Page 1

Opinion:

A&E:

You don’t have to be a life long fan to root for the Rangers

Willow whips her hair back and forth

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VOLUME 96, ISSUE 35 SMUDAILYCAMPUS.COM

Weather

‘Designed on a Dime’ winners revealed Resident Life and Student Housing revealed the names of the “Designed on a Dime” winners yesterday. For individuals, Lauren Rodgers, Tessa Gartin, Shelby Walker, Samantha Watkins and Julia Burman took the titles, winning $40 gift cards to Target, The Container Store or Bed Bath and Beyond. Roommates who won the contest include Juan Chapus and Eduardo Leon Amtman, Tyler Hayes and Chad Staiger, Ashley Tanaka and Clare Tokheim, and Lauryn Bodden and Courtney Smith. Their prizes were the same as those who won individually. The contest was open to all students living in residence halls and focused on rooms that followed fire safety regulations, RLSH Community Standards and room decorating policies. Additional guidelines included rooms that were economical, creative and focused on efficiency. The contest ran from Oct. 4 to Oct. 18 and was judged by the A-LEC, Enrollment Services and Dr. White’s office. Those students who participated in the contest but did not win will still receive a $10 gift card to Chipotle. Pictures of the winning rooms may be found on the RLSH website in November.

ExxonMobil Lecture Series comes to Meadows

Visit us online at

Mystery surrounds SMU alumnus’ death

Restaurant provides buzz-worthy food

By JESSICA HUSEMAN Editor-in-Chief jhuseman@smu.edu

Photo courtesy of 1963 Rotunda

B. Gill Clements was the son of former Texas governor, Bill Clements.

Index News . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,6 Arts & Entertainment . . . . . . . . . . 3 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Opinion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

News Editor tadams@smu.edu

Beside US-75, behind some bushes and a Best Western sits a shotgun diner with a mentality stuck between a Café Brazil and an eclectic burger joint. Buzzbrews may be a place that is overlooked when you’re heading north on Central Expressway, but after having a meal here, it may catch the corner of your eye every time you drive by. With a menu overloaded with breakfast items, it is a good thing that they have a variety of 20 different coffee beans hanging above their counter. Below the suspended canisters sit coffee dispensers for customers to mull over, select and pour themselves. If that is not enough to show their caffeinated dedication, a laminated “Brew Menu” sits on each table, offering lattes, steamers

and espresso. With flavors ranging from Highland Butterscotch to Persian Lime, an energetic wannabe 20-something behind the counter is ready to suggest his favorites. The Granny’s Snicker Doodle steamer that was listed had me excited. The simplicity of the buttery cinnamon, sugar snicker doodle cookie never disappoints me, so how could a caffeinated version in a cup not do the same? The small diner answers this question by making a latte that falls just below the bar set by the cookie. Though the cinnamon-flavored comfort relieves you from the over-zealous air conditioner, there is nothing truly special about this beverage. But apparently, a few secrets lie behind the blue counter. The Classic Crème Brulee is a favorite to some employees. With the amount of indulgence in this over-sized coffee

See FOOD on Page 3

SENATE

Turner tops most paid on campus Twelve organization charters revoked By MEREDITH SHAMBURGER Senior Staff Writer mshamburge@smu.edu

President R. Gerald Turner tops the list in total compensation at SMU for the 2009 fiscal year, having received a total of $2,774,000 last year. That number represents a salary of $534,866, bonus and incentive compensation of $264,739, deferred compensation of $219,223, benefits of $127,591 and “other compensation” of $1,627,581. The Daily Campus obtained this information from SMU’s latest tax returns, which are public record since the University is a non-profit organization. The return lists the highest-paid employees at SMU, which includes administrators, professors and coaches. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) changed forms between the 2008 and 2009 fiscal years, providing a more detailed look at compensation at SMU. However, the change made it difficult to determine increases or decreases in an individual’s total compensation from fiscal year 2008 to 2009. The information provided through the return lists individuals’ base salary, bonus and incentive compensation, deferred compensation, and benefits. It also provides information about

“other compensation,” which is not to him, hoping he stays for a long specified. period of time.” A big part of Turner’s compensation The program would have eventually last year was the early payment of paid Turner $1 million, along with a a deferred benefit program that the $2 million life insurance policy for University had entered into with his family. However, U.S. Congress Turner in 1999, decided to begin four years after he regulating and came to SMU. defining deferred President R. “In 1999… benefit programs SMU is advancing differently in Gerald Turner: 2004, according very rapidly under [Turner’s] to Boone. leadership,” “As a result, Head Football said Michael M. the tax treatment Coach June Jones: Boone, SMU was materially trustee and Vice adverse than what everybody Chair of the SMU had anticipated Board of Trustees Head Basketball that would be compensation Coach Matt Doherty: the tax results committee. “It’s dramatically when we put it in improving. five years earlier Dean of Cox School of The Board [of in ’99,” Boone Business Albert Niemi Jr.: Trustees] feels said. very strongly about making SMU decided Provost Paul Ludden: sure [Turner] to give Turner understands the cash value of how much we the policy, not appreciate what including the life he’s doing, and insurance, as a Graphic by HELENA BOLOGNA way to get out so we look for a way to provide a deferred See REPORT on Page 6 compensation benefit

$2,774,000

$2,142,056

$571,143

$435,879

$406,046

By MEREDITH SHAMBURGER Senior Staff Writer mshamburge@smu.edu

Senate voted Tuesday afternoon to effectively revoke 12 student organization charters for failing to attend a MOM, or mandatory organization meeting, and turn in requested materials. Senate revoked the charters of AIESEC, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Art History Club, Christian Science College Organization, Dance Club, Democracy Matters, Medieval Club, Society of Automotive Engineers and the Student Athlete Advisory Committee. Senate also voted to not allow the Middle Eastern Student Association (MESA), the Music Educators National Conference (MENC) and the Marketing Association to attend a makeup MOM meeting, revoking their charter. SMU uses these meetings to go through risk management and insurance. According to organizations chair, Bethany Mackingtee, the organization committee felt that the temporarily-chartered MESA would be better off reapplying for charter. Mackingtee also explained

that MENC didn’t have the required 12 members and they only met once a year. Senate voted to allow College Democrats, Advertising Club, Phi Alpha Delta and Engineers Without Borders to attend a makeup MOM meeting today. Organizations with revoked charters will still be able to meet, according to Mackingtee, but they won’t be recognized by SMU or be able to use SMU resources provided to chartered organizations. The Medieval Club and Marketing Association visited the meeting in an attempt to get Senate to reconsider. Both groups argued that Senate shouldn’t revoke their charter.

