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INSIDE

Ketchup Burger Bar impresses Basketball loses 5th straight Tapestries come to Meadows

Meadows goes ‘BOOM’

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MONDAY

FEBRUARY 6, 2012 MONDAY High 57, Low 41 TuEsday High 60, Low 42

VOLUME 96 ISSUE 56 FIRST COPY FREE, ADDITIONAL COPIES 50 CENTS

Culture

SMU celebrates Chinese New Year PAT BOH Contributing Writer pboh@smu.edu

Richard Braxton, www.anvilphoto.com

Nikki Giovanni spoke to a packed house in Hughes-Trigg theater last Friday. Giovanni was the first in a series of speakers set for Black History Month.

ABS brings famous poet on campus HALEY THAYER Contributing Writer hthayer@smu.edu World-renowned poet Nikki Giovanni gave a speech in the Hughes-Trigg Theater Friday night in support of Southern Methodist University’s kickoff to Black History Month. The theme this year is “Raising the Bar” in which the Association of Black Students will have numerous programs to educate people about the history of African American culture. In front of a full auditorium, junior SMU student A’Rielle Gatlin said, “I’m excited to embark on this month-long journey in celebration of our rich history.” Black History Month began as National Negro History Week in 1926, and 50 years later, President Ford officially recognized Black History Month. This was a way for the nation to honor the history of Black Americans. Poet Nikki Giovanni, 68, is a university distinguished professor at

Virginia Tech University. She has reached many audiences around the world through her powerful speeches and has written poetry to her late friends Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King Jr. On Dec. 1, Nikki Giovanni walked around the campus of Virginia Tech saying, “Happy Rosa Parks Day!” She said students would turn to her saying they didn’t know it was Rosa Parks Day. And she said, “It’s not, that’s just how you get it started.” Through the laughter and shouts from the packed crowd in HughesTrigg, Giovanni, who was barely bigger than the stand she stood behind, spoke from her heart about what Black History Month means to her. She explained her magnificent relationship with Rosa Parks and how it evolved her into a strong, independent woman. “No one can tell me how to feel about things, I make my own decisions,” Giovanni said. This is a reminder as to how

Rosa Parks was an example of the first sit-in, standing up for her rights, starting a revolution. Giovanni brought up points about how inequality is still prevalent in our society today and stated that America needs to grow up and give black men the credit they deserve. The bad history that follows them allows the speculation that there is no exact number as to how many African-American men have been murdered from lynching, stoning etc. While watching the winter X Games in Aspen late one night, Giovanni questioned why she wasn’t watching breakdancing or double Dutch. “Why is no one filming that? Why do they not get the same opportunities just because they cannot pay for Aspen?” Giovanni said. Although all these scenarios still go on, Nikki Giovanni still believes that life is about being happy. She says she is one of the happiest people she knows, and she

hopes that everyone can still feel love for one another. Multiple standing ovations were given towards the end as Giovanni answered questions from the crowd and was given a T-shirt and plaque from the Association of Black Students. While waiting to get a picture and autograph from Giovanni, Kelley Butler, 39, said, “She is an amazingly, vibrant speaker who has the dynamic ability to be in tune with the culture of every generation in the room.” Butler, who is part of the black leadership forum from Prudential Mortgage Capital Company, got a group of her colleagues to come with her to the speech. They all agreed that the most important aspect of Giovanni’s speech was how no one can tell her how to feel, touching so many people in the room at that moment. Black History Month at SMU has many programs coming up and some that span throughout the entire month.

L ANDSCAPE

The Chinese Students Union (CSU) rang in the New Year with its Chinese New Year celebration Saturday night at Highland Park Presbyterian Church. Students from both Southern Methodist Univeristy and University of Texas-Southwest co-hosted this event, which was open to the general public. The event featured an array of cultural and traditional Chinese customs. “I’m here to enjoy the celebration for New Year’s,” SMU sophomore Lindsay Hong said. A local Chinese restaurant catered several spicy dishes for the event. Student groups performed a variety of musical acts, including hip-hop dances and Chinese pop songs. Other acts included a parody talk show featuring SMU sophomore Haoyi Yu. Hundreds of students, faculty members, community members and companies with Chinese culture ties flooded the auditorium. Besides entertaining the local Chinese-American community, CSU hoped to provide a way for those interested to experience Chinese culture. “We’re inviting [everyone interested in Chinese culture] to come and join us for the dinner and show tonight,” Rong Qian, an SMU sophomore and CSU member, said. Alex Chang, a freshman biomedical engineering student, decided to attend

the event because “I’m part Taiwanese, so I’m interested in Asian culture.” The Chinese New Year does not have a fixed date but rather follows the lunar calendar and changes every year. This year falls in the Year of the Dragon. Considered one of the most important cultural events, this festival is celebrated in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau, as well as countries with large Chinese populations such as Singapore, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam. While Chinese New Year customs may vary from community to community, many of the practices remain the same. Traditionally, adults hand out red packets of money to children, and families exchange gifts. All homes are completely cleaned to start the New Year fresh. Lastly, many people wear red, as the color is considered lucky. SMU Chinese language professors instructed classes on how to celebrate the Chinese New Year. “All teachers spent some time in class introducing Chinese New Year: the origin, the preparation before New Year, the decorations and do’s and don’t’s on the first day of New Year and Chinese zodiac,” Yan Xia, the Chinese Area Advisor, said. This year’s Chinese New Year took place on Jan. 23.

