Page 1

Global

Development Internship Training Manual / 2009 Kenya


HISTORY, STUDENT MOVEMENT

FOR

REAL CHANGE

Student Movement for Real Change (SMRC) began with the idea that the world’s youth are an untapped resource with the potential to directly change the world. In 2001, Saul Garlick sat down with friends to discuss the lack of student involvement in public policy and founded SMRC. Though they were high school students, the group understood that international disparities in the quality of education and infrastructure led to international disparities in economic development. On a trip to South Africa the following year, Saul was offered the opportunity to visit the Manyeleti Community near Mozambique. What he saw was unsettling: 80 children without a proper classroom were forced to learn in the shade of trees, without access to school supplies. Saul pledged $10,000 and the support of SMRC, and returned home to begin fundraising. Through the hard work of SMRC members, and with the help of a South African philanthropist and the Buffelshoek Trust, SMRC raised the necessary funds to build classrooms and provide students with much needed supplies. The same model of student involvement was successful at the collegiate level as well. The first college chapter was soon established at Johns Hopkins University, and was immediately followed by successful chapters across the country. Today, SMRC continues to grow and mature. SMRC’s fresh, grassroots approach to impact health and education in rural African communities has proven to be a highly effective method for engaging community members while educating young leaders from the US in global development. Over 70 young people travelling to South Africa and Kenya in the last two years to implement projects developed in partnership with community members in rural areas. The organization is primarily concerned with long term sustainable investments in community health and education. The method by which these types of investments are indentified and developed is called the Global Development Program (GDP). The GDP begins with the summer Global Development Internship (GDI) which includes a rigorous 25 hours of structured training followed by an immersion experience where students live and work in rural developing communities for 8 weeks, building ideas and opportunities with locals. Interns are invited to submit proposals for a project, and those with selected projects become Global Development Fellows (GDF). The fellowship supports the project through non-profit infrastructure, mentoring, and a year-long in-country fellowship to implement the project. The success stories from the GDP are inspiring. Three schools, four school libraries, two soccer fields, 56 sanitary latrines, 20 hand washing stations, a dam, two community centers and a rainwater catchment system and more have all been implemented and managed by community entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurial instruction ensures that these projects are sustainable and some become locally profitable for years to come. This winning formula reinforces SMRC’s core belief that successful development comes from within a community can cannot be imposed from the outside. The model is distinctively replicable and scalable. By adding the GDP to additional communities, the program is both self-sustained and able to engage additional communities without losing its depth or quality. Other organizations will find that the model is ready to implement in additional rural communities – and that students in the United States are hungry for opportunities to engage in development in a process that encourages a deep personal investment while contributing to community empowerment. Over the past two years, SMRC has also conducted six camps, numerous HIV/AIDS awareness days, six teaching assistance programs, health promotion workshops for 160 women, and voluntary counseling and testing of HIV/ AIDS. This leaves communities healthier and better educated. The young people at the heart of SMRC work under the guidance of experienced ambassadors, successful business executives, and international socio-economic and development experts. SMRC has worked with organizations such as Rotary International, FUNDaFIELD, the Buffelshoek Trust and the community-based Kayafungo Women Water Project group to engage the communities and support projects. Best of all, SMRC is just getting started. The organization hopes to lead 3,250 students to communities by 2016, with 1,000 of those individuals going on to work in related fields by 2020. By empowering young people, SMRC ensures that their investments in social entrepreneurship result in a maximum return for the communities in which they work. SAUL GARLICK , EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR


CONTENTS PART I: GETTING STARTED (PAGES 1‐15)  ORIENTATION  GOALS  HOW IT WILL WORK  ITINERARY  EMERGENCIES  RULES AND EXPECTATIONS  WHERE YOU ARE GOING  KAYAFUNGO COMMUNITY  MANAGING FEELINGS 

PART II: GLOBAL POVERTY 101 (PAGES 16‐34)  CAUSES OF POVERTY  TRADITIONAL APPROACHES TO POVERTY  MODERN APPROACHES TO POVERTY  SMRC’S DEVELOPMENT PHILOSOPHY   

PART III: YOUR ROLE (PAGES 35‐59)  NEW PROJECTS  GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT FELLOWSHIP 2010  WORDS OF WISDOM   

APPENDIX (PAGES 60‐61)  A: LOCAL COMMUNITY MAP   

BIBLIOGRAPHY (PAGES 62‐63)    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS  


1

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

PART 1: GETTING STARTED—WELCOME   I.

ORIENTATION

II.

GOALS

III.

HOW IT WILL WORK  A. ITINERARY  B. EMERGENCIES  C. RULES AND EXPECTATIONS 

IV.

WHERE YOU’RE GOING  A. KAYAFUNGO COMMUNITY 

V.

MANAGING FEELINGS   

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


2

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

I.

ORIENTATION   MOLLY ANDERSON 

ANN GONG 

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 

MATT ANDREW 

ALICIA LEE 

QUINNIPIAC UNIVERSITY 

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 

ALEXANDRA CROSSON 

LAURA MACARTHUR 

CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY 

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 

RACHAEL ESTESS 

ALEXIS SMITH 

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

TOWSON UNIVERSITY

 

ACTIVITY—ICE BREAKERS    

     

TWO TRUTHS AND A LIE   DIRECTIONS: Get in groups of 5 and have each person make three seemingly unbelievable statements about  themselves: two true statements and one lie. For example, "I've never broken a bone. I have five sisters. I was  born  in  Yugoslavia."  The  group  must  guess  which  statement  is  the  lie.  The  person  must  explain  the  story  behind the two truths. 

I’VE DONE SOMETHING YOU HAVEN’T DONE  DIRECTIONS:  With  the  whole  group:  each person  will  introduce  themselves  and  then  state  something  they  have done that they think no one else in the class has done. If someone else has also done it, the student    must state something else until he/she finds something that no one else has done. 

     

   

   

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


3

G LOBAL DEVELOPM MENT  I NTERNSHIP —K — ENYA  

A.

LIFE MAPPS 

Fill in the m map below with information about your ow wn history.  You u can choose w what details yo ou would like to o  highlight about your fam mily, hometown n, university, personal experiences, travel, aacademic interrests, hobbies,  relationshiips, tragedies, momentous occasions, mem mories, etc.  Feeel free to change the structure provided beelow  and add evvents or leave some blank. Have fun with th his and be read dy to explain itt in your small group in 30  minutes.     

Keenya!

 

PART A I:   G ETTING  S TARTED T  

             WWW . STUD DENTMOVEMENTUSSA . ORG 


4

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

II.

GOALS  

GDI MISSION: GDIs mobilize developing communities to improve local health and education.  ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐

To develop an understanding of contemporary development philosophy.    To develop historical and political awareness about local community and country.  To collect histories about local community and its members.  To be inspired to do future development work by confronting community challenges and opportunities.  To understand complexities of community politics.  To get exposure to norms, lifestyles and community structures.   To become familiar with the local language.   To identify local contacts in order to facilitate future community development initiatives.  To help community members learn about local resources.  To reference local resources when building a community vision. 

PERSONAL GOALS FOR SUMMER:  _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ 

LIFE GOALS:  _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________   

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


5

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

III.

HOW IT WILL WORK  

ITINERARY – KENYA   SATURDAY, JUNE 27  DEPART WASHINGTON, D.C. AT 6 PM ON UNITED AIRLINES FLIGHT 918  SUNDAY, JUNE 28  ARRIVE LONDON, ENGLAND AT 6:20 AM  DEPART LONDON AT 10:20 AM ON KENYA AIRWAYS FLIGHT 103   ARRIVE NAIROBI, KENYA AT 8:50 PM      ACCOMMODATION:  KENYA COMFORT HOTEL   MONDAY, JUNE 29    MEETINGS   ACCOMMODATION:  KENYA COMFORT HOTEL  TUESDAY, JUNE 30     DEPART NAIROBI AT 5:00 PM ON KENYA AIRWAYS FLIGHT 612  ARRIVE MOMBASA, KENYA AT 6:00 PM   ACCOMMODATION: DANCOURT HOTEL  WEDNESDAY, JULY 1    MOMBASA       ACCOMMODATION: DANCOURT HOTEL  FRIDAY, JULY 3  TRANSFER TO KALOLENI AND KAYAFUNGO  JULY 2‐AUGUST 4  INTERNSHIP IN RURAL COMMUNITIES    JULY 9‐11    NGOMENI BEACH ISLAND VISIT   JULY 25‐27    WANDERING WARRIOR SAFARI VISIT (TENTATIVE DATES)  MONDAY, AUGUST 3  TRANSFER TO MOMBASA       ACCOMMODATION: DANCOURT HOTEL  TUESDAY, AUGUST 4    DEPART MOMBASA AT 8:40 PM ON KENYA AIRWAYS FLIGHT 102   WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 5    ARRIVE LONDON AT 6:45 AM    DEPART LONDON AT 10:05 AM FOR WASHINGTON, DC ON UNITED AIRLINES FLIGHT 921    ARRIVE WASHINGTON, DC AT 1:30 PM 

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


6

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

FOOD AND WATER  In Nairobi and Mombasa, GDIs are responsible for their own food and water expenses.  In Mariakani and  Kayafungo, SMRC will provide three meals a day and bottled drinking water.  Each GDI will receive a small amount  of money to purchase sufficient bread, peanut butter, and water bottles to last during the rural portion of the  internship.  Each GDI is responsible for carrying with them breakfast, lunch, and water during the days we work in  Kayafungo.  Dinner will be cooked by homestay families or in the hostel kitchen in Mariakani.   

SHOPPING   GDIs will have at least one half day in Mombasa during which a few hours will be allocated for purchasing  souvenirs.  Be sure to have in mind what you would like to purchase as this time will be very limited.  Also, be sure  to negotiate prices as you will always be told a higher price than a shopkeeper will accept.   

MONEY GDIs will have an opportunity to exchange money in both Nairobi and Mombasa.  Both cities are major urban  centers fully equipped with Kenyan banks, exchange money centers, ATMs, etc.  If you have not notified your bank  that you will be out of the country, your ATM card might be rejected.  Keeping large amounts of cash while on the  trip is highly discouraged.  During the time in the communities you might spend a few dollars on a coca‐cola, candy  bar, or fruits.  Small bills and coins will be most useful.   

PHONES AND INTERNET  Internet in Kayafungo will be accessible at most once a week.  Internet connection is not reliable, and often is not  functioning for days at a time.  If you have a special need to use the internet, please let one of us know in advance.   Due to the remote conditions and unreliability of electricity and internet, we cannot promise internet will always  be accessible.    Students may choose to purchase their own Kenyan cell phones.  There will be time the first week in Nairobi and  Mombasa to make these purchases.  Cell phone use is not permitted during group activities, and please be  respectful of your peers and the community. 

HEALTH AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS  SMRC emphasizes the importance of drinking plenty of water, washing hands, sleeping, and eating right in order to  stay healthy throughout the internship.  In addition to the tips for staying healthy that we have included, please  note additional precautions that you need to take while in the rural areas that we will discuss.  STAYING HEALTHY   1. Malaria risks:  Prophylaxis, a prescription anti‐malarial drug, is a must for traveling in Kenya.  The  anopheles mosquito which carries malaria, bites most frequently from dusk until dawn.  Don’t forget to  bring repellent sprays and creams.  Consider long pants, long sleeves and socks for nighttime sleeping.  2. Tap Water:   Do not drink the tap water in Nairobi or Mombasa.  Drink bottled water instead!  Ice cubes in  drinks are not usually made from bottled water, and may be unsafe for your consumption.  3. Raw vegetables and fruits:  Stay away from fruits and vegetables with skins. Everything must be peeled.   Do not eat raw vegetables, only vegetables that have been properly cooked. 

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


7

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

4.

5. 6.

Rabies:  Rabies is a problem in Kenya. Stay away from stray animals, especially monkeys and cats.  Do not  pet, stroke or feed these animals.  Some animals may appear healthy, but they are probably not  immunized.   HIV:  Do not practice high‐risk behavior. HIV is a high risk in Kenya.  Diarrhea:  Diarrhea is common while traveling, especially in an environment you are not used to like  Kenya. Try to maintain a light diet, avoid caffeine, fruit juice and greasy foods should this occur. If you  experience any serious issues be sure to inform the staff so we can help.   

EMERGENCY AND INSURANCE  1.

2.

What is an emergency?   a. Life threatening conditions  i. Cardiac emergencies  ii. Trouble breathing  iii. Shock  iv. Severe bleeding  v. Unconscious or unresponsive  vi. Diabetic emergencies  vii. Poisoning  viii. Seizures  ix. Burns  x. Head, neck, or spinal injuries  b. Abuse, harassment, and assault  i. Physical  ii. Sexual  iii. Emotional  c. Missing persons  d. Violation of rules   What to do in case of an emergency?  a. Call a team leader  b. Additional options  i. International Volunteer Card 24 hour assistance  ii. Sara Nzai, local contact  iii. US Embassy  c. Use your best judgment!   US Contact Information SMRC National Office  Saul Garlick cell  Vanessa Carter cell  International Volunteer Card 24  hour assistance 

202‐657‐6616 303‐908‐6730 602‐738‐2629 Continental USA 1.800.208.0873   

 

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


8

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

Kenya Contact Information International Volunteer Card  24 hour‐7 days a week global  assistance  Vanessa Carter cell  Saul Garlick cell  Emily Karechio cell  Kenya Team Leader  Abdalla Mohamed cell  Kenya Team Leader  Sara Nzai  US Embassy—Post 1 Emergency All emergencies—national line

International Collect    1.715.295.5452    0737‐152504 0720‐278614 0721‐618045 0721‐925350 0722‐514246 999

RULES 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

9 9 9 9 9

Let an  SMRC  staff  member  know  of  your  whereabouts  at  all  times  if  you  plan  to  part  from  the  larger  group, even when you go with a partner.  Always travel in at least groups of 2.  Do not go wandering alone, especially after dark.  Do not go exploring on your own!  Ever!  Do not drive any vehicle.  Do not ride in public transportation.  Do not ride on or drive a motorbike.  Do not travel in local public transportation or with any non‐SMRC affiliated driver.  Do not use, purchase, handle illicit drugs at all, ever.  You will be sent home at your own expense.  If you are 21, you may drink alcohol in moderation.  Keep in mind alcoholism is a problem in these  communities and this is not the trip to be inappropriate or embarrass yourself.  We may go out, as a  group to bars together in the cities.  Internet, phones, and cameras should be used only during permitted times.  Use common sense, and do  not be rude.  Do not make promises to community members.    Never mention bringing money or fundraising for a project.  Keep your fellow GDIs and staff informed about your health.  It is essential for us to communicate in order  to be helpful.  Do not take risks.  If you are questioning whether or not it is allowed or it is safe, just don’t do it. 

EXPECTATIONS AND TIPS ON BEING A SUCCESSFUL GDI  9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

Be 5 minutes early, no exceptions, no matter what.  Don’t judge, be open minded  Ask questions  Show up ready   Start early and work late  Be proactive, take initiative, ask how to be helpful   Don’t complain  Feel personally responsible   Hold yourself to a high standard  Remember that nothing is beneath you  Listen and learn from others (community members, your colleagues, staff)  Be respectful of all members in the community, whether they are peers or elders, strangers or host family  members, SMRC’s staff or other trip participants.  

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


9

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

9

IV.

Be aware of the risks associated with engaging in sexual activity.  HIV/AIDS is a high risk in Kenya. 

WHERE YOU’RE GOING 

KAYAFUNGO COMMUNITY   Kayafungo is a rural community located in the Kaloleni District of Coast Province, about 52 km north‐west of  Mombasa.  Kayafungo is comprised of 43,000 people who identify themselves as members of the Giriama  tribe.  Mariakani and Kaloleni are 15 kilometers from Kayafungo.  Mariakani is on the Mombasa‐Nairobi highway  and has a gas station, market, restaurants and general hospital.  Kaloleni is equipped with similar resources and  located on the other side of Kayafungo (see map).    Kayafungo is divided into four sub‐locations: Mrimani, Kinagoni, Miyani, and Mbalamweni.  Each sub‐location is  comprised of multiple villages.  See Appendix A for a map of Kayafungo.    The women of Kayafungo walk several hours each day to collect water from unprotected dams.  The dams contain  turbid water that displays high levels of total dissolved solids (TDS) and E. coli bacteria.  The water is consumed  untreated and the people consequently suffer from diarrhea and water borne diseases that reduce individual  productivity, time spent learning in school, and the overall health of the community.  Children assist in the  collection of water, and are particularly impacted by the severe lack of water and sanitation.  Infants are most  susceptible to water‐borne disease, and dehydration is the leading cause of death among children.  Schools are  forced to close early during the dry season to allow students time to collect water because they do not have the  resources.  Attitude and behavioral changes are necessary if the people of Kayafungo are going to solve the  predicaments they face.     

SMRC’S PAST WORK IN KAYAFUNGO  READ ABOUT SMRC’S PAST WORK IN KAYAFUNGO IN THE WATER REPORT, PRODUCED BY SMRC. 

