Issuu on Google+

         

   

        KAYAFUNGO WATER & SANITATION REPORT    Prepared by Lily Muldoon, Project Director    2008 ‐ 2009   

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS:  1.

Background (p. 1) 

2.         3.     4.           5.  

Overview of Kayafungo (p.1)    a. Location and Climate    b. Economy  Report Methodology (p.3)  Water and Sanitation Assessment (p.4)    a. Water Quantity    b. Water Quality    c. Hygiene and Sanitation  Possible Water Solutions (p. 6)  a. Roof Rainwater Harvesting    b. Surface Water    c. Boreholes    d. Piped Water Sources    e. Dams    f. Point‐of‐use Water Treatments 

            6.   Possible Sanitation Solutions (p. 11)      a. Ventilated Improved Pit Latrines      b. Plastic Latrines      c. Compost Latrines      d. Bacteria Treatment    7.   SMRC Initiatives (p.12)      a. Water Solutions      b. Sanitation Solutions    8.   Other Organizations (p. 17)      a. World Vision      b. African Medical and Research Foundation      c. Arid Lands      d. Coast Water Services Board      e. Coast Development Authority    9.     Lessons Learned (p. 19)    10.   Appendices (p. 21)      a. Map      b. Roof Rainwater Catchment System Budgets      c. Sanitation Project School Information Chart      d. Sample Government Update Letter      e. Contact List 

 


1   

1. BACKGROUND    The Student Movement for Real Change (SMRC) is working with the Kayafungo community to address issues of water,  sanitation, health and education.  Lily Muldoon, SMRC Kenya Project Director, initiated the projects in 2006 during a  study‐abroad semester and returned with volunteers in 2007 and 2008 to conduct community needs assessments,  develop capacity and implement SMRC’s major development initiatives. This report addresses the information gained  and work carried out by SMRC concerning water and sanitation in Kayafungo, Kenya.         2. OVERVIEW  OF KAYAFUNGO 

 

a. L OCATION AND  C LIMATE  

The Kayafungo Location is in the Kaloleni Constituency of the Kaloleni District in the Coast Province of Kenya, 500km  southeast of Nairobi and 52km northwest of Mombasa.  See Appendix A for a map of the region.   Kayafungo contains arid and semi arid zones and receives an erratic rainfall between 400‐900mm annually. The rainfall  occurs in two main seasons; the long rainfall season is March until July and the short rainfall season lasts from October  until December. The location is generally hot and humid all year with high temperatures both day and night.  The annual  mean minimum temperature ranges between 22.5°C to 24.5°C and the maximum temperature ranges between 30°C to  34°C.    The location lies within a region with the lowest wind speeds in Kenya.  Available records show that wind speeds range  between 4.8 km/hr to10.9 km/hr.  These wind speeds are less than the minimum wind speed of 11 km/hr required to  economically operate windmill driven water pumps or generators.  The potential evaporation in the Kayafungo Location  is in the range of 2,000‐2,200 mm/yr.   

b. E CONOMY  

Kaloleni District is the poorest district in the Coast Province, the  second poorest province in Kenya. Currently 80 percent of the people  living in Kayafungo Location live below poverty line. The location‐ level poverty index is 37, indicating a high depth and incidence of  poverty.1 In Kaloleni District, 70% of the population is hard‐core  poor.  This group is defined as those households that cannot meet  the basic minimum food requirements after spending all of their  income on food alone.  To gauge who is poor, medium and rich the Kayafungo people  reported that over 35% of the Kayafungo population is very poor,  Kids after collecting water in Kayafungo  35% is generally poor, 20% live averagely and 10% of the population is  considered rich. The wealth indicators in Kayafungo location are illustrated in the table below derived from a study  conducted by World Vision in 2004. The incomes range from $14.50 per month ($0.48 per day) to over $285 per month.   The average household was reported to afford at least two meals a day for all family members.2                                                                     1 Geographic Dimensions of Well‐Being in Kenya, Central Bureau of Statistics, 2003. 

2 Community Water Sources Feasibility Study – Kaloleni ADP. World Vision – Watsan Consultants. August 2004.  Water Report 2009—Kayafungo, Kenya 

 

www.studentmovementusa.org 


2   

  R ESULTS OF WEALTH RANKING IN  K AYAFUNGO  L OCATION    

Very Poor 

Poor

Medium

Rich 

Description 

• Lives in a mud house  • Has no livestock  • Children do not go to  school  • Has no latrine  • Has no radio  • Has few household  items  • Earn income from casual  labor  • Eats one meal a day 

• Lives in a mud  house  • Has one or two  animals  • Children do not go  to school regularly  • Has no latrine  • Has no radio  •Has few household  items  •Practices  subsistence farming  • Eats less than 2  meals a day 

• Has a permanent  house  • Owns large piece of  land  • Has cows and goats  • Children go to good  schools  • Has radio and TV  • Has good furniture  • Practices good  farming  • Runs a big business  • Eat three meals a  day 

Income 

• Earns less than $14.50  per month  30% 

• Earns less than $21  per month  35%

• Has a semi or  permanent house  • Owns land  • Has more than two  goats  • Children go to  school regularly  • Has a radio  • Has a bicycle  • Has a dining table  • Has chairs and bed  • Has utensils  • Runs small business  • Eats at least two  meals a day  • Earns on average  $21 per month  25%

Census  Percentage* 

Earns more than  $285 per month  10% 

  * The census percentage is arrived at by asking the community how many people they believe are in each category  within a group of 100 people. 

2. REPORT METHODOLOGY    This report is a compilation from many sources including SMRC personnel, published government censuses, studies  done by other non‐governmental organizations (NGOs) working in the region, and interviews with relevant government  ministries.  A description of the research process for this report is outlined below.  In 2006, Lily Muldoon lived in homes in Kayafungo for one month.  During this time she conducted community meetings,  interviewed individuals at their homesteads and researched government archives in order to evaluate community  needs.  She returned in June 2007 and April 2008 to assist professional assessments and further understand community  needs.  The Muthaa Community Development Foundation (MCDF), a partner on health with SMRC, conducted a series of five  community  needs  focus  groups  from  May  5  through  May  9,  2008.    Four  focus  groups  were  open  to  all  community  members and one was specifically for community leaders.  Over 600 community members participated in the process.        WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


3    Daniel Tewles, a project coordinator from SMRC, worked in Kayafungo  from October to December 2007. His primary responsibility was to create  a focus group of community leaders to gather information through  discussions and to conduct a formal population and demand assessment  survey.  This survey utilized leaders from each of the 25 villages in  Kayafungo to gather data on population and water use.  Additionally, he  held community meetings and meetings with the Kayafungo Women  Water Project that addressed community needs. Caleb Morse, another  SMRC Project Coordinator, performed a survey of the latrine coverage in  Kayafungo in June 2007.  He traveled to all 29 schools in Kayafungo (17  nursery, 7 primary and 5 secondary schools) and interviewed the school  headmasters to determine school populations, water usage and latrine  statistics. 