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For more information visit: hilltoppolitics.wordpress.com/

Mascots stay on campus after inspiring student spirit News Intern rclements@smu.edu

Newsroom: 214.768.4555 Classified: 214.768.4554 Online: smudailycampus.com

See CLEMENTS on Page 6

By TAYLOR ADAMS

ADMINISTRATION

By ROBERT CLEMENTS

Contact Us

The search for B. Gill Clements, an SMU alumnus and son of former governor Bill Clements, ended in a shootout with police and Clements’ neighbor, Howard T. Granger, on Saturday morning. Clements’ body was then found in a freshly dug grave on Granger’s property. Clements was reported missing at around 10 p.m. Thursday from his vacation home in Athens, Texas after he had missed a meeting earlier that morning. Authorities arrived on his property Thursday night, finding Clements’ SUV still parked on his property. Law officers searched throughout the night on Thursday, but found nothing. As

authorities searched Clements’ property on Friday, Granger, 46, confronted them armed with an AK-47. Granger threatened the officers with the gun telling them to get off his property, although the officers were still on Clements’ land. The police officers returned later that day with a SWAT team, an armored car and a search warrant for Granger’s property. The search was cut short when Granger returned with his AK47 and fired at least 30 rounds into the armored police vehicle, shattering some of the windows. Police returned fire, and Granger was killed. Police then raided Granger’s home, finding guns and several rounds of ammunition. Granger’s

ITY

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On Thursday, Meadows School of the Arts will host the 2010 ExxonMobil Lecture Series that will focus on social responsibility in the advertising industry. The event will consist of a lecture and a question and answer session at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium, followed by a coffee and chocolate reception in the Hope Lobby. The lecture will feature a panel of advertising leaders who will discuss trends toward social responsibility. Tickets are required for the event, but they are available at no charge. Contact Meadows Ticket Office at 214-768-2787 to reserve yours today.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 27, 2010 FIRST COPY FREE, ADDITIONAL COPIES 50 CENTS

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DALLAS, TEXAS

Everyone knows and loves our cherished mascot, Peruna, the Shetland pony. We see him at every home football game, convocation, graduation and other special events around campus. Many, however, are unaware of Peruna’s rich history. During SMU’s early years, the mascot was unofficially called the “Parsons,” but that changed in 1917 when the SMU student body voted to become the “Mustangs.” Later in 1932, Cy Barkus, a 1929 Perkins School graduate said, “I was out on a picnic and saw a little black

horse running through the high weeds and I said, ‘That would make a good mascot for SMU.’ So I went to Coach Ray Morrison and said, ‘Ray, I’ve found a horse that I think would make a good mascot,’ and he told me to bring it to the pep meeting. So I got a popular [student] to bring the pony to the pep rally, and from then on, it became the official school mascot.” When Peruna first started appearing at events with the Mustang Band, he was called “the midget wonder horse” on the program. Peruna’s name comes from a popular drug in the 1920s known as Peruna Tonic, which was 18 percent alcohol. During Prohibition, the

tonic was used as an easily accessible, albeit questionably legal, substitute for traditional spirits, hence, the double entendre of our “spirited” mascot. Some of Peruna’s more “spirited” moments include trying to mount Texas Tech’s horse, Misty, pooping mid-field on TCU’s brand new turf, kicking UT’s Bevo and killing Fordham University’s Ram with a kick to the head. Peruna I passed away tragically after being hit by a car on Mockingbird Lane on Halloween in 1934 just after his return from New York City. Peruna was buried at the old Ownby stadium. A statue crafted by Michael Owen, Jr.

See MASCOTS on Page 6

KALEN SCHOU/ The Daily Campus

The burial site of Peruna I is located at Peruna Plaza at the south end of Ford Stadium. Peruna I is commerated by the statue picture above, sculpted by Michael G. Owen Jr., class of 1937.


2

Style

• Wednesday, October 27, 2010

The Daily Campus

Pop-culture costume hits for Halloween Halloween falls on a Sunday this year, meaning if you’re costume crazy you have the potential to extend your costume creativity for a full four days, Thursday through Sunday. By SARAH BRAY Style Editor sabray@smu.edu &

DARBY RADCLIFF Contributing Writer dradcliff@smu.edu

REALITY TV ROYALTY Snooki and The Situation: These two Jersey Shore gems have somehow both managed to nationally brand their unique looks. Whether you’re looking for a couples costume or you want to ride solo, here is the GTL (Get the Look) lowdown. To get Snooki’s signature look use a bump-it or really any household appliance adequate for adding height. Simply a spray-on tan will not suffice, if you’re trying to go full-on guidette: Applying multiple layers of orange paint should do the trick. Throw on a frock that’s more a shirt than a dress, and complete the look with either blinged-out shades or sculpted raccoon eyes. “Fake it ‘til you make it.” You might not be able to buy The Situation’s twelvepack, but you can emulate his other admirable assets. Get “juiced,”: blowout and style your locks; throw on an Ed Hardy trucker hat, baggy jeans, and dark shades—and of course, shirt optional.

Campus Events

OCT . 30

October 27 to November 5

OCT .

Service of Memory

Noon in Perkins Chapel. The service will be held in memory of all SMU staff and alumni who have passed in the past yea.

27

OCT . 31

POP-CULTURE PRINCESSES Lady Gaga: Show your “Poker Face” and go Gaga this Halloween. Gaga has presented her “little monsters” with endless jaw-dropping fashion innovations. Her creations are for the fearless, but for everyday people they make killer Halloween costumes. For a quick and cheap Gaga emulation, tape a deck of cards and poker chips to your face and weave them throughout a head-turning hair-do. Katy Perry: You don’t have to be a “California Girl” to channel Katy Perry’s “Hot N Cold” look. Mrs. Russell Brand’s style is always sweet, with her outfits straight from CandyLand. Satisfy your sweet tooth for Halloween with an edible costume consisting of cotton candy hair and a dress glued with your favorite sugary delights. Ke$ha: Don’t let your costume be so “blah blah blah!” Empty the trash and literally throw on the bag for one-ofa-kind grunge look inspired by Ke$ha. After you’ve made a hole in the trash bag for your limbs, tease your hair to look like an “Animal” and grab some cheap plastic shades. Now you are ready to “Tik Tok.” SMU STAPLES Feral Cats: Right meow SMU is home to over 60 feral cats and, whether you’re allergic or not, these furry felines are fed and fixed on your dime. This Halloween don’t just be a boring black cat, be an SMU Super Campus Cat! Snag ears and a pin on tail at any Halloween retailer. Park ‘N Pony: Slap on an SMU polo, slide into some pleated khakis and shove your pockets full of faux parking violations. You’re the law and if a neighborhood trick-ortreater so much as dares to grab more than the allotted single Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup, take action! Flash Photography: You’ve seen them on the Boulevard, you’ve seen them at parties, and you’ve met new friends when they’ve shoved you together with strangers for photos. Whip your camera out because this Halloween you’re joining the team! You might not be receiving a paycheck for your photography contributions this weekend, but you will sure look snappy! All you have

Football at Tulane 2:30 p.m. in New Orleans. Watch the Mustangs trample the Green Wave on the CW33.

Halloween

Do all of your homework on Saturday so that you can throw on your costume and eat candy.

OCT. . 31

SMUniversity Worship

11 a.m. to noon. in Perkins Chapel. Anyone is welcome to attend the services, which take place every Sunday.

NOV. . 1

Spring Enrollment Begins

8 a.m. Log on to Access and enroll before classes fill up! Enrollment ends January 24.

to do is emblazon the Flash Photography logo on a red polo and baseball cap. Don’t forget, the key element to the costume is the camera. Enhance your standard digital device, with a larger-than-life cardboard case. TECH TOYS Twitter: Trick or Tweet? Have the most re-tweeted threads of the night. To create your cyberspace costume you’ll need felt, Velcro, and sticker or iron-on-letters. Construct several re-attachable 140 character or less haphazard blurbs for a night of tricky tweeting. Refresh your reasonings and reflections throughout the night and be sure to take lots of TwitPics! Facebook: Rake in some friend requests while you’re out and about this Halloween weekend. Take a screen shot of your profile page, save it as a jpeg and blow it up poster-size on cardboard at Kinkos. Attach a Sharpie and have your newfound friends write on your wall. Caution: this costume does not come with “poking” capabilities. Google Earth: Looking for a scarily creepy costume that’s going surely going to spook your neighbors with your vast knowledge of their residence? Muster as many miniature Monopoly houses as you can manage and hot glue them on your head-to-toe landscape-inspired look. TACKY TRENDS Silly Bandz: First there were Pogs, then Beanie Babies, followed by Tamagotchis and later Pokemon, but 2010 brought a funky fad few saw coming - Silly Bandz. Conceptualizing this costume takes creativity. Pool noodles? Pipe cleaners? For the most time efficient approach, try (appropriately) silly string for your silly band costume. Get a dozen cans of silly string at the dollar store, and then aim, shoot, fire. Instantly you’re covered in hundreds of indistinguishable squiggley shapes.