HOMESTAY GUIDELINES  Homestays are an opportunity to get a closer look at local culture, daily life, and family structures.  It is important  to keep these guidelines in mind during the first days you arrive and throughout your stay with your new friends  and family.  SMRC pays host families a small amount to host students each night.  1.

2.

RESPECT Be sure to follow your host family’s rules and maintain a respectful attitude during all of your interactions  with family members.  Pay attention to how your actions and demeanor impact other members of the  family or house guests and strive to model culturally appropriate behavior at all times.      ASK  Always ask when you are unsure about something.  In order to follow house rules, you have to know what  they are.  Despite the language barrier, simple questions require simple answers.  Be proactive and  cheerful with your questions and needs. Here are a few questions you should consider asking in your first  couple of days:  à How do I bathe?  How much water can I use?  à Where is the outhouse/latrine?  à What time do most family members go to bed?  When should we be very quiet?  à May I have guests come over?  

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


10

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

à When can I use the kitchen?  IMMERSE  Make an effort to fully immerse yourself with your host family and spend a few extra minutes committing  yourself each day to learning something about the local culture.  Often, family members are shy and  introverted which can create some awkward silences and uncomfortable situations.  Use patience and  make the extra effort every day.  LAUGH  Don’t take yourself too seriously, and laugh at your mistakes.  No one expects you to know how to live like  the locals. Nothing breaks down cultural barriers like a mutual gigglefest.  HELP  Offer your assistance with household chores as much as possible.  This is a great way to learn about the  culture.  Understanding how the mother of your family cooks, cleans, collects water, washes clothes is all  part of the homestay experience. Be sure to keep your room tidy and clean up after yourself or your  guests.  APPRECIATE  Express your appreciation for your host family’s hospitality as often as possible.  Use a sincere smile and  say thank you regularly.  It is a privilege for you to have the opportunity to stay in their home, make sure  they know you feel that way.  CHILL  Traveling abroad and being in a new environment is a very exciting and high‐energy experience.  Take  time out to relax in your homestay and don’t expect your family to ever entertain you.  Chill out and  observe the daily rhythms of the homestay family and local community.  GIFT  Bring a culturally appropriate gift to share with your host family.  This can be a good way to break the ice  upon your arrival or to be saved as a thank you present before your departure.  Don’t show up empty  handed! 

CULTURAL NORMS  GREETINGS  

CLOTHING

ALCOHOL USAGE 

EATING STYLE 

Kenyans generally greet by shaking hands and inquiring about each other's  families, relations.   Kiswahili phrases like Jambo, Hujambo, or Habari yako are  common during this exchange. However, most people in the various ethnic  languages use their mother‐tongue when they greet one another. Kissing on the  cheeks and hugging is becoming more popular, though, especially in the urban  areas.  A few communities (Maasai is an outstanding example) are very proud of their  traditional dress or costume style. Kikoy and kitenge clothes, as well as shuka for  women, are widely accepted as part or Kenya`s heritage, and Kenyans wear them  as a display of patriotism and cultural pride. However, the majority of Kenyans  freely wear western style clothes.  Drinking alcohol is common, and it is generally accepted and allowed for adults. There are numerous beer parties, both traditional and contemporary. Many  people also go to the bars/pubs after a day of hard work. Some people may  choose not to take alcohol for various reasons like health, religion, personal or  other. Palm Wine, the local brew tapped from palm trees, is very popular in the  rural areas.   Ugali (or sima) “corn‐flour bread” is Kenya`s most popular food, and is eaten with  protein foods like chicken, beef or fish, in addition to vegetables. Different tribes 

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


11

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

CONVERSATION STYLE  SENSE OF HUMOR 

DANCING

PUBLIC DISPLAY OF  AFFECTION 

CONCEPT OF TIME 

OTHERS

also widely consume more of certain kind of food, depending on the location or  the region. Most people prefer to wash and use their hands to eat, but spoons and  knives are sometimes used. People see eating as time for community and enjoy  eating together in groups. It’s customary to eat touching food with only the right  hand, using the left hand only when necessary.  Gestures are common, in helping to explain a point. Interruptions are pardonable,  and many conversations, especially between the elderly, are richly laced with  proverbs, sayings, and riddles.   Both in traditional and modern Kenyan societies, humor and laughter are  treasured, and are widely displayed either in normal speech and conversations, or  as a way of entertainment or comedy. Humor defines one aspect of the warm,  cheerful and welcoming nature of the people of Kenya.  Because of the varied nature of Kenyan culture, dancing style and music exists in  many different styles and rhythm.  There are men‐only, women‐only and general  dances, depending on the theme of the song. Traditional drums, shakers, harps,  flutes, and modern musical instruments are used. Kenyan hip hop, reggae and rap  culture, as well as western dancing and singing styles are becoming more popular.  Many people jam pack night clubs and weekend fiestas to enjoy a free dancing  atmosphere, especially in the urban areas.  Depending on the kind of affection, impressions of public display of affection in  the rural areas and urban areas vary. For sexual relations, it is generally indecent  to display intense affection in public. Men and women rarely show public affection  in Kayafungo. You will not find men and women sitting, talking, or eating together.  For educational institutions, office, business and other formal schedules, 10 to 15  minutes lateness is normal.  However, for many social meetings and other casual  gatherings, it is not uncommon for people to be later.  On‐the‐dot time schedule is  observed, depending on the nature of meeting, organization rules & regulations or  activities.  Particularly in the rural area, it is not unusual for a meeting to start 1‐2  hours late. Relax and be patient while waiting for a meeting or an event to start.  Kenya is greatly multicultural, with more than forty cultural tribes and different  tribal languages. Because of this unique representation of culture, it is not easy to  discuss any one culture that would adequately describe the behavior of a wide  cross‐section of Kenyans. Most Kenyans are flexible and show tendencies of  embracing each others’ culture, especially because of far‐reaching intercultural  marriages and communal activities. 

CULTURAL COURTESIES  GREETINGS 

USE OF HANDS 

PERSONAL SPACE 

Always say hello and always shake hands. Kenyans have a charming formality in their  greetings. This is such an important ritual that close family members will shake  hands on meeting. When entering a room, a person may shake hands with everyone  present before continuing with conversation. This may not be expected of you in the  workplace but certainly will be expected at first introduction. Telephone  conversations, will also often start with a polite greeting and an inquiry into one’s  health.   Supporting your right forearm with the left hand while shaking hands shows respect  for a leader or an elder. It is also considered improper to causally touch an elder.  When you pass something always use your right hand or both hands. Using the left  hand only is considered improper. Pointing at someone with an index finger is rude.  One beckons or points with all fingers of the hand.   Kenyans have different concept of personal space than Americans do. Kenyans will  stand much tighter together while in conversation, and in queues people sometimes 

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


12

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

FAMILY

almost lean up against the people around them. Some Kenyans are uncomfortable  with eye contact. They are not being rude or subservient; this is simply custom for  them. We are being rude if we challenge this. So don’t.   Kenyans keep very close ties with family.  Family tragedies as well as those affecting  colleagues are lived personally. Sometimes, colleagues will travel over 500km to  attend the funeral. Some Kenyan’s, particularly those from western Kenya, take  family rituals extremely seriously. The dead are treated with honor and burial rituals  may continue for as long as a year after the death. Equally, the birth of a child is  occasion for many celebrations. Amongst the Luhya, the grandmother descends on  the new parents with as many friends as she can gather. This occasion is called Khu  singa mwana. The Kikuyu have a similar ceremony called Itega.  This information came from “Karibu Kenya” the visitor’s guide from the U.S. Mission in Nairobi. 

LOCAL LANGUAGE: SWAHILI AND GIRIAMA  Kenya has two official languages: Swahili and English.  There are over 40 other languages spoken throughout the  country, including Giriama (also pronounced: Kigiriama or Kigiryama).  The Giriama people inhabit the Coast  Province cities of Mombasa and Malindi, as well as the inland towns Mariakani and Kaloleni.  The majority of  people in Kayafungo is from the Giriama tribe and speaks Giriama.  Some also speak English and Swahili.     

SURVIVAL SWAHILI  Swahili  Jambo  Habari?  Mzuri  Asante  Tafadhali  Ndiyo  Hapana  Leo  Kesho  Moto  Baridi  Hoteli  Chumba  Kitanda  Duka  Askari  Hatari  Daktrari  Choo 

English Hello How are you? I’m fine/good/well Thank you Please/excuse me Yes No Today Tomorrow Hot Cold Hotel Room Bed Shop Policeman/guard Danger Doctor Restroom

English Good Morning   Good Afternoon

Giriama Lamkadze

Sindadze

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


13

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

.

ACTIVITY—LOCAL LANGUAGE    TURN TO THE PERSON NEXT TO YOU AND PRACTICE GREETING EACH OTHER IN  SWAHILI AND GIRIAMA 

V.

MANAGING FEELINGS  

Accessing rural developing communities can be the most transformative experience of one’s life. It is also  extremely rare and difficult to connect with a community where you are at home even as a visitor. SMRC offers  you direct exposure to a community, a home to connect with, and the opportunity to understand local culture  and norms before even considering what can be done to alleviate some of the pressing needs that the  community faces. Spending a substantial period of time in a poor community is a privilege. The hospitality the  community members will offer you will surprise you, and it might even feel uncomfortable at times. The feeling  that you are invading personal space will be among the daily personal challenges you will face.  Rest assured  that you are there because the community feels honored to host you, and wants to welcome you to their  family.   As you become acquainted with the community and begin to connect with individuals, you might feel a deep  sense of guilt or injustice in the reality that you live among remarkable privilege with seemingly endless  resources. Numerous issues will inevitably occupy your thoughts, including what your role in that community is,  or if you are indeed an imposter for visiting and even thinking you can change their lives, you may even doubt  whether there should be “change” in the way you envision it. Being exposed to people who face deep injustice,  economic strife, poor health and lack of education can be viewed through several lenses. You will, at some  point, look through each lens as you begin to understand where you are and what you are dealing with. You  might feel sorry for the community. Sometimes, when you see how happy the children are or how connected  families are, you may even feel jealousy.   Because of the tumultuous emotional and intellectual journey you are beginning, SMRC has developed a  program to acquaint you with the feelings you will invariably encounter. While nothing we can write will  completely answer your questions – we must each arrive at answers through our own exploration of issues and  our own worldview – we have identified a few fundamental principles that we hope will make your experience  more rewarding. We have listed them below:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

It is a privilege for you to connect with your host community, and the community feels privileged to  host you.  You should never judge. Peoples and cultures vary greatly around the world and you do not have all  the answers.  You will often feel uncomfortable, that is okay. Being uncomfortable means you are experiencing a  unique opportunity for personal growth.  Do not feel guilty—chance tells us where we are born. Rather than feel sorry, feel energized to work  with community members to confront challenges honestly and openly.  Feeling sadness is okay; your compassion is a strength, not a weakness.  You have the power, by working with others, to change the world. 

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


14

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

As you refer to these principles, digest them and consider them in your experience, bear in mind the following  facts about what you are doing. Imagine a room filled with 100 people. In that room, 50 of the people live on  less than $2 per day. 66 live on less than $3 per day. Also in that room, about 40 people don’t have access to  decent toilets or hand‐washing resources, and 22 of the people don’t have any clean drinking water. Also in  that community, 1 in 100 people are college educated. That room is our global community and those numbers  are real.   You are part of an elite group of people who have massive influence over the future of the world. You are also  in an even smaller and more exclusive group than that. Of the 1% of the world that is college educated, most of  those people will never experience rural poverty in a developing community directly. They will never know how  a majority of the world lives, and what they can do to solve the gross disparities that are inherent to that room.  Embrace this opportunity to become exposed to poverty, as a person with humility and a deep sense of  opportunity mixed with responsibility. Remember that this is a chance to learn from the community, which will  hopefully benefit from working with you as much as you will benefit from working with them. This is your  chance to understand a place and a people in a unique way. Take the challenge and embrace the experience.   Below you will find a poem that discusses the conflicting emotions and seemingly contradictory actions we are  taking by directly engaging with global development.  This poem is more a critique of development agencies  and international financial institutions, but it is still worth reading.  THE DEVELOPMENT SET   BY: ROSS COGGIN  

EXCUSE ME MY FRIENDS I MUST CATCH MY JET ‐  I'M OFF TO JOIN THE DEVELOPMENT SET;   MY BAGS ARE PACKED AND I'VE HAD ALL MY SHOTS,  I HAVE TRAVELERS CHEQUES AND PILLS FOR THE TROTS. 

THE DEVELOPMENT SET IS BRIGHT AND NOBLE,   OUR THOUGHTS ARE DEEP AND OUR VISIONS GLOBAL;  ALTHOUGH WE MOVE WITH THE BETTER CLASSES,  OUR THOUGHTS ARE ALWAYS WITH THE MASSES. 

IN SHERATON HOTELS IN SCATTERED NATIONS,   WE DAMN MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS;   INJUSTICE SEEMS SO EASY TO PROTEST ,   IN SUCH SEETHING HOTBEDS OF SOCIAL REST. 

WE DISCUSS MALNUTRITION OVER STEAKS  AND PLAN HUNGER TALKS DURING COFFEE BREAKS.  WHETHER ASIAN FLOODS OR AFRICAN DROUGHT,  WE FACE EACH ISSUE WITH AN OPEN MOUTH. 

WE BRING IN CONSULTANTS WHOSE CIRCUMLOCUTION   RAISES DIFFICULTIES FOR EVERY SOLUTION ‐ 

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


15

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA  

THUS GUARANTEEING CONTINUED GOOD EATING   BY SHOWING THE NEED FOR ANOTHER MEETING. 

THE LANGUAGE OF THE DEVELOPMENT SET,   STRETCHES THE ENGLISH ALPHABET;  WE USE SWELL WORDS LIKE 'EPIGENETIC'   'MICRO', 'MACRO' AND 'LOGARITHMETIC'. 

DEVELOPMENT S ET HOMES ARE EXTREMELY CHIC,   FULL OF CARVINGS, CURIOS AND DRAPED BATIK.  EYE‐LEVEL PHOTOGRAPHS SUBTLY ASSURE   THAT YOUR HOST IS AT HOME WITH THE RICH AND THE POOR. 

ENOUGH OF THESE VERSES ‐ ON WITH THE MISSION!  OUR TASK IS AS BROAD AS THE HUMAN CONDITION!  JUST PRAY TO GOD THE BIBLICAL PROMISE IS TRUE :  THE POOR YE SHALL ALWAYS HAVE WITH YOU 

PART I: GETTING S TARTED 

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


16

 

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

PART II: GLOBAL POVERTY 101  The global development challenge is perhaps the most difficult problem of our time. While some of the  world flourishes, an increasing number of individuals suffer from poverty and exclusion from opportunity  in ways often unimaginable to a US college student. This challenge is so difficult primarily because it  requires an understanding of humanity itself, including all of the structures that we as society have  developed to maintain its order. Poverty is the result of geography, disease, conflict, inadequate  education, money, culture, oppression, hate, fear, language and virtually every possible variable.   Accepting that poverty is as complex as one can imagine is an important realization as you begin your  internship. There is no silver bullet that will solve “the poverty question.” Indeed, anyone who believes  there is such a magnanimous solution is woefully misguided. Solutions to poverty are most effective when  they come straight from communities. There are no shortcuts, no easy answers, and there is no single  source to blame for poverty.  In this section you will discover the meaning of sustainable development through multiple perspectives.  You will learn about the different theories that have come to dominate the debate about how to fight  poverty in the 21st century and you will learn some of the latest and most creative ideas for reducing  poverty in a generation. We live in a time when economic disparity is at an unprecedented level across  the globe, but that is matched by remarkable creativity and innovation in finding solutions. Consider  yourself part of a new “enlightenment” – a period when the world is saying “no more” to gross inequality  and when people are ready to leverage their human and financial capacity to solve the poverty question.  

I.

CAUSES OF POVERTY  

II.

TRADITIONAL DEVELOPMENT APPROACHES  

III.

MODERN DEVELOPMENT APPROACHES  

IV.      SMRC’S DEVELOPMENT PHILOSOPHY    

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


17

 

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

I.

CAUSES OF POVERTY 

The causes of global poverty have been split into two sections below.  First, we have outlined the most commonly  cited  causes  of  global  poverty  including  colonialism,  corruption,  natural  resource  curse,  institutions,  geography,  etc.  Then, we discuss reasons that explain why poverty has plagued the community you are visiting.  

GLOBAL    COLONIALISM   The following description is an excerpt from Dead Aid by Dambisa Moyo, Chapter 3: Aid is Not Working (Pg 29‐33)i.  The idea of colonialism is that colonial powers delineated nations, established political structures and fashioned  bureaucracies that were fundamentally incompatible with the way of life of indigenous populations.  Forcing  traditionally rival and warring ethnic groups to live together under the same flag would never make nation‐building  easy.  The ill‐conceived partitioning of Africa at the 1885 Berlin Conference did not help matters.  The gathering of  fourteen nations (including the United States, and with Germany, Britain, France and Portugal, the most important  participants) produced a map of Africa littered with small nations whose arbitrarily drawn borders would always  make it difficult for them to stand on their own two feet—economically and politically.  

