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snapixel magazine

issue 7

Summer’s End September 2010


See the rest of the series “Oh, Hello You”on page 56 The Cover: Cropped image from series “Les Escarlets” by Pauline Darley, see page 34 for more


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ummer has finally come to a close here in the Northern Hemisphere, and Snapixel is ready to remember and celebrate with pictures that remind us of that season so recently passed. However it was spent, as long as it involved using a camera - it’s documented in this magazine. There’s an assortment of images; photos that we typically associate with summer, and some we may not. But flipping through this magazine we hope to have you enjoying the brightness and warmth of the imagery, and the pure talent of all of the photographers on display!

Cheers, The Snapixel Team

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Editor Kaitlyn Ellison

Art Director Adam Oliver

Chief Operations Officer Ivan Wong

Web Director/ Information Technology Florian Cervenka

Marketing Associate Daniel Israelyan

Photographers: ashley batz www.ashleybatz.com David Rankin www.rankinstudio.com John Allen www.flickr.com/photos/ nantucketphotography J.P. Dobrín http://jpdobrin.com Pauline Darley www.paulinedarley.com Rob Lenz www.flickr.com/photos/rlenz Rocío Cristal Talavera Rivera http://rocio.snapixel.com/ Samuel Bradley www.samuelbradleyphotography.com SErgio San Martin www.sergiosanmartin.com Terry Hancock www.downunderobservatory.com

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ochi A Japanese Summer Photographs by J.P. DobrĂ­n

Before traveling to Japan, I had watched visual by-products coming out of the country for many years. I was always enamored by Japanese cinema as well as anime and manga. I actively sought out themes and personalities I had read about and watched. The dichotomy between young and old, conformism, the pushed-to-the-brink salary man were all things that intrigued me. But above all, I was most interested in the feeling of utter loneliness of individuals amidst a sea of millions of people in a staggering urban metropolis.

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SURF CULTURE Photography By JOHN ALLEN

“I started using film when I first picked up a camera at the age of ten, and haven’t stopped since. The film that I use most is medium format 120/220 film, which is the longest manufactured roll film format - having been first mass produced for Kodak Brownie cameras in 1901. Using film helps me to slow down, enjoy the moment and be more deliberate about the images that I’m making. I love photographing people and the ocean, and I started shooting surf culture years ago as a reaction to the joy I felt by being in and around the water. I wanted to capture that feeling and put it in a bottle, the best way to do that was through photography. There is a saying in the surf community that “the best surfer is the one having the most fun.” That saying holds true to photography as well - you don’t have to be the best photographer or even have the best camera, as long as your making an image of something which you love and have come to know a great deal about. When you create a photo from your heart, your picture has the potential to become a revelation to the rest of the world.” -John Allen

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Page 16: Pipeline, North Shore Oahu - considered the most dangerous wave on the planet Page 18: Surfer, Uluwatu Bali, Indonesia Page 19: Merpati attaching her leash, Bali, Indonesia Page 20: Hawaiian Maui. The lower back tattoo is of a taro plant from which native Hawaiians believe they are descended Page 21 (Top): Balinese Boy, Bali, Indonesia Page 21 (Bottom): Australian Surfer, Bali, Indonesia Page 22: Dawn Patrol, Kuta Bali Page 23: Surfer’s Grave, Maui

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The Seven Sisters, also known as the Pleiades or M 45 is in the constellation Taurus. A relatively new star cluster still surrounded by the nebulosity from which the stars had formed. I used a Canon Digital Rebel (300D) and a 5 inch 3.3 Takahashi telescope on a Losmandy G8 mount. Twenty 3-minute exposures were combined in the program Deep Sky Stacker. -Rob Lenz Snapixel Magazine

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“Cygnus” - A wide field view of the Milky Way, constellation Cygnus. Shot on October 10 2001 in Southern Utah with a Canon Rebel XSi (Self Modified to shoot infrared) at ISO 800, with a Canon EF 50 mm F1.8 II at F4. Used Atlas EQ-G (Hypertuned with EQMOD,) no autoguiding for 12 lights at 15- seconds, and 3 darks. Software used: Subtraction in Iris, Registration/Stacking in Registar, adjusted in Photoshop. -David Rankin

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M24 Orion Nebula, NGC 1977 Running Man Nebula. M42 - The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south of Orion’s Belt. It is one of the brightest nebulae, and is visible to the naked eye in the night sky. M42 is located at a distance of 1,344 ± 20 light years and is the closes region of massive star formation to Earth. The nebula is estimated to be 24 light years across, and is one of the most scrutinized and photographed objects in the night sky. The nebula has revealed much about the process of how stars and planetary systems are formed from collapsing clouds of gas and dust. Astronomers have directly observed protoplanetary discs, brown dwarfs, intense and turbulent motions of the gas, and the photo-ionizing effects of massive nearby stars in the nebula. There are also supersonic “bullets” of gas piercing the dense hydrogen clouds of the Orion Nebula. Each bullet is ten times the diameter of Pluto’s orbit, and tipped with iron atoms glowing bright blue. They were probably formed one thousand years ago from an unknown violent event. The Orion Nebula is an example of a stellar nursery, where new stars are being born. Date of shoot: December 10th and 12th of 2010 with a modified Canon 5D Mark II and a TMB 130SS F7 Refractor using WO/TMB 2.7” Field Flattener. IT was auto-guided with Orion Auto Guider on Stellarvue 10x16, and mounted on Mountain instruments MI-250 (pier mounted.) The image was acquired using Nebulosity II, stacked with Deep Sky Stacker and processed with Photoshop CS3. -Terry Hancock

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Les Escarlets

Summer Fashion with Photographer Pauline Darley

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Model: Paloma H Makeup: MademoiselleMu Assistant: Maxime Stange Snapixel Magazine I Portraiture I 63


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Exploring Pamplona with Sergio San Martin

Escaping the Crowds...

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Rocío Cristal Talavera Rivera I manipulate. Although, it really just started it out of curiosity. I was unsatisfied with my art with at that time, and I had a lot of pictures at hand. I started thinking that I should transform them into something mesmerizing. The result is a collection of digital photographs that study the allure of visual bliss. For some, photography is about that decisive moment. But to me, that moment is only the start. In the creative process there is a lot of experimenting and improvising; the aftermath is an idyllic reflection of introspective awareness and unconscious fascination coming together. Observation is a curious thing. Finding out what it is that about these particular geometrical shapes and contrasting textures can be at once logical and illogical. Sometimes, I gather parts to produce a whole by creating an intuitive connection between one image and the next. They fall together like pieces of a puzzle. Other times, it’s like holding a mirror to a picture as it vainly evolves into a beautiful hallucination. The grace of recurring symmetry is like a fantasy. Contemplation, nostalgic like a child-like game of finding faces in the clouds, allows us the freedom of interpretation. It’s key to inspiration and personal growth. It’s taking pieces of this and that, learning, discerning, accepting, rejecting. Contemplation is looking at oneself and seeing what’s not there. Mirror. Repetition. Mantra.

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Oh, Hello You Oh, Hello You Photography by Samuel Bradley

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Summertime, and the weather is hot Photographer: Ashley Batz

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Photo by Rocío Cristal Talavera Rivera

Want to Contribute? We’re looking for projects. Head to www.snapixel.com/magazine to check it out, and then shoot us an e-mail at support@snapixel.com to show us what you’ve got!

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Contribute. Get Published. Snapixel Magazine.

Snapixel Magazine Issue 7: Summer's End  

Remember the good times of the most-beloved season, in the twilight of summer we find wonderful photography!

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