Illustration by HELENA BOLOGNA

Police Reports OCTOBER 25 10:43 a.m. Owens Art Center. A faculty member reported the theft of approximately five dollars of change from his desk drawer. This occurred between 10/22 and 10/25. Open. 3:41 p.m. Cockrell McIntosh Hall. Cooking inside one of the room set off the smoke detecotr. Closed.

8:54 a.m. Theology Quad. A student reported damage to his vehicle. Open.

OCTOBER 26 9:03 a.m. Theology Quad/Hawk Hall. A student reported the theft of his bicycle at this location. Open. 11:51 p.m. Moore Hall. Two student s will be referred to the Conduct Officer for underage drinking and two students will be referred to the Conduct Officer for underage alcohol possession. Closed.


Arts & Entertainment

The Daily Campus

CONTINUED FROM FRONT PAGE

cup, the Italian cake on display may lose its appeal. As any 24-hour restaurant should, Buzzbrews serves breakfast all day and all night, which may be one reason people curl up in booths with laptops late on a Thursday night (At the least, it’s the Wifi). French toast (or griddle toast, as the Buzz crew calls it), does not quite get its justice, getting placed below the appetizers and “Quickie Breakfast” sections. Though overloaded with nuts and powdered-sugar, the griddle toast is better than a number of attempts around town. A coat of cinnamon tops the bread that manages to be dense enough for the batter, but not dry enough to fit with the French toast standard in Dallas. Scramblers and crepes are a section of the menu worth both perusing and pursuing. The “Bluto” is a delicious and dangerous combination of bacon, onion, jalepeno and cheese. Offered as an omelet or stuffed in a crepe, this plate has more egg than it can handle. But the sausage mixed in provides enough flavor to compensate for the greasy feeling that is both poor for your heart and satisfying to your stomach. The list of sandwiches has opportunities to indulge with every item. Though the burger and BLT caught my eye, the waiter, who will not hesitate

to call a pretty girl “baby,” said that their grilled cheese is a top order in the joint. The bread is a bit over-buttered, but toasted to a perfect golden brown. While it is adequate, it is really the inside that makes this sandwich a favorite for my server and his customers. A grilled cheese sandwich that they call “Farmer’s Fantasy” mixes cheddar, Swiss and blue cheese into a melted mess topping TYLER WILLIAMS/ The Daily Campus a tomato between the toasted bread. A crisp Buzzbrew’s has two locations that are open 24 hours a day: N. Central Expressway at Fitslice of pickle, a wedge zhugh Ave., and Lemmon Ave at Herschel Ave. of pineapple and a bag of Sun Chips make this an ideal lunch capacity. reaches the point of soggy. The baker or late-night fourth meal. The carrot cake flavor is trailing red in the diner has the Kahlua-cocoa The first bite could be a cheesy velvet in many cupcake stores, yet the ratio down, avoiding an over-powering flashback to childhood without the cake is not always executed perfectly. Kahlua disaster, but until this desert can tomato soup. Unfortunately, a bit of While moist carrot cake can be found be easily eaten with a fork, another cake inconsistent blue cheese can bring a in many establishments, few are up to takes the top spot. The Italian Cream cake may sound different feeling—one that not even the par with this icing. A buttery cream power of bacon can overcome on this cheese is simply all you need with this simple, but the nuts in the cake and the plate. spiced desert, and thankfully, Buzzbrews coconut on the icing take this dessert beyond a European white cake. This Whether or not you are full after a knows it. The Kahlua cake seems like the best is the best that Buzzbrew’s has offered plate of pancakes or a burger and chips, the cakes displayed on the counter are choice for the chocolate-lover at your lately, and is worth the difficult control tempting enough to push your stomach’s table, but this baked good’s consistency of not eating all of your BLT.

MUSIC Photo by ASHLEY RANDALL

From left, Drew Wall, Newton Pittman and Jonathan Brooks are all upstaged by the theater premiere of “Buddy the Dog,” in Undermain Theatre’s latest show.

Undermain Theatre shows off new tricks A&E Editor lsmart@smu.edu

They say that every dog has its day, but if you are the Undermain Theatre you have a whole string of days. It seems that the Undermain is carrying the success of its last season into the new with their latest show, “The Dog Problem.” Equal parts funny and absurd, this production has audiences leaving the theater pleasantly thoughtful. The direction in which Katherine Owens takes “The Dog Problem” is impressive in the way that she makes a could-be grotesque situation and instead turns it into amusement. In the opening scene, Ray (Jonathan Brooks) and Ronnie (Drew Wall) introduce the upbeat and uproarious pace of the play. When Joey (Newton Pittman) arrives on the scene, the plot begins to unravel, and the chaotic absurdity begins. Joey believes that Ray and his dog have humiliated his sister Teresa (Shannon Kearns-Simmons), and he is seeking revenge. The extremes to which the situation escalates are both heartbreaking and hilarious, thanks to David Rabe’s script and a whole lot of impeccable comedic timing. Ridiculous seems to go hand in hand with evil in this play, as the meanest character of them all, Uncle Malvolio (Bruce DuBose) is wheeled onto the stage by his dopey henchman, Tommy (Andrew Aguilar), sucking on a lollipop. It should be acknowledged that as funny as the human actors in the

3

FOOD: buzzing about the ‘Farmer’s Fantasy’

THEATER

By, LAUREN SMART

Wednesday, October 27, 2010 •

play are, there is no real way for them to match the special energy that a live animal brings on stage, which is emphasized by the stage presence of this particular dog, Buddy. As the one female in the show, Kearns-Simmons has a lot to live up to. Although she firmly delivers the emotional punch needed in the second half, she seems out of place in the subtly overplayed world of characters. Furthermore, her announcement of pregnancy in the second act is just one more sign that she does not belong in this dog-eat-dog world of men, that she, just like Eve in the Garden of Eden, simply causes problems. DuBose and Wall are by far the most enjoyable characters in the show, but for very different reasons: DuBose for his portrayal of the crotchety, yet curious mobster, who manages to intimidate everyone else, even though he can barely walk; Wall for his portrayal of the loveable, psychic maladroit. It would be a difficult task to find something about the Undermain’s season opener to dislike. From the installation of new, more comfortable chairs – which, happen to be the reupholstered seats of the Kalita Humphreys Theater – to the always-changing set, which this time, resembles the streets of New York – there is no reason to miss out on Dallas’ finest avant-garde. For more information about “The Dog Problem,” the Undermain Theatre or student ticket prices, visit www.undermain.com.