INSTITUTIONS The following description is an excerpt from Dead Aid by Dambisa Moyo, Chapter 3: Aid is Not Working (Pg 29‐33).  Another explanation put forward to Africa’s poor economic showing is the absence of strong, transparent and  credible public institutions—civil service, police, judiciary, etc.  In The Wealth and Poverty of Nations, David Landes  argues that the ideal growth and development model is one guaranteed by political institutions.  Secure personal  liberty, private property and contractual rights, enforced rule of law (not necessarily through democracy), an  ombudsman‐type of government, intolerance towards private rent‐seeking and optimally sized government are  mandatory.    While public institutions—the executive, the legislature and the judiciary—exist in some form or fashion in most  African countries (artifacts of the colonial period), apart from the office of the president their real power is  minimal, and subject to capricious change.  In strong and stable economic environments political institutions are  the backbone of a nation’s development, but in a weak setting—one in which corruption and economic graft reign  supreme—they often prove worthless.   

TRIBAL GROUPINGS  The following description is an excerpt from Dead Aid by Dambisa Moyo, Chapter 3: Aid is Not Working (Pg 29‐33).  Another argument posited for Africa’s economic failures is the continent’s disparate tribal groupings and ethno‐ linguistic make‐up.  There are roughly 1,000 tribes across sub‐Saharan Africa, most with their own distinct  language and customs.  Nigeria with an estimated population of 150 million people has almost 400 tribes.  To put  this in context, assuming Nigeria’s ratio, imagine Britain with its population of 60 million divided into some 160  ethnically fragmented and distinct groupings.    The most obvious issue is the risk facing nations with strong tribal divisions is that ethnic rivalry can lead to civil  unrest and strife, sometimes culminating in full‐blown civil war.  Even during peaceful times, ethnic heterogeneity  can be seen to be an impediment to economic growth and development.  According to Paul Collier, author of The  Bottom Billion (2007), the difficulty of reform in ethnically diverse small countries may account for why Africa    PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


18

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        persisted with poor policies for longer than other regions.  Ethnically diverse societies are likely to be characterized  by distrust between disparate groups, making collective action for public service provision difficult.   

GEOGRAPHY The following description is an excerpt from Dead Aid by Dambisa Moyo, Chapter 3: Aid is Not Working (Pg 29‐33).  One argument, advanced by geographical determinists such as Jared Diamond in Guns, Germs and Steel (1997), is  that a country’s wealth and success depend on its geographical environment and topography.  Certain  environments are easier to manipulate than others and, as such, societies that can domesticate plants and animals  with relative ease are likely to be more prosperous.  At a minimum, a country’s climate, location, flora, fauna and  terrain affect the ability of people to provide food for consumption and for export, which ultimately has an impact  on a country’s economic growth.    In Africa: Geography and Growth, Paul Collier, adopts a nuanced approach to the endowments issue by classifying  African countries in three groups: countries which are resource‐poor but have coastline; those that are resource‐ poor and landlocked; and countries which are resource‐rich (where it matters little whether the country is  landlocked or has a coastline).  The three groups have remarkably different growth patterns.  Historically, on an  economic performance basis, coastal resource‐scarce countries performed significantly better than their resource‐ rich counterparts whether landlocked or coastal; leaving the landlocked, resource‐scarce economies as the worst  performers.  Collier reckons that these factors cost these economies around one percentage point of growth.  This  is a pattern which exists globally as well as being true for the African continent.  Unfortunately, Collier notes,  Africa’s population is heavily pooled around the land‐locked and resource‐scarce countries. 

NATURAL RESOURCE CURSE  The following description is an excerpt from Bottom Billion by Paul Collier, Chapter 3: The Natural Resource Trap  (Pg 38‐39).ii  The “resource curse” has been known for some time.  Thirty years ago economists came up with an explanation  termed “Dutch disease,” after the effects of North Sea gas on the Dutch economy; it goes like this.  The resource  exports cause the country’s currency to rise in value against other currencies.  This makes the country’s other  export activities uncompetitive.  Yet these other activities might have been the best vehicles for technological  progress.    Take a country that neither has natural resource exports nor receives aid.  Its citizens want to buy imports, and the  only way they can pay for them is through exports.  Exporters generate foreign exchange, and importers buy the  foreign exchange off them to purchase the imports.  It is the need to pay for imports that makes exports valuable  to the society that produces them.  Now, along come natural resource exports (or aid, for that matter).  The  resources are sources of foreign exchange for the society.  Exports lose their value domestically.  Another way of  saying the same thing is that items that cannot be traded internationally, such as local services and some foods,  become more expensive and so resources get diverted into producing them.   

CORRUPTION AND BAD GOVERNANCE  The following description is an excerpt from Bottom Billion by Paul Collier, Chapter 5: Bad Governance in a Small  Country (Pg 64‐65).  Governance and economic policies help to shape economic performance, but there is an asymmetry in the  consequences of getting them right and getting them wrong.  Excellent governance and economic policies can help 

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


19

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        the growth process, but there is a ceiling to feasible growth rates at around 10 percent: economies just cannot  grow much faster than this no matter what governments do.  By contrast, terrible governance and policies can  destroy an economy with alarming speed.  For example, President Robert Mugabe must take responsibility for the  economic collapse in Zimbabwe since 1998, culminating in inflation of over 1000 percent a year.  Because of this  asymmetry, the implementation of restraints is likely to be even more important than the promotion of  government effectiveness.   

COMMUNITY – KAYAFUNGO, KENYA  Kaloleni District is the poorest district in the Coast Province, the second poorest province in Kenya. Currently, 80  percent of the people living in Kayafungo Location, located in the Kaloleni District, live below the poverty line. The  location‐level poverty index is 37, indicating a high depth and incidence of poverty.iii In Kaloleni District, 70 percent  of the population is “hard‐core poor,” households that cannot meet the basic minimum food requirements after  spending all of their income on food alone.    A lack of water is consistently identified as the greatest challenge facing the Kayafungo community.  These results  appear in every major and minor evaluation of the region conducted by either NGOs or governmental  organizations, including the community needs assessments conducted by SMRC personnel.  Women walk for up to  six hours a day to collect water, and schools close early in the dry season to allow children time to assist in  collecting water.  The Coast Water Services Board identifies Kayafungo as one of the 50 locations in greatest need  of water in the Coast Province, and as one of the two locations in the Kaloleni District in greatest need of water.  The Coast Development Authority reports that of the 10 most common causes of outpatient morbidity in the  Kaloleni Division, diarrhea is ranked second to malaria.  Children under the age of five are most vulnerable.  The  Gotani Health Dispensary, the area’s primary clinic, reports that diarrhea—likely caused by poor quality of water— is the number one killer of children under five in Kayafungo.  Children and adults also suffer from intestinal worms,  skin infections and respiratory system diseases.  The community, therefore, has two primary problems.  First, the community, local NGOs, and government  agencies all consistently and unequivocally identify the lack of water as the greatest problem in Kayafungo.  The  second need is for improved health.  The disease burden in Kayafungo is caused by an inadequate quantity of  water, poor water quality, lack of sanitation infrastructure and poor hygiene practices.  Read more about  Kayafungo’s struggle with water in the Water Report, produced by SMRC.       

ACTIVITY—LECTURE

II.

TRADITIONAL APPROACHES 

DEVELOPMENT VERSUS RELIEF   DEVELOPMENT: International development refers to the improvement of the quality of life. The  development field encompasses foreign aid, governance, healthcare, education, gender equality, disaster  preparedness, infrastructure, economics, human rights, environment and related issues. The wide range 

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


20

 

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

of projects underneath the development umbrella has a common long‐term focus. Development is  making improvements that we are meant to provide new opportunities for people, whereas relief  provides solutions to urgent needs for a shorter period of time.     RELIEF: Disaster relief or aid in response to a humanitarian crisis aims to save lives, alleviate suffering, and  rebuild society after a natural or human‐made crisis has occurred. Relief work includes preparing for a  disaster, disaster response (emergency evacuation, quarantine, mass decontamination, refugee camps,  etc), supporting people, and rebuilding communities after a disaster.  

DEVELOPMENT POLICY AND EXPERTS DEBATE  Global poverty remains the scourge of the 21st century. In a world where 1 billion people lack access to clean  water, 2.6 billion people do not have basic sanitation and 100 million children will never attend primary school, the  scope of the challenges the next generation of leaders faces cannot be overstated.  During his administration, President George W. Bush tripled aid to African nations by creating both the President’s  Emergency Plan for Aids Relief (PEPFAR) and the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) programs. President Bush’s  innovative Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) provides aid to countries that meet specific governance,  democracy and human rights indicators.  These health initiatives have increased available aid resources on a  bilateral basis.   Today, the Obama administration and policy makers are looking for new ways to engage the global community.  The 2006 creation of a State Department Director of Foreign Assistance (dual‐hatted as Administrator of USAID)  was seen as the first step toward modernizing and reforming U.S. foreign assistance. Large support has been  mounted for a total reform of how the U.S. administers foreign assistance, and how it can be managed more  effectively.    Public discourse over development and foreign assistance is predominantly led by two disparate intellectual  camps. The first includes those who feel that aid has been underfunded and ineffective.  They content that there  has, for too long, been a lack of political will to fight global poverty and address human rights issues as extensively  as would be necessary to meet the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)1. They believe more dollars should be  provided from the west to support aid and relief work – as much as 0.7 percent of each industrialized nation’s  gross domestic product (GDP).  Alternatively, others argue that aid agencies are misguided to believe that they can truly reduce global poverty  through the direct allocation of foreign assistance. To succeed in fighting global poverty, creativity and initiative  must be driven from within a developing nation.   Increasingly, a third camp has emerged that feels development assistance has failed not because there is not  enough money in the system or because the people are unable to initiate change given the nature of the aid itself,  but that governments are so corrupt that they completely undermine aid effectiveness. Current and future policy  makers must identify how to prioritize development and ultimately, improve aid effectiveness. iv    To better understand the disparate views of economists and development experts, the arguments presented by  three leading experts, Jeffrey Sachs, William Easterly and Paul Collier, are reviewed in the next section.                                                                     1

These initiatives were born on the heels of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), a set of 8 aspirations that the  international community agreed to in 2000. Among the goals outlined in the MDGs are to end poverty and hunger, combat  HIV/AIDS, improve maternal health, achieve environmental sustainability and achieve global partnership. 

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


21

 

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

JEFFREY SACHSv  Sachs is an economist at Columbia University’s Earth Institute and serves as Special Advisor to United Nations  Secretary‐General Ban Ki‐Moon working on achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). He is the  founder and co‐President of the Millennium Promise Alliance, a nonprofit organization dedicated to  ending extreme poverty and hunger. He is the author of The End of Poverty and Common Wealth. Sachs argues  that foreign aid is an effective tool for ending global poverty. He urges the United States and all industrialized  nations to provide for 0.7 percent of their gross domestic product to be spent on aid. With a massive increase in  financial investment, Sachs’ believes poverty can be ended by 2025.   He calls for a “Green Revolution” in Africa,  similar to the agricultural successes that drastically boosted the livelihood for Asia’s poor populations during the  second half of the 20th century.  Sachs’ identifies the major problems facing African development as food production, disease control (exacerbated  by geographical realities) and transportation. With targeted efforts, Sachs’ believes interventions can directly solve  these problems. Some examples he provides include bed nets to combat malaria and meals for children to increase  school attendance. In essence, Sachs approaches global poverty with what can be called “Clinical Economics”  whereby we would ask questions and work together to identify practical solutions.   

WILLIAM EASTERLYvi  Easterly is an economist at New York University where he is a professor of Economics, joint with Africa House, and  Co‐Director of NYU’s Development Research Institute. He is also a visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution and a  non‐resident Fellow of the Center for Global Development in Washington DC. Easterly is an associate editor of  the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Economic Growth, and of the Journal of Development  Economics. His recent books include The Elusive Quest for Growth and The White Man’s Burden.  Easterly frames the development debate between “Planners” and “Searchers.” He calls out Jeffrey Sachs directly,  arguing that Sachs and those who ascribe to his solutions are advocating for top down interventions that  ultimately fail. Aid agencies including USAID, UNICEF, UNDP, and the World Bank would be included among the  institutions he finds at fault. He does, however, believe in the power of the individual – the searcher who identifies  opportunities and solutions through entrepreneurship and problem solving on the local level.  Read this short  excerpt from Easterly’s book The White Man’s Burden (pgs 5‐6):  “In foreign aid, Planners announce good intentions but don’t motivate anyone to carry them out;  Searchers find things that work and get some reward.  Planners raise expectations but take no  responsibility for meeting them; Searchers accept responsibility for their actions.  Planners determine  what to supply; Searchers find out what is in demand.  Planners apply global blueprints; Searchers adapt  to local conditions.  Planners at the top lack knowledge of the bottom; Searchers find out what the reality  is at the bottom.  Planners never hear whether the planned got what it needed; Searchers find out if the  customer is satisfied.    A Planner thinks he already knows the answers; he thinks of poverty as a technical engineering problem  that his answers will solve. A searcher admits he doesn’t know the answers in advance; he believes that  poverty is a complicated tangle of political, social, historical, institutional, and technological factors.  A  Searcher hopes to find answers to individual problems only by trial and error experimentation.  A Planner  believes outsiders know enough to impose solutions.  A Searcher believes only insiders have enough  knowledge to find solutions, and that most solutions must be homegrown.”vii 

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


22

 

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

PAUL COLLIERviii  Collier is a Professor of Economics, Director for the Centre for the Study of African Economies at The University of  Oxford and Fellow of St Antony's College. From 1998 – 2003 he was the director of the Development Research  Group of the World Bank. Collier is a specialist in the political and economical predicaments of poor countries. He  holds a Distinction Award from Oxford University.  Collier’s most recent book is The Bottom Billion. His work focuses on the poorest billion people currently living in  the developing world. These countries are the least developed and slowest growing in the world, and as  globalization increases, those countries fall further behind in development. He writes, “I think the sad reality is that  although globalization has powered the majority of developing countries toward prosperity, it is now making  things harder for these latecomers.”ix   Collier’s work has focused on societal traps that prevent a country from escaping poverty.  While it is possible to  escape a trap and catch‐up with development rates comparable to other countries, international markets (and  related policies) make catching up increasingly difficult. Collier identifies four traps: conflict, natural resources,  landlocked with bad neighbors, and bad governance in a small country.  He expands his analysis to review the development sector including the implementing agencies and the advocacy  scene, for which he has harsh words. The “development biz,” as Collier calls the aid agencies and companies that  do contracted work in developing countries, is criticized for its denial of or inability to address the needs of the  bottom billion – leaving the focus on the middle four billion of the global community. The “development buzz,” as  Collier refers to the celebrities and NGOs that generate a great deal of energy and interest in solving the problems  of the bottom billion, is criticized as being unable to create and implement policies that lead to significant change.   

THREE KINDS OF AIDx  CHARITY‐BASED AID: Monies or materials distributed from charities or nongovernmental organizations to local  individuals, organizations, or institutions on the ground.    

EXAMPLE: PARTNERS IN HEALTH (PIH)  Partners in Health’s success has helped to prove that allegedly “untreatable” health problems  can be addressed effectively, even in poor settings. Until very recently, it was conventional  wisdom that neither multidrug‐resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) nor AIDS could be treated in such  settings. PIH proved otherwise, developing a model of community‐based care used successfully  to treat MDR TB in the slums of Lima, Peru, and deliver antiretroviral therapy for AIDS in a  squatter settlement in rural Haiti. National health authorities in both countries have now  significantly expanded these pilot projects. Today, PIH has transplanted and adapted its model of  care to the epicenter of the HIV pandemic in Africa, launching projects in Rwanda in 2005 and  Lesotho in 2006. Elements of PIH’s community‐based approach have been disseminated to and  adapted by other countries and programs throughout the world.xi 

HUMANITARIAN AND EMERGENCY AID: Aid given in response to a natural disaster or human conflict and directed  specifically for the relief of people affected by the crisis.   

EXAMPLE: THE UNITED NATIONS REFUGEE AGENCY (UNHCR) 

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


23

 

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

The protection of 34.4 million uprooted or stateless people is the core mandate of UNHCR. The  agency does this in several ways. Using the 1951 Geneva Refugee Convention as its major tool,  UNHCR ensures the basic human rights of vulnerable persons and that refugees will not be  returned involuntarily to a country where they face persecution. Longer term, the organization  helps civilians repatriate to their homeland, integrate in countries of asylum, or resettle in third  countries. Using a worldwide field network, it also seeks to provide at least a minimum of shelter,  food, water and medical care in the immediate aftermath of any refugee exodus.xii   

SYSTEMATIC AID: Aid payments made directly to governments.  Multilateral aid is transferred via institutions such  as the World Bank or International Monetary Fund (IMF) and bilateral aid is from government to government.   