Emily Karechio and Abdalla Mohamed from  the Muthaa Community Development  Foundation 

Engineers Without Borders at Washington State University (EWB@WSU)  traveled to Kayafungo in June 2007 to conduct an initial site assessment.   As  part  of  this  assessment,  EWB@WSU  tested  the  water  quality  at  a  random selection of dams and pans, and also tested the water quality at the source for piped water.  The Coast Water  Services Board (CWSB) supplemented this assessment with dry season testing.     World Vision has  several communities needs  past decade.  A 2007 study  quantitative analysis of  indicators” that included  2004, World Vision  Sources Feasibility Study as  Development Program  term evaluation of the ADP  need among the Kayafungo  addressed before focusing  activities.  A similar study 

generously shared the results of  assessments conducted over the  of the Kaloleni District included  “transformation development  water and sanitation surveys. In  conducted a Community Water  part of the Kaloleni Area  (ADP).  In 2003, a separate mid‐ revealed that water is the major  community and needs to be  on other poverty alleviation  was conducted in 1998. 

SMRC personnel has also  and information from the  Water and the Ministry of  Arid Lands Resource  Education. 

interviewed and received advice  Ministry of Health, Ministry of  State for Special Programmes  Management and the Ministry of 

Saul Garlick, Lily Muldoon, and KWWP Group  representatives in Kayafungo 

      

      WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


4      4. WATER AND SANITATION ASSESSMENT 

The lack of water is consistently identified as the greatest challenge facing the Kayafungo community.  These results  appeared in every major and minor evaluation of the region conducted by either NGOs or governmental organizations,  including the community needs assessments conducted by SMRC personnel.  Women walk for up to six hours a day to  collect water and schools close early in the dry season to allow children time to assist in collecting water.    Studies by World Vision in 1998, 2004 and 2007 all ranked water provision as the highest priority for the Kayafungo  community.  The Kayafungo community identified the following needs as part of a 2004 World Vision focus group study: 

PROBLEM 

FREQUENCY

RANK 

Lack of water 

x 54

1

Inadequate medical services 

x 4

2

Unemployment 

x 3

3

Poor roads 

x 3

4

Illiteracy 

x 3

5

Inadequate security 

x 2

6

Lack of markets 

x 1

7

Lack of food 

x 1

8

Lack of land 

x 1

9

  The Coast Water Services Board identifies Kayafungo as one of the 50 locations in greatest need for water in the Coast  Province and as one of the two locations in the Kaloleni District in greatest need of water.  The Coast Development Authority reports that, in the Kaloleni Division, diarrhea is ranked second after malaria in the list  of the ten most common causes of outpatient morbidity.  The most vulnerable group is children under the age of five.   The Gotani Health Dispensary, the primary clinic in the location, reports that diarrhea—likely caused by poor quality of  water—is the number one killer of children under five in Kayafungo.  Children and adults also suffer from intestinal  worms, skin infections and respiratory system diseases.  The community therefore has two primary needs.  First, the community, local NGOs, and government agencies, all  consistently and unequivocally identify the lack of water as the greatest need in Kayafungo.  Relieving the burden of  inadequate water supply is a priority.  The second need is for better health.  The disease burden in Kayafungo is caused  by an inadequate quantity of water, poor water quality, lack of sanitation infrastructure and poor hygiene practices.   These needs are explored below. 

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


5   

a. W ATER  Q UANTITY     The community identifies the quantity of water as their primary need.  The 2004 World Vision Study found that only  4.2% of the population in Kayafungo is using the recommended 20 liters of water per person per day, while 77% uses  less than 10 liters per person per day and 18.8% uses 11‐19 liters per person per day.  The vast majority of the  population (74.3%) takes more than 60 minutes to walk to a water source.  Only 1.6% has piped water near their  compounds and 24.1% takes less than 60 minutes to walk to a water source.    Similar results were observed by an SMRC project  coordinator in a study conducted at the end of 2007.   The primary water sources in the community are  open dams and pans.  Most of the water pans and  dams are seasonal and remain dry for up to 6‐8  months in a year due to low rainfall reliability.  The  walking distances vary during the wet and dry  seasons.  On average, a walking distance of 1‐4km is  covered during the wet season and increases to 6km  or more in the dry season. 

b. W ATER  Q UALITY     The quality of water at the pans and dams is poor.  EWB@WSU and the CWSB performed a battery of water quality tests  at a random selection of pans and dams in both the wet  A woman collects water at Nzoweni Dam  and dry seasons.  Manganese and phosphorus levels  exceed World Health Organization (WHO) limits by a factor of two.  Lead and turbidity levels exceed WHO limits by one  to two orders of magnitude.  The WHO recommends fecal coliform limits of 0 MPN/100 mL, while levels in excess of  1,100 MPN/100 mL are common at the dams and pans.  The water the people drink is brown and contains visible organisms.  The people are often too poor to boil it or to use a  chemical cleaning agent.  For some families, cultural belief exists that boiling or treating water removes desirable tastes  from the water; consequently, they drink the water directly from the dams and pans without treatment.   

c. H YGIENE AND  S ANITATION     According to the District Public Health Authorities and the Kilifi District Development Plan 2002‐2008, the latrine  coverage in the District is estimated at 40%. The World Vision Study estimates that latrine coverage in Kayafungo is less  than the District average.  During a 2007 study, Caleb Morse of SMRC identified unlined pit latrines as the most common  type of latrine.  Common pit latrines are constructed with mud walls supported by twigs and branches and thatched  roofs made of palm leaves.  Only a few have corrugated iron sheets for the roof or walls.i  The floors are made from  wooden poles and mud.    Mr. Morse similarly found sanitation in schools to be inadequate. Mr. Morse noted that schools either did not have a  single latrine in the school compound for pupils or had too few to meet the needs of the pupils and teachers.        WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


6    The Kenya Ministry of Health recommends that  schools have one latrine for every thirty students.  The  Ministry of Education reports that none of the 29  schools in Kayafungo meet this recommended ratio.   In fact, the majority of the schools in Kayafungo do not  even have half of the recommended number of  latrines.  Every single school in the Kayafungo location  is in need of additional latrines.  Awareness of hygiene and sanitation is low.  There are  several cultural beliefs in the community that  contribute to poor health.    First, there is a strong belief that in‐laws cannot share  the same latrine. Extended families very often live on  the same compound, and it is uncommon for a  compound to have more than one latrine, if it has any  latrines at all.  Therefore, even when there are latrines available, many women are not able to use them due to this  cultural belief.    Typical latrine in Kayafungo 