environment

It’s not cheap being green SPENCER J EGGERS / The Daily Campus

MACEY MERIGGI Contributing Writer mmeriggi@smu.edu It is hard to imagine that over 100 years ago the land that the Southern Methodist University campus sits on was a cotton field. Today, SMU’s 175-acre campus is well-known for its tree-lined boulevard and perfectly manicured grass, which entice many prospective students and donors alike. In 2004, SMU received an Honor Award from the Professional Grounds Management Society in the Urban University Grounds category. The university’s lawns have also been featured in leading landscape magazines. For the past nine years, Kevin Dillard has served as SMU’s landscape manager and worked thoughtfully toward maintaining and improving SMU’s high standard of grounds keeping. Former Residence Life and Student Housing tour guide Natasha Cannon noticed that prospective students are often impressed by the landscaping on campus. Often times,

the well-kept campus was part of the reason students chose to come to SMU. The university would not release the landscape budget figure after repeated calls to the Budget and Financial Planning office. The Resource Management Services office also declined to comment. According to the 2010 Treasurer Report, however, only three percent of the 2009 to 2010 endowment was designated for maintenance purposes, while the other 97 percent was used for educational program support, scholarships and faculty and staff support. Considering that SMU is one of 77 universities with an endowment of about $1 billion, that three percent allotted to the upkeep of school grounds is still a fairly large amount. Many students feel that the upkeep of the school grounds strongly reflects the university’s overall concern with the image it gives off. “For the hefty price tag that comes with an SMU education, a beautiful, pristine and green campus should be expected, if not demanded,” junior James Gunnar said.

Other students, however, believe that the fiscal resources used for landscape maintenance could be put to better use. Aric Horst, 20, agrees that SMU’s campus is beautiful, but he thinks that the university could cut the budget set aside for landscaping without decreasing the standard of aesthetic appeal that the school offers. Instead of spending as much capital on the grounds management, Horst believes that the university’s Internet access would benefit from a complete overhaul. Due to Dallas’ unique weather, Dillard and his 18-member team work tenaciously to maintain and manage the existing flora on campus. Aside from the already poor soil conditions that North Texas has to offer, the maintenance staff struggles with the extreme temperature changes that sometimes occur overnight and without much warning. Dillard explains that the team’s only defense against the unpredictable weather is to “plan ahead by using the right plant in the right place based on what you know is the average condition.” But when the temperature can go from

70 degrees to below freezing overnight, it can be difficult to plan ahead. This winter in particular has been unusually warm in North Texas, and Dillard admits that the issue with this phenomena is that it tricks the plants into come out of dormancy too early. When this occurs, the plants can be easily damaged by a late frost, which happens with some regularity during the winter months. Conservation and sustainability are the focus for SMU’s distinctive landscape management. The use of drought-resistant plants and perennials have become commonplace on campus in order to conserve water and other resources during this record-breaking Texas drought. Dillard strives to use as much recycled water as possible to combat the shortage of water. If the drought continues, however, “we may have to reevaluate what gets planted and when in order to save water in the long run.”

SMU looks to recycle its title SARAH KRAMER Editor in Chief skramer@smu.edu It’s that time of year for students to prove how eco-friendly they are in the annual RecycleMania competition. After being awarded first place in the Texas private schools per capita division last year, SMU faces the challenge of defending the title. “Participating in Recyclemania is a great way to get the students involved in sustainable efforts whether they are interested in being more environmentally friendly, or simply want to be number one,” said President of the Environmental Society Pamela Varela said. While SMU recycled 18.15 pounds last year, the Sustainability Committee and Environmental Society are expecting to do even better during this year’s eightweek competition.

“The goal and hope is that based on this awareness it will carry over as a practice in their everyday lives,” said Eric English, the co-chair of the SMU Sustainability Committee. “This will be our third year of participation as a campus whole, in the competition division, and we have steadily progressed each year.” Last year, SMU placed 54 of 363 schools in the per capita division nationally and 159 of 230 schools in the targeted material division. This year SMU continue the tradition of celebrating RecycleMania with an eco-fashion show and art competition in March. “RecycleMania is a great mashup of practical action and school spirit,” said Kim Cobb, co-chair of SMU Sustainability Committee. The competition began Sunday and ends March 31.