EXAMPLE: PRESIDENT’S EMERGENCY PLAN FOR AIDS RELIEF (PEPFAR)  In 2003, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) was launched to combat  global  HIV/AIDS  ‐  the  largest  commitment  by  any  nation  to  combat  a  single  disease  in  history.  The  initial  legislative  authorization  for  PEPFAR  is P.L.  108‐25,  the  United  States  Leadership  Against Global HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003.xiii 

EXAMPLE 2: MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS   In September 2000, building upon a decade of major United Nations conferences and summits,  world leaders  came together at United Nations Headquarters in New York to adopt the United  Nations Millennium Declaration, committing their nations to a new global partnership to reduce  extreme poverty and setting out a series of time‐bound targets ‐ with a deadline of 2015 ‐ that  have become known as the Millennium Development Goals.  The eight Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) – which range from halving extreme poverty to  halting the spread of HIV/AIDS to providing universal primary education, all by the target date of  2015  –  form  a  blueprint  agreed  to  by  all  the  world’s  countries  and  the  entire  world’s  leading  development institutions. They have galvanized unprecedented efforts to meet the needs of the  worlds poorest.xiv 

III.

MODERN APPROACHES 

ASSET BASED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT  OVERVIEW  Asset Based Community Development (ABCD) is a way for external agencies to understand how to properly create  effective socio‐economic change in developing countries.xv ABCD is a theory, an approach, a set of methods, and a  strategy with a particular set of values that are implemented in varied and unique ways. An alternative to the  traditional needs‐based approaches that focus on a community’s problems or deficits, ABCD is a strategy that aims  to help community members understand their gifts, talents, and resources because they are the most effective  drivers of their own development. One major challenge for outsiders is to figure out the best way to stimulate this  process within communities without creating a sense of dependency.xvi    ABCD is dramatically affecting the way agencies and actors implement projects and implement development  projects. Today it is widely accepted that needs based approaches beginning with an outline of a community’s    PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


24

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        needs, or what a community does not have, can cause communities to internalize this negativity.  This approach  has a disempowering effect. Communities often begin to define themselves by their deficits and see their world as  a glass that is “half‐empty,” instead of “half‐full.” ABCD focuses on the positive attributes, past successes, and  strengths of a community, its inhabitants, and the associations within it in order to empower communities to help  themselves.  

THEORY OF CHANGE  Outsiders struggle with the concept of stimulating change because, as leaders in our home communities, we are  used to directing, managing, analyzing, and resolving issues. However, within the framework of ABCD, outsiders  must learn the unique practice of becoming facilitators of projects and interventions, not direct implementers. It is  helpful to begin by understanding how change occurs. Below is an excerpt from Terry Bergdall, an expert in  community development who spent two decades living and working in several African countries.     “Behavior, the way people act individually or within a group, is based on the way they see themselves in  the world. It’s a matter of self‐perception, self‐story, self‐image – which is all 3 ways of saying the same  thing. For example, it could be said that the unilateral tendencies and actions of the current US  government are consistent with an image of rugged American individualism. Images are created through  the reception of ‘messages.’ People continually incorporate, or discard, new messages into their  accumulated understanding of themselves in the world. Messages come in many forms: verbal, visual,  and experiential. Education is an elaborate process of conveying various ‘messages’ about particular  subjects. Messages come in varying degrees of strength: one reads all the time about the negative health  effects of fatty foods. Yet these often only mildly alter one’s prevailing self‐understanding and behavioral  choices about diet. A heart attack, however, is a much stronger message – as are most experiential  messages.    Images go through a continual process of change. Most involve minor adjustments as new pieces of  information (messages) are aligned to an existing image. Inconsistent messages that challenge a strong  image are usually ignored. Sometimes, especially if received several times from differing sources, or if the  message is strongly experiential, ‘doubt’ begins to emerge as the contradictory messages gain  prominence. Radical change occurs when an established image is replaced by a totally new self‐ understanding. When images change, behavior changes. This understanding about change can be  summarized in five points: 1) people live out of images, 2) images control behavior, 3) images are created  by messages, 4) images can change, and 5) when images change, behavior changes.    The desired change in my work has been to shift community self‐understanding from passivity (e.g.,  waiting as ‘clients’ to receive services; self‐images of being ‘victims’) to becoming active agents of their  own development.”xvii    Bergdall’s theory outlines why outsiders must be careful not to perpetuate the negative mind‐set of local  community members. Change is a process that takes time, and outsiders can play a major role to stimulate and  facilitate this process, but they must be mindful of the impact of their actions and words.   

APPRECIATIVE INQUIRY  It is important for outsiders to begin interventions by understanding local assets and resources. In addition, it is  crucial to investigate how a community understands and uses these resources. Outsiders must work directly with    PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


25

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        the community to understand what local resources are available. Appreciative inquiry, the first step in the ABCD  process, identifies and analyzes the past successes, skills, and capacities of community members. This serves to  orient outsiders and familiarize local people with the goals, personalities, and cultural nuances of foreign visitors.  Only after outsiders have become familiar and identified key local leaders do they begin to organize. After  organizing a committee of local volunteers, outsiders facilitate asset mapping exercises in order to strengthen the  community’s understanding of their abilities and local resources. 

SOCIAL CAPITAL  Because we believe assets are not just resources, but also the knowledge transferred within the community  regarding these resources, outsiders also must focus on building social capital. Social capital is “the store of good‐ will and obligations generated by social relations … like other forms of capital, social capital is a latent asset, and  individuals can increase or deplete it depending on where they stand in the reciprocal exchange of social support  and obligation.”xviii As Dambisa Moyo explains, social capital is like invisible glue that holds together a local  economy. Examples of social capital include close knit friends and family relationships, informal associations within  communities, and relationships with people and groups outside of the community, such as extended family  members, local authorities, and NGOs located nearby.  ABCD requires that special attention be given to these associations and methods for their mobilization in the  community’s interests. Within the community, strengthening networks and social bonds can create solid support  groups for new development ideas. Leveraging of inter‐community linkages has enormous potential for  diversifying existing social networks and connecting remote communities with new opportunities. ABCD then  becomes a strategy for sustainable economic development as community members become engaged citizens of a  greater county, city, and country and can take advantage of available access to goods, services, and local  government. 

SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP  Social entrepreneurship is a new approach in the development field, and can be understood as an ideal mix of  business models and wide ranging progressive goals. In other words, social entrepreneurs and social enterprises  are a blend of nonprofit goals and models with for‐profit goals and models. A successful social enterprise is  basically a business that carries out a social mission while making money. The most basic goal is to create a  financially sound and efficient enterprise while implementing innovative solutions to pressing social problems.  This new approach is steadily becoming very popular around the world. The Nobel Peace Prize in two of the last  three years was awarded to social entrepreneurs: Wangari Maathai, founder of the Green Belt Movement in 2004  and Muhammad Yunus of the Grameen Bank in 2006.xix Universities from across the world, such as the Said  Business School at Oxford, the Tata Institute of Social Sciences in India, the Fundacacao Getulia Vargas University  in Brazil, University of the Pacific in Stockton, CA and many others, are adding new programs for students to study  social entrepreneurship. At more than 200 universities in the United States and Canada alone, courses,  scholarships and speaker series have been adopted focusing on the rising field.  In the development field, social entrepreneurship has initiated a multitude of projects proven to be more  sustainable because of the incorporation of a traditional private sector goal—making profit.  The inclusion of a  revenue generating component for social development projects provides a clear incentive for local project  managers and allows for a local economy to support a new community project.  This causes communities to begin 

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


26

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        relying more on themselves then depending on the support of visiting donors or foreign governments.   Communities are empowered to be directly responsible for their own development.  

DEFINITION OR LACK THEREOF  Within the field of social entrepreneurship, a variety of social efforts exist. Social entrepreneurship can include  business ventures with social missions, hybrid organizations mixing non‐profit and for‐profit pieces, non‐profits  that create new ways of financing their operations, as well as corporate social responsibility efforts. The newness  of the social entrepreneurship industry allows for organizations with diverse structures to label themselves as  social entrepreneurs. Jean Baptiste Say, a 19thcentury French economist, originally defined the term entrepreneur  as someone who reorganizes economic resources in order to produce a higher productivity and greater yield. In  recent years authors have broadened this traditional definition of entrepreneurship to include individuals who  seek change and look for the possibilities created by change instead of the problems.xx Gregory Dees, a professor  at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, says, “Social entrepreneurs are one species in the genus  entrepreneur.”xxi Modern day theorists agree on the broad spectrum of organization types that social  entrepreneurship encompasses and supports the sector‐bending of non‐profits and for‐profits. However, they  debate over the ideal model for a social enterprise, and more importantly, whether these new enterprises are  having a positive impact on their constituencies.   

CHALLENGES Managing social and commercial objectives, the double bottom line, of social enterprises is one of the most  challenging operational components of the field. Social enterprises are designed with a model that balances  making a profit with achieving a specific social mission. Unfortunately, measuring the effectiveness of attempts to  improve a community’s social needs, such as literacy and health, is not as straightforward as measuring whether a  company is making a profit. Even if improvements can be measured, such as lower HIV infection rates, it can be  difficult to determine why this happened. For example, a non‐profit provides HIV education to a community with a  thirty percent infection rate. Two years later if the infection rate lowers by five percent; it is not conclusive to give  the non‐profit credit for this achievement. Many other factors could have helped lower the infection rate such as  the construction of a health clinic, higher income from a successful crop yield that allowed more children to attend  school, etc.xxii As a result, social entrepreneurs have to take additional steps to ensure their ventures are  successful.  Most importantly, this includes creating mechanisms that reflect a heightened sense of need for  accountability to the communities served. 

MEASURING SOCIAL IMPACT   It is very difficult to measure the success of a development project because improvements in well‐being or  livelihood are subjective. Yet, it is very important for nonprofits to understand how they do or do not add value to  communities. Evaluating what works and what does not allows nonprofits' constituents to give feedback which is  important for determining future involvement and programs. The most prominent dilemma facing development  efforts is how to measure the social impact and effectiveness of interventions and projects. Foundations, donors,  supporters, and volunteers wonder how their hard work and dollars make a difference beyond the personal  fulfillment one feels in helping others. More importantly, nonprofits are accountable to the communities they  work in and need to hear directly from local community members as to whether their work is adding value.  Accountability and effectiveness are crucial factors in determining whether social value has been created and  whether it is sustainable. Traditional for‐profit organizations are under constant scrutiny by shareholders,  investors, and consumers to produce higher quality products and services while maintaining a high rate of return 

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


27

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        on investments and maintaining profitability. Recently, non‐profits have begun to face similar pressure to prove  they are having a measurable impact in the lives or communities of others.  

Measuring efficiency is difficult for a non‐profit because of the vague concept of value. Commonly, for‐profits and  non‐profits measure the cost per output instead of the cost per outcome. For example, a tire manufacturer that  bases his or her competitiveness on the cost per tire will likely be less successful than a tire manufacturer that  includes in his calculations the true unit of value to the consumer. The true unit of value incorporates the number  of miles a tire will travel as well as its cost.xxiii Outputs are the total number of programs provided, students served,  or communities reached—in other words, the total amount of work a non‐profit does. Outcomes are the results of  this work or the benefits people or communities received during or after their involvement with the organization.  For example, for a non‐profit that aims to uplift a community of low income youth through after school  educational programs, the total number of youth served is the output measure, whereas the number of students  that have graduated and found livable‐wage jobs describe the outcomes. A success rate is the ratio comparing  outputs and outcomes and is the number of students participating in the program compared to those who end up  with jobs. These definitions imply that there are two ways to improve an organization’s efficiency: 1) lower costs of  producing each output and 2) raise the success rate—increase the number of outputs that turn into outcomes.xxiv  Another challenge to measuring social change is the misconception of quick‐fix solutions to the world’s problems.  In order to measure outcomes, appropriate goals and timelines must be set to determine whether an organization  was successful at achieving those goals. There is still confusion about how to set targets for innovative solutions  that have never been tried before. In addition, “…social change is different from for‐profit in another important  way: It often runs at the speed of molasses.”xxv Often, organizations that appear to be failing after two years  become booming successes by year twenty. This happens because social change is slow. Nevertheless, foundations  and donors pressure organizations to set artificially ambitious targets, assuming people will meet them because  the targets exist.   Donors typically cause another problem: constantly supporting new ideas and projects instead of investing in long‐ term projects. Organizations have a difficult time evaluating the costs, outcomes, and successes of particular  projects because foundations are more interested in providing financial support for the next exciting idea.xxvi This  prevents smaller non‐profits from working on the sustainability of just one project. It also often causes  organizations to initiate new projects that are only tangentially related to their missions. This is known as mission  drift and causes donor‐driven, unsustainable development in several nonprofits.xxvii Nonprofits lack two essential  assets: time and money. For many organizations a donor willing to give $10,000 or $50,000 for a project is just too  tempting to resist, no matter if it is not within their exact mandate.  In the end, development workers generally  believe positive change will result from money spent, and this is more important than a nonprofit management  crisis like mission drift.       Even if organizations have the time and resources to conduct appropriate evaluations to measure their impact, the  development field faces practical issues as well as ethical dilemmas that come with the experiments necessary to  verify impact. In psychological and medical studies, scientists attempt to prove that their prescription to resolve a  patient’s problem is effective based on an experiment with a target group and a control group. In order for the  results of this study to be accurate, the participants of the study must be randomly chosen and assigned to the  target group and control group. The complex challenges that doctors and scientists face in these studies explode  when the scientific method is attempted in the real world. Furthermore, in the development field, new approaches  to difficult challenges, such as poverty, hunger, child abuse, or low crop yields in rural Brazil, mean that scientific  applications of control groups are nearly impossible. This is often due to ethical dilemmas that arise when control  groups are excluded from an organization’s humanitarian assistance.  For example, an organization that provides    PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


28

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        food aid would have to restrict one community as the control group from receiving food from the assistance  program.  The need to perform a proper experiment does not override humanity in this sector.xxviii 

As a result of these challenges, evaluations and data that result only from groups that have directly received an  organization’s assistance can be misleading. For example, an organization may take credit for a community’s  improved employment rates after teaching basic skills training to various members of the community.  This  outcome does not take into account a boost in the economy or a long‐term improvement in the local education  system. Without a control condition to separate these external factors from the work of an organization, it is  unclear to determine what the organization alone has actually achieved.xxix 

CASE STUDY: MICROFINANCE   Microfinance is an example of social entrepreneurship, which focuses on the sale of small loans or credit. It has  become popular in the development field as an idea for helping impoverished people improve their economic  situation.  The idea of small loans is not new, and for decades the lack of formal financial institutions to support  poor people’s needs opened a window for moneylenders to take advantage of the desperately poor population. In  third world countries, usurious dealings between lenders and borrowers are so commonplace that often the  borrower does not realize how manipulative creditors are.xxx Many contracts are essentially bonded slavery  because borrowers cannot handle the burden of the loan, borrowing more and more money to pay back the  original loan. Exploitative contracts and incredibly high interest rates perpetuate the cycle of poverty, keeping poor  people poor.   In Africa, several initiatives supported by microcredit sell everything from handicrafts and beadwork to chickens  and mosquito nets. Across the continent and throughout the global south, examples of women who have doubled  their monthly income as a result of a small loan from a trusted lender have encouraged more nonprofits and  international agencies to coordinate these types of entrepreneurial interventions. Several organizations act as  banks, lending money directly to qualified groups of individuals. Additionally, organizations will offer classes and  resources on issues facing local communities such as domestic violence or HIV/AIDS awareness.   Mohammed Yunus approached the institutionalized banking system of Bangladesh to inquire about the possibility  of broadening their traditional customer base to reach the vast population of rural poor.  After the banks turned  Yunus down, he created his own independent institution, Grameen Bank. Yunus, an economics professor from  Bangladesh, is credited with discovering the benefits of micro‐credit loans to impoverished people and has spent  twenty‐seven years perfecting the idea of rural banks. Since Grameen Bank’s inception in 1982, the bank has  loaned more than $5.3 billion to nearly seven million borrowers, all of whom lack the regular requirements  demanded by the Bangladesh banking system. Ninety‐six percent of borrowers are groups of women and ninety‐ eight percent of all loans are recovered by Grameen. The discovery that poor people without any collateral are  reliable borrowers has changed millions of lives around the world. As Grameen’s success became known  throughout the 1990s, microfinance banks and lending programs have spread at a rapid rate and several banks  have made remarkable advances towards breaking the cycle of poverty.   Yunus initiated a pilot project in the Jobra communities in south‐eastern Bangaladesh, where Yunus was the head  of the Economics Department at Chittagong University in 1974. Famine had struck Bangladesh, and the rural  communities surrounding the university were hit hard by the food shortage. Yunus was deeply affected by the  haunting presence of starving people dying every day outside the university. The agriculture, economics, and  culture of the community members consumed Yunus’ life for the rest of the 1970s, and his experiences led to his  discovery of how successful microcredit to the poor can be.xxxi To date Grameen Bank has expanded its work to  reach more than 81,000 villages, over 97 percent of all the villages in Bangladesh.xxxii Grameen Bank is the    PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