Second, there is a deep‐seeded belief that washing one’s hands in the same bowl as someone builds a sort of trust and  forms an important connection.  For this reason, it is common for families and close friends to wash their hands from  the same bowl using the same water.  Clinical and field studies show that pouring water over the hands when washing is  exponentially more effective in eliminating bacteria than washing hands in the same bowl ‐ a stark contrast to the  current cultural practices in Kayafungo.  Third, focus groups revealed that members of the community believe that boiling water diminishes the flavor and makes  water undesirable to drink.           5. WATER SOLUTION POSSIBILITIES 

  SMRC explored several options to address the water crisis in  Kayafungo.  Specifically, SMRC researched roof rainwater  harvesting, surface water collection, boreholes, piped water  systems, dams and point‐of‐use water treatments.  These  options are outlined below. 

a. R OOF RAINWATER HARVESTING   Description:  Roof rainwater harvesting requires an iron‐sheeted  roof, gutters and a collection tank to store water after it has  rained.  Kayafungo is classified as moderately suitable for  rainwater harvesting and is not reliable due to consistent dry 

SMRC rainwater catchment system with plastic  tank at Gogoraruhe Primary School. 

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


7    spells.  Rainwater harvesting from roof catchments is a technology which has not been exploited fully due to lack of  reliability and lack of resources. 

  FORMULA TO DETERMINE THE WATER A SURFACE CAN CAPTURE ON A METAL ROOF:  0.765 x annual precipitation in millimeters x surface area in meters2 =  volume of captured water in liters  Options: When constructing a roof rainwater catchment system a plastic or ferro‐cement tank can be installed.  Plastic  tanks are generally smaller, cheaper and do not last as long (about 10 years). Ferro‐cement tanks have the potential to  be larger (up to 60,000 liters) and have a longer life expectancy.  However, ferro‐cement tanks can crack and are difficult  to repair; as evidenced by the ferro‐cement tank constructed by World Vision at Gandini Primary School.    Rainwater catchment systems can also be cleaned to improve the quality of the water collected. Devices exist that are  fairly simple to design that "flush" the roof with the first part of a rainstorm to clean off the roof.  The rest of the  rainwater is collected and stored in a tank.  This device avoids dust, bird droppings and other contaminants from  collecting in the tank.   Budget:  Below are approximations based on January 2009 quotations.  Plastic tank and guttering (5,000 Liters) = Ksh. 39,200 (US$520)  Ferro‐cement Tank (X Liters) = Ksh. 311,990 (US$4,110)  See Appendix B for full budget breakdown.  Pros: The rainwater catchment systems provide direct access to comparably clean water at favorable locations. They are  relatively cheap to install and have decent longevity. The water is protected from insects and other forms of water‐born  disease. The ferro‐cement tanks are excellent insulators and keep water cool in a hot, dry climate.  Cons:  Dependent upon rainfall, tanks can remain empty during the dry seasons. Often, there is insufficient rainfall in  Kayafungo for rainwater catchments to adequately supply water. Also, catchment systems can only be installed on  metal roofs, limiting their location coverage.   Usually, catchment systems are installed on public institutions.  Funding installation on private locations is difficult for  establishing equitable use.  

b. S URFACE WATER    Description: Users directly collect the water from rivers and streams during the rainy seasons and scoop from the dry  riverbeds during the dry seasons.  The streams and rivers in the region are seasonal and therefore people usually cannot use this water source during the  dry season. River Mnyenzeni is the location’s main and only year round river.  It creates the border between Kayafungo  Location and Mariakani Location.      WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


8   

c. B OREHOLES   Description: A borehole is a machine drilled, small diameter, vertical, round hole in the ground, tapping one or more  groundwater bearing layers (aquifers).  Four boreholes exist in the Kayafungo Location but they are incomplete or no longer in use. Boreholes that have been  drilled in this region have proved unsuccessful in terms of water quality.  Use of all of them has been discontinued  because of high salinity in the water. 

d. P IPED WATER SOURCES   Description: Currently there is no piped water in Kayafungo Location.   The pipeline from Mariakani to Kaloleni, cutting through Kayafungo, was in use but is no longer reliable due to lack of  water pressure and breaks in the pipe caused by the construction of the new Kaloleni‐Mariakani road. The road  contractor is responsible for the pipeline’s restoration.  When SMRC first got involved in water development in Kayafungo in 2006, water reached Kibao‐Kiche from Mariakani.   A water management committee, with the assistance of World Vision and SMRC, created a proposal to extend the  pipeline from Kibao‐Kiche to Gotani to Viragoni.  However, when SMRC and Engineers Without Borders  at Washington State University (EWB@WSU) returned  to Kayafungo in 2007 to perform an engineering survey,  the Coast Water Service Board (CWSB) declared the  Kibao‐Kiche Gotani Viragoni pipeline technically  unfeasible.  Instead, they were planning for the  construction of a 1,500m2 tank at Mwijo.   EWB@WSU performed a survey and created a design  for pipelines extending from Mwijo Tank to schools and  high‐density population areas, including Gotani,  Kinagoni and Miyani.  The survey and design are available for review; contact  SMRC. 

Mwijo Tank (1500m3) under construction by the Government of  Kenya. Completed September 2009. 

In December 2007, SMRC was informed by the CWSB CEO, Engineer Mwasina, that the Mwijo Tank construction was  underway but the pipeline feeding Mwijo Tank from Mariakani was incomplete and of insufficient diameter to fill the  tank.  The pipeline started at 6” diameter at Mariakani and reduced to 3” at Kibao‐Kiche.  The total cost of the 150mm diameter steel rising main extending from Mariakani to Mwijo Tank is estimated by CWSB  to be Ksh. 76,600,000 (approximately $1 million).  This cost is inclusive of the piping, fittings, pump houses, power  supply and labor.    Completion of this pipeline was outlined in the Performance Contract between the Ministry of Water and Irrigation and  the Coast Water Services Board to be carried out between 1st July 2008 to 30th June 2009. With completion of this      WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