2

FOOD

The Daily Campus

MONDAY n FEBRUARY 6, 2012 REVIEW

TECHNOLOGY

Uptown’s latest burger joint addition KATE PETTY Food Editor kpetty@smu.edu Though relatively new to the Dallas dining scene, Ketchup Burger Bar is already making a name for itself. Located in Uptown, the burger joint opened a couple of weeks ago on Hall street. In typical Uptown fashion, Ketchup Burger Bar’s décor is clean and modern, but with a pleasant coziness that keeps the place from feeling stark. The entrance opens into a bar area, which I would imagine gets pretty noisy on a weekend night. Fortunately, those preferring a slightly more subdued dining experience can continue through to another room of tables and booths more spaciously arranged. There wasn’t much of a lunch crowd when I stopped in one Saturday afternoon, but luckily that meant quick service and an attentive waiter. The menu is simple but offers a wide variety of burgers, ranging from $7 to $13. Choices include something for every palette – beef, turkey, chicken, veggie, Ahi tuna and even lamb. For those not in the mood for such a heavy meal, three salad options, to which one can add any of the aforementioned burgers, are available. Not wanting to branch out too much, I decided on their namesake

SPENCER J EGGERS/The Daily Campus

Scoutmob offers huge discounts to many local restaurants in the Dallas area.

One more food app to add to your collection SPENCER J EGGERS/The Daily Campus

Ketchup Burger Bar not only uses fresh organic ingredients in their burgers, but is also available for delivery.

Ketchup Burger, which was topped with cheddar cheese, caramelized red onions, lettuce, tomato, mustard and their signature house ketchup. Also on the menu — seven different types of fries. Luckily the $6 fry trio lets you get a basket of any three fries of your choosing. That’s still a lot of narrowing down to do, but after much debate I decided on two classics, the house fries and the sweet potato fries, as well as a more unique option, the white truffle parmesan fries. Our fries arrived with a selection of four different ketchups. If you hadn’t guessed, the restaurant’s name isn’t just a title. Ketchup Burger

Bar takes pride in their selection of specialty ketchups, including a spicy chipotle ketchup and a sweet ketchup seasoned with cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Per the waiter’s suggestion, the sweet ketchup made a delightful pairing with the sweet potato fries, which were perfectly crisp. Unfortunately the white truffle parmesan fries didn’t have much flavor and they, as well as the house fries, were pretty soggy. The Ketchup burger had good flavor and was cooked to perfection. It came out picture perfect - nice and hot with the cheese melting down the sides. The only downside was how juicy the burger was. I know this

Campus Events TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

SMU Tate Student Forum: International economist Dambisa Mayo discusses her books in the HughesTrigg Student Center Ballroom at 4:30 p.m.

Ministers Week: A collection of group sessions and workshops sponsored by the Perkins School of Theology in Hughes Trigg Portico A from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.

Latin American Queer Movie Festival: A showcase of Latin American movies dealing with representations of gender in McCord Auditorium at 6 p.m.

SMU Tate Lecture: Dambisa Mayo discusses her economic theories and works in McFarlin Auditorium at 8 p.m.

If you’re not using Scoutmob yet, you should be. Scoutmob hit the app scene almost a year ago, but it’s still trying to make a name for itself. The premise behind this app is to suggest great local restaurants and then sweeten the deal by offering a discount. You may be thinking this sounds kind of like another Living Social or Groupon company, but the creators behind Scoutmob believe that their service goes the extra mile. All of the restaurant deals

through Scoutmob offer you at least 50 percent off your purchase, if not more. Also, you don’t have to buy anything beforehand. None of that buying an online coupon that you may or may not get around to actually using. With Scoutmob, all you have to do is press “Use The Deal” on your phone, show it to your waiter, and you’re done. As if that’s not enough, Scoutmob also writes a short bio on each restaurant detailing the atmosphere, the type of food and other general information, including where the restaurant is located and their hours. The bio concludes with a “menu highlights” section that features the restaurant’s signature dishes.

Police Reports

MONDAY February 6

is normally a desirable aspect of a burger, but I draw the line when it becomes a struggle to hold the burger without it falling apart. Other than that, my only issue was that the mustard overpowered the ketchup. I can’t say that I really missed it though, even without the ketchup the burger tasted good. Overall, the meal was tasty. For an uptown restaurant, the prices were decent. The menu offerings were not as remarkable as they initially appeared, but the food was good and if you’re in Uptown and craving a burger, Ketchup Burger Bar isn’t a bad place to visit.

KATE PETTY Food Editor kpetty@smu.edu

February 7

February 8

FEBRUARY 1

FEBRUARY 2

FEBRUARY 3

5:06 p.m. Beta Theta House/3058 SMU Blvd. A student reported theft of three Greek letters. The theft occurred on Feb. 1 sometime between 2 a.m. to 8 a.m. Open.