29

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        inspiration for several other organizations, including the Grameen Foundation, Grameen Phone and other  technology programs that have raised employment levels, increased access to information and resources, made  communication among villages possible, and undoubtedly improved livelihoods.xxxiii 

The most remarkable achievement of the Grameen Bank and some of the other microfinance institutions is that  generally over ninety‐five percent of borrowers are women. In third world countries, traditional cultures often  deny women many rights automatically granted to men. In Bangladesh, even a wealthy woman could not borrow  money from a bank without her husband’s approval and signature. In addition, women in Bangladesh bear the  burdens of poverty and hunger because of their duty to care for their families. It is an unwritten law that if there is  not enough food, the mother of the family does not eat. Women have the most insecure social standing and can  be thrown out by their husband simply after three spoken declarations of “I divorce thee.”xxxiv These extraordinary  challenges women face made Yunus’ early goal to make more than half of Grameen’s borrowers women very  difficult. However, Yunus learned that women are better at improving their economic situation than men because  of the innate obligation women carry to provide for their children. Women are credited with improving a family’s  economic situation because a destitute woman’s first and foremost priorities are her children and her household  as a whole whereas often when a man earns extra income, he spends it on himself.xxxv  There are other microfinance institutions that have been created since the Grameen Bank that differ significantly,  but are still recognized and praised as social entrepreneurship. Compartamos, the largest microfinance institution  in Latin America, became a fully regulated bank in 2006.  The founder and CEO, Carlos Labarthe, believes a for‐ profit business model is the only way to have a massive and sustainable impact. With more than five hundred  thousand clients, the Compartamos model differs from Grameen in its simplicity. Compartamos provides only  credit to a wide range of low income populations. Though most of its borrowers are also women who face similar  hardships in Latin America as in Bangladesh, Compartamos does not invest in programs on family planning,  domestic violence, or women’s empowerment like Grameen and other microfinance institutions modeled after  Yunus.xxxvi  Labarthe believes that by providing the opportunity for personal productivity, wealth will be created for everyone.  He disagrees with Yunus’ mission to focus on providing credit to the poorest of the poor and in recent years has  expanded Compartamos’ target clients from women in rural areas to men in urban areas.xxxvii Compartamos faced  no competition at its inception in 1990 because more than seventy percent of Mexico’s population had no access  to banks. The lack of competition allowed Compartamos to charge extremely high interest rates with most  borrowers paying an annual rate of a hundred and five percent in interest and taxes.xxxviii Astoundingly, these kinds  of microfinance institutions are more profitable than most commercial banks.  As Yunus explains in his book, these  kinds of loans hold down the poor and make economic development impossible.  

IV.

OUR APPROACH 

SMRC’S PHILOSOPHY ON DEVELOPMENT  WHAT WE DO:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Prioritize local community initiatives  Work with community members  Prefer working with women and youth partners  Small‐scale development projects (under $40,000)  Outside funding (from US) 

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


30

 

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Partner with local NGOs  Catalyze new development ideas   US Youth in local community during immersion experience relative “shared austerity”2  Seek to reverse image of victim to image of mastery in communities  Harness the power of the market  Focus on health and education  Sustainable projects  Hold ourselves accountable to the communities we work in 

WHAT WE DON’T DO:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Give money to government  Develop and fund large scale community revitalization plans  Judge community struggles or behavior  Make promises to community members   Create unrealistic expectations among community members  Rely on government money  Tell community members to act a certain way or do things we don’t do 

WHAT WE THINK:  1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Community members know what they need in their lives  Aid is not inherently good or bad, but whoever directs it must be mindful of its impact  Project results and outcomes are the priorities for measuring success  Dollar values are meaningless when the goal is about impact and outcomes  Change takes a long time and happens slowly 

WHY ABCD  SMRC believes that the values in asset based community development provide an effective strategy for improving  health and education in rural communities. Asset based community development helps guide nonprofit  organizations like SMRC on how to facilitate change within communities. We use an asset based approach for two  reasons:   1. We believe development should not just improve socioeconomic welfare but also expand capabilities.  2. We believe assets are not just resources but also the knowledge transferred within the community regarding  these resources. This is more universally known as social capital.   SMRC’s work in communities brings outsiders to partner directly with local people on mapping assets, organizing  committees, building projects, and creating new networks. As outsiders, we have to be careful how we stimulate  the process of community organizing for change and how we can avoid creating a culture of dependency. The goal  is to encourage local people to take an active role in their own development, so they feel empowered to begin  pulling themselves out of the poverty trap.  Asset‐based community development instructs outsiders to act as facilitators or catalysts. Instead of directing the  development of a community, SMRC guides local people to do it themselves. Therefore, outsiders guide the                                                                    2  SMRC defines shared austerity as the effort to share the experience of daily life as a local in each of the  communities we work in. We call it austerity because these are poor communities where most families live on $1‐ $2 a day and this is uncomfortable for us.     PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


31

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        process of initiating a new community development project such as a community center or a bakery. This is an  arduous process that involves several steps: organizing a committee, monitoring and evaluation, asset mapping,  building a community vision and plan, mobilizing assets for the plan, leveraging resources from the outside, and  creating a plan for sustainability. Each of these steps is explained in Part III: Your Role of this manual. 

WHY YOUNG LEADERS   In the 21st century, young leaders are uniquely equipped to identify and develop solutions to health and education  issues that continue to plague half of the global community. SMRC leverages young leaders from the United States  to be the catalysts for implementing our development approach for physical, emotional, and social reasons. Youth  make better global leaders physically because they generally have more energy, time, and are healthier. Socially,  students have an easier time connecting with local community youth because the youth‐to‐youth exchange is  honest and open. Today’s young leaders feel a moral responsibility to help developing countries and are open  minded to innovative solutions. 

WHY RURAL COMMUNITIES   Absolute poverty is more than twice as concentrated in rural areas than in urban centers. Rural poverty accounts  for nearly 63 percent of poverty worldwide, reaching between 65‐90 percent in sub‐Saharan Africa (International  Monetary Fund, 2001). Healthcare and education remain behind urban levels. Access to education is lower among  rural children, youth and adults. The gap between urban and rural illiteracy is increasing; in several countries, rural  illiteracy is two or three times higher than urban illiteracy (Food & Agriculture Organization, 2000). The millennium  Development Goal for sanitation will fall short of its goal by half a billion people ‐ most of them in rural Africa and  Asia. The severe human and economic toll of missing the sanitation target could be prevented by closing the gap  between urban and rural populations and by providing simple hygiene education (World Health Organization and  UNICEF, 2004). Massive urbanization increasingly marginalizes rural populations (Food & Agriculture Organization,  1997).  Meanwhile, development initiatives the world over are falling short. “Every year, governments and  charities spend some $200 billion on projects in poor countries” (Washington Post, 9/3/07). Yet rural poverty  reduction languishes. Current approaches to poverty reduction are failing despite significant financial  commitments.   

WHY SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP  SMRC believes in the power of people, compassion and the market economy. Social entrepreneurship invites  individuals to identify creative, entrepreneurial solutions to society’s problems. Many of these ideas are  interdisciplinary and rely on local communities and revenue generation activities, thereby enjoying a self‐sustained  existence.   Our asset‐based community development model is consistent with our belief in social entrepreneurship and the  power of markets. As outsiders, young leaders from the US can bring new ideas to communities about how they  may leverage their local assets to establish new social enterprises. Such efforts can lead to the development of  home‐based healthcare networks, business and community centers, bakeries, and other socially productive and  sustainable solutions to health and education.  

SMRC’S MODEL   The Global Development Program is a comprehensive process that connects university students from the United  States with rural developing communities abroad to mobilize local people to create partnerships and sustainable  projects. All of the steps of our asset based community development approach (listed above and detailed later in 

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


32

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        this manual) are implemented through the three parts of the Global Development Program: Internship, Fellowship,  Community Ownership.  

The internship lays the groundwork for fulfilling SMRC’s mission and is a crucial first step towards community  empowerment. Interns are selected from across the United States to live and work in one of SMRC’s communities  for 6‐8 weeks. The first weeks are spent collecting information informally and completing evaluations on previous  SMRC projects in the communities. This time period enables visiting students to build relationships with local  students and families. Visiting students leverage new relationships to build core committees for collaboration.   Together with their local partners, they begin by taking an inventory of local assets, resources, and social capital.  This activity informs the development of a community plan for a particular area of interest such as health or  education. A community plan includes a vision, along with an outline of roles and responsibilities for each member  of the committee. Interns’ final task is to guide the committee in utilizing local assets to the fullest extent possible.  Interns work in teams to complete monitoring and evaluation of past projects including conducting interviews,  hosting focus group discussions, and distributing surveys.   The Fellowship is an opportunity for internship alumni to return to the community for 6‐12 months and work again  with their local committee to leverage external resources (funds raised in the US) and implement a project. Fellows  are selected by the Board of Young Trustees based on their performance during the internship to build a local  committee and facilitate utilizing local resources. Fellows are responsible for raising a certain amount of funds that  will be directed towards the local community’s project upon their return. SMRC covers fellows’ travel and living  expenses, and provides a small stipend throughout the Fellowship.   Community ownership is the successful transition from a project being facilitated by a fellow to a community  based project managed and sustained entirely by a local person or group of persons. The success of this  component is measured by internship participants’ monitoring and evaluation work.  

ACTIVITY—LECTURE

HOW DOES SMRC MEASURE IMPACT?  Despite these challenges, SMRC believes it is crucial to evaluate projects in order to reflect on their  implementation and understand what outcomes may have been achieved. With consideration of the values  outlined in asset based community development, non‐profit interventions must be carried out with a serious  commitment to the community’s interests. This means non‐profits using the ABCD strategy are accountable to  communities first, before the constituencies back home who might be funding their staff, travel, healthcare, etc.   Being accountable to the local communities we work in means asking them what is working and what is not.  Unfortunately, this is not as easy as it sounds. Local community politics, trust issues, and cultural barriers are major  reasons why, if a visitor tries to ask simply for answers, he or she will be misguided and misdirected. Community  members are fearful of visitors' judgments and perceptions just as we, as visitors, are fearful of what they might  think of us.  SMRC asks Global Development Interns to implement a three step evaluation program: Observe, Monitor, and  Evaluate. First, interns need to build a relationship with the community so they know our intentions are not to  change their ways or judge them, but first, just to understand and learn.     PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


33

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA        The second and third steps, monitoring and evaluation, complete a comprehensive process to report on past  projects' success.  These two parts focus on particular projects implemented in the past. Monitoring tracks  progress made towards project objectives and evaluation determines whether efforts have been worthwhile, or if  they have added value.xxxix The purpose is to measure the success of reaching particular objectives or outcomes  and to re‐think the next steps in the project’s life.   

Each Global Development Fellow creates a unique monitoring and evaluation plan for the following year’s Global  Development Interns.  Fellows are responsible for ensuring sustainability through local community management.     

ACTIVITY—FINAL DEBATE 

TOPICS:

1. 2. 3.

 

Massive increases in aid will end global poverty.   Aid does more harm than good.  SMRC is the best approach for global development. 

                                                                 

i

Dambisa Moyo, Dead Aid (Farrar, Straus and Girous, New York: 2009), 29.   Paul Collier, The Bottom Billion (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007).  iii  Geographic Dimensions of Well‐Being in Kenya, Central Bureau of Statistics, 2003.  iv  Saul Garlick, “Next America Project Final Report,” Center for Strategic and International Studies, (2009).  v  Jeffrey Sachs, The End of Poverty: Economic Possibilities for Our Time (New York: Penguin Press, 2005).  vi  William Easterly, The White Man’s Burden: Why the West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good  (New York: Penguin Books, 2006), 8.  ii

vii

Easterly, 5. 

viii

ix x

Collier, 3‐13. 

Collier, 80. 

Moyo, 58.   Partners in Health (PIH), available online: www.pih.org.   xii  UNHCR, available online: www.unhcr.org.   xiii  President’s Emergency Plan for Aids Relief, available online: www.pepfar.gov.   xiv  Millennium Development Goals by the United Nations, available online: http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/bkgd.shtml.  xv  Daniel Armanios, Asset‐ Based Assessments, 2009.  xvi Alison Mathie and Gord Cunningham, “From Clients to Citizens: Asset Based Community Development as a Strategy for  Community‐Driven Development,” The Coady International Institute, St. Francis Xavier University (2002): 2.  xvii Terry Bergdall, “Reflections on the Catalytic Role of an Outsider,” Asset Based Community Development Institute,  Northwestern University, 21 February 2003.  xviii Alison Mathie and Gord Cunningham, “Asset Based Community Development—An Overview,” Coady International Institute,  St. Francis Xavier University (2002): 8.  xix David Bornstein, How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas (New York: Oxford University  Press, 2007), xiii.  xx J. Gregory Dees, “The Meaning of Social Entrepreneurship,” Kauffman Center for Entrepreneurial Leadership (2001): 3.  xxi Dees 2.  xxii Dees 3.  xxiii A. Neuhoff and R. Searle, “More Bang for the Buck,” Stanford Social Innovation Review, (2008): 1.  xxiv Neuhoff and Searle 2.  xxv A.C. Snibbe, “Drowning in data,” Stanford Social Innovation Review, (2006): 1.  xxvi Neuhoff and Searle 4.  xi

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


34

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA                                                                                                                                                                                                                        xxvii

J. G. Dees and Beth Anderson, “Sector‐bending: Blurring the lines between nonprofits and for‐profits,” Society (2003): 16.  Snibbe 4.  xxix Snibbe 5.  xxx Muhammad Yunus, Banker to the Poor, (New York: Public Affairs, 1999), 48.  xxxi Yunus ix.  xxxii Grameen Bank, available online http://www.grameen‐info.org/bank/.  xxxiii Grameen Foundation, available online: http://www.grameenfoundation.org/.  xxxiv Yunus 72.  xxxv Yunus 73.  xxxvi Connie Bruck, “Millions for Millions,” The New Yorker, Vol. 82, No. 35, (2006): 7.  xxxvii Bruck 6.  xxxviii Bruck 7.    xxviii

PART  II:   G LOBAL  POVERTY  101      

     

       WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA .ORG  


35

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

PART III: YOUR ROLE   As a Global Development Intern, your primary responsibility is to lay the foundation for development of new  projects.  As we have described in this manual, social change is slow moving and the most sustainable  development requires a process.  We created the Global Development Program in order to be thorough in the  identification and implementation of new projects.  You will begin the internship spending time with local  community members, learning from them and about their way of life.  By the end of your internship, some of you  will be working closely with a committee on a new project idea and others will complete repairs and  improvements to past projects, all guided by observation and evaluation reports.   Below, we have detailed the  steps you will take to identify new projects, conduct evaluations, and apply for the Global Development  Fellowship. Lastly, we have included some tips for you on your role as a facilitator.    

I.

NEW PROJECTS  

II.

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT FELLOWSHIP 2010 

III.

WORDS OF WISDOM  

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


36

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

I.

NEW PROJECTS  

ACTION PLAN  Step 4:  Organize Core  Group

Step 3:  Monitoring  and  Evaluation

Step 5: Map  Assets

Step 2:  Capacity  Inventory

Step 6: Build  Vision and  Plan

Step 7:  Mobilize  Assets

PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION:  FELLOWSHIP 2010

Step 1:  Observe

STEP 1: OBSERVE  To begin developing a relationship with the community, informal discussions and interviews that draw out  people’s experience of successful activities and projects will help to uncover the gifts, skills, talents and assets  people have.  Not only does this uncover assets that people have not recognized before, but it also strengthens  people’s pride in their achievement.  This celebration of achievement and realization of their potential  contribution builds confidence in their abilities to be producers, not recipients, of development.i 

ACTIVITY—SCAVENGER HUNT1    OBJECTIVE – DAY 1: INCREASE AWARENESS OF COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE, RESOURCES, ETC.    Walk around the community in a small group, and answer the following questions without asking people:  1. What kinds of water sources do people use?   2. How do people collect water?  3. Are the roads paved?  4. What are the houses made of?   5. What do people do with trash?  6. Is there any wildlife nearby?  7. Are there public bathrooms?  8. What is the terrain people walk on like?  9. What kinds of tools do people use for their daily activities?                                                                    1

These lists are not exhaustive.  Feel free to add your own questions. 

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


37

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

10. Do people wear shoes?   11. What kind of clothing are people wearing? Do you notice anything unique about the way men or women  are dressed?  12. Where do people buy their clothing? How much does a t‐shirt cost?  13. Where do people buy their food? Are there any stands or stores in the community selling food? How  much do things cost? Are the prices what you expected them to be?  14. Identify community spaces, i.e. hang outs, fields, stores. What kinds of community spaces exist and how  are they used?  15. What kind of transportation do people use? Do people have bicycles?    