Whipping Willow paints the walls By JORDAN JENNINGS A&E Editor jjennings@smu.edu

Move over Rihanna, Will Smith’s nine-year-old daughter Willow Smith can whip her hair way better than you. Willow released her first single, “Whip My Hair,” in early September under Jay-Z’s Roc Nation label, and already she’s topped the Billboard R&B charts hitting No. 17. Haters watch out—the young star’s not going anywhere. She sings that she’ll “whip em off, cuz she ain’t doing nothing wrong.” Willow is more than an R&B prodigy, award-winning actress and diva-licious dancer—she’s a fashion standout. In her music video, released just a week ago, Willow rocks a heart-shaped hairdo, faux Mohawk and colorful clothes that Disney’s Lizzie McGuire would envy. Stomping her feet and whipping her hair, little Smith paints white walls in bright colors and “keeps the party jumping.” Her new music video has people of all ages talking. It already has over seven million views on YouTube. Willow’s not just a preteen sensation, ‘‘Whip My Hair” is a club hit. Sure, the age-appropriate lyrics are repetitive, but they are definitely addicting. Clubbers beware, pressing repeat may give you whip lash. This isn’t Willow’s first time in the lime-light either. In 2007 she starred in “I am Legend” alongside her father at age seven. A year later, she won a Young Artist Award for Best Performance in a Feature film in the movie “Kit Kittredge: An American Girl.” We can thank Willow’s famous

parents, Will and Jada Pinkett Smith for their daughter’s overnight stardom. Talk about a talented family, the Granny Smith apple doesn’t fall far from the Willow tree. So, what’s next for the young pop artist? Willow turns double digits on Sunday.


4

Opinion

• Wednesday, October 27, 2010

The Daily Campus

The Daily Campus A Publication of Student Media Company, Inc.

Trivia of the Day

Editorial Staff

OPINION INTERN

Advertising Sales Representatives . . . . . . . . . Charlie Coleman, Nina Lacson, Griffin Klements, Clayton Shepherd Classified Representative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Flanders Marketing Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bree Ungar Sales Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Ashley Duncan

Production Staff Advertising Designers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chloe Saba Nighttime Production Coordinator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chloe Saba

Business Staff Business Assistants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Flanders, Lola Obamehinti, Rachel Washington The Daily Campus, a student newspaper at Southern Methodist University is operated by Student Media Company, Inc., Hughes-Trigg Student Center 3140 Dyer Street, Suite 314 Dallas, TX 75205. The Daily Campus is published daily Monday, Wednesday, and Friday during the academic semester. For local, national, and classified display advertising, call 214-768-4111. For classified word advertising call 214-768-4554.

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1. Who is the top earning dead celebrity? a. Michael Jackson b. Elvis Presley c. John Lennon

Advertising Staff

Alex Stambaugh

2. What world sports event did the newly deceased psychic octopus, Paul predict? a. The World Series b. The World Cup c. The Beijing Olympics

3. Which singing superstar was offered over $1 million dollars to star in an adult film? a. Beyonce b. Sheryl Crow c. Susan Boyle

4. How long is the World’s largest mouth (Guiness Book of World Records)? a. b.

11.33 in 5.27 in

c. 6.69 in 5. Which candy from Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is currently being developed? a. b.

Everlasting Gobstoppers Three-Course-Meal Gum

dc@smu.edu • http://www.smudailycampus.com SMU Box 456, Dallas, TX 75275 214-768-4555 • Fax: 214-768-8787

EDITORIAL

Student optimism is no match for Dallas’ racially divided reality Dallas is often considered a cosmopolitan city of luxury and bon gout. To counter Austin’s “Keep Austin Weird” motto, Dallas has put out t-shirts with slogans like “Keep Dallas Classy” or the less-flattering “Keep Dallas Pretentious.” This monolithic view of Dallas as a capital of wealth and style is not only wrong, but frankly destructive. Yesterday I visited West Dallas, one of our town’s most segregated areas. Driving through, I got a sense of the neglect that has subjugated this neighborhood to poverty. Underfunded schools, under-resourced neighborhoods and a general lack of access all contribute to the difficult living conditions many West Dallas residents face. Besides being cash-poor, many residents suffer from lack of access to transportation, sanitation and healthy food. The contrast with the usually highlighted cosmopolitan and luxurious Dallas is astounding. While in West Dallas, a man approached my friends and me in search of some spare change for a bus fare. When we apologetically declined to help, he expressed with some despondence that if he were white like us, we would have helped him; as we had not, it was, of course, because he was black. For him, the reality that we did not give was par for the course, a pattern he had clearly seen before. True, we were all white. But contrary to his assumptions, I am sure that we would not have cared any more to be approached by a man of our own race in an unfamiliar area asking for money. Regardless, I felt powerless to express what I really wanted to say. I wanted to tell him that it was not on account of his race that we did not help, that truly we would not have given were he white, black or green. I wished to tell him that we were all idealistic college students who believed in promoting social justice. The simple reality is that we were not able to or were not comfortable to give him our cash. Race did not deserve the blame for our decision. But even if our own intentions were pure, the reality of his life and neighborhood spoke volumes against anything I might have had to say, even if I could get the right words out. His neighborhood, with an almost wholly minority population, is neglected by city, state and federal funding. There is only one grocery store to serve an area with over 30,000 residents. By contrast, the area of town from which we hail—the neighborhood where our university stands—is rich, vibrant and over-funded. We have gourmet grocery stores and a public pool with a waterslide. We have well-manicured parks, expensive bronzes and plentiful fountains. We have an active police force that will stop you from going 31 in a 30. While the laws and intentions may be written and professed to be colorblind, the reality is not. We live in a supremely divided city. The difference between affluent areas likes North Dallas, the Park Cities and Uptown and poor areas like West Dallas could not be more marked. The history of West Dallas runs deep and divided, but the social amnesia seems to begin on the north banks of the Trinity River. How can we forget so quickly that just 10 minutes away exist areas on the brink of disaster? How can we stand to live in a city where half of us live like royalty and the other half like slaves? But most importantly, what can we do about it?

c.

Wonka Bars

6. What does the 57 on Heinz ketchup bottles represent? a. The variety of pickles the company once had b. The number of founding fathers of the company c. The street where the factory was first located

7. What is the most common name in the world? a. Jesus b. Mohammad c. Sam

knees? a. Dogs b. Elephants c. Giraffes

12. T/F: Cats can hear ultrasounds. a. True b. False

13. Why was the Model T invented by Ford only available in black at first? a. Cheapest b. Fastest to dry c. Less likely to get dirty

14. What does ‘Karoke’ mean in Japanese?

8. Can Atlantic lobsters be blue? a. Yes b. No

9. When is World Tourist Day? a. April 29 b. June 17 c. Sept. 27

a. ‘Let Loose’ b. ‘Take the Stage’ c. ‘Empty Orchestra’

15. What is the official name of Rhode Island? a. The State of Rhode Island b. Rhode Island and Providence Plantations c. Rhode Island and the Bay Islands

10. What burns the least calories? a. Sleeping b. Watching TV c. Laughing

11. What is the only animal with four

Answers: 1. a 2. b 3. c 4. c 5. b 6. a 7. b 8. a 9. c 10. b 11. b 12. a 13. a 14. c 15. b

Editor in Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Huseman Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katie Simon News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Taylor Adams Associate News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Meredith Carlton Arts & Entertainment Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lauren Smart Associate Arts & Entertainment Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Laura Cook Style Editor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Bray Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jordan Jennings Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . EJ Holland Health & Fitness Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jovin Lim Opinion Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adriana Martinez Chief Copy Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jessica Hawks Copy Editors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pat Traver, Tashika Varma, Amrita Vir Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Danser Layout Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Helena Bologna Online Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Josh Parr