9    pipeline and d sufficient water quantity in n Mwijo Tank, tthe design creaated by EWB@ @WSU for pipellines to extend d from  Mwijo Tankk to Kayafungo could potentiaally be constru ucted.   The pipelinee from Mariakaani to Mwijo Tank is fed by M Mzima Springs, a natural sprin ng 200km to th he northwest tthat  supplies Mo ombasa and most of its surro oundings with w water.  Mzima Springs can po otentially supp ply an adequatee volume  of water to service the Co oast.  But the pipeline leadingg from Mzima SSprings is out o of date and in d disrepair.   The World B Bank is fundingg a massive reh habilitation pro oject of the Mzzima Springs pipeline feedingg Mombasa.  H However,  construction n is slow and w will take severaal years to com mplete. Two oth her pipelines, SSabaki and Barricho, now feed ding  Kaloleni can n potentially exxtend to Kayafungo.  Constru uction from theese lines will taake new researrch, designs an nd  planning.  B was consideriing once again extending thee pipeline from m Kibao‐Kiche to Gotani.  In 2008, the  As of Januarry 2009, CWSB Constituenccy Developmen nt Fund committed Ksh. 1.5 m million (approxximately US$20 0,000) to the p project. There iis no  timeline or plan for constrruction.  

e. D AMS A   Description::  Dams are open water reserrvoirs created by  damming a seasonal or pe erennial river.  On the lower part of  n overflow stru ucture exists th hrough which eexcess  the dam, an water outflo ows after the rreservoir is full.   Dams are th he main source e of water for tthe people in  Kayafungo.  Water dams aare seasonal an nd remain dry for up  ow rainfall reliaability.   to six to eight months in aa year due to lo other alternativve  Most dams are located in areas where o sources are scarce.   of earth througgh either manu ual labor  Dams require excavation o or heavy maachinery. Both processes aree described below.     nstruction for m mechanized exxcavation  Steps to con 1. 2. 3.

Mech hanically excava ated dam 

Let commun nity decide locaation of dam   Notify Districct Water Officeer via formal leetter  Solicit quote es for a design aand survey (so ome contractorrs or officials w will require a sitte visit before offering a  quote)  Perform a su urvey with either government or private en ngineers  Submit tender forms for co ontractors  Oversee construction  dam use and m maintenance  Educate on d

4. 5. 6. 7.   nstruction for m manual excavaation  Steps to con 1. Let commun nity decide locaation of dam   2. Work directly with Project Management Committee      WATER REPORRT 2009—KAYAFU UNGO ,   K ENYA        

 

 

WWW . STUD DENTMOVEMENTUSSA . ORG


10    3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Notify District Water Officer, local administration and other NGOs via formal letter   Site visit by District Water Officer   Design by trained community members  Community digging days   Educate on dam use and maintenance 

Dams also can be constructed that include a piped water filtration system where the water runs through a simple  filtration system from the dam.  Maintenance includes replacing the filtration material, desilting the dam and replacing  and repairing the pipeline.  Contact Kurera Kidangu of Sawageco Engineering Services for more details.  Existing Projects:  World Vision Humanitarian and Emergency Affairs Programme has completed a number of food for  work dam construction projects where they pay the community members in maize flour and cooking oil to dig. Kwa  Mbita Dam in Kinagoni and Mirihi Ya Kirao Dam in Mbalamweni, were excavated in by World Vision in Spring 2009.  World Vision has also funded construction of water dams using heavy machinery at Kinagoni in Mbalamweni, and at  Gogoraruhe in Mbalamweni. They have also funded construction of a diesel‐powered pipeline leading from Waa Dam to  the St. Michael’s cluster of schools in Mrimani. Please contact World Vision for more details on their dam digging  experience and future plans.  A description of the SMRC Kwa Choga Dam excavation project can be found in Section 7.  Pros: Construction of water pans is currently the most viable option to improve water access in Kayafungo. They are the  only free, public source of water in the location. Even though there are plans to bring piped water to Kayafungo, dams  will continue to be necessary for animals, irrigation, and the more remote and poorer communities for the foreseeable  future.  Cons:  During the wet season, when the dams become full, they are dangerous for those collecting water.  Humans and  animals that stand on the unstable dam walls may fall in the water and drown.  The dams also become eroded and silted over time, steadily decreasing their capacity until they become useless.   Lastly, dams can increase health risks. They are breeding grounds for mosquitoes and thereby increase the prevalence of  malaria.  Also, the water provided in a dam is not clean and requires point‐of‐use water treatment for proper usage.  Budget: The budget for a survey and design is between Ksh. 80,000‐163,000 (approximately US$1,500). The budget for  excavating an average dam using heavy machinery is between Ksh. 2‐4 million (approximately $40,000). Manual  excavation comes from community labor, often associated with a type of relief project. Budgets and compensation vary  depending upon the project.   

f.

P OINT ‐ OF ‐ USE WATER TREATMENTS  

For all point‐of‐use water treatment systems a large education component is required to inform people that dirty water  makes them sick and how to best treat the water.    Slow sand filters: Slow sand filters remove most bacteria and some sediments from tainted water. They are often used in  rural areas that have land to spare.  The design is slightly complicated but the maintenance is very easy.  Maintenance  needs to be done every few weeks for the filtration system to work.  An Engineers Without Borders volunteer, Carrie      WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


11    Schramm, notes “Since the dams Kayafungo people use seem to have high levels of turbidity I think we would need to  settle out the solids before going into the filter, but those are very easy to design/construct/maintain.”    Because the houses in the area are so widely separated, one central water filtration system is not as effective.  Smaller  systems need to be designed that will be located at each homestead. People would continue to have to collect water to  bring back to the filtration system, but at least the water they ultimately drink and use would be clean.   Chemical Treatment: Several options for chemical treatment exist, including, but not limited to, treatments such as  chlorine and water guard. These treatments are more effective in killing bacteria than sand filtration.   Two ways exist to chlorinate water: (1) Diffuser – this method consists of a pot or other container filled with coarse sand  and chlorine powder and submerged in a water supply.  The chlorine seeps out into the water through holes in the  container.  Sources show that a single pot with 1.5 kg of powder and 3 kg of coarse sand can serve 60 people for two  weeks.  (2) Drip‐feed chlorinator – this method adds chlorine to water in a ratio consistent with the volume of water  treated.    More information on water treatment can be found at:  www.lifewater.org/resources/water_treatment.html  Life Straws – These “straws” are portable point‐of‐use water filters.  They are offered by Vestergaard Frandsen and help  people obtain safe drinking water at home and outside.  They are produced in small size for personal use and larger for  family use.  Visit: www.vestergaard‐frandsen.com/lifestraw.htm for more information.       6. SANITATION SOLUTION POSSIBILITIES 

a. V ENTILATED  I MPROVED  P IT  L ATRINES   The ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrine is the standard latrine built in schools and institutions in Kayafungo.  The VIP  latrine offers improved sanitation by eliminating flies and  smell, through air circulation. The addition of a chimney  draws air currents into the structure and through the  squat hole. Odors rise through the chimney and disperses.  The structure of the toilet means that any flies attracted to  the pit through the squat hole will try to escape by  heading towards the strongest light source, which comes  from the chimney.  Once inside the chimney they are  trapped by a fly guard and die in the squat hole.   SMRC built 4‐door VIP latrines at schools and the health  clinic in Kayafungo.  Construction of each latrine cost Ksh.  156,000 (approximately US$2,000), a price inclusive of  materials, transport and labor.  SMRC VIP latrine at Gandini Primary School 

b. P LASTIC  L ATRINES   SMRC researched plastic latrines produced by Kentainers.  Kentainers is a rotational moulding company based at  Embakasi in Nairobi. They make plastic tanks and plastic latrines from polyethylene material that is suitable for use in  most domestic and industrial purposes. Installation of each 4‐door plastic latrine is predicted to cost Ksh. 176,000  (approximately $2,300).  These quotations need to be verified with the supplier.      WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