OBJECTIVE – DAY 2: UNDERSTAND LANGUAGE BARRIER CHALLENGE    Walk around the community in a small group and find out this information:  1. Who is the chief?  2. Is he married?  3. Who is his wife?  4. Do they have children?  5. Who is the next chief?  6. What is the local culture called?  7. What is the most common way to earn money here? Other ways people earn money?  8. What are some other ways people subsist?  9. What religion to people practice here?  10. Does anyone farm?  Why or why not?   11. Is the water clean?  12. What vegetables can grow here?  13. Who calls community meetings?  14. Who runs the bakery/school/local store, etc.?  15. Who makes decisions about the community?  16. Does anyone from the government come here? What kinds of interactions do they have?  17. Are there any social groups? Is there a women’s group?  18. Are there any influential people in the community besides the chief? If so who are they and what do they  do?  19. What do children do when they are not in school? Is there a favorite game or activity they take part in?     

OBJECTIVE – DAY 3: LEARN ABOUT DAILY LIFE    1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Learn how to wash clothes  Learn how to make ugali/mealie pap  Learn how to collect water or buy water  Learn about what to do when someone gets sick  Learn how to clean the floor  Learn how to bathe  Learn how to kill a chicken  Learn how to tie a baby on your back 

  STEP 2: INVENTORY  “Every single person has capacities, abilities and gifts.”ii  The more community members that use their skills and  talents, the stronger a community becomes.  In developing communities, residents often focus on deficiences and  have a difficult time recognizing the useful or positive qualities in people around them.  Even where there are 

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


38

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

deficits or flaws, there are still positives that developing community members can be reminded of.   Remember:  where there are high school drop outs, there are high schools; where there is child abuse, there is a youth  population; and where there is graffiti, there are artists.   

ACTIVITY—THE CAPACITY INVENTORYiii    Hello. I'm with Student Movement for Real Change. We're talking to local people about their skills. With this  information, we hope to help people contribute to community development. May I ask you some questions about  your skills and abilities?    

PART I ‐‐ SKILLS INFORMATION     Now I'm going to read to you a list of skills. It's a long list, so I hope you'll bear with me. I'll read the skills and you  just say "yes" whenever we get to one you have.  We are interested in all of your skills and abilities. They may have  been learned through experience in the home or with your family. They may be skills you've learned at church or in  the community. They may also be skills you have learned on the job.     

HEALTH   Caring for the Elderly ________   Caring for the Mentally Ill ________   Caring for the Sick ________   Caring for the Physically Disabled or Developmentally Disabled ________      Now, I would like to know about the kind of care you provided.     Bathing ________   Feeding ________   Preparing Special Diets ________   Exercising and Escorting ________   Grooming ________   Dressing ________   Making the Person Feel at Ease ________     

OFFICE   Typing (words per minute) ________   Operating Adding Machine/Calculator ________   Filing Alphabetically/Numerically ________   Taking Phone Messages ________   Writing Business Letters (not typing) ________   Receiving Phone Orders ________   Operating Switchboard ________   Keeping Track of Supplies ________   Shorthand or Speedwriting ________   Bookkeeping ________   Entering Information into Computer ________   Word Processing ________    

CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR   Painting ________     PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


39

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

Tearing Down Buildings ________   Knocking Out Walls ________   Furniture Repairs ________   Repairing Locks ________   Building Garages ________   Building Room Additions ________   Tile Work ________   Electrical Repairs ________   Bricklaying & Masonry ________   Cabinetmaking ________   Kitchen Modernization ________   Furniture Making ________   Soldering & Welding ________   Concrete Work (ramps) ________   Installing Windows ________   Carpentry Skills ________   Roofing  ________     

MAINTENANCE   Window Washing ________   Floor Waxing or Mopping ________   Caulking ________   General Household Cleaning ________   Planting & Caring for Gardens ________   Floor Sanding or Stripping ________   Wood Stripping/Refinishing ________   

FOOD   Serving Food to Large Numbers of People (over 10) ________   Preparing Meals for Large Numbers of People (over 10) ________   Clearing/Setting Tables for Large Numbers of People (over 10) ________   Washing Dishes for Large Numbers of People (over 10) ________   Preparing meat ________   Baking ________     

CHILD CARE   Caring for Babies (under 1 year) ________   Caring for Children (1 to 6) ________   Caring for Children (7 to 13) ________    

TRANSPORTATION   Driving a Car ________   Driving a Van ________   Driving a Bus ________   Driving a Taxi ________   Driving a Tractor Trailer ________   Driving a Vehicle/Delivering Goods ________    

OPERATING EQUIPMENT & REPAIRING MACHINERY   Repairing Radios, TVs, VCRs, Tape Recorders ________   Repairing Other Small Appliances ________  

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


40

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

Repairing Automobiles ________   Repairing Large Household Equipment (e.g., refrigerator) ________   Operating a Dump Truck ________   Assembling Items ________    

SUPERVISION   Writing Reports ________   Filling out Forms ________   Planning Work for Other People ________   Directing the Work of Other People ________   Making a Budget ________   Keeping Records of All Your Activities ________   Interviewing People ________     

SALES   Operating a Cash Register ________   Selling Products Wholesale or for Manufacturer (If yes, which products?) ________   Selling Products Retail (If yes, which products?) ________   Selling Services (If yes, which services?) ________   How have you sold these products or services? ________   Door to Door ________   Store ________       

MUSIC   Singing ________   Play an Instrument (Which one?) ________       

SECURITY   Guarding Property ________   Armed Guard ________   Crowd Control ________     

OTHER   Upholstering ________   Sewing ________   Dressmaking ________   Crocheting ________   Knitting ________   Beadwork ________   Moving Furniture or Equipment to Different Locations ________   Managing Property ________   Assisting in the Classroom ________   Hair Cutting ________   Phone Surveys ________       Are there any other skills that you have which we haven't mentioned?       

        PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


41

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

PRIORITY SKILLS       When you think about your skills, what three things do you think you do best? Which of all your skills are good  enough that other people would hire you to do them? Are there any skills you would like to teach? What skills  would you most like to learn?    

PART II ‐‐ COMMUNITY SKILLS     Have you ever organized or participated in any of the following community activities?       Church ________   Sports Teams ________   Political Campaigns ________   Community Groups ________   Community Gardens ________   Other Groups or Community Work? ________       Let me read the list again. Tell me in which areas you would be willing to participate in the future.   

PART III ‐‐ ENTERPRISING INTERESTS AND EXPERIENCE BUSINESS INTEREST       Have you ever considered starting a business? Yes _____No _____   If yes, what kind of business did you have in mind?   Did you plan to start it alone or with other people? Alone _____Others _____   Did you plan to operate it out of your home? Yes _____No _____   What obstacle kept you from starting the business?     

BUSINESS ACTIVITY       Are you currently earning money on your own through the sale of services or products?    Yes _____No _____        If yes, what are the services or products you sell? Whom do you sell to? How do you get   customers? What would help you improve your business?       

PART IV ‐‐ PERSONAL INFORMATION        Name_____________________________       Address _____________________________       Phone _____________________________       Age _____________________________     Sex: F_____ M_______     

    PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


42

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

STEP 3: MONITORING AND EVALUATION  OVERVIEW  SMRC believes that an honest and thorough appraisal of the projects that are completed by the local community in  partnership with Global Development Interns and Fellows is essential for gaining insight into effective strategies  for sustainable development and social entrepreneurship. GDIs are responsible for conducting comprehensive  monitoring and evaluation of specific projects completed in past years. Prior to implementing projects, GDFs are  responsible for outlining a set of outcomes that are desired from their community investments. All projects are  required to seek local sustainability, which will be assessed by the GDIs separately from the outcomes evaluation.  In this section you will find several projects along with a brief description and contextual history, objectives,  expected outcomes, recommended evaluation tools and local community contacts that will guide you to monitor  and evaluate each project’s sustainability.   As mentioned, each project has “expected outcomes.” During the evaluation process, think of these as the goals of  the project and be sure to ask difficult questions and compile useful data that can be analyzed to test whether the  projects are achieving or working towards meeting those goals.  

MONITORING VS. EVALUATION  Often the language of monitoring and evaluation becomes confused or grouped as one. During the internship,  monitoring will take on a distinct meaning to evaluation, which will be explained below in depth. Briefly,  monitoring is an assessment of the progress made towards original objectives. The goal is to observe if the project  has been sustained by the community, and if so, who is managing the project, how are revenue generating  activities (if relevant) continuing. Evaluation is the “community impact” assessment. This is the opportunity to find  out if the projects are meeting their intended outcomes or goals, and whether the project was worthwhile to the  community members who use the resource(s). 

MONITORING AND EVALUATION TECHNIQUES  OBSERVATION: Often simple observation will reveal whether a project is successful. Health, for example, can often  be observed among students through their energy, color, and skin. This method is particularly useful for  monitoring purposes. 

INTERVIEW: These are one‐on‐one meetings where you have the opportunity to ask a series of questions, open  and closed, that will hopefully provide insight into how a project has affected the person or community. Extensive  notes and transcription is recommended for this information to be most useful. 

SURVEY: A set of questions on a page (anonymous or not) that provides structure for you to gather specific  feedback from individuals. These can be passed out and filled out in a private location if necessary. 

DATA: This is the most quantitative and statistically significant information you can collect. This can be collected  through institutional records (i.e. student attendance records) or through sample data or polling. 

FOCUS GROUPS: This is an opportunity to hear an exchange of ideas around a project, which can lead to  interesting results and disagreements that will reveal strengths and weaknesses of a project. Groups can be  intimidating because they lack anonymity within the group of participants, but can also lead to vibrant discussion  about an issue and a project’s impact. 

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


43

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

MONITORING During the Internship, each intern will complete monitoring of one project. When conducting the monitoring  portion of the internship, interns are interested in answering one question, concerning the same goal regardless of  the project, that is: “Is this project sustainable?”   Sustainable projects are locally owned, managed and run, and continue to meet user needs in perpetuity. If a  project is falling into disrepair, is dirty or unsanitary, or suffers from corrupt management practices, it ceases to be  sustainable and requires additional community intervention. 

HOW YOU WILL CONDUCT MONITORING:  1. 2.

3. 4.

Understand the goal: “To assess if the project is sustainable.”  Identify clear indicators that may inform SMRC whether the project is sustainable, including: revenue  generation, management, functionality, supply of resources, community use, cleanliness, organization,  user‐friendliness, and others.  Identify methods to assess the above indicators, including: observation, management structure, focus  groups, interviews, surveys and others.  Compile data with care.  The goal is high quality information and this will not be gained throug rushed  questions.  Consider using the “Funneling Technique” during interviews and focus groups.  This technique  starts with broad open questions,“funnels” down with an open question, and finishes off with a closed  question (find descriptions of types of questions below in the Activity). 

ACTIVITY—ASKING THE RIGHT QUESTIONS    Read the descriptions of the types of questions you can ask while conducting monitoring and evaluation  interviews. Find a partner and ask them each type of question with the goal of finding out if their lifestyle (as they  lead it in the US) is sustainable. First, ask any questions in any order. Then start over and ask them using the  Funneling Technique.   

QUESTION DESCRIPTIONS:  1.

Open: Get the subject to talk; leave the answer wide open for individuals to fill in the blanks. Examples:  Tell me about… or What happened when…?    2. Probing: Are used to fill in details; they are questions which tease out important reactions. Examples:  What exactly did you think of the lesson? Or Did this connect to your experiences?    3. Reflective: Are useful to obtain further information, they are a repeat of something the person answering  has said or implied. Examples: You say he over reacted, how? Or You didn’t seem to enjoy the experience,  why?    4. Hypothetical: Frequently lead to hypothetical answers; they can be useful in certain areas such as  exploring values, new areas, or problem solving. Example: Would X upset you?    5. Closed: Only require one or two word answers; are used to establish single, specific facts. Examples: Yes  or No questions such as, Have you benefited from this program?

    PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


44

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

EVALUATION When evaluating the outcomes of a project, there are a few steps that will improve the quality of the information  you gather. The most important element to remember is that evaluation is intended to find out if the project  achieved its expected outcomes. This is, in many ways, impossible to prove because one can never be sure that the  impact was because of the intervention and not some external force.  However, a correlation is helpful in assessing  whether a project has been useful for the community or not.   Evaluation can be completed through a variety of different media. Interviews, surveys, questionnaires, focus  groups, data collection, and observation are among the most effective options. Each must be understood carefully  and planned for.  It is important to prepare your evaluation technique prior to the actual process. It is typical for a  project to require more than one evaluation technique. Interviews and data provide different perspectives. It may  happen that the community responds positively to an intervention because it provides confidence, but there is no  statistical improvement in their daily life. Collecting and analyzing both anecdotal and statistical information will be  helpful when you review the information you have gathered during the evaluation to write your report.  Be sure to answer the following 5 questions as you develop your evaluation.  1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Why? Identify the project’s goal that you are going to measure for. These are provided in the booklet, but  be sure to stay focused!  What? Clearly define what problem or issue will be calculated or measured.  Who? Identify who the key players are that are involved in this project?  When? Assess the timeline and be sure that you have the necessary time to make a complete and  successful project evaluation.  How? Select which techniques will help you gather the best information to assess whether the goal has  been met. 

By answering the above 5 questions, you are ready to lay out your “terms of reference” – a framework for you to  gather information and share responsibilities for collecting the data. 

REPORTING The internship requires that you complete one monitoring report and one evaluation report. Both reports should  include the goal, your method, what you learned through analysis of the data you collected, what should be  improved, and what your recommendations are for next steps.   Sometimes there is “planned change” and other times there is “unplanned change.” Be open to both. It is critical  that wherever possible the individual conducting the monitoring and evaluation is not biased, and keeps an open  mind to whatever the status or impact of a project might be. The better the information, the better the results our  community‐based development will yield.         

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


45

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

ACTIVITY—PAST PROJECTS   

SANITATION   1. LATRINES   Description: In a partnership with Rotary International, SMRC constructed 14 four‐door ventilated improved pit  (VIP) latrines at eight primary schools, five nursery schools and at the Gotani Health Clinic.  The location of the  latrine construction was determined during community meetings led by the Assistant Chief in each sub‐location.   The community was responsible for digging the pit (20‐feet deep), providing the hard core and all the water  necessary during the construction period.  The SMRC Project Director bought and transported all materials and  contracted Changawa Building and General Construction for the labor to gbuild the structures.  Latrine Distribution:  Mrimani Sub‐Location: St. Michael’s Primary School, Mwijo Primary School, Mitsikitsini Primary School  Kinagoni Sub‐Location: Kinagoni Primary School, Uhuru Primary School, Katsangani Nursery School  Miyani Sub‐Location: Miyani Primary School, Nzoweni Nursery School, Kasemeni Nursery School.  Mbalamweni Sub‐Location: Gogorarhe Primary School, Kinolo Nursery School, Ramisi Nursery School, Gandini  Primary School, Gotani Health Clinic    Objectives: To provide a sanitary means to dispose of waste at major institutions in Kayafungo Location.    Expected Outcomes:   • Increased latrine use in schools.  • Increased latrine use at home.  • Reduced incidence of disease, parasitic infestation and worms.  • Increased female school attendance.    Evaluation Tools:  • Interview: school headteacher, staff, parents, pupils  • Physical observation of latrine   • Observation of latrine usage  • Girls attendance data    Contacts:  Elias Changawa, Lead Contractor of Changawa Building and General Construction  Mobile Phone: 0729‐32‐8613  For school headmaster names and contact info see Sanitation Project School Information chart.   