EDITORIAL

Hop on the bandwagon

There is no need to be a life-long fan to appreciate true success story I’m just going to repeat what every Facebook status last Friday night said through various combinations of all caps and exclamation points: It’s an exciting time to be a Rangers fan. For those of us who have watched disappointing seasons on end, waiting for Alex Ehmke the Rangers to stop worrying about home runs and get a bullpen, Lee and Wilson are a godsend. And for those new fans who don’t remember the heydays of Gonzalez, Greer and Pudge, the Rangers’ success is at least thrilling insomuch as it distracts us from certain other Dallas-based sports teams. However, I have witnessed on many occasions a growing divide between these two communities. New fans give a shout out to the Rangers, whether by writing a quick status update or buying a jersey, and are the immediate subject of criticism. “How long has she been a fan?” or, “Does he even know who’s pitching tomorrow?” loyal fans protest. This growing conflict seems to be based around the important question: “Have you earned the right to be a Rangers fan?” The veterans of the game who pose this question seem to think that because they yelled and screamed at the TV for decades at every backwards K, fielding error and unearned run allowed by the Rangers that this season is to reward their loyalty. Meanwhile, new fans just want a share of the excitement. For myself, a fan of about three years who is somewhere between these two groups, I for the life of me don’t CONTRIBUTOR

care how big the bandwagon gets: There’s always room for more Rangers fans. This team can and should appeal to anyone who admires the story of the underdog, first and foremost because of our franchise history. For those new to the team, these are some of the facts that make this already outstanding season at least 10 times cooler. Before this year, the Rangers were one of three teams to never appear in a World Series game, accompanied by the Washington Nationals and Seattle Mariners, and amongst those three they’re the team that has been around the longest (and by inference, losing the longest). Furthermore, in their only three seasons of postseason play (’96, ’98 and ’99), they had one victory in nine games. The underdog story continued into the 20092010 seasons with two separate, substance-abuserelated incidents: first in August of 2009 when Josh Hamilton, the Rangers’ champion slugger, admitted a relapse after years of being clean, and second in February of 2010, when Manager Ron Washington admitted to using crack. In each case, the Rangers stuck behind their leaders and emerged stronger than before. Hamilton is a probable for AL MVP and Washington, who took the team from .463 win percentage in 2007 to .556 in 2010, is now a heavy contender for Coach of the Year. And finally, nothing speaks more volumes about the Rangers’ defying incredible odds than the financial facts: They did it with less money than anyone else. All too often, people forget that in this same season the Rangers organization declared Chapter 11 bankruptcy. While the Rangers were battling it out on the field, potential owners Mark Cuban and Nolan Ryan were battling it out in the

courts. The fact that this didn’t interfere with their ability to play the game is truly astounding. Everyone needs to remember that the Rangers have one of the lowest budgets in baseball. Ranked 27th out of 30 teams, Rangers payroll ($55 million) pales in comparison to baseball cities like Philadelphia ($142 million), New York ($206 million for the Yankees), and San Francisco ($98 million), all of which sent teams to the playoffs this year. After all of this, you are left with a team without a history of victory (and therefore little fan support) that was able to move past major incidents amongst its key members, ignore courtroom politics and make it to the World Series—all with a smaller budget. You can’t make this stuff up. In light of these facts, the question that veterans ask, “have you earned the right to be a Rangers fan?” has the issue reversed. The real question is, “have the Rangers earned your fandom?” and the answer to this question is undoubtedly yes. So my basic pleas are as follows: to the die-hard Rangers fans out there, when you see some guy throw up the antlers when Murphy catches a fly ball or someone tells you that they’re excited that Feliz is catching tomorrow, don’t freak out. This is how baseball dynasties are made. And for the new fans, don’t let this newfound passion for all things Rangers fizzle out if things don’t go well in the coming weeks. After all, as the new motto goes, “these are my Rangers,” and yours, and yours, and yours. Alex Ehmke is a junior political science, public policy and economics triple major. He can be reached for comments and questions at aehmke@smu.edu.

CARTOON

Rebecca Quinn is a senior art history, Spanish and French triple major. She can be reached for comment at rquinn@smu.edu.

Opinions expressed in each unsigned editorial represent a consensus decision of the editorial board. All other columns on this page reflect the views of individual authors and not necessarily those of the editorial staff.

SUBMISSION POLICY What good is freedom of speech if you’re not going to use it? Would you like to see your opinion published in The Daily Campus? Is there something happening on campus or in the world you really want to say something about? Then The Daily Campus is looking for you! E-mail your columns and letters to dcoped@ smudailycampus.com or to the commentary editor. Letters should not exceed 200 words in length and columns should be 500-700 words.

Submissions must be in either text format (.txt) or rich text format (.rtf). For verification, letters and columns must include the author’s name, signature, major or department, e-mail address and telephone number. The Daily Campus will not print anonymous letters. A photograph will be required to publish columns. The editor reserves the right to edit for length, spelling, grammar and style.

NATE BEELER/MCT Campus


Sports

The Daily Campus

Wednesday, October 27, 2010 •

5

PRO FOOTBALL

MEN’S SOCCER

Cowboys lose Romo, NFC East battle By ASSOCIATED PRESS

MICHAEL DANSER/The Daily Campus

SMU midfielder Arthur Ivo prepares to take a shot on goal against The University of South Carolina during play Oct. 6 at Westcott field.

Soccer player honored By EJ HOLLAND

Associate Sports Editor eholland@smu.edu

SMU junior midfielder Arthur Ivo has been named Conference USA Player of the Week and added to the TopDrawerSoccer.com National Team of the Week for his efforts against conference foes No. 17 Tulsa and Memphis. Ivo has helped lead the No. 5 Mustangs to a 13-1-0 overall record and 5-1-0 mark in Conference USA action. On Wednesday, in a much anticipated conference showdown against No. 17 Tulsa, the junior came through in the clutch. Ivo scored a goal in the 62nd minute on a free kick, from 40 yards out to tie the game at two. “We work on free kicks almost everyday at practice and I kind of got lucky,” Ivo said. “The ball moved a lot but I got lucky and it went right through the keeper’s hands.” He then had the game-winning assist to fellow midfielder Robbie Derschang, who sent the ball into the

Mustang Sideline:

far upper 90 for the win. “It was a great ball by Arthur [Ivo], he just saw me wide open on the counter,” Derschang said. Saturday in a 3-0 win over Memphis, Ivo was at the top of his game yet again. This time he notched a goal in the 49th minute on a set piece from 20 yards out. Ivo also assisted on a goal when he set up for another free kick just outside the box and hit the crossbar which allowed defender Leone Cruz to rebound the ball and score. Ivo is originally from Braganca Paulista, Brazil but played his high school soccer at Oakridge High School in Arlington. At Oakridge, he earned All State honors all four years and led his team to a state championship in 2005. As a freshman at SMU, Ivo made an immediate contribution by starting eight games and finishing third on the team in goals scored. A year later, his contribution significantly decreased, and only he started six games. However, Ivo has bounced back with a superb junior

year. On the season, Ivo has tallied seven goals including two game winners and four assists which are all good enough for second on the team. He is also a perfect two for two on penalty kick conversions and has collected at least one point in four consecutive matches. This is the second time this season Ivo has been named Conference USA Player of the Week. Ivo will star in the Mustangs’ final home game against Kentucky on Saturday at 7 p.m. “We’ll do whatever it takes to win; we’re giving a hundred percent to win the game,” Ivo said. “We just go out there and play our heart out.” As a team the Mustangs are ranked fifth in the country according to the NSCAA/HendrickCars.com Natonal Rankings. SMU also sits at the top of Conference USA with 15 points. Kentucky is currently in fourth place with an overall record of 5-64 and a 2-1-2 mark in conference action.