12    World Vision is doing a pilot project with the plastic latrines in schools in Kayafungo but, as of March 2009, the results  are not released.  Plastic latrines may be an option SMRC wants to explore. 

c. C OMPOST  L ATRINES   A composting latrine is a closed unit, not connected to a sewage system or septic tank, used to receive, contain, and  compost human waste via aerobic biodegradation. Once dried, the compost can be used as fertilizer. No organization  working in Kayafungo has yet introduced this technology.  The cost of a compost latrine depends on size and type.  In April 2008, Lily Muldoon, Ryan Knight and MCDF met with the GTZ EcoSan Promotion Project, a branch of the Ministry  of Water and Irrigation Water Sector Reform Programme in Nairobi. This organization uses a holistic approach to  address sanitation using a urine diverting dehydration toilet.  If SMRC chooses to pursue composting toilets, GTZ EcoSan  is a good organization to contact.  Another option is the Enviro‐Loo, a waterless, dry sanitation toilet system.  More information on the Enviro‐Loo can be  found at:  http://www.enviro‐loo.com.   

d. B ACTERIA   Avantu: Ecomania makes three products created by Avantu including Fatking (for oil related industries), Mozziking (for  mosquito control) and Pitking (used in septic tanks and pit latrines)    Pitking is an easy‐to‐use bacteria solution which turns feces into a safe liquid and gas.  The powder is mixed with water  and poured into a full latrine.  Within a week the amount of waste in the latrine is reduced.  After the “initial shock” the  latrine must be maintained by adding a less potent treatment monthly.  In 2008 SMRC was quoted a yearly cost of Ksh.  27,756 (approximately $365) for the initial shock and to maintain the latrines. Prices vary and are negotiable.    SMRC and MCDF visited the office Ecomania in Nairobi in April 2008.    Bio‐Clean: Bio‐Clean is a blend of bacteria and enzymes used in pit latrines.  For more information read about this new  technology at: www.bio‐clean.com, or contact Ralph Pippit, a Rotarian from Castle Rock Colorado who has experience  with bio‐clean, at: 24hope@renewed‐hope.org.           7.  SMRC  INITIATIVES 

  WATER SOLUTIONS  R OOF  R AINWATER  C ATCHMENT  I NSTALLATION    Gogoraruhe Primary School  Description: In February and March 2009, SMRC installed two 5,000‐liter plastic tanks and gutters to collect rainwater on  the roof of the office and two classrooms at Gogoraruhe Primary School.  Objectives: To capture rainwater to be used by Gogoraruhe Primary School.  Expected Outcomes:       WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


13    • • • • •

Students in school longer because they do not need to collect water daily.  Reduced water costs for the school.  Improved health of the students and teachers.  Increased use of hand‐washing station.  Higher Kenya Certificate of Primary Education (KCPE) exam results. 

Contacts:  Jadin Protek, Material supplier in Mombasa  Phone: 0712‐31‐5350    Tile & Carpet Center, Supplier and transporter of tanks  Phone: 0736‐96‐3000  Email: mail@msa.tilecentre.com    John Barisa, Gogoraruhe School Headteacher  Phone: 0733‐47‐7803 

R OOF  R AINWATER  C ATCHMENT  S YSTEM  R EHABILITATION   Gotani Dispensary  Description: World Vision previously constructed a ferro‐cement tank and gutters to collect rainwater at Gotani  Dispensary.  The gutters became disconnected from the pipe feeding to the tank.  In September 2008, SMRC hired  Changawa Building and General Construction to buy the materials and provide the labor necessary to repair the  catchment system.  Objectives: To capture rainwater to be used at Gotani Dispensary.  Expected Outcomes:   • •

Reduced water costs for dispensary.  Improved health of patients. 

Contacts:  Leonard Denje Washe, Nurse In Charge, Gotani Dispensary  Phone: 0724‐20‐9007    Mourine H. Masha, Community Nurse, Gotani Dispensary  Phone: 0733‐67‐5388 

K WA  C HOGA  D AM  C ONSTRUCTION    Description: Kwa Choga Dam was first built by the Katsangani community in 1972 and has been the community’s only  source of water for domestic use.  Due to the rise of the population in the area and prolonged drought, the community  wrote a proposal to SMRC to expand the dam to hold more water.   

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


14    The dry spell at the beginning of 2009 was particularly desperate for the people of Kayafungo.  SMRC chose to relieve  the water situation by expanding the dam, while at the same time providing relief money for work by the community.     Dams require excavation of earth, through either manual labor or heavy machinery. The budget for a professional  survey and design is between Ksh. 80,000‐163,000. The budget for excavating an average dam using heavy machinery is  between Ksh. 3‐6 million.  Due to budget and time constraints, SMRC chose to hire the community to do the design and  provide the manual labor.    In February 2009, before the start of the rainy season,  SMRC contributed a total of Ksh. 638,000 (~$8,285) to  pay community members and supervisors for their  labor.  We hired community supervisors who had  been trained through a World Vision program on dam  excavation and each person was given Ksh. 150 for  every 1m x 2m x 1.5ft plot excavated.  The dam is  expected to serve 900 people daily.  During and after pay day, small kiosks opened near  the construction site so others not digging benefited  by creating income generating activity.  Objectives: To alleviate the water crisis in Katsangani. 