2. HAND‐WASHING STATIONS   Description: Recognizing the importance of hand‐washing with soap in the reduction of disease, SMRC installed  a total of 20 hand‐washing stations at the sites of latrine construction. The hand‐washing stations were specially  designed to support a school with 80 liter tanks, two taps and waste water collection basins.  Each hand‐ washing station was also equipped with a white mesh bag used to hold soap.    At each primary school, SMRC installed two hand‐washing stations, one for boys and one for girls.  At each  nursery school and the health clinic, we installed one hand‐washing station. Note: Gogoraruhe Primary School  and Uhuru Primary School were nursery schools when SMRC started the sanitation project so these schools  have one hand‐washing station.  After installation, each school was given four bars of soap and instructions to  keep the stations filled with water and soap daily.    PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


46

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

  Objectives: To provide pupils and community members the opportunities and incentives to properly wash their  hands with soap after using the latrine and before eating.  Expected Outcomes: To reduce the incidence of disease caused by improper hand‐washing.  Evaluation Tools:  • Interview: school headteacher, staff, parents, pupils  • Physical observation of hand‐washing stations  • Observation of hand‐washing practices    Contacts:  Ndovu Tanks, Hand‐washing station design company located in Mombasa  Phone: 0733‐61‐3285 / 0720‐63‐1115   

3. HEALTH, HYGIENE & SANITATION WORKSHOPS   Description: From September to December 2008, SMRC carried out a series of four ten‐day workshops with 160  participants from the Kayafungo community.  Health facilitators from the Muthaa Community Development  Foundation (MCDF), Emily Karechio and Abdallah Mohamed, led the workshops.  Following the trainings each  successful participant was given a Community Health Trainer (CHT) certificate and official yellow uniform.      Topics included:   • Personal hygiene (Hand‐washing, bathing, teeth‐brushing).  • Common diseases (Water and hygiene related diseases and prevention, worms).  • Nutrition (Balanced diets, nutrients found in local foods, best preparation of foods, malnutrition).  • HIV/AIDS (Understanding the disease, causes and prevention measures including use of both female  and male condom, VCT importance and relationship between HIV/AIDS and TB, how to live positively,  home‐based care, ARVs).  • Water treatment.  • Latrine Construction (Identification of locally available materials, types of soils, construction methods).  • Waste water disposal.  • Ecological alternatives in sanitation (Refuse disposal).  • First Aid.  • Trainer of Trainers (TOT) ‐ Training skills in the community.    Please review the MCDF Workshop Summary Report for more detailed information.    During the workshops we learned that most participants did not know about HIV/AIDS or know their status.  In  collaboration with the Ministry of Health, World Vision and Youth Alive we hosted two mobile Voluntary  Counseling and Testing (VCT) days, the first on October 17, 2008 at Magogoni Chuch ACK and the second on  November 14, 2008 at Gotani Health Dispensary. Youth Alive mobilized the community and performed skits and  songs to create awareness about the disease.  In total 332 people came to the event and the counselors tested  131 people.    For the second phase of our Community Health Trainer program in February 2009, six selected CHTs from each  sub‐location did a one‐and‐a‐half hour training with every class in every school where we installed hand‐ washing stations.  The CHTs trained students on the importance of hand washing for good health as well as  when and how to wash hands. Following the training in the schools, the CHTs monitored and evaluated whether  the latrines and hand washing stations were maintained and used properly by the students and the community.  See results from the second phase of the CHT program in the MCDF Workshop Summary Report.    Objective: To build the capacity of workshop participants who will improve the health and quality of life for the  community as a whole using a training of trainer approach.      PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


47

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

Expected Outcomes:   • Increase in number of household latrines.  • Increase in latrine use.  • Increase in practice of hand‐washing with soap.  • Reduction of incidence of disease.  • Reduction of malnutrition  • Community Health Trainers perform training with the community in schools and at local barazas on  their own initiative.    Evaluation Tools:  • Interview: Community Health Trainers, facilitators, school teachers, pupils  • Household behavior observation  • School behavior observation  • Household latrine survey    Contacts:  Emily Karechio, Team Leader and Facilitator from the Muthaa Community Development Foundation  Email: muthaa2@gmail.com  Phone: 0720‐27‐8614  Abdallah Mohamed, Facilitator from the Muthaa Community Development Foundation  Email: abdallamcdf@gmail.com  Phone: 0721‐61‐8045  Terry Adhiambo, Community Nurse and Social Worker, Guest Facilitator  Phone: 0721‐76‐5183  Mourine H. Masha, Community Nurse at Gotani Dispensary, Guest Facilitator  Phone: 0733‐67‐5388  Shungu David, DASCO ‐ Kaloleni, In charge of HIV/AIDS in District  Email: shunguma08@yahoo.com  Phone: 0721‐23‐0505   

WATER   1. ROOF RAINWATER CATCHMENT INSTALLATION (GOGORARUHE PRIMARY SCHOOL)  Description: In February and March 2009, SMRC installed two 5,000‐liter plastic tanks and gutters to collect  rainwater on the roof of the office and two classrooms at Gogoraruhe Primary School.  Objectives: To capture rainwater to be used by Gogoraruhe Primary School.    Expected Outcomes:   • Students stay in school longer because they do not need to collect water daily.  • Reduced water costs for the school.  • Improved health of the students and teachers.  • Increased used of hand‐washing station.  • Higher KCPE scores.    Evaluation Tools:  • Review Weekly and Daily Water Use Logs starting March 2009 kept by the school Headteacher.  • Collect and review Roof Rainwater Catchment School Survey given to all schools in Kayafungo created  by SMRC and distributed by the Ministry of Education – Kaloleni in March 2009.  Should be collected in  Chief’s Office.  • Interview: school headteacher, staff, parents, pupils.   

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


48

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

Contacts:  Jadin Protek, Material supplier in Mombasa  Phone: 0712‐31‐5350  Tile & Carpet Center, Supplier and transporter of tanks  Phone: 0736‐96‐3000  Email: mail@msa.tilecentre.com  John Barisa, Gogoraruhe School Headteacher  Phone: 0733‐47‐7803   

2. ROOF RAINWATER CATCHMENT SYSTEM REHABILITATION (GOTANI DISPENSARY)  Description: World Vision previously constructed a ferro‐cement tank and gutters to collect rainwater at Gotani  Dispensary.  The gutters became disconnected from the pipe feeding to the tank.  In September 2008, SMRC  hired Changawa Building and General Construction to buy the materials and provide the labor necessary to  repair the catchment system.  Objectives: To capture rainwater to be used at Gotani Dispensary.  Expected Outcomes:   • Reduced water costs for dispensary.  • Improved health of patients.    Evaluation Tools:  • Interview nurses and patients on water use.  • Create rainwater collection log.  Contacts:  Leonard Denje Washe, Nurse In Charge, Gotani Dispensary  Phone: 0724‐20‐9007  Mourine H. Masha, Community Nurse, Gotani Dispensary  Phone: 0733‐67‐5388   

3. KWA CHOGA DAM CONSTRUCTION  Description: Kwa Choga Dam was first built by the Katsangani community in 1972 and has been the  community’s only source of water for domestic use.  Due to the rise of the population in the area and prolonged  drought, the community wrote a proposal to SMRC to expand their dam to hold more water.    The dry spell at the beginning of 2009 was particularly desperate for the people of Kayafungo.  SMRC chose to  relieve the water situation by expanding the dam, while at the same time providing relief money for work by the  community.       Dams require excavation of earth, through either manual labor or heavy machinery. The budget for a  professional survey and design is between Ksh. 80,000‐163,000. The budget for excavating an average dam  using heavy machinery is between Ksh. 3‐6 million.  Due to budget and time constraints, SMRC chose to hire the  community to do the design and provide the manual labor.  In February 2009, before the start of the rainy  season, SMRC contributed a total of Ksh. 638,000 (~$8,285) to pay community members and supervisors for  their labor.  We hired community supervisors who had been trained through a World Vision program on dam  excavation and each person was given Ksh. 150 for every 1m x 2m x 1.5ft plot excavated.  The dam is expected  to serve 900 people daily.    During and after pay day, small kiosks opened near the construction site so others not digging benefited by  creating income generating activity.    Objectives: To alleviate the water crisis in Katsangani.    Expected Outcomes:   • Community members walk less distance to their water supply.    PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


49

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

• • •

Water supply available for more time throughout the year.  Hunger alleviation during time of drought and famine.  Increase of business 

Contacts:  Robert Jefwa, Kwa Choga Dam Project Chairman  Phone: 0715‐31‐1427  Raymond Tisho, Kwa Choga Dam Project Member  Phone: 0733‐70‐5551  Nicolas Gitobu, Area Development Program Coordinator for World Vision  Phone: 0721‐78‐7448    Evaluation Tools:  • Interviews: Community members, supervisors  • Dam evaluation discussion with World Vision  • Focus groups  • Review with project management committee   

EDUCATION    1. GOGORARUHE PRIMARY SCHOOL (CLASSROOMS, OFFICE, DESKS, MATERIALS) 

Description: When SMRC built a latrine at Gogoraruhe Nursery School the Project Director noticed that classes  were being held underneath a tree and in an unfinished building without a roof. The Constituency Development  Fund (CDF) had allocated money to build an office and classroom but the construction was incomplete and the  money was lost due to corruption.  In November and December of 2008, SMRC contracted Changawa Building  and General Construction to complete the unfinished structure, thereby constructing two classrooms and an  office.    In an agreement with the School Management Committee to provide desks to the nursery school, SMRC  furnished the primary school classrooms each with 30 desks and furnished the headteacher’s office and  teachers office with tables, desks, bookshelves and cupboards.  SMRC also donated to the school a supply of  pencils, pens, chalk and notebooks for 200 students.    Objectives: To improve primary education for the community of Gogoraruhe.    Expected Outcomes:   • Increased student attendance.  • Improved quality of education.  • Increased KCPE scores.    Evaluation Tools:  • Interview: school headteacher, parents, pupils.  • Observe classes.  • Comparison with surrounding primary schools.    Contacts:  John Barisa, Gogoraruhe School Headteacher  Phone: 0733‐47‐7803  Elias Changawa, Lead Contractor of Changawa Building and General Construction  Mobile Phone: 0729‐32‐8613    2. MWIJO SECONDARY DAY SCHOOL (CLASSROOM, OFFICE)    PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


50

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

Description: Before the involvement of SMRC, Kayafungo did not have a day secondary schools.  All of the  secondary schools in Kayafungo were boarding schools barring most students from attending because  Kayafungo families could not meet the school fees.  In February 2009, SMRC built a classroom as the start of  Mwijo Secondary Day School.  The School Management Committee raised the funds to build an adjoining  teacher’s office and veranda and provided all of hardcore and water during project construction.  SMRC  personnel bought and transported all materials and contracted Changawa Building and General Construction for  labor.    Objectives: To promote secondary school education for Kayafungo pupils.    Expected Outcomes:   • Increased secondary school student attendance.  • Improved KCSE scores.  • Improved development through increased entrepreneurship and agriculture productivity.    Evaluation Tools:  • Interview: school headteacher, parents, pupils.  • Observe classes.  • Comparison with surrounding secondary schools.    Contacts:  Raymond Kazungu, Mwijo School Headteacher  Phone: 0735‐56‐4862 

MEDICAL   AFYA BORA CLINIC  Description: The Gotani Dispensary is the only health institution to serve thousands of people in Kayafungo.  The  Dispensary has no electricity, no clean water and insufficient government funds for services and medications.   Through a personal micro‐finance loan of Ksh. 80,000 from Lily Muldoon, Mourine Masha, the community nurse  at Gotani Dispensary, is starting a private clinic called Afya Bora (meaning “good health” in Swahili) located in  Kibao‐Kiche.  She is receiving guidance from the Nurse in Charge at the Gotani Dispensary and a Public Health  Officer from the Ministry of Health.    Kibao‐Kiche is located 5km south of Gotani Dispensary and the clinic is situated on a newly constructed road  between Mariakani and Kaloleni.  The clinic can potentially target a population which previously did not have  access to formal health services.    By March 2009, Mourine had bought the building and acquired some of the equipment and drugs.  Once she  gets all of the required materials, she will receive approval from the Ministry of Health to open and a nurse and  lab technician will be assigned by the Ministry to assist her in the clinic.  Once more funding is available, Mourine plans to provide advanced services not currently offered in Kayafungo  location.  These services include a blood testing lab, maternity ward and family planning unit.  Kibao‐Kiche also  has electricity so she has plans to buy a refrigerator and provide vaccines.    Objectives: To provide better health services in Kayafungo.    Expected Outcomes:   • Improved health.  • Decreased infant mortality rates.   

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


51

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

Evaluation Tools:  • Interview nurse and surrounding community  • Meeting with Ministry of Health  • Survey     Contacts:  Mourine H. Masha, Community Nurse, Gotani Dispensary  Phone: 0733‐67‐5388  Leonard Denje Washe, Nurse In Charge, Gotani Dispensary  Phone: 0724‐20‐9007  Alio Ibrahum, Public Health Officer  Phone: 0722‐87‐1071 

STEP 4: ORGANIZE A CORE GROUP OR COMMITTEE  In the process of taking your inventory, particular people will emerge as leaders in the community.  The next step  is to organize a group of committed volunteers who are interested in exploring further the community’s assets and  acting on the opportunities identified.   

ACTIVITY—GET TO KNOW YOUR COMMITTEE  LOCAL LANGUAGE LESSONS  Practice the local language with your group.  Ask for help on pronunciation and other questions you might have  about vocabulary and conversation.   

SPORTS AND GAMES  Universal games like soccer or card games are easy ways to get to know people.  

LIFE MAPS  Use the same map outline from our orientation to share your life story and learn about others’ personal histories. 

STEP 5: MAP ASSETSiv  Mapping is more than gathering data. It is very important that citizens and their associations do the asset mapping  themselves so that they build new relationships, learn more about the contributions and talents of community  members, and identify potential linkages between different assets. 

NEEDS BASED ASSESSMENTS explore what a community lacks as the basis for development.  ASSET BASED ASSESSMENTS explore what a community has as the basis for development through a “…process of  self‐mobilization and organizing for change.”v   Don’t Forget:  We’re trying to stimulate the process of change while simultaneously we must avoid creating a  culture of dependency.    Identifying associations  The starting point of this exercise is to identify associations in the community. These relationships are the engines  of community action, and are therefore essential (and often unrecognized) as assets. One way to do this is to start  with the core group and ask them what associations and informal groups they belong to. Once these have been    PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


52

 

G LOBAL DEVELOPM MENT  I NTERNSHIP —K — ENYA 

listed, ask the core group p to expand the list to includee associations they know abo out. This longeer list of associaations  can then b be clustered byy type and thosse associationss most likely to participate in working togetther for a comm mon  purpose caan be identified d. In the proceess of identifyin ng associationss, the list of leaaders in the community also  expands.  Identifyin g the assets  of local instittutions  This would d include goverrnment agenciees, non govern nment agencies and private ssector businessses. The assetss of  these instittutions could b be the servicess and programm mes they provide, the meeting places they offer, the  equipmentt and other sup pplies they maay have, or the communicatio ons links they m may have. Theyy also have paid or  unpaid staff that may be important linkks in the comm munity.  Identifyin g physical asssets and nat ural resourcees  Assets such h as land, wate er, minerals orr other resourcces can be listed here. Identiffy those which are communaally  owned and d managed and d those which are individually owned and m managed.  Mapping  the local eco nomy  This exercise helps people in the comm munity understand how the lo ocal economy works, showin ng how well loccal  resources aare maximized d for economicc benefit. Are p products and seervices importeed that could b be produced lo ocally? 

ACTIVITYY—MAP ASSETS    Review this exxample asset m map and use th he next page to o create a new asset map.  Bee specific.   

A SAMPLEE MAP Assocciations:

Phyysical  Resourrces:

Home Base e Care Group

Land

Dance e Troupe

Schools

Traditiional Assisted Birth Women n's Group

Latrines

hurch   Ch

V Vacant classroo om

S Suru Vi llage Instittutions:

Individuals: Parents

Sch hools

Youth

Nonprofits

Students

Muniicipality

Artists

Police Department

Entrepreneurrs

 

P ART  III:   Y O UR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUD DENTMOVEMENTUSSA . ORG 


53

 

G LOBAL DEVELOPM MENT  I NTERNSHIP —K — ENYA 

YOUR COM MMUNITY ASSSET  MAP  

Asso ociatio ons:

Physiccal  Resource es:

My Commun nity Insttitutio ons:

In ndividu uals:

      P ART  III:   Y O UR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUD DENTMOVEMENTUSSA . ORG 


54

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

STEP 6: BUILD VISION AND PLAN  The next step is to develop a goal that connects your assets and capacities to your core group’s commitment for  community development.  This is the beginning of a new project and will lay the foundation for developing the  project before you leave the community and while you are away. 

ACTIVITY—PLANNING 1. 2. 3.

Discuss issues of interest with group.  a. How do they relate to assets and capacities that have been outlined?  Decide goals for community development.  Write mission statement and vision. 

STEP 7: MOBILIZE ASSETS  The process continues as an ongoing mobilization of community assets for economic development, more  specifically to meet the goals outlined in Step 6.   

ACTIVITY—CREATE TO DO LIST    1. Outline key contacts specific to project goals who will be essential in project implementation. Include  people who need to know about the project “vision.”  For example: associations, families, school  teachers/principals, authority figures, local NGOs, clinic workers.   2.

Develop a plan for how to propose and present projects and project ideas to those key contacts. 

3. Get approval from local institutions and representations: chief, community development forum, local  municipality, etc.  4.

Create a sustainability plan for the long term and for the time you will not be in the community. 

5. Assign/elect committee members to specific roles and determine a process for holding members  accountable for their responsibilities.   6. Facilitate implementation of project goals.  Do your best to make it possible for committee members to  do their jobs.  Some ideas: encourage necessary conversations, write ups/reports, marketing to community,  petitioning of community members, information gathering from associations.     

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


55

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

II.

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT FELLOWSHIP 2010 

FELLOWSHIP DESCRIPTION: Global Development Intern alumni have the opportunity to propose projects to  SMRC’s Board of Young Trustees.  If selected, alumni will become Global Development Fellows and upon meeting  fundraising goals will receive a travel and living stipend to return to Manyeleti or Kayafungo to implement  proposed projects.  Benchmarks are set throughout the 2009‐2010 school year to meet fundraising project  budgets.  These goals must be met by April 15 of 2010 in order to receive SMRC support.  Fellows that have  reached set goals by April 15 will be invited to a training session in Washington, D.C. and will receive funding to  return to the community and implement their project.  Fellows will be expected to depart for the country of their  fellowship in June.   