NSCAA/HendrickCars.com Rankings

C-USA Men’s Soccer Standings

Rank 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Team

Team Akron Louisville Maryland North Carolina SMU Connecticut UC Irvine Butler Creighton

Overall 13-0-1 12-0-2 11-2-1 11-2-1 13-1-0 10-1-4 12-1-2 13-0-1 11-2-0

(Oct. 26)

C-USA Overall W L T Pts. W L T SMU .........................5... 1 ..0 ..15 .............13...1 ...0 UCF...................... 4 ...0.. 2 ..14 ........... 9 ...2 .. 2 Marshall ............... 3 ...3.. 1 ..10 ........... 8 ...4 .. 4 Kentucky .............. 2 ...1.. 2 ...8 ............ 5 ...6 .. 4 Tulsa ..................... 2 ...2.. 1 ...7 ............ 8 ...4 .. 1 South Carolina...... 2 ...2.. 1 ...7 ............ 7 ...5 .. 2 UAB ..................... 2 ...3.. 0 ...6 ............ 8 ...5 .. 0 FIU ....................... 1 ...4.. 0 ...3 ............ 7 ...7 .. 0 Memphis .............. 0 ...5.. 1 ...1 ............ 3 ...9 .. 1

ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) – Tony Romo threw the pass, then didn’t have a chance. Linebacker Michael Boley was coming right at him, unblocked and going full speed. The hit was so hard that when Romo landed on his left shoulder, Boley heard him “let out a little scream.” All Romo remembers was how much trouble he had breathing. It was probably the last gasp for the 2010 Dallas Cowboys, too. Romo broke his left collarbone on the play, turning a promising start in Monday night’s game against the New York Giants into yet another loss. The Cowboys went through a funk after losing their quarterback and Eli Manning took advantage, powering New York from a 13-point deficit to a 41-35 victory that put the Giants a full game ahead of the NFC East and tied for the most wins in the conference. Manning led New York (5-2) on five straight scoring drives over the middle two quarters, posting 31 points. He bounced back from interceptions on his first two drives of the night to match his career best with four touchdown passes, Brandon Jacobs ran 30 yards for a touchdown and Lawrence Tynes kicked a career-best 53-yard field goal, just some of their many highlights. “The way we started the game tonight, to be able to come back from that and show the mental toughness was big,” Giants coach Tom Coughlin said. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said he was told Romo would miss about 6 to 8 weeks. More tests that are scheduled for Tuesday should help set a timetable. But it might not matter much. Dallas is 1-5, so there may not be any reason to rush back. The 1970 Bengals are the only 1-5 team ever to make the playoffs. “I’m staying optimistic,” Romo said. “This football team has a lot of high-character guys, a lot of competitive individuals who aren’t going to give in to a tough situation.” Tough? Put it this way: The historically woebegone Texas Rangers could win more games in

October and November than the five-time Super Bowl champion Cowboys. And with the Super Bowl coming to Cowboys Stadium in February, it’s all but certain the host team won’t be playing. Worse still, this once-promising season is now linked to 1989 — the year Jones bought the team, Jimmy Johnson took over as coach and the Cowboys went 1-15; that was the last time Dallas started 1-5. At least back then everyone knew the team was lousy. “There are a lot of teams in this league that have had to step in and do a different direction at quarterback,” Jones said. “We’ve got to be able to play without Romo.” This was the fourth straight win for the Giants. The really stunning number is five; that’s how many quarterbacks they have injured this season. Even in a week where the NFL is scrutinizing hard hits, Boley didn’t draw a flag. It was a clean play, just a textbook example of a hard hit. “The guard didn’t see me,” Boley said. “I came in scot-free. ... I didn’t think he was going to lay down. I thought it was a normal hit. After I got up and started running, I looked back and saw he was down.” X-rays showed the break before halftime. Romo was back on the sideline for the second half, his arm in a sling and covered by a jacket. He wore a headset and tried encouraging teammates, but there wasn’t much to cheer about. The Cowboys actually were up only 10-7 when Romo left and stretched it to 20-7. Then came New York’s scoring flurry, which sent home much of the crowd by the middle of the third quarter and prompted chants of “Let’s go Rangers!” The Giants were already ahead by the time Romo’s injury was diagnosed. Dallas backup Jon Kitna hadn’t played since Oct. 5, 2008, when he was part of Detroit’s winless season. Whether it was the long layoff, being 38 or both, he sure looked rusty. His first and third passes were tipped. The next time he dropped back, he was sacked for a 10-yard loss, forcing Dallas to punt from its own end zone. The Giants took advantage of the short field to score

the go-ahead touchdown. His next pass was fumbled by Jason Witten, setting up Tynes’ long field goal. It got so bad that there was a mock cheer when he completed a pass for a first down early in fourth quarter. He finished 16 of 33 for 187 yards. “It just took him a while to get going,” Cowboys coach Wade Phillips said. “Once he did, it gave us a chance.” Kitna ended up throwing a pair of touchdown passes to rookie Dez Bryant in the final 3:17, but Dallas failed to recover onside kicks after each. New York got another field goal from Tynes after the first, then ran out the clock after the second. Manning was 25 of 35 for 306 yards. This was the fourth time he’d thrown four TD passes. Hakeem Nicks caught nine passes for 108 yards and two touchdowns. Steve Smith caught nine passes for 101 yards and a touchdown. Mario Manningham had the other TD catch. Ahmad Bradshaw ran 24 times for 126 yards. Jacobs had 75 yards on 12 carries. The craziest part about this game was how many things the Cowboys did right: A club that had only four takeaways all season snatched five. A special teams group that was getting known for giving up big plays made a huge one — a 93-yard punt return for a touchdown by Bryant. They drew only five penalties. But they also went 0 for 10 on third downs. And Romo wasn’t the only guy lost to injury. Defensive end Jason Hatcher and left guard Montrae Holland hurt groins. Holland already was filling in for injured starter Kyle Kosier, so the Cowboys had to go with Phil Costa, a rookie free agent who was making his NFL debut. Romo had thrown every pass by a Cowboys quarterback since Nov. 16, 2008, when he returned from a broken pinkie on his throwing hand that cost him three games. He set the franchise record for yards passing in a season last year, making the Pro Bowl for the third time. In his brief action Monday night, he broke his own club record by throwing for a touchdown in his 18th straight game. He was 5 of 7 for 39 yards.

CLASSIFIEDS 214-768-4554

DAILY CAMPUS CLASSIFIEDS MONDAY, WEDNESDAY AND FRIDAY. 8 DAYS, 25 WORDS, $30 SMUDAILYCAMPUS.COM. DCCLASSADS@SMU.EDU

CHILD CARE. BABYSITTER WANTED FOR a six month old. Prefer Wednesday 12-4, some nights. $10/hr. Please contact Shannon at shanlaffey@yahoo.com or (702) 401-9802. NEED RESPONSIBLE AFTERNOON CHILDCARE. Mom with newborn needs responsible student with open afternoons to drive older children to activities in SMU, UP area. Email dtomizuka@gmail.com.

EMPLOYMENT BEST JOB ON CAMPUS! The Daily Campus is seeking advertising sales reps. This is an opportunity for advertising, marketing, or business majors to acquire “real world” experience. Looks great on resume! Earn commission while learning outside sales. Flexible hours. Call Diana at 8-4111, come by HughesTrigg, or e-mail ddenton@smu.edu. FRIENDLY AND RELIABLE photographers needed to work local events for new iphone app. Good hourly pay. No experience needed. 214-799-2205 or administrator@snapshotphoto.net for more details. HIRING MOTIVATED SALESPEOPLE for web scheduling, task management software. No tech skills necessary. Compensation includes monthly base salary plus bonuses for meeting/exceeding sales goals. jobs@plumlife.com.