Kwa Choga Dam under construction 

Expected Outcomes:   • • • •

Community members walk less distance to their water supply.  Water supply available for more time every year.  Hunger alleviation during time of drought and famine.  Increased business activity 

Contacts:  Robert Jefwa, Kwa Choga Dam Project Chairman  Phone: 0715‐31‐1427    Raymond Tisho, Kwa Choga Dam Project Member  Phone: 0733‐70‐5551    Nicolas Gitobu, Area Development Program Coordinator for World Vision  Phone: 0721‐78‐7448 

SANITATION SOLUTIONS  L ATRINES    Description: In a partnership with Rotary International, SMRC constructed 14 four‐door ventilated improved pit (VIP)  latrines in eight primary schools, five nursery schools and at the Gotani Health Clinic.  The location of the latrine      WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


15    construction was determined during community meetings led by the Assistant Chief in each sub‐location.  The  community was responsible through voluntary labor to dig the pit (20‐feet deep), provide the hard core construction  material and all water necessary during the construction period.  The SMRC Project Director bought and transported all  materials and contracted Changawa Building and General Construction for the labor.  Objectives: To provide a sanitary means to dispose of waste at major institutions in Kayafungo Location.  Expected Outcomes:   • • • •

Increased latrine use in schools.  Increased latrine use at home.  Reduced incidence of disease, parasitic infestation and worms.  Increased female school attendance. 

Contacts:  Elias Changawa, Lead Contractor of Changawa Building and General Construction  Mobile Phone: 0729‐32‐8613  See Appendix C (Sanitation Project School Information Chart) for school headmaster names and contact information. 

  H AND ‐ WASHING STATIONS   Description: Recognizing the importance of hand‐washing with soap in the reduction of disease, SMRC installed a total  of 20 hand‐washing stations at the sites of latrine construction. The hand‐washing stations were specially designed to  support a school with 80 liter tanks, two taps and waste water collection basins.  Each hand‐washing station was also  equipped with a white mesh bag used to hold soap. At each  primary school, SMRC installed two hand‐washing stations, one  for boys and one for girls.  At each nursery school and the health  clinic, SMRC installed one hand‐washing station. Please note,  Gogoraruhe Primary School and Uhuru Primary School were  nursery schools when SMRC started the sanitation project so  these schools have one hand‐washing station.  After installation, each school was given four bars of soap and  instructions to keep the stations filled with water and soap  provided daily.  Objectives: To give pupils and community members the opportunity and incentive to properly wash their hands with  soap after using the latrine and before eating.  Expected Outcomes: To reduce the incidence of disease caused by improper hand‐washing.  Contacts:  Ndovu Tanks, Hand‐washing station design company located in Mombasa  Phone: 0733‐61‐3285 / 0720‐63‐1115      WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


16   

H EALTH ,   H YGIENE  &   S ANITATION  W ORKSHOPS    Description: From September to December 2 008, SMRC carried out a series of four ten‐day workshops with 160  participants from the Kayafungo community.  Health facilitators from the Muthaa Community Development Foundation  (MCDF), Emily Karechio and Abdallah Mohamed, led the workshops.  Following the trainings each successful participant  was given a Community Health Trainer (CHT) certificate and official yellow uniform.    Topics included:   • • • •

• • • • • •

Personal hygiene (Hand‐washing, bathing, teeth‐brushing).  Common diseases (Water and hygiene related diseases and prevention, worms).  Nutrition (Balanced diets, nutrients found in local foods, best preparation of foods, malnutrition).  HIV/AIDS (Understanding the disease, causes and prevention measures including use of both female and male  condom, VCT importance and relationship between HIV/AIDS and TB, how to live positively, home‐based care,  ARVs).   Water treatment.  Latrine Construction (Identification of locally available materials, types of soils, construction methods).   Waste water disposal.  Ecological alternatives in sanitation (Refuse disposal).  First Aid.   Trainer of Trainers (TOT) ‐ Training skills in the community. 

Please review the MCDF Workshop Summary Report for more detailed information.   During the workshops we learned that most participants did not know about HIV/AIDS nor know their status.  In  collaboration with the Ministry of Health, World Vision and Youth Alive we hosted two mobile Voluntary Counseling and  Testing (VCT) days, the first on October 17, 2008 at Magogoni Church ACK and the second on November 14, 2008 at  Gotani Health Dispensary. Youth Alive mobilized the community and performed skits and songs to create awareness  about the disease.   In total 332 people came to the event and  the counselors tested 131 people.  For the second phase of our Community  Health Trainer program in February 2009, six  selected CHTs from each sub‐location did a  one‐and‐a‐half hour training with every class  in every school where we installed hand‐ washing stations.  The CHTs trained on  reasons for hand washing, when to wash  hands and how to wash hands. Following the  training in the schools, the CHTs monitored  and evaluated whether the latrines and hand  washing stations were maintained and used  properly by the students and the community.  See results from the second phase of the CHT  program in the MCDF Workshop Summary Report. 

Group learning during SMRC workshops 

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


17    Objective: To build the capacity of workshop participants to improve the health and quality of life for the community as  a whole using a training of trainer approach.  Expected Outcomes:   • • • • • •

Increase in number of household latrines.  Increase in latrine use.  Increase in practice of hand‐washing with soap.  Reduction of incidence of disease.  Reduction of malnutrition.  Community Health Trainers perform training with the community in schools and at local barazas on their  own initiative. 

Contacts:  Emily Karechio, Team Leader and Facilitator from the Muthaa Community Development Foundation  Email: muthaa2@gmail.com  Phone: 0720‐27‐8614    Abdallah Mohamed, Facilitator from the Muthaa Community Development Foundation  Email: abdallamcdf@gmail.com  Phone: 0721‐61‐8045    Terry Adhiambo, Community Nurse and Social Worker, Guest Facilitator  Phone: 0721‐76‐5183    Mourine H. Masha, Community Nurse at Gotani Dispensary, Guest Facilitator  Phone: 0733‐67‐5388    Shungu David, DASCO ‐ Kaloleni, In charge of HIV/AIDS in District  Email: shunguma08@yahoo.com  Phone: 0721‐23‐0505            8. OTHER ORGANIZATIONS ADDRESSING  WATER IN KAYAFUNGO 

  The water crisis in Kayafungo is being addressed to varying degrees by World Vision, Amref, the Ministry of Arid Lands,  the Coast Water Services Board and the Coastal Development Authority.  In addition to other development projects, these organizations have constructed pans and dams, built rainwater  catchments in schools, built latrines in schools, and conducted health and sanitation training. 

A. W ORLD  V ISION   Organization Description: World Vision is a Christian humanitarian organization dedicated to working with children,  families, and their communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice.  They have over 30,000 employees working with almost 100 million people in over 100 countries. 

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


18    Work in Kayafungo: World Vision has been operating in Kayafungo for approximately 20 years and is reaching the end of  their commitment to the region.  They plan to permanently discontinue their Kayafungo operations in 2011. There are  two World Visions offices operating in Kayafungo, the Area Development Programme (ADP), and the Humanitarian and  Emergency Affairs (HEA) office. The ADP office focuses on long‐term health, water and education projects, and is located  in Kaloleni. SMRC partnered with World Vision ADP to conduct two mobile HIV/AIDS voluntary counseling and testing  (VCT) days in November, 2008.  The HEA office focuses on relief work and food security, and is located in Kilifi. Programs include demonstration farms,  food for work dam and building construction projects.  In 2008, World Vision created a Water Users Association, which is a community organization representing Kayafungo  water needs.  The group primarily consists of members from the Kayafungo Beekeepers Association.  World Vision constructs latrines, rainwater catchment systems, and classrooms and conducts workshops regularly in  Kayafungo Location.  They are a great resource for SMRC because they have worked extensively in the region for a long  period of time. 