4:03 p.m. Kappa Alpha House/3004 SMU Blvd. A student was issued a University Park citation and booked into University Park jail and referred to the Student Conduct Office for being intoxicated in a public place. Closed.

12:35 a.m. Cockrell-McIntosh Hall/5904 Bishop Blvd. A student was referred to the Student Conduct Office for underage drinking. Closed.

5:40 p.m. Hamon Arts Library/6100 Hillcrest Avenue. A student worker reported theft of his money from his wallet. The theft occurred on Jan. 30 between 6:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. Closed.

4:25 p.m. Fondren Library East/6414 Hyer Lane. A staff member reported theft of a patio chair. The theft occurred sometime within the two week period. Open.

1:16 a.m. Boaz Hall/3200 Binkley Avenue. A student was issued a University Park citation, arrested, booked into University Park jail and referred to the Student Conduct Office for being intoxication in a public place. Closed.


The Daily Campus

MONDAY n FEBRUARY 6, 2012 Super bowl

Associated Press

New York Giants wide receiver Victor Cruz loses control of the ball under pressure from New England Patriots defensive back Sterling Moore and linebacker Brandon Spikes during the first half of the NFL Super Bowl XLVI football game in India-

basketball

Men’s Basketball loses, but prepares for TCU KELSEY CHARLES Contributing Writer kcharles@smu.edu The SMU Men’s Basketball team (10-13, 2-7) fell 59-52 to the University of Central Florida Knights (17-6, 6-3) on Saturday in Moody Coliseum, despite a career high effort by Jalen Jones with 16 points. Robert Nyakundi, coming off of a hamstring injury, added 15 points to the board, while no other Mustang was able to score more than five points. On the other end of the floor, Marcus Jordan, son of former NBA legend Michael Jordan, scored a game high 17 points for the Knights, while Isaiah Sykes and Tristan Spurlock added 15 points a piece. The Knights dominated the

glass, doubling SMU’s offensive rebounds throughout the night (14-7), which SMU’s coach, Matt Doherty, cited as one of their major downfalls in the game. “They are big and strong, and at the end of the day, the second chance points I felt really hurt us.” This ended up costing the Mustangs 12 points, and ultimately the game, in spite of a great overall defensive effort throughout the night. “It’s tough to play well and yet still lose,” Doherty said. Their lack of productivity on the offensive end was also to blame. “We’ve got to come together as a team and fight this,” Jalen Jones said. “You can’t get rattled.” The team shot 37.8 percent

from the field, falling short of their season average of 42.8 percent. Adding to their offensive woes, the Mustangs committed nine turnovers in the game. The Mustangs plan to continue to get better in practice as they look forward to their upcoming matchup against their arch-rival, the TCU Horned Frogs (13-9) this Wednesday at home. “There’s still a lot of season left,” Coach Doherty said. “We’ve played well, we’ve just got to keep trying to get better and better and hopefully the wins will come.” Tip-off is set for this Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 7 p.m. in Moody Coliseum. Tickets can be purchasedonlineat smumustangs.com/tickets.

SPORTS

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4

OPINION

The Daily Campus

MONDAY n FEBRUARY 6, 2012

Editorial Staff Editor-in-Chief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sarah Kramer Managing Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chase Wade SMU-TV News Directors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stephanie Brown, Meredith Carlton Assignments Desk Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tashika Varma Online Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Michael Murphy News Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rahfin Faruk Arts & Entertainment Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cassandra Robinson Associate Arts & Entertainment Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Katelyn Hall Sports Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mercedes Owens, Brooke Williamson Associate Sports Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kathryn Roden Photo Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spencer Eggers Style Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shelby Foster Health & Fitness Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anne McCaslin Parker Food Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kate Petty Opinion Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Brandon Bub Copy Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jan Anderson, Laura Murphy, Meghan Sikkel, Katie Tufts Video Editors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Summer Dashe, Wesleigh Ogle, Ali Williams, Eric Sheffield, Kent Koons

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Business Staff Business Assistant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Felix Curry The Daily Campus, a student newspaper at Southern Methodist University is operated by Student Media Company, Inc., Hughes-Trigg Student Center, 3140 Dyer Street, Suite 314 Dallas, TX 75275 The Daily Campus is published daily Monday, Wednesday, and Friday during the academic semester. For local, national, and classified display advertising, call 214-768-4111. For classified word advertising call 214-768-4554.