YO—SANDWHICHES WITH attitude. N.Y. SUB 3411 Asbury 214-522-1070.

FOR RENT

FULLY FURNISHED, THREE blocks from SMU. Private home, private entrance, parking. Full bath, kitchen, WiFi, cable, washer/ dryer. New construction. $900.00 + utilities. Available 1/1/2011. Donna 214-535-2666.

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY 3 bed, 3 bath off Greenville. 2 huge baths w/jacuzzi tubs, huge front porch, kitchen w/granite countertops + stainless steel fixtures, hardwood floors, fully furnished minus bedrooms. $2800/mo. Melissa 832-276-9195.

ROOM FOR RENT in Executive Home for the right female student. 1 or 2-Bedroom, 2-bath furnished condo for Lease. $600/student. Terms Negotiable. 5 min to campus. Avail. Oct. 15. Call for information 214-528-9144.

BEAUTIFUL 3,600 SQFT private residence with security. One block from campus. 5/4.5. Female owner/occupant seeks student or faculty to share expenses. Call 214-522-2320.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

BILLS INCLUDED $1500/M0. 2/1.5 Gated condo. Meadow, 75. California feel. Chocolate hardwoods, granite counters, SS appliances. 1st floor, 5 doors open onto pool, grill station, gazebo, palms. Fenced back porch. New Washer/Dryer. Equipped with security, cable, DSL. 469-6883518 - Aaron. CONDO UNIVERSITY/MATILDA. 2 bedroom/2 bath. New wood floors, Pool, upstairs, washer/ dryer, approx. 1000/sq. ft. $950/ month. Please call 214-691-5363.

10546 STONE CANYON Road unit 127. $88,500 estimated mortgage $627.20. HOA, includes all utilities. 2/2, 1,208 sqft. 12 min from SMU, gated community. 2 assigned covered parking. Crystal 214-709-6404. BEAUTIFUL TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE. Walk to SMU. 3 bed, 2 bath, 2 car garage, open kitchen, fabulous master suite. Priced to sell. New construction. 3108 Rosedale UNIT H. $430,000. Amy Timmerman, Nathan Grace Real Estate. 214-395-4062, amy@ pickaperch.com.

Sudoku

STUNNING TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE. 3 bed, 3.5 bath, 2 car garage, 2 additional parking spaces. Great for roommates. Walk to class. 3101 ROSEDALE UNIT C. $480,000. Amy Timmerman, Nathan Grace Real Estate. 214-395-4062, amy@ pickaperch.com.

ROOMMATE ROOM FOR RENT- for the right female student. 2 Story Condo, walking distance from campus. Huge Closets, All Utilities Included. $1100/ mo. Lauren Kasper 202-368-5261.

ACCOUNTING, MATH, CHEMISTRY, Statistics, Economics, Finance, Physics, Rhetoric, Tutoring. “Learn to work smarter not harder.” David Kemp Tutorial Services. Call 469-767-6713. ACCOUNTING TUTOR 12 YEARS experience teaching/tutoring accounting students. Results-based tutoring. Let me help you excel this summer! Jason Rodriguez CPA, MS, MBA. 985-414-5331. ALL SCIENCES: Biology, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Anatomy, Physiology, English, SMU Alumna Graduate degree. Tutor All Levels, college, high school. Piaras (Pierce) McGonagle Individual or group settings. (214) 789-0425.

SERVICES DON’T LIFT A finger, call Cosmopolitan Maid Service. Occupied, move out cleaning. Bonded and Insured since 1989. No Job Too Big or Small. 972279-0726.

TUTOR SERVICES ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE TUTOR. Voted “The Best” for 15 years. College is more fun when you have a tutor. Lee Lowrie, CPA, MBA 214-208-1112.

By Michael Mepham

10/27/10

PERSONABLE INSIDE SALES rep to update computer account files, offer specials to established accounts. Flex hours between 9 and 4. $15/hr. Must be reliable. Call Mr. Bruce 8-11 M-F, 214-373-6920. www.tnccdallas.com. R+D KITCHEN BY Hillstone aka Houston’s is hiring servers, greeters. Call 214-890-7900 for appointment/apply in person M-Sun 2-5p. Located at 8300 Preston Center Plaza in University Park.

FOOD A REAL N.Y. Sub from one of those national chains? Figgedaboudit. N.Y. SUB 3411 Asbury 214-5221070.

MATH, STATISTICS TUTOR for MBA, college, high school students. Highland Park, Austin College, SMU alumna; M.S. Math; 20 years Texas Instruments; 2 years college math instructor; 11 years professional tutor. Sheila Walker 214-417-7677.

ACROSS 1 One of a “Sesame Street” duo 5 Tizzy 11 Chest muscle, briefly 14 Bug tail? 15 Injury requiring emergency room treatment 16 Everyone 17 Track and field event 19 Double standard? 20 Hardly laid-back 21 Morsel 22 Corp. exec hopefuls 23 Agreed 27 Dilettante 31 “Nuts!” 32 Baby Arp’s first word? 33 Metric prefix 36 Talk big 39 Lou Gossett Jr. played one in “An Officer and a Gentleman” 42 Ketel One alternative, familiarly 43 Señor’s “Certainly!” 44 Bistro 45 Crash site? 47 In a way 49 Air traveler’s need 53 Main Web page 54 Nashville sch. 55 Bond 60 Jackie’s second 61 Folder holder 64 Droop 65 Composer Debussy 66 Opposite of 43Across 67 Prefix with skeleton 68 Counselor’s charge 69 Mail-routing abbr. DOWN 1 Thai currency 2 Online marketplace

For solutions to our Sodoku puzzles, checkout our website at www.smudailycampus.com/puzzles. © 2010 Michael Mepham. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

TUTORING OR HOMEWORK Coaching from SMU freshman. For H.S. students and younger. Graduate of top prep school, enthusiastic, work well with kids. Local only. 207-712-3977, spoliquin@smu.edu.

TUTORS WANTED HOMEWORK COACH NEEDED for two boys ages 9 and 13. Job requires after school hours M-Th. Please e-mail mwatsonllc@me.com. Job location Hillcrest and Lovers Lane area. Responsibilities include helping 3rd and 7th graders with homework and school projects.

By Dan Naddor

3 4 5 6 7

Easy win Hefty volume USPS delivery Miró on the wall Second-deepest U.S. lake 8 “Faster!” 9 Hammed it up 10 Like crudités 11 “Hit Me With Your Best Shot” singer 12 Hall of Fame Broncos quarterback 13 Intimate 18 Leisure 22 African country nearest Spain 24 BMW rival 25 Small songbirds 26 Cologne that sounds wrong? 27 Tacks on 28 Trading center 29 Señor’s sendoff 30 Happy hour request 34 CBS forensic drama 35 “Not to worry” 37 “Hush!” to Romeo 38 “__ bien!”

