Issuu on Google+

More Notes

February 25, 2010 Issue No. 9

Questions and Answers: Eunice Chalmers Watching Eunice teach an art class is much like observing an experienced gardener tend her prize roses. Here, the students are the flowers and Eunice helps their artistic skills unfold, petal by petal. She encourages, critiques and makes helpful suggestions as she moves through the class with an intimacy and thoroughness that inspire even the casual onlooker. More Notes wondered how she does it:

Q: How did you come to High Mowing? A: My husband, Stephen, and I came to High Mowing in 1971. My first posi-

tion here was in the kitchen—not the art studio. We came from the lower east side of New York, where we learned about Anthroposophy and High Mowing from David LAMBERT ‘66. We heard of the fire here and—sometime later— that there were job openings in the kitchen. As professional cooks with a love of the arts, it was a natural fit for us. We didn’t just come here to work—we were looking for a community. And, the first time we drove up Abbot Hill, it was magical. You could tell there was a culture of love and support here.

Eunice Chalmers, Studio Arts Teacher, surrounded by artwork from her students at High Mowing School.


More Notes Eunice Chalmers continued

“Art is a language through which we seek to express our understanding of the world in terms of shape, color, and above all, light.”

Q: When did your role expand from the kitchen? A: Mrs. Emmet encouraged us. The kitchen was really the heart of the school. And,

I enjoyed being there and developing relationships with the students and other teachers. We also catered school events, banquets, weddings, etc. This provided an extensive creative outlet, particularly in the form of elaborately decorated cakes. But, Stephen and I also involved ourselves with other things. We were inspired by the artistic atmosphere at High Mowing and became involved in school events— like May Day­—where we introduced the maypole dancing and skit. We once put on a play at May Day, which Stephen wrote. Doing this while cooking meals for hundreds of people afforded us the opportunity to rise to our better selves. At that time there was no Prom at High Mowing. So, along with the other teachers, we instituted one. But we wanted it to be an all-school event—with no one excluded. We totally transformed the Big Room to create a magical evening and we arranged dates for the students as well. We even took ballroom dancing lessons in order to teach them how to dance.

The Art Studio at High Mowing; a place of inspiration.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

2


More Notes Eunice Chalmers continued

“Through careful observation and the development of skills in the fundamentals of art, we become attuned to the beauty and wonder of our world. The astonishing thing is that the more we lose ourselves in the object of our observation, the more our true selves are revealed.”

Q: When did you start teaching art at High Mowing? A: Roughly ten years ago, Ruth Pittman was the art teacher. The art classes were over

crowded and it was felt Ruth needed support, so she graciously let me try my hand at teaching. I had only two classes at first, but more were added as the program developed. Ruth was my mentor in those early years. In fact, I wouldn’t have made it through them without her guidance and insight. There are so many things a new teacher must learn! And, she helped me through all of it. There was no art studio here back then. The school generously built this studio which I filled with many interesting objects I collected or were donated to me. I was The curriculum in Eunice’s studio The curriculum is based on the understanding that development of artistic skills precedes and strengthens artistic inspiration and enables the students to more readily realize their innate potential. The program unfolds as a three-step process. The curriculum for the Fundamentals of Art class is aimed at younger students, is a year long and pursues a course of mostly black and white observational exercises. The students work with graphite and charcoal to gain an understanding of contour, tonal value, intuitive perspective and portraiture. Later in the year we add color, using pastels and watercolors. We focus attention on mastery of these traditional materials, doing both observational and imaginary work. The Intermediate classes pursue the fundamental principles of art, but with greater complexity and maturity. Adding new mediums—such as oil pastels and pen and ink—students explore negative space, composition and design. In their junior year, students go out doors to paint and may use oils, learning the “Old Master’s” approach of under painting and glazing. Advanced classes offer students more freedom to shape their individual curriculums. This often follows their need for college portfolios. The work in this class is based on an understanding of the observational process and pushes the students to go beyond the technical. Employing their artistic awareness, students express themselves with greater depth and a more penetrating personal approach.

LEARNING THE BASICS: Above, Eunice helps Stella Marcial ‘13 in the Fundamentals of Art class. Additional High Mowing student art can be found on our website: www.highmowing.org.

HIGH MOWING SCHOOL STUDENT ART

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

3


More Notes Eunice Chalmers continued

always looking for unusual subjects for my students to draw. I wanted to offer them an artistic environment conducive to creative expression. Along with my desire to inspire them, I find that they also inspire each other.

Q: What keeps you going? A: I’m really an old kid at heart. I never wanted to grow up. Being a teacher and an adult have certainly made me more responsible. But, the students help me stay young.

I’m comfortable around high school students and they respect me because I make them work. This is what teenagers need—to get outside of themselves and work through what they are observing. This way, they make it their own. And, the more they take themselves out of the equation, the more they reveal their inner selves.