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Column

Sports: the greatest unifier (and divider) of them all akbar iqbal akbari@smu.edu

Super Bowl weekend is upon us and everybody is excited, even those who know almost nothing about the sport. It’s one of those odd days of the year when it doesn’t matter who you are or where you’re from, chances are you’ll spend it just like about almost everyone else. Being a huge sports fan myself, I know what it’s like to be passionate beyond rationality. However, I did not grow up around football, so this time I can take a step back and observe proceedings from a more neutral perspective. Nevertheless, the importance of the occasion has not been lost. It causes me to once again wonder why human beings place so much importance on something that can mean everything and nothing at the same time. I believe sports can be summed up in one simple comparison. While I write this, America is in the midst of pre-game festivities that include the inevitable trash talking and mocking of the opposition by just about anyone even remotely involved and extensive analysis of both teams by supposed experts (a flexible term since most fans think they fall into this category). This is a good example of how a sporting event can provide people with a much-needed break from reality. However, there are times when things can become all too real and for the wrong reasons, as is what happened last week in Egypt. A nation torn by civil strife has just faced a new catastrophe: a riot and stampede during a soccer match that left at least 74 people dead and close to a thousand injured. In my opinion, this truly emphasizes what can happen when people lose touch with what is truly important. Attacking one another, physically or otherwise, takes away from the occasion and ruins the point of the event. Competitive occasions make life more meaningful, even if it is irrational in some sense. Few things can compare to the pride and joy in seeing your team achieve something great. The bragging rights that come with it are a very welcome bonus. An event such as the Superbowl and FIFA World Cup have the ability to make entire nations put aside everything else and share one single point of focus, a feat of enormous proportions. However, history is littered with examples where horrible things happen when a game stops becoming just that. It is a slippery, downward slope when vindictiveness replaces competitiveness and such behavior has no place in sport. Akbar is a junior majoring in psychology and business.

POLICIES The Daily Campus is a public forum, Southern Methodist University’s independent student voice since 1915 and an entirely student-run publication. Letters To The Editor are welcomed and encouraged. All letters should concentrate on issues, be free of personal attacks, not exceed 250 words in length and must be signed by the author(s). Anonymous letters will not be published and The Daily Campus reserves the right to edit letters for accuracy, length and style. Letters should be submitted to dc@smu.edu.

Guest columns are accepted and printed at the editor’s discretion upon submission to dc@smu.edu. Guest columns should not exceed 500-600 words and the author will be identified by name and photograph. Corrections. The Daily Campus is committed to serving our readers with accurate coverage and analysis. Readers are encouraged to bring errors to The Daily Campus editors’ attention by emailing Editorial Adviser Jay Miller at jamiller@smu.edu.

Associated Press

A gas pipeline worker, checks the valves at the gas pumping station at Pisarevka, Russia.

In oil business, let the free market decide RAHFIN FARUK rfaruk@smu.edu Republicans tout themselves as fiscal conservatives – believers in the free market process. Candidates like Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney preach on the power of the invisible hand of the market and its ability to choose winners and losers. Day after day, GOP faithfuls are told that liberals are deterring economic progress. As someone who shares many views with fiscal conservatives, I find the Republican position hypocritical especially in light of the Keystone XL oil pipeline project – a proposed pipeline that will span from Canada to Texas if approved. Environmental concerns and private property rights aside, the economics of oil

are not free. OPEC, a cartel that has great power over global oil prices, can raise the price of oil at will. Traditional economics used by policymakers virtually ignores the negative externalities of petroleum ­­— pollution, public health and land destruction. But the biggest culprit for low gas prices remains Republicansponsored subsidies. For years, Republicans have supported supplementary ‘income’ to large gas and oil corporations like Exxon Mobil and Texaco. Corporations that generate billions annually receive hundreds of millions of dollars worth of supplements from the American taxpayer. Needless to say, gasoline prices should be higher. Environmental

economists like Lester R. Brown estimate that in a true free market, gas would cost more than $10 per gallon. So, what is the benefit of high gas prices? It will cause a shift to environmentally friendly sources of energy as the market becomes product neutral. As more companies start to invest in a fair market, more will choose research and development in the green sector. This will result in transitions to green products like the Chevy Volt and the Nissan Leaf. And, unlike oil, green energy has great long-term potential. One percent of the world’s geothermal energy could meet 99 percent of the world’s energy needs. Solar panels, wind energy and nuclear energy have the potential to cause a

green revolution. But, as with all things, it depends on the market. Before the Guttenberg press, no one wanted to read books because vellum was too expensive. Before the Ford Model T, there were still thousands of horses in New York City. Before the personal computer, only corporations could afford high-powered computing devices. I’m not a hippie or a tree hugger, but I’d like to think that Republicans and I can agree on this: the free market is the way to go. Rahfin is a freshman majoring in economics, mathematics and public policy.