B. A FRICAN  M EDICAL AND  R ESEARCH  F OUNDATION  (AMREF)  Organization Description:  AMREF is the largest African health organization in the world, providing health care and  training across the continent. Its mission is to improve people’s health as a means for them to escape poverty.  The  AMREF office in Kaloleni has three development agenda themes: (1) Community Partnering; (2) Capacity Building; (3)  Health Systems Research.  Work in Kayafungo:  AMREF opened its office in Kaloleni in 1997 and plans to finish its development program in the  district by 2011.  They are primarily addressing issues of hygiene education, latrine construction, hand‐washing behavior  and water crisis alleviation.  AMREF has started school health clubs where teachers are given a syllabus regarding better health practices to teach  pupils who are then responsible to teach their peers.  They are also building 4‐door VIP latrines and hand‐washing  stations in schools.  The hand‐washing station design is a “leaky tin” or a “tippy tap.”  These hand‐washing stations are  old bottles hung up with a hole and stopper which pupils can use to wash their hands after using the latrine.  AMREF  chose to use a simple model for the hand‐washing station, which can easily be replicated at home.  AMREF is also building 40,000‐liter ferro‐cement tanks and gutters on schools lacking water and rainwater cathment  systems.  

C. M INISTRY OF  S TATE FOR  S PECIAL  P ROGRAMMES  A RID LANDS  R ESOURCE  M ANAGEMENT  P ROJECT  (A RID  L ANDS )  Organization Description:  Arid Lands is a branch of the Kenyan Government focusing on drought relief for both humans  and animals. The regional Arid Lands Programme focuses on Kaloleni and Kilifi Districts.   Work in Kayafungo:  Currently Arid Lands is building water pans in Kaloleni and Kilifi Districts but has no water pan  excavation plans for Kayafungo Location.  In Kayafungo Location, they have been promoting entrepreneurs and have  been working closely with the Kayafungo Beekeepers Association.  To decide on projects, they solicit the community for  project proposals.      WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


19   

D. C OAST  W ATER  S ERVICES  B OARD  (CWSB)  Organization Description: The Coast Water Services Board is the provincial water authority for the Coast Province.  They  work under the Ministry of Water & Irrigation and have the responsibility to provide and maintain water systems in the  region.  Work in Kayafungo: Through the Ministry of Water & Irrigation, CWSB constructed Mwijo Tank.  They are now working  on raising money to fund the construction of a rising main from Mariakani to fill the tank at Mwijo.  CWSB also started a water pipeline project connecting Kibao‐Kiche to Gotani to Viragoni.  Two kilometers of pipe and a  water meter were installed at Kibao‐Kiche.  However, due to lack of water pressure this project is no longer feasible.  

E. C OAST  D EVELOPMENT  A UTHORITY  (CDA)  Organization Description: The Coast Development Authority is a governmental organization responsible for all  infrastructural development projects in the Coast region, including the Coast Province, and portions of the Eastern and  North Eastern provinces. The CDA receives some governmental funding to work on projects proposed by registered  Community Based Organizations (CBOs). Their staff also works on a semi‐private basis to assist development projects.  No associated fees are imposed for CDA working on a CBOs project.  However, if CDA works on a semi‐private basis (for  SMRC for example), they will charge like a private company.  Work in Kayafungo: The CDA has no previously recorded work in Kayafugo but they could potentially work with a  registered CBO on a development project.          9. LESSONS LEARNED 

  With three years of development work in Kayafungo Location and many projects complete, SMRC personnel have  taken away many important lessons.  First, all projects must be carried out working directly with the community in  addressing their expressed needs.  Meetings must be held often with a variety of groups, not just the chief and  administration, so the community stays engaged and ultimately takes responsibility for the project after completion.   Second, all government officials want to be informed of all development projects happening in their region.  Keep them  informed by writing a formal letter (see Appendix D for sample letter) and making a “courtesy call” by stopping by their  office for a short update and conversation.  The following positions must be informed of all projects:  • • • • • •

District Commissioner / District Officer  District Office of the relevant Ministry  Kayafungo Area Chief  Assistant Chief of the sub‐location project is taking place  Constituency Development Fund  Relevant NGOs 

Third, when networking for projects making a phone call or showing up in someone’s office is usually the best option.   Kenyans do not regularly check or respond to email.    Finally, be patient!  Community development projects take time; one project can take years to complete.  Do not rush a      WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


20    project because of a personal schedule.  Be responsive to the community needs and let people work at their own pace.   Forcing a different time schedule on partners working at a different rate is counter‐productive and ineffective.         

 

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


21              10. AP PPENDICES 

 

APPENDIX X   A:   MAP   

          

   

Kayafung go is represented d by the red starr

              WATER REPORRT 2009—KAYAFU UNGO ,   K ENYA        

 

 

WWW . STUD D ENTMOVEMENTUSSA . ORG


22   

    APPENDIX   B:    ROOF   RAINWATER   CATCHMENT   SYSTEM   BUDGETS  One (1No.) 5,000 Liter Plastic Tank, Gutters on Two Classrooms and an Office (Budget used at Gogoraruhe Primary  School March 2009)   

Item 

Quanity 

Unit 

Unit (Ksh.)

Supplier

28,550

Extended  Cost  28,550

1  Tank (5,000  Liters)  2  PVC (6") 

Pc 

20Ft 

600

2,400

Mombasa Paint and Hardware  

3  PVC Bend  (6")  4  Hooks  (metal)  5  Tap 

Pc 

200

800

Taheri General Traders  

30 

Pc 

80

2,400

Jadin Protex 

Pc 

650

650

Mercantile Traders Ltd  

6  Tanget 

0.25 

Kg 

1,200

300

Mombasa Paint and Hardware  

7  Pipe (1/2") 

 3 Ft 

1,100

1,100

Mombasa Paint and Hardware  

8  Labor 

Contract 

3,000

3,000

Changawa Building and General Construction 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL  (Ksh.) 