HIGH MOWING SCHOOL STUDENT ART

from the Executive Director

I’m not just creating artists at High Mowing. Only a small number of my students go on to art school. But, I want all of my students to go out and become artistic adults. Imagine that—artistic doctors and lawyers! It’s all in how you see the world. An artistic person sees relationships in everything. This develops an inner conviction that what is beautiful is good and counters the cynicism and materialism so prevalent in our society.

—Eunice Chalmers

High Mowing Mission Statement You may remember from previous More Notes that the school is conducting a self-study as part of the re-accreditation process. As part of this work, the faculty met in the fall to study our mission statement. In brief, a mission statement: • Is short and sharply focused • Defines why we do what we do; why the school exists • Provides direction for doing the right things • Inspires our commitment • Says what, in the end, we want to be remembered for After review and comments, the faculty recommended a revised mission statement to the Board, which formally adopted it at their meeting in February. We’re inspired by the new statement (which you see here) and hope that you’ll find that it communicates the spirit of High Mowing.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

High Mowing is a Waldorf high school community for boarding and day students. We aim to educate artistically through dynamic, transformative activity that resonates with the developmental stages of adolescence and the unique development of each individual. Inspired by love and respect for humanity and nature, our mission as a community is to recognize and nurture the highest potential in each young person, to foster the balanced unfolding of physical, social, moral, and intellectual capacities, and ultimately to awaken the will to make life choices with compassion and integrity.

www.highmowing.org

|

February 25, 2010

|

4


More Notes

even Congratulations! more

from the Guidance Office

College Acceptances for Seniors:

At this point in the year, our seniors have submitted college applications to over 120 colleges—with some student’s still submitting for March 1 deadlines. As decisions come in, it is important for students to know their rights and responsibilities. A brochure from the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) has been given to all seniors. One area where confusion can occur is with the commitment date. When a student is offered admission to a college, she has the right to wait until May 1 (Candidates Decision Day) to respond to an offer of admission and/or financial aid. If a college requests a commitment prior to May 1, students may request—in writing— an extension until May 1. Colleges must grant this extension and the request may not jeopardize the student’s status for admission or financial aid.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges (NY) Paul Smith’s College (NY) College of the Atlantic (ME) Eckerd College (FL) Green Mountain College (VT) University of Vermont (VT) Western New England College (MA) Ithaca College (NY) University of New Hampshire (NH) University of Vermont (VT) Franklin Pierce University (NH) American Academy of Dramatic Arts (NY) Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama (Scotland) Massachusetts College of Art and Design (MA) Montserrat College of Art (MA) Earlham College (IN) Savannah College of Art and Design (GA) Fisher College (MA) Lasell College (MA) Lynn University (FL) New England Institute of Art (MA) Ringling College of Art and Design (FL) Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (FL) Keene State College (NH) Ithaca College (NY) Savannah College of Art and Design (GA) Eckerd College (FL) Cornish College of the Arts (WA) Cornell College (IA)

Georgia Doing Martin Schuster Haley Clougherty Aidan Blansfield Gus Meissner Zoë Falk Abigail Yandell Dillon Badger Shea Vaccaro Lilianna Susskind Brian Schmidt Amanda Mullen Ariana Taylor Dieter Ulken PJ Friel Michelle Crocetti Jazmin Ment Matthew McLean Will Talbot Piper Tasoulas

Haiti

HELPING

In light of the recent devastating earthquake in Haiti, a few High Mowing students decided to help. Robbie von Kampen ‘11, Blue Sky ‘11, Syd Oliver ‘13, Hillary Renaud ‘13, Allison Hill ‘13, Amber Johnston ‘11, Zoë Falk ‘10, Madeleine Duchêne ‘12 and Nelly Schläefereit

‘11 ordered tote bags, t-shirts and tank tops, which they screen-printed and sold at Winterfest. They are still taking orders and have just received a fresh batch of totes and shirts. If you would like to place an order (for an extra $5, we ship!) contact Allison Hill.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

5


More Notes Classroom Updates

Sweet Thoughts February 14 was a day dedicated to love. The sophomores planned events throughout the day to remind us of the theme. Following tradition, Advisors made valentines for their Advisees. These were hung on a tree, in the Big Room. There was also a wishing well for student valentines, which were delivered throughout the day. — Dianna Normanton

TRIMESTER TWO GRADES will be sent out to parents at the beginning of the week of March 15.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

6


More Notes Measure for Measure: the junior play The juniors are still in their Shakespeare block, preparing for their performance of Measure for Measure, a rarely produced play that has never been presented at High Mowing. Here are a few photos from a recent rehearsal. Of special note is the fact that this fell on “Super Hero” day at the school, which explains the dress of a few of the performers. There will be a performance for parents and other community members on February 25 at 7:30 p.m. We hope to see you there! — Wendy Bruneau

CRAFTING A PERFORMANCE: The juniors rehearse

Measure for Measure, under the guidance of Stephen Chalmers and Wendy Bruneau (to the right). Clockwise from the top: Max Wilson, Carly Abrahams-Dematte, Alex Petakov, Phoebe Bourdon and Mikel Diazgoñi Proal go over their lines. Roze Bradshaw and Phoebe await their scenes. Carly and Seamus Conley rehearse. And, Rose Durnan and Max practice a scene. In the background: Rose at dress rehearsal.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

7


More Notes Classroom Updates continued

SENIOR PROJECTS: This year’s topics cover a wide range, from artistic therapies for autism to a feasibility study for using wind power at High Mowing!