Promising numbers belie economic truth ANDREW FIEPKE afiepke@smu.edu Over the past couple of months, it seems like the economic news keeps getting better and better, putting President Obama and the Democrats in a much stronger position for the 2012 elections. Even as recent as November, most Democrats were incredibly pessimistic about their chances. Now, after three months of betterthan-expected job reports and a steadily declining unemployment rate, Democrats talk openly about keeping the Senate and the Presidency as well as re-taking the House. Throughout 2011, virtually every opinion poll had Obama and the Democrats behind Republicans, but now most polls have Obama ahead of his possible opponents. While it seems like the latest economic report, released last Friday, which pegged the unemployment rate for January at 8.2 percent, down from 8.5 percent

in December, is nothing but good news for the president and his party. The reason for the decline in the unemployment rate needs to be taken into account. The main reason that the unemployment rate has been declining is because only people who are actively seeking work are counted as unemployed. In January, even though 243,000 jobs were created, a good number showing that the economy is indeed improving, the more significant statistic is the number of people who gave up looking for work and, therefore, are not technically part of the workforce and cannot be counted as unemployed. In January, 1.2 million people dropped out of the workforce, an all-time record. This factor was the main reason that the jobless rate declined; not any stellar economic growth or job creation. Another indication of this is the Labor Force Participation

Rate, which fell to a record low of 63.7 percent. This means that only 63.7 percent of people who would normally be eligible for work are even actively searching for employment. This is clearly not the sign of a strong and lasting recovery, and the non-partisan CBO came out earlier this week with a report that pegged the real unemployment rate at 10 percent. This is not the official number, but it is an estimation of what the real unemployment rate would be if all of the people who would normally still be in the labor force under more normal economic circumstances. The surface statistics point to an Obama recovery, yet the numbers that underlie these statistics point to an overall weak economy. This recovery has been the weakest on record. On average, at this point after a recession, the economy should be growing at double the rate it grew last year. Look for President Obama to begin taking credit for the declining unemployment rate,

and improving economic picture. However, Americans outside of Washington feel the effects of the smaller labor force and the continued weakness of the housing market. Any economic problems in Europe could push the economy back over the brink. So, America is not out of the woods yet. Since this is an election year, it is unlikely that the gridlock in Washington will yield to allow any meaningful economic help to pass. Therefore, the economy is likely to continue improving on the surface as it has been. President Obama will make the most of this and will most likely be re-elected, unless the Republican challenger, most likely Mitt Romney, can make the case, supported by historical facts, that this recovery is not as quick or effective as it should be. Andrew is a sophomore majoring in finance, French, and markets and culture.


The Daily Campus

ARTS

MONDAY n FEBRUARY 6, 2012 Theater

5

SMU student play goes off with a ‘boom’ Katelyn Hall Associate A&E Editor khall@smu.edu SMU student theater production of “Boom!” lived up to its name. Energetic, entertaining and downright explosive, the play delivered an impacting and impressive experience. Senior theater major Jason Moody produced the show, which ran last weekend in the Owens

Fine Arts Center, because he felt passionate about the script. “I’m just really connected to this show,” Moody said. In addition to producing the show, Moody played the lead ,Jules, a marine biologist who,based on his research on fish, believes a large comet is going to hit earth. Jules’ strange belief acts as the catalyst for an eerie and postapocalyptic plot that centers on the

marine biologist and a journalism major named Jo. Acting as Jo was junior theater major Elizabeth Peterson whose performance was rich and intriguing. Peterson and Moody skillfully unraveled a complicated relationship for the audience. Moody’s performance of a deeply determined but unaroused homosexual is convincing and enthralling. As if this montage were not

entertaining enough, third year theater graduate student Aleisha Force, as Barbara, added yet another dimension. Force’s role remains unapparent for a good portion of the play. It later becomes clear that she is the puppet master to scene itself. The play is an exhibit in a museum she controls. Force kept the audience on their toes throughout the performance and delivered the final twist of the

play: she herself is not human, but a fish. The humans did not survive the apocalypse. Though performed in the small Doolin Gallery of Meadows, “Boom!” could have easily have been a mainstream community production for the brilliant acting, realistic set design and skillful direction of junior theater major Miranda Parham. “You can come and see student theater here that will be a student

show—sort of minimal and with a focus on the acting,” Moody said. “Every time I do a show, I want to produce something that you could go see in the main theaters of SMU or elsewhere in the community. I want to live up to an expectation almost.” And live up to an expectation he did. With this satisfying production, the senior theater major can go out with a “boom.”

