning. I stuck an “imagine peace” postcard to the poster to emphasize the idea of peace in the photograph.”

Kamilla and Herman The Netherlands “We are happy! We have nothing more to say about our picture.”

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Toni Alvarado Spain “I was biking with a friend, who waited at the top of a hill to take the picture of me just in time.�

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Edel Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. My name is Edel Gribbin, I am currently 22 and I live in the outskirts of a small town in the North of Ireland. It’s quite a small community, but a peaceful one which is quite a rare thing in this part of the country. I’m a full time student studying Photography with a wonderful bunch of friends. When I’m not working on my latest assignments I spend my time playing music. I’ve been playing music since I was very young and I have many strings to bow.

Northern Ireland

Share something about your country that others may not know. A special food, social custom, religious custom, or activity that is unique to where you live. My country has been very divided over the last 50 years or more. There has been a lot of fighting and bombing between different religious communities. Within the last 15 years we have had the chance to vote for peace which the majority of the country said yes to, but this hasn’t helped to stop the fighting. Lately it has mainly been dissidents bombing and threatening our country that has turned it into what it is today. All that aside, Northern Ireland is a fantastic place full of culture, creativity and “the craic”. It just takes a few rotten apples to spoil its taste. How did you decide what to shoot for the event? My shoot for the 2010 event will be inspired by my family, which is the foundation of my photography inspiration. I’m still having a think about how I will promote peace in my photographs. If you could shoot a picture of anything in the world what would it be? I’d like to photograph the places Ansel Adams shot between the 1930’s and 1950’s. He captured a peaceful serenity between a energetic gloomy skyline. It’s these two contrasts are make his images burst with wonder and intrigue. What prevents peace? Both personally and between nations? When two sides of an argument don’t understand why they are arguing there will be no room for peace in this world. 32

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Robin Oudheusden Amsterdam, Netherlands “Celebrating love, respect, and understanding on Worldwide Moment.”

Ira Vollenberg Düsseldorf, Germany “I am a big fan or creative analog photography, especially Lomography and Polaroid pictures. When I read about the Worldwide Moment, I absolutely wanted to participate. It’s a great idea to see what people all over the world do at the same moment! Because I wanted to see if my picture turned out, and not to wait for the laboratory to develop the film, I decided to take a Polaroid shot with the new color film of the impossible project. Our local time was 12:10. I would have like to have done something more special, but when it came to the moment, we just finished breakfast, and my girlfriend was still sitting in front of the computer, as we had a very lazy Sunday. I handed her the sign, and took a Polaroid of her. Later that day, we went for a walk to the park and took pictures of the colorful autumn leaves - it was a sunny day.”


Bára Ólafsdóttir

Lake Thingvellir, Iceland

“This view is to the south and toward the geothermal plant in Nesjavellir, which generates electricity and hot water by utilizing geothermal water and steam.”

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Vincent Baif

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Tammi Cornett United States “Rolling out of bed at 5 am not sure what to take a picture of, I decided to take a picture of the bed. The bed that is now just for me. My husband is a soldier and the Army gave him a job to do in Iraq. Our bed is my peace, the place to rest my head after another long day without my husband. But I know that each day we are apart, we are one more day closer to being together. Peace to the world.�

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Enrique Cintron Puerto Rico “This is the first fortified structure on the island of Puerto Rico, and was a key part in defending the island for the Spanish. It is now a World Heritage Site declared by the United Nations. “

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Meghann Prouse United States “Love like you mean it.�

Aziz Maazouz

Orlando, Florida


Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. Rod Blackhurst. Motion picture director. Photographer. Currently living in Los Angeles by way of Denver, Colorado. I like small towns, diners (favorite: Miss Albany Diner, Albany, NY), autumn, the saw as an instrument, blue cheese, club soda, crowd participation, disappearing acts, and getting eight hours of sleep. What drew you to participate in Worldwide Moment and how would you describe the connection you feel towards other people participating? Through our common past in rock and roll, I was introduced via a mutual friend to WWM founder Brett Brownell in 2006. Since then we’ve had the opportunity to work on several projects together and I’m looking forward to collaborating with him again in the future. I felt the strongest connection this year to my fiancée who was a time zone away waking in the middle of the night as well to take her WWM photograph. If you could shoot a picture of anything in the world what would it be? Having grown up in a rural community with a population of sixteen hundred, I’d like to shoot a series of Irving Penn inspired portraits of every person in town. And I’d like to be able to shoot uncensored in the North Korean capital of Pyongyang. PS – Dear Pete Souza, if you ever plan on leaving your position as official White House photographer, let me know. What is your biggest fear about the world today? Every day I grow more and more concerned with the radical religious right wing movement in the United States. Freedom of religion includes the right to practice no religion at all and yet there are radical religious activists who want their set of beliefs imposed on the nation as a whole unequivocally. What prevents peace? Both personally and between nations?