10/27/10 Monday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

40 Cereal Mikey liked, in ads 41 Abundant 46 Number one Hun 48 Movie souvenir 49 Period 50 Seuss’s environmental advocate 51 Sadat’s faith 52 Search for and find, as a CD track

56 1492 trio member 57 How some NFL games are resolved 58 Circus sight 59 Prince William’s school 61 TV monitor 62 B-F connectors 63 __ Lingus

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6

News

• Wednesday, October 27, 2010

CLEMENTS: Cause of

SMU alumnus’ death unknown

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

wife was present during the shootout and refused to leave the residence, forcing police to use tear gas to get her out. She has since refused to speak to the authorities. In interviews with The Dallas Morning News, neighbors said they heard negotiations with Granger over a bullhorn before hearing shots. “We didn’t know what was going on,” said neighbor Amanda Rodriguez, 28. “We felt under siege.” Authorities located Clements’ body the next morning, buried in a shallow grave behind Granger’s house. Clements’ identification and some of his clothing were found in an outbuilding on the property. Authorities are still investigating a possible motive, but Henderson County Sheriff Ray Nutt said Clements had complained when Granger shot across a fence at a tree on his property. “Mr. Clements did have some type of conversation with him about that. I don’t know of what nature,” Nutt told The Associated Press on Monday. The cause of death has not yet been released, but Nutt said that officials believed that Clements had been shot. Authorities say that Granger had no police record and that they could not find any previous law enforcement calls to the property, though neighbors report that they were cautious of Granger. Granger’s small wooden house was decorated with several signs reading “Keep Out” and “No Trespassing,” and he was known to carry his AK47 with him. “Everywhere you saw Granger, you saw him with that gun on him,” neighbor John Laster told the AP. “It was like he [liked] to intimidate people.” Carolyn Barta, an SMU professor of journalism and author of the book “Bill Clements: Texian to the Core,”

Photo courtesy of 1963 Rotunda

B. Gill Clements, pictured second from left, was secretary of Phi Delta Theta at SMU.

a biography of Clements’ father, expressed her sorrow over the event. “It’s a real tragedy, he was a really nice man,” Barta said. “He and his father both loved SMU and were generous in terms of philanthropy and devoting their time in service to SMU. It’s just a real loss.” Clements graduated from SMU with a degree in finance in 1963, and was a member of Phi Delta Theta, serving as the fraternity’s rush chairman and secretary. While at SMU, he met his wife Pat, who also graduated in 1963. The couple raised their three children in Highland Park. Clements worked as president of SEDCO (Southeastern Drilling Co.), the oil-drilling company founded by his father. The company later sold to Schlumberger Ltd. Clements was a strong contributor to the University, donating to SMU Fund, the Phi Delta Theta house, the tennis program and the Mustang Club. He served on the Cox Associate Board from 1970 to 1976 and on the Clements Center for Southwest Studies Advisory Panel from 1995 to

2004. Clements’ father, Bill Clements, served two terms as Texas’ governor, and in between those terms served as chairman of the SMU Board of Governors. During his tenure, the “PonyGate” scandal erupted, leading to the infamous Death Penalty for SMU football. He later served as vice-chairman of the SMU Board of Trustees. In 1994, Bill Clements donated $10 million to SMU to endow the history department and create the Center for Southwest Studies, which now bears his name. He has also donated $4 million in 2008 to support improvements in facilities at SMU-in-Taos. He has donated to various other projects on campus, and has been a SMU Trustee Emeritus since 1991. B. Gill Clements is survived by his father, his wife of 47 years, three children and seven grandchildren. His memorial service will be held today at 4 p.m. at St. Michael’s All Saints Church in Dallas.

The Daily Campus

REPORT: Turner tops list CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

of the program based on IRS rules, according to Boone. Turner released SMU trustees from their promise of life insurance. Had the changes not taken place, Boone said the program would still be in place. Turner received $1,586,108 from that one-time payment. Boone said that the Board of Trustees was very pleased with Turner’s time at SMU. Boone said that they got a “great return on the investment,” and that Turner has “proven it by delivery of great successes for the University.” “I think, to a person, every member of the Board of Trustees of SMU would say, ‘The best investment that we’ve made over the last 15 years is Dr. R. Gerald Turner,’” Boone said. Head football coach, June Jones, received the second-highest total compensation at SMU with $2,142,056. That number breaks down into: $2,102,320 in salary, $6,541 in “other compensation,” $23,000 in deferred compensation and $10,195 in benefits. Jones’ salary is partially paid for by the Circle of Champions, an athletic fundraising group. The money that is raised funds “the difference between June Jones’ and his coaches’ compensation and what was available in the existing football budget,” university spokesman Kent Best said. The athletic director sends

Turner a recommendation for Jones’ compensation, and then the Board of Trustees then approves that recommendation. S. Leon Bennett, former general counsel for SMU, received $662,056 in total compensation last year: $328,295 in salary, $25,000 in bonus and incentive compensation, $273,232 in “other compensation,” $23,000 in deferred compensation and $12,529 in benefits. Bennett retired at the end of 2008. He was replaced by Paul Ward. Compensation data for Ward is not available. Head basketball coach, Matt Doherty, received $571,143 in total compensation last year: $517,301 in salary, $10,000 in bonus and incentive compensation, $3,583 in “other compensation,” $23,000 in deferred compensation and $17,259 in benefits. Athletic director Steve Orsini earned $445,065 in total compensation last year: $388,816 in salary, $11,102 in “other compensation,” $23,000 in deferred compensation and $22,147 in benefits. Dean of the Cox School of Business Albert Niemi Jr. earned $435,879 in total compensation last year. Associate Dean in the Cox School of Business William Dillon earned $428,891 in total compensation last year. Provost Paul Ludden earned

$406,046 in total compensation last year. Cox professor Amit Basu earned $345,135 in total compensation last year. Vice President for Student Affairs, Lori White, earned $240,524 in total compensation last year: $202,718 in salary, $9,704 in “other compensation,” $23,000 in deferred salary and $7,577 in benefits. Associate provost, Tom Tunks, earned $195,819 in total compensation last year: $170,331 in salary, $1,665 in “other compensation,” $17,339 in deferred compensation and $6,484 in benefits. University controller John O’Connor received $194,438 in total compensation last year: $168,613 in salary, $1,081 in “other compensation,” $17,287 in deferred compensation and $7,457 in benefits. Former Dedman dean, Cordelia Candelaria, received $193,688 in total compensation last year: $124,039 in salary, $50,000 in bonus and incentive compensation, $4,811 in “other compensation,” $12,500 in deferred compensation and $2,338 in benefits. Candelaria resigned from her position in 2009, citing “serious personal circumstances.” She was succeeded by the current dean of Dedman College, William Tsutsui. Compensation data for Tsutsui has not yet become available.

MASCOTS: graves of Peruna CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

(’37) was placed at Peruna’s burial site and now stands at Peruna Plaza outside Ford Stadium. Peruna II was supplied by W.E. Culwell, of Culwell and Sons on Hillcrest and thus began a long tradition between the Culwell Family and SMU. Culwell’s generosity continued until his death in 1964, and his family continues the tradition today. Peruna lived on campus at first and was cared for by an organization called “The Saddle Burrs,” but incidents on campus, like Peruna spending the night in sorority houses, drove Peruna out to the Culwell ranch in Grapevine. Peruna’s current home is kept private, for security.

Peruna VIII, our current mascot, is the first Peruna to serve at the new Gerald J. Ford Stadium. He famously began his career in 1997 by tripping and dragging his handlers at the Cotton Bowl. He is perhaps more famously known for leading the Mustang Band in President George W. Bush’s inauguration parade in 2001. Peruna can be seen during home football games running from end-zone to end-zone at the end of each quarter and the half. He used to run after each touchdown, much like the University of Oklahoma’s Sooner Schooner, but a change of conference and new rules put that practice to an end in 1996.

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