ART

Meadows Museum expands repetoire with Portugese ‘Pastrana Tapestries’ MEREDITH CAREY Contributing Writer mbcarey@smu.edu SMU’s Meadows Museum is known for its extensive collection of Spanish art, but another country will get to steal the limelight in the most recent exhibition: “The Invention of Glory: Alfonso V and the Pastrana Tapestries.” The exhibition highlights four recently restored tapestries that commemorate the conquest of

two North African cities by King Alfonso V of Portugal. Miguel Angel Aguilar, president of Fundación Carlos de Amberes, pointed out that the four textiles are unique in that they do not focus on biblical or mythological subjects, like most tapestries of the time. Ranging from 30 to 50 feet wide, the Pastrana tapestries detail the soldiers, armor and weaponry of 15th century Portugal. Unlike most war-themed artwork, the final panel of the

exhibition shows the victors and the losers in an unorthodox light. Usually, the tapestry that recounts the victory is a celebration of the victors’ destruction, but the Pastrana tapestries show the victors and losers with similar facial expressions, which Aguilar described as “simply human.” The tapestries, woven from silk and wool thread, have been preserved in the Collegiate Church of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción in Pastrana. There, the Fundación Carlos

de Amberes, who led and funded their restoration, found them in poor condition. Today, “they look as close as they can to their original selves,” Director of the Meadows Museum Dr. Mark A. Roglán said. Also included in the exhibition, and exclusively at the Meadows Museum, is the armor of King Alfonso V’s standard-bearer, who himself is featured in the third panel. The armor is the only existing example of Portuguese armor of

that era and is usually housed in the Cathedral of Toledo in Spain. The exhibit at SMU also celebrates the first collaboration between the Meadows Museum and the National

Gallery and is open until May 13. The tapestries exhibit will include various events including lectures, musical performances and historical programs.

SUBS SO

FAST

YOU’LL FREAK! Photo Courtesy of Meadows Museum

“The Invention of Glory: Alfonso V and the Patrana Tapestries” is currently playing at the Meadows Museum and will run through May 13.

Since 1951

FREAKY FAST

DELIVERY! ©2011 JIMMY JOHN’S FRANCHISE, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

CHILDCARE

FOOD

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DALLAS FAMILY SEEKS nonsmoking concierge, $13/hr 12-14 hrs/week. We reimburse $.55/ mile. Main duties include groceries, returns, pharmacy, USPS, dry cleaning, scheduling services, some laundry and light housework. Childcare experience a plus! Please e-mail resumes to 75230Family@att. net or fax resume to 972-404-4619. SEEKING NANNY tTOhelp w 3 kids (ages 9,7,3) in Christian home. 35-40 hrs/wk, some flexibility, most hrs between 8am-6pm Mon-Fri. Evening help approx 1weeknight/ wk and 1 weekend evening/mo. College and/or childcare exp. A plus; can accommodate some class schedules. Salaried position w 2 wks paid vaca. Park Cities Area. Mid-Feb start.214-395-4087

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FULLY FURNISHED APARTMENT three blocks from SMU - private entrance, parking, full bath, kitchen, washer dryer, newer construction, all utilities paid. $1,300 Donna 214-5352666. ROOM FOR RENT in Executive Home for female student. Two blocks from campus $600/ month. - Furnished 2 Bed/2 Bath condo. Available March 1st $1150/ month. 214-528-9144.

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TUTOR SERVICES ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE TUTOR. Statistics tutor. Voted “The Best” for 16 years. “College is more fun when you have a tutor.” Lee Lowrie, CPA, MBA cell 214-208-1112. SMU Dallas, Texas. Stats 2301- Accounting 2301, 2302, 3311, 3312, 6301 - Finance 3320 - Real Estate 33811

ACCOUNTING, MATH, CHEMISTRY, Statistics, Economics, Finance, Physics, Rhetoric, Tutoring. “Learn to work smarter not harder.” David Kemp Tutorial Services. Call 469-767-6713. MATH, STATISTICS TUTOR for MBA, college, high school students. Highland Park, Austin College, SMU alumna; M.S. Math; 20 years Texas Instruments; 2 years college math instructor. Sheila Walker 214-417-7677. smumath@sbcglobal.net

* SMURENT.COM PROVIDES FREE help for students looking to lease, rent, buy, or sell. Walking distance, uptown, town homes, apartments. SMU alum owned. SMUrent.com 214-457-0898 BaileyRealtyGroup@gmail.com

Sudoku

By Michael Mepham

02/6/12

EVENT

ARE YOU DRIVEN? WANT A ON CAMPUS JOB THIS SPRING/ SUMMER? BEST JOB ON CAMPUS! The Daily Campus is seeking sales reps. This is an oppotunity for advertising, marketing, or business majors to aquire “real world” experience. Looks great in resume! Earn commision while learning outside sales. Flexible hours. Call Diana a 214-768-4111, come by Hughes-Trigg, or emailddenton@ smu.edu A+ STUDENT STAFFING seeks college students for part time and fulltime office positions. Call 214-3579500 to set up an interview. Jobs pay $10-12/hr www.studentstaff.com HIGHLAND PARK DESIGN firm seeking office assistant to update contact list, run errands, file paper work. Flexible hours. Contact Whitney, Whitney@laurahunt.com