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Lack of education. Much of the social unrest within the United States today comes from a lack of knowledge and a misrepresentation of the facts by the media, which then sways the opinions of those who are under educated. The same is true of global issues. The majority of Americans still believe that Saddam Hussein was in possession of weapons of mass destruction and that Al Quaeda was operating in Iraq prior to the invasion in 2003. And the vast majority of Americans believed then President George Bush. Think how different the global landscape would be right now if Americans from the President down to the common man had made educated and intelligent decisions on the issues.


Allen Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. I own K2 Photo Studio in Denver, CO with my wife. We shoot all types of subject matter, and our studio has catered to private and commercial clients nationwide. I’m a music lover, an avid guitar player, and full time gadget enthusiast. I grew up sailing in South Florida, but was blown by the winds of Hurricane Andrew to Austin, Texas. There I met my wife and high school sweetheart. I got and beat cancer when I was 25 and decided to do things differently from then on. My wife and I bought a 1955 Chevy, packed our bags and moved to Denver to explore. We now hike and ski regularly, and spends my summers camped out at Red Rocks watching live music.

USA/denver

What is your experience/inspiration with photography? I've been interested in photography since I was a young boy. My parents used to take the camera away from me because I would go through rolls of film on any camera they loaded. I tried to take a photography class when I was in high school, but I could never get anything in focus. I finally figured out that I had needed glasses six years later. Once I fixed that minor obstacle, I bought a first generation DSLR, shot as many pictures as I could, and never worried about film again. Now I have a strong desire to go back and shoot large format on film. Or use pinhole cameras, or Holgas, and my dream camera is a Leica M6. What drew you to participate in Worldwide Moment and how would you describe the connection you feel towards other people participating? I think it is an amazing concept. To be able to see into the lives of thousands of people all at the same moment is just such a unique idea. I'm really torn as to whether I like the carefully crafted shots of the pro photographers or the real and candid camera phone pics more. It's just such an engaging experience to go through the gallery and see what all these people feel they have to communicate with their one shot until next year. It's like people I guess, some are happy or sad, some are formal, some are just amazingly candid and in the moment. If you could shoot a picture of anything in the world what would it be? My unborn child. He/She is due in March of 2011, and I'd really love to get a sneak peek. Next year I might say the dining room of the shipwrecked Andrea Doria, or a million other things, but this year that's what's on my mind. What is your biggest fear about the world today? I feel political discourse has grown so aggressive from all sides. There are a million media outlets that serve as echo chambers that only reinforce a one-sided view of the world. There is no grey area left any more where compromise and reason can be explored. Political decisions are made based on carefully crafted wedge issues and not necessarily the betterment of our society as a whole. People don’t challenge their own assumptions, or dig beneath the surface of their beliefs to understand why they believe what they do and whether that idea is really worth fighting for.

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Fabián Garcilita R.V. Mexico City, Mexico “A view of Mexico City at night, into the desert city that is full of cars and people during the day.”

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Roland Staib United States “On an early flight out of Norfolk, Virginia. Sunrise somewhere over the Eastern Shore.”

Mike Schweizer San Francisco, United States “A shot of the eastern portion of San Francisco, taken from upper Market Street. The prominent street in the center of the image is the main portion of Market street, and the San Francisco-Oakland Bay bridge can be seen in the upper right hand of the photograph.”


Catherine Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live.

Canada

My name is Catherine Koch, I am from Vancouver BC Canada. After recently spending nine months on the African continent, I now refer to Vancouver as my home base when I will not be in Africa in the future!  In 2007 I sponsored myself and went to Africa to connect directly with some of the millions of orphaned children there. I had learned from a UN document  titled “The State Of The World’s Children” that there were an estimated 12,000,000 orphaned children in SubSaharan Africa in 2007, due to HIV/AIDS alone, and a increase to 20,000,000 was projected for 2010, and that was just considering those orphaned by HIV/AIDS. All other considerations, including war, other diseases and in some countries short life expectancy of parents, the estimate for 2010 was closer to 50 million, which is more people than the entire population of Canada.  Since my return to Canada I have founded a small charity called “Love Is The Answer” - LITA - and our intention is to help build a bridge between people here in the West and orphaned children in Africa, share awareness, help to connect and build relationships, and bring Love and empowerment to orphaned and vulnerable children in Africa, towards a self-sustainable future. We do this by raising awareness and funds in the West that provide direct, hand to hand, support for small, community based, community directed, local, grass roots organizations striving to support large numbers of orphans in their communities, and also by working one on one with children who are growing up in “child headed families.”  Presently our projects are in Uganda, and we hope over time to reach orphaned children in neighboring countries as well.  Share something about your country that others may not know. A special food, social custom, religious custom, or activity that is unique to where you live.  I feel very blessed and most grateful to have been born in Canada. I think what I enjoy most and what makes Canada most unique in the world is the huge amount of diversity that can be found all across her, from sea to sea to sea. Be it her landscape, her flora, fauna, her people, her opportunities, her resources, her religious and spiritual beliefs, as well as her general goodwill, politeness and kindness and her desire for peace and harmony at home and throughout the world. Perhaps it’s because on any given street, in many of our urban centers, one can see and experience a great many cultures and countries from around the world represented, living for the most part very peacefully... everyone able to smile in the same language! How will / did you decide what to shoot for the event? As WWM approached, I was finishing work on a little model of a proposed child care center that will serve orphaned children in Uganda. The model is destined for an elementary school here in Vancouver who are generously holding “loonie and twonie days” ($1 and $2 ) as fund raisers for the kids “LITA” supports in Uganda. I thought if I could arrange for the Director of the community based organization in Uganda who is organizing the project there to photograph some of the children who will one day benefit from this proposed child care center, we would match up the photos and that would be fun. To see the kids in real time and the proposed project that will benefit them one day, as a model, still a “dream,” if you will... What is your biggest fear about the world today? I have no fear about the world today. I have Joy and Love! The world is overflowing with individuals and energies offering and supporting human kindness and peace and tolerance to one another. We are coming to realize, more and more every day, that we are all one, and we all are here to Love and to be Loved. It’s very wonderful!  What prevents peace? Both personally and between nations? Or, if we turn that question around, what promotes peace?