39,200

 

 

 

 

 

(Transport provided free by Tile & Carpet Company)

Jadin Protex 

                                            WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


23           

APPENDIX B (CONTINUED)  Two (2No.) 40,000 Liter Ferro‐Cement Tanks (Budget proposed by Ngala Memorial Secondary School)    Extended  Unit Cost  Cost  Item  Material  Quantity  Unit  (Ksh.)  (Ksh.)  1  Ordinary Portland cement  120 Bags 650 78,000  (Bamburi)  2  Water Proof cement  40 Kgs 50 2,000 

 

BRC wire gauge 65 

4

Roll

21000

84,000 

Chicken mesh wire 

8

Roll

2000

16,000 

Binding wire 

40

Kgs

150

6,000 

Sisal twine 

8

Kgs

150

1,200 

Sisal poles (large size) 

200

No

40

8,000 

River sand (Gongoni) 

28

Tons

1200

33,600 

Ballast 3/4" x1/2"mix 

10

Tons

3000

30,000 

10 

Hardcore 

28

Tons

1000

28,000 

11 

Coral blocks (Size 14" x 7" x7") 

120

No

32

3,840 

12 

Empty plastic sacks (large) 

120

No

50

6,000 

13 

GI pipe 1"0 

2

No

1950

3,900 

14 

GI plug 1'0 

2

No

40

80

15 

GI tee 1"0 

2

No

60

120

16 

GI elbow 1"0 

2

No

50

100

17 

Tap 1"lockable 

2

No

650

1,300 

18 

Gate valve 1"0 

2

No

1000

2,000 

19 

Valve socket wire 1"0 

2

No

50

100

20 

Coffee tray wire 

4

M

300

1,200 

21 

Pipe timber 2" x 2" 

44

Ft

20

880

22 

Nipple 1"0 

2

No

35

70

23 

Polythene sheet 

80

M

70

5,600 

TOTAL  (Khs.) 

311,990 

 

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


24   

APPENDIX C: SANITATION PROJECT SCHOOL INFORMATION CHART    SCHOOL 

HEADMASTER NAME

PHONE NUMBER

TOTAL POPULATION  TEACHERS

MRIMANI SUB‐LOCATION  P: 1,213 

P: 17  N: 3 

St. Michael’s Primary 

Nelson Tipya 

0721‐69‐8288 

N: 339  P: 1,092 

P: 17 

Mwijo Primary 

Raymond Kazungu 

0735‐56‐4862 

N: 127 

N: 2 

P: 664 

P: 10 

N: 173 

N: 3 

Mitsikitsini Primary 

Fredrick Matandi 

0734‐94‐5698 

KINAGONI SUB‐LOCATION 

P: 1,044 

P: 15 

N: 152 

N: 3 

Kinagoni Primary 

Johnny Mueri Baya 

0734‐52‐4958 /  0712‐00‐9089 

Uhuru Nursery (now Primary  School and #’s are different) 

Theresea Mkare 

0729‐98‐8453 

81 

Katsangani Nursery 

Margaret Kambi 

N/A 

36 

P: 531 

P: 9 

MIYANI SUB‐LOCATION  Miyani Primary 

Michael Karisa 

0727‐10‐1886 

N: 145 

N: 2 

Nzoweni Nursery 

Patrice Dhahabu 

N/A 

30 

Kasemeni Nursery 

Raymond Kmasha 

0729‐68‐5491 

40 

MBALAMWENI SUB‐LOCATION  P: 735  Gandini Primary 

Charles Tsuma 

0721‐89‐3781 

N: 93 

P: 140 

P: 2 

Gogoraruhe Primary 

John Barisa 

0733‐47‐7803 

N: 110 

N: 2 

Kinolo Nursery 

Irene Ngala 

N/A 

87 

Ramisi Nursery 

Grace Chrispus 

N/A 

16 

Gandini Health Clinic   

Leonard Denje   

0724‐20‐9007 

‐ 

‐ 

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


25   

APPENDIX D: SAMPLE GOVERNMENT UPDATE LETTER                      LILY MULDOON                    P.O. Box 1011                    MOMBASA  DISTRICT COMMISSIONER  Kaloleni District  P.O. Box 1  KALOLENI    RE:  SMRC PROJECT UPDATE AND FUTURE PLANS IN KAYAFUNGO LOCATION    24th February 2009  Dear Sir,  I wish to inform you that the Student Movement for Real Change (SMRC) has successfully completed the first phase of  our development interventions in Kayafungo Location, Kaloleni District.  Our work assisted in three main sectors as  outlined below.  Health and Sanitation :  • • • • •

Constructed 14 four‐door Ventilated Improved Pit latrines at six primary schools, seven nursery schools, and at  the Gotani Health Clinic.  At the latrine sites, installed 20 hand‐washing stations with water catch basins and soap.  From September‐December 2008, educated 160 Community Health Trainers in health topics including disease,  HIV/AIDS, nutrition and home latrine construction.  Facilitated Community Health Trainers to do hand‐washing promotion and health trainings in 13 schools.  Held two VCT days in Kayafungo where over 130 people were tested and counseled on HIV/AIDS. 

Water :   • • •

Installed two 5,000L plastic tanks and gutters at Gogoraruhe Primary School.  Rehabilitated the rainwater catchment system on Gotani Dispensary.  Expanded the existing Kwa Choga water pan in Katsangani through a community work program. 

Education :  • • •

Built two classrooms and an office at Gogoraruhe Primary School.  Equipped the classrooms and office at Gogoraruhe Primary School with desks and furniture.  Built one classroom at Mwijo Secondary School. 

With our first phase complete, we are excited to introduce you to the next phase of SMRC development in Kayafungo  called the Global Development Internship (GDI).  In June 2009 SMRC will bring a group of 10 American students to  Kayafungo for six weeks. 

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

 

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


26    During the course of this program, students will be performing an evaluation of SMRC's past development projects,  doing a continuation of our community needs assessment and establishing new projects to be carried out the following  year.  On 11th March 2009, I personally will be leaving the country to continue my studies in the United States.  Vanessa Carter,  the SMRC Director of Programs, will be leading the GDI program and will be in contact with you in June to keep you  informed as we progress.  Thank you for your support in our development initiatives.  Sincerely,   LILY MULDOON  PROJECT DIRECTOR, SMRC  0738‐73‐2076 / 0710‐51‐4915    CC:   DISTRICT OFFICER  KALOLENI DISTRICT 

   

   

   

   

 

 

 

 

CHIEF KAYAFUNGO  KALOLENI DISTRICT  DISTRICT EDUCATION OFFICER  KALOLENI DISTRICT                                                                     

    WATER REPORT 2009—KAYAFUNGO, KENYA       

 

 

WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG


STUDENT MOVEMENT FOR REAL CHANGE  1807 18TH ST NW  WASHINGTON, DC 20009  TEL: 202‐657‐6616  www.studentmovementusa.org     


Water Report Kenya