For solutions to our Sodoku puzzles, checkout our website at www.smudailycampus.com/puzzles. © 2012 Michael Mepham. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

ACROSS 1 PC screens 5 Bumbling types 9 Washer or dryer: Abbr. 13 Banister 14 “Deck the Halls” syllables 15 Cuba, to Castro 16 *Start of a Jackie Gleason “Honeymooners” catchphrase 19 Capone associate Frank 20 Political satirist Mort 21 Pale 23 “Be right with you!” 25 Moe, Curly or Larry 28 Space-saving abbr. 29 *Vivaldi classic, with “The” 33 Pot-scrubbing brand 34 Fencing sword 35 King with a golden touch 36 *Cat’s blessing, so it’s said 39 Brainstorms 42 Company with a “swoosh” logo 43 “The Racer’s Edge” 46 *Tennessee Ernie Ford hit about coal mining 49 Musician’s asset 50 Big name in tea 51 New Orleans university 53 Orch. section 54 Coarse file 58 Pantyhose that came in a shell 59 What the starred answers start with 63 Upscale hotel chain 64 Potatoes’ partner 65 Post-Christmas retail event 66 Bog fuel 67 Hwy. accident respondents 68 Managed care gps.

By Carl Esposito

DOWN 1 Chums 2 Met by chance 3 Men’s wear accessories 4 Bandits in Vegas? 5 More than occasionally, to a bard 6 Oohs’ partners 7 Circus insect 8 Scout uniform component 9 Help 10 Free TV ad 11 Layered building material 12 Layered ristorante offering 17 Feudal estate 18 “Do it, or __!” 22 Loch of legend 24 Filmmaker Ethan or Joel 26 Domesticated 27 Suffix with psych 30 Ivy League sch. in Philly 31 Got going again, as a fire 32 Fancy watch

Friday’s Puzzle Solved

2/6/12

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

36 NHL part: Abbr. 37 “Understood” 38 Dryer outlet 39 Followers: Suf. 40 Low-cal soda 41 Radical 43 Company associated with the alcoholic “7” in a “7 and 7” 44 Citrus hybrid 45 Gets the creases out of

47 Brontë’s “Jane __” 48 “Star Trek” helmsman 52 Dog restraint 55 Zenith 56 Goblet feature 57 Jr.’s exam 60 Cell “messenger,” briefly 61 Tailor’s concern 62 Fourths of gals.

Can’t wait until tomorrow for Crossword solutions? For solutions to our Crossword puzzles now, checkout our website at www.smudailycampus.com.


6 ADVERTISEMENTS

The Daily Campus

MONDAY ■ FEBRUARY 6, 2012

S M U -I N -TA O S 5 F A L L 2 0 1 2

NEW FALL SEMESTER – Now accepting applications Experience a full fall semester in Taos 5 Earn 15-18 credit hours 5 3 fall breaks Courses available for most majors and minors 5 Add or complete a business minor AUGUST 21 – DECEMBER 12

INF O SE S SIONS

ANTH 2301 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology – Nibbs

Ever y Wednesday 1 – 5 p.m. Room 338 - Blanton Building Visit with Taos program students 214-768-3657

ANTH 3310/CFB 3310 Good Eats: Forbidden Flesh – Nibbs ANTH 3312 Mesoamerican Archaeology – Marken ANTH 3334/CF 3334 Fantastic Archaeology and Pseudoscience – Marken ASPH 1300 Basics of Digital Photography – Hunter ASPH 3306 Photography in Taos – Hunter CF 3338 Defining the Southwest – Allbright CF 3374/ANTH 3374 Taos Experience – Adler CFA 3372 Inventing Americas: Imagining SW Indians – Allbright COMM 3385/4325 Nonprofit Writing and Internship – TBD ENGL 3310 Contemporary Approaches to Literature, Language and Culture – Satz ENGL 4360 Studies in Modern and Contemporary American Literature – SW emphasis – Satz *FINA 3310 Finance Fundamentals – TBD *FINA 3312 Personal Finance – TBD GEOL 1315 Intro to Environmental Sciences – Jacobs GEOL 2320 Southwestern Environments: A Geologic Approach – Jacobs HIST 3311 Nineteenth-Century American West – Smith HIST 3322 (CFB 3322) Native American History – Smith *MKTG 3310 Marketing Concepts – Kindley *MNO 3310 Management Concepts – Jackofsky PSYC 2319 Social Psychology – TBD SPANISH 2311, 2312 (or equivalent, based on student needs) – TBD STAT 2301 Statistics for Modern Business Decisions – TBD WELL 2131 Mountain Sports – Weil *Courses eligible for business minor

For more details about course descriptions, please visit smu.edu/falltaos

DC020612  

The print edition of The Daily Campus for Monday, Feb. 6, 2012.

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