Choosing in our every thoughts and actions. Our remembering, there is no way to peace. Peace IS the way. I agree with 02 itI in our hearts, John Lennon ~ “Love and Peace are eternal.” We just all need to wake up, remember and choose it! And we are!


Steve Radcliffe Virginia Beach, United States “This image was captured from a small beach on the North Landing River in Virginia Beach, Virginia. The only sound was a jumping fish, the only movement a dissipating ripple on the water. I believe the serenity reflected by this image speaks to the peace we all seek in this world. To attain it, we must respect our differences.�

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Guillermo Palavecino Argentina “The 10.10.10 was, for me as a hobbyist photographer, an inspiring way to think in a big picture way. For that, thank you very much!�

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Africa Asia australia Europe North America South America

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The Globe

ECHOSTAR 11 SATELLITE

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Please introduce yourself, tell us a little bit about what you do and where you live. I am the EchoStar 11 Satellite, an American communication satellite and I live approximately 22,300 miles (34,700Km) above the Earth. What is your experience/inspiration with photography? I am inspired by what I see daily: dramatic images of Earth and occasional views of the Moon and Venus. The regular night/day cycle, weather patterns, and seasonal changes in the western hemisphere are clearly visible in the continuous Earth view of North America, Central America and South America. The DISH Earth camera on board offers a 30 degree x 22.4 degree field-of-view. The ‘eyes’ of the camera observes objects in the visible spectrum, similar to the human eye, with a resolution of about 20 km per pixel. The camera’s image rate is one frame per every 15 seconds. The camera was developed in conjunction with EchoStar satellite engineers and teams from Ecliptic Enterprises Corporation and Space Systems/Loral. If you could speak another language fluently what would it be? My language is digital, ones and zeros, and it is actually universal, everybody understands it. If you could shoot a picture of anything in the world what would it be? I was lucky to shoot a picture showing the shadow of the Moon, cast during a rare solar eclipse. It is wonderful! What is your biggest fear about the world today? I am always concerned when I see hurricanes traveling in the Atlantic.

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Editor Kaitlyn Ellison

Art Director Adam Oliver

Copy editor Robin LAm

Contributing Writers: Brett Brownell Lizabeth Meuse

Contributing Photographers: Adnan Faraz

Gaurab Raj Pant

Rod Blackhurst

Allen Klosowski

Guillermo Palavecino

Roland Staib

Aziz Maazouz

Hamad AlSarraf

Shokoofeh Dezfuli

Alex Kontis

Ira Vollenberg

Solomon Freeman

Bára Ólafsdóttir

Jarrod Mouton

Steve Radcliffe

Catherine Koch

Jorge Artajo

Tammi Cornett

Catherine “Caz” Scott

Kamilla Hensema

Tiziano Nienyu Hsieh

Chrisna Herbst

Meghann Prouse

Toni Alvarado

Clo�� Thommelin

Mike Schweizer

Toni Handoko

Danielle Kiernel

Molly Hart Milroy

Twinkle de los Reyes

Deepsh Kumar Singh

Naomi Schindler

Vicky Webb

Echostar 11 Satellite

Razafindralambo Hery Nirina

Vincent Baif

Edel Gribbin Enrique Cintron Fabián Garcilita R.V.

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Rik Heijmen Robin Oudheusden

Vlado Kekoc Yaelle David Yudit Ilany


It’s your turn.

WWM 2011 www.worldwidemoment.org

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Snapixel Special Edition, Worldwide Moment 2010