GDF BENEFITS:  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Personal expenses paid during fellowship including round trip air travel to community, room and  board costs, and a small stipend to cover transportation in‐country  501(c)3 non‐profit status that allows for tax exemption and tax deductible benefits  Legal counsel and representation  Accounting services  Access to SMRC’s international contacts and network of 12,000+ individuals  Mentor in SMRC office to guide project development and fundraising efforts 

APPLICATION:  Only GDI alumni may apply to become fellows.  Projects must be aligned with SMRC’s mission and  address a clearly defined community need.  Applicants must have identified at least one community partner and  include in the application a detailed timeline for the project, a detailed budget, and a practical fundraising plan.   See the application for specific instructions. 

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:  ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Must have completed the SMRC Global Development Internship (GDI) in 2009  Must commit to a minimum of 6 months to implement proposed project  Identified a local partner at the project site that has agreed to assist with the project development  and implementation  Commitment to fundraising project money and developing a network of support  Project must have high potential for sustainability in the long term  

SELECTION PROCESS:  Fellowship applications will be reviewed by SMRC using a fair and thorough process  designed to select projects that will make the greatest impact.  After proposals are submitted, the Board of Young  Trustees2 will work both individually and collaboratively to review project proposals.  Some applicants may be  asked to participate in a telephone interview with members of the Board.  This will be an opportunity for  applicants to share more information about themselves and their projects.  Upon selection, SMRC will announce  fellowship recipients and will send each applicant the Board’s feedback on each proposal.     COMPETITIVE FELLOW PROJECT PROPOSALS WILL:                                                                    2

The Board of Young Trustees is comprised of young leaders in a variety of fields that advise the organization and lead new  project and community selection.  The Young Trustees have broad experience living and working in international communities  and many are alumni of SMRC’s Global Development Internship or are former chapter leaders.    

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


56

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ ƒ

Align directly with SMRC’s mission  Address a clearly defined community need with innovation and thoughtfulness  Have strong local community support for the project   Show the applicant has connected with the local community  Have a positive recommendation from GDI 2009 staff 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS:    What if I do not meet the fundraising benchmark?  What happens to the money I fundraised?  If you do not meet the benchmark, you will not receive funding from SMRC to return to the community and  implement the project. Donors will receive notification that their donations will be automatically  committed to other SMRC’s projects.    Can I apply if I am a sophomore?  Yes, but your project timeline must be 6 months to 1 year which would likely require time away from your  university.      How much is the stipend?    For South Africa, fellows will receive $200 a month.  For Kenya, fellows will receive $250 a month.    How do I fundraise?  SMRC’s office will guide you through the process of building a network of support and how to approach  contacts, foundations, and potential donors for your project.  We are a resource for you, but you have to  be dedicated to putting in hard work as fundraising is a major challenge.    Can I apply for grants?  Yes. SMRC’s office will provide you support for completing these applications and will submit them directly  when necessary.    Can I apply to be a team leader and a fellow?  Yes.  Please indicate your preference on your applications.       

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


57

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT FELLOWSHIP—APPLICATION  Please submit via email to Vanessa Carter at vanessa@studentmovementusa.org no later than September 1, 2009. 

A. Personal Information  FIRST NAME____________________ LAST NAME___________________________   EMAIL___________________________________________  HOME PHONE ________________________ CELL PHONE______________________  CURRENT ADDRESS: ________________________________________________  CITY: _______________________________ STATE: ______ ZIP: _______________________  PERMANENT ADDRESS: ______________________________________________  CITY: _______________________________ STATE: ______ ZIP: _______________________  COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY: ___________________________ MAJORS: _____________________  YEAR OF GRADUATION: __________ AGE: ______  WHAT COMMUNITY ARE YOU WORKING WITH? ______________________________________  WHO IS IN YOUR COMMITTEE ?  ____________________________________ 

PARTNER CONTACT INFO: ________________________________________________ 

B. PROPOSAL   Please submit 200‐300 words to answer each of the following questions.    

ABOUT YOU  1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Who in your life has most influenced you? Who from the community has influenced your life?   What kinds of challenges have you faced in the past with people of different cultures and how have  you overcome them?  Who have you connected with in the community? Why it is important for you to work with them in  the community?  Why are you committed to SMRC’s mission? How did you get involved and how do you foresee your  future involvement after the fellowship?  What are some of your major accomplishments? Tell us how you have been responsible, reliable, and  professional. 

ABOUT THE PROJECT  1. 2.

3.

Describe the issue this project addresses. Include how the issue affects the community.   Detail the outline of your project implementation plan. How will you re‐introduce the project after  being away for 9 months? What is the timeline? What are some short term and long term goals?  What is the plan for sustainability?  Who will you be working with on this project? Who is in your committee in the local community? Is  anyone else involved in the implementation? Be sure to include any anticipated partnerships with  other organizations or sponsors.   

PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


58

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

NETWORKING AND FUNDRAISING  1. 2.

Detail your calendar for the next 9 months including academic, extracurricular, and personal  obligations. What will you accomplish by the set benchmarks?   How do you intend to fundraise to meet your project’s budget? What groups, individuals, and  communities will you reach out to? What is your strategy for raising money? What grants do you plan  to apply for? 

C. ATTACHMENTS:   1. 2.

Please submit  any  illustrations  or  visuals  that  will  help  us  understand  you  and  your  project  plan  better. (If applicable).  Please  submit  a  1‐2  page  budget  in  Excel  of  all  expected  revenue  and  expenses  including  what  resources you used to determine costs.  Request an example upon your return to the US.   

III. SOME WORDS OF WISDOM   BEING A FACILITATOR  Because we need to understand not just what the community has but how a community understands and uses  its assets, it is important to work with the community.vi  It is essential to understand that working with the  community, the researcher is a facilitator.vii  He/she helps the community self‐implement their assets and  practices in new and creative ways in order to address self‐identified problems.    An effective facilitator does not directly do anything for the community but always works directly with  community members.  Facilitators lead by taking a step back and guiding community groups towards  predetermined goals.  This is much easier said than done, however, there are several practical activities that  can be followed.  In the process of appreciative inquiry, facilitators help communities to affirm their real  situation, sort of like holding up a mirror to community members.  As a facilitator, outsiders guide  conversations, focus groups, or interviews by asking particular questions in a unique way.   The idea is to get  the community to tell you what they have, not what they wish they had.  This is very difficult and requires  time and patience.  However, if successful, community members will begin to identify a potential project  based on what is feasible given community assets, and not based on an external definition of what is needed.   Read this excerpt below that outlines an example of a planning meeting during which a facilitator asks several  probing questions in order to uncover the local assets.  This example shows how to move a needs based  conversation to an assessment of the community’s assets.  “Discussions about local assets during the planning meeting were interesting to people in  Endabeg, a village in the Babati District of Tanzania, but they also wanted facilitators to consider  their needs. Q: ‘Okay, what do you think are some of your biggest needs?’ A: ‘We need for the  co‐op to deliver sufficient amounts of fertilizers to us on a timely basis.’ Q: ‘What is the  problem that you hope will be solved?’ A: ‘Our crop production continues to go down every  year.’ Q: ‘Besides your concerns about fertilizer, what are other possible reasons for the drop in  crop production?’ A: ‘We are losing top soil to erosion.’ Q: ‘What practices are you following  in Endabeg that might be perpetuating these problems? A1: ‘We are cutting trees on the high  slopes above the fields; water is running too fast and flows over our fields.’ A2: ‘We are not  careful bout the direction in which we plow our fields.’ A3: ‘It isn’t a soil erosion issue, but we    PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


59

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP—KENYA 

are always planting the same crop year after year so the ground is getting tired.’ Q: ‘What can  you do differently in Endabeg to address some of these problems that are contributing to the  ongoing drop in your crop production?’ A: ‘We could create small terraces, we could replant  trees above our fields, we could rotate our crops, we could build some small damns to slow down  the running water during the rains, we could ..., we could … etc, etc. (Note: It takes patience  and skill for a facilitator to ask probing questions in different ways; it also takes time to explore  and consider different ideas and suggestions; small group work can be helpful here.)”viii      Other questions might include:  1. Questions based on process or practices (How do you fetch water? Where do you go to get food?)  2. Questions based on resources available (What is wildlife in the community? What do children play with?)  3. Questions based on passion (When you go to school, what makes you happy?)ix    After  identifying  the  assets,  facilitators  work  with  community  groups  to  build  “practical  plans  of  action”  that  include  a  clear  process  for  mobilizing  resources  towards  meeting  goals.    Outlining  the  roles  for  members  of  the  team is important to make sure people feel included and important.  This is the key to accomplishing goals set out  and ensuring long‐term involvement of a group of community members.                 

                                                                  i  Mathie and Cunningham, 1.    ii   John  Kretzman  and  John  McKnight,  “Building  Communities  from  the  Inside  Out:  A  Path  Toward  Finding  and  Mobilizing a Community’s Assets,” Institute for Policy Research, (1993).  iii   Reprinted  with  permission  of  John  P.  Kretzmann  and  John  L.  McKnight,  pp.  19‐25,  from  Building  Communities  from the Inside Out: A Path Toward Finding and Mobilizing a Community's Assets, Evanston, IL: Institute for Policy  Research (1993).  iv  Mathie and Cunningham, 1.  v  Mathie and Cunningham, 2.  vi   W.  Schapp  and  S.S.  Nandi,  “Beyond  PRA:  experiments  in  facilitating  local  action  in  water  management,”  Development in Practice, (2005), 643‐654.  vii  V.J. Michener, “The participatory approach: Contradiction and co‐option in Burkina Faso,” World Development,  (1998), 2105‐2118.  viii  Bergdall, 4.   ix  Daniel Armanios, Asset Based Assessments, 2009, 2.    PART  III:   Y OUR  R OLE      

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


60

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP 

APPENDIX A: KAYAFUNGO COMMUNITY MAP     

 

APPENDIX A: MAP OF LOCAL COMMUNITY  

            

      

             WWW.STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA. ORG  


61

GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTE RNSHIP 

APPENDIX A: MAP OF LOCAAL COMMUNITY  

          

    

             WW WW. STUDENTMO OVEMENTUSA . OR RG  


62 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP 

BIBLIOGRAPHY ASHOKA.ORG.  Innovators  for  the  Public,  http://www.ashoka.org/files/InnovationsBookletSmall.pdf,   

2009.

ARMANIOS, DANIEL. ASSET‐BASED ASSESSMENTS. 2009.  BERGDALL, TERRY. “REFLECTIONS ON THE CATALYTIC ROLE OF AN OUTSIDER.” ASSET BASED COMMUNITY  DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. (21 FEBRUARY 2003): 1.  BORNSTEIN, DAVID. HOW TO CHANGE THE WORLD: SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS AND THE POWER OF NEW IDEAS.  OXFORD: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2007.  BRUCK, CONNIE. “MILLIONS FOR MILLIONS.”  THE NEW YORKER 82, NO. 35, (2006): 6, 7.    BUSINESS FOR GOOD BLOG, HTTP://WWW.BUSINESS4GOOD.ORG/2007/04/IMPORTANCE‐OF‐SOCIAL‐ ENTREPRENEURSHIP. HTML    COLLIER, PAUL. THE BOTTOM BILLION: WHY THE POOREST COUNTRIES ARE FAILING AND WHAT CAN BE DONE  ABOUT IT. OXFORD: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2007.  DEES, J. GREGORY. “THE MEANING OF ‘SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP.’” CENTER FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SOCIAL  ENTREPRENEURSHIP AT DUKE UNIVERSITY, (MAY 30, 2001), AVAILABLE  HTTP:// WWW. CASEATDUKE .ORG/DOCUMENTS/DEES_SEDEF.PDF  (ACCESSED  JUNE  8, 2009).  DEES, J. GREGORY AND BETH ANDERSON. “SECTOR‐BENDING: BLURRING THE LINES BETWEEN NON‐PROFITS AND  FOR‐PROFITS.” SOCIETY. (2003): 16.  EASTERLY, WILLIAM. THE WHITE MAN’S BURDEN: WHY THE WEST’S EFFORTS TO AID THE REST HAVE DONE SO  MUCH ILL AND SO LITTLE GOOD. OXFORD: OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2006.  GARLICK, SAUL. “NEXT AMERICA PROJECT FINAL REPORT.” CENTER FOR STRATEGIC AND INTERNATIONAL STUDIES.  (2009).  GEOGRAPHIC DIMENSIONS OF WELL‐BEING IN KENYA, CENTRAL BUREAU OF STATISTICS, 2003.  GRAMEEN BANK, AVAILABLE ONLINE HTTP://WWW.GRAMEEN‐INFO.ORG/BANK/.   

Grameen Foundation, available online: http://www.grameenfoundation.org/. 

KRETZMAN, JOHN AND JOHN MCKNIGHT. “BUILDING COMMUNITIES FROM THE INSIDE OUT: A PATH TOWARD  FINDING AND MOBILIZING A COMMUNITY’ ASSSETS.” INSTITUTE FOR POLICY RESEARCH. (1993). 

BIBLIOGRAPHY

   

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


63 GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT INTERNSHIP 

"LANGUAGES OF SOUTH AFRICA." SOUTHAFRICA.INFO. SOUTH AFRICA ALIVE WITH POSSIBILITY.  <HTTP://WWW.SOUTHAFRICA.INFO/ABOUT/PEOPLE/LANGUAGE.HTM#XITSONGA>.  MATHIE, ALISON AND GORDON CUNNINGHAM. “ASSET BASED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT‐ AN OVERVIEW.”  SYNERGOS KNOWLEDGE RESOURCES, (FEBRUARY 21, 2002), AVAILABLE  HTTP:// WWW. SYNERGOS . ORG/KNOWLEDGE /02/ABCDOVERVIEW. HTM (ACCESSED J UNE  8, 2009).  MATHIE, ALISON AND GORDON CUNNINGHAM. FROM CLIENTS TO CITIZENS: ASSET BASED COMMUNITY  DEVELOPMENT AS A STRATEGY FOR COMMUNITY‐DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT. NOVA SCOTIA: ST. FRANCIS  XAVIER UNIVERSITY, 2002.  MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS BY THE UNITED NATIONS, AVAILABLE ONLINE:  HTTP:// WWW. UN.ORG/MILLENNIUMGOALS/ BKGD.SHTML .  MOYO, DAMBISA. DEAD AID: WHY AID IS NOT WORKING AND HOW THERE IS A BETTER WAY FOR AFRICA. NEW  YORK: FARRAR, STRAUS AND GIROUX, 2009.  NEUHOFF, ALEX AND ROBERT SEARLE. “MORE BANG FOR THE BUCK.” STANFORD SOCIAL INNOVATION REVIEW.  (SPRING 2008): 1.   

OSBERG, SALLY AND ROGER MARTIN. “Social Entrepreneurship: The Case for Definition.”   

http://www.skollfoundation.org/media/skoll_docs/2007SP_feature_martinosberg.pdf, 2009. 

PARTNERS IN HEALTH (PIH), AVAILABLE ONLINE: WWW.PIH.ORG.  Philanthropic Foundation Canada, http://www.pfc.ca/cms_en/page1112.cfm#s.   

PRESIDENT’S EMERGENCY PLAN FOR AIDS RELIEF, available online: www.pepfar.gov.   REPORT FOR AFRICA FOUNDATION ON ESTABLISHMENT OF DEVCENTRE IN BOHLABELA DISTRICT, MPUMALANGA  WITS ACORNHOEK ADVICE CENTRE. BUFFELSHOEK TRUST. 09 MAR. 2009  <HTTP://WWW.BUFFELSHOEKTRUST.CO.ZA>.  SACHS, JEFFREY. THE END OF POVERTY: ECONOMIC POSSIBILITIES FOR OUR TIME. NEW YORK: THE PENGUIN PRESS,  2005.  SNIBBE, ALANA CONNER. “D ROWNING IN DATA.” STANFORD SOCIAL INNOVATION REVIEW. (FALL 2006): 1.  UNHCR, AVAILABLE ONLINE: WWW.UNHCR.ORG.  YUNUS, MUHAMMAD. BANKER TO THE POOR: MICRO‐LENDING AND THE BATTLE AGAINST WORLD POVERTY. NEW  YORK: PUBLICAFFAIRS, 2007.   

BIBLIOGRAPHY

   

             WWW . STUDENTMOVEMENTUSA . ORG 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS     CONTRIBUTED TO AND EDITED BY:    SAUL GARLICK  EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR   

VANESSA CARTER  DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMS   

ANDREA CALDERON  COMMUNITY RELATIONS   

LILY MULDOON  FELLOWSHIPS COORDINATOR   

BRET MARES  DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR   

DANIEL ARMANIOS  GDI ALUMNI, 2007    JESSICA SCHWARTZ  PROGRAMS INTERN 


Student Movement for Real Change Office Number: 202-657-6616 1807 18th St. NW Washington, DC 20009 United States

www.studentmovementusa.org

Training Manual Kenya 2009  

Training Manual Kenya 2009

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you