Senior Research Papers The seniors have been working since the beginning of the year on their research papers. This is a major undertaking involving months of research and writing on a topic of each student’s choice. After numerous drafts and much editing and polishing, the students are getting ready to present their papers. On March 16, each student will present her paper in a 10-minute oral report. The sessions will be attended by a panel of three evaluating faculty members—and the juniors, to get an idea of what will be expected of them next year. Later, on April 2 at 7:00p.m., the seniors will assemble in the Big Room for an ‘expo’ showcasing all their hard work. Every student will have his or her paper available for inspection, as well as a visual presentation of the work done for their project. This year will even include a circus arts performance! Parents and other community members are warmly invited to attend the evening. —Wendy Bruneau

Upcoming Model United Nations High Mowing will hold its second annual Model United Nations Conference on Saturday, March 27. The conference will open at 9:00a.m. and close at 9:00p.m.

ADMISSIONS:

Re-enrolling

Students

The Admissions Office will mail Enrollment Agreements (including tuition assistance awards) to parents of students that are currently enrolled at High Mowing on March 10. Please sign and return the Enrollment Agreement (with registration fee) to the Admissions Office by April 12, 2010, to reserve your student’s space for the upcoming school year.

Participants play the role of ambassadors from UN member states to debate current issues on the organization’s agenda. Students make speeches, prepare draft resolutions, negotiate with allies and adversaries, resolve conflicts and navigate the conference rules of procedure—all in the interest of mobilizing “international cooperation” to resolve problems that affect countries all over the world. Students conduct extensive research on the agenda topics as well as on the country they represent so that they can realistically represent that country during the conference. We will have a Security Council with the following topics:

We will have a General Assembly with the following topics:

Nuclear Capabilities of Iran

Deforestation and Biodiversity

Economic Difficulties in Haiti

Water and Sanitation Child Soldiers

Trouble in Somalia

We are looking forward to an exciting event. —Cary Hughes

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

8


More Notes Student News

Seamus Conley ‘11 Art Exhibit As part of an independent study, Seamus Conley’s art will be on display in the High Mowing dining room from February 10 through spring break. The following statement accompanies his work: “For the past two years I have been painting seriously. This is my first time showing a body of work. It is very different from what one usually sees on the walls at High Mowing—especially when viewing our more technical or realistic work. I am very excited to put these pieces on display.

Done something noteworthy?

tell us! ntichanuk@ highmowing.org

TRANSITIONS:

Artwork now on display by Seamus Conley.

These paintings were done over the past few months, during the course of an independent study in modern art. To date, I have completed twenty-two paintings and the pieces selected for this exhibit represent the greater body of work. The theme of this series is transition and growth and the changes that both places and people go through over time.

Many thanks to both Rachel Johnson and Susan Brown for their assistance and support, as well as to the Academic Committee for allowing me to do this. “ — Seamus Conley

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

9


More Notes Student News continued

Uncle Fran’s Breakfast combines a vital blues sound with rock and jazz fusion. Their uptempo tunes will have your toes tapping, but their heartfelt ballads are even more extraordinary.”

Student Concert to benefit High Mowing On Saturday, March 20, at 7:00p.m., Uncle Fran’s Breakfast, a band of three seasoned High Mowing musicians, will present a concert to benefit the High Mowing School tuition assistance fund. The concert, which will take place in the Big Room at High Mowing, will include acoustic and electric blues and progressive rock. Uncle Fran’s Breakfast includes Jonah Tolchin ‘11 on guitar, lead vocals and harmonica; Shea Vaccaro ‘10 on bass and lead vocals; and Seamus Conley ‘11 on drums and harmony vocals. The trio, who play original songs as well as covers, has been working together for two and a half years. For this concert they will be joined by guest artist Caitlin Gillam ‘12 on lead vocals. Jonah has performed multiple times at Studio 99 in Nashua and Nelson’s in Wilton. He studied with Wilbo Wright in New Jersey and Flynn Cohen in New Hampshire. Seamus has studied drums and percussion for the past ten years with Judith Bruneau, in addition to studying guitar and bass. He also plays and composes music on guitar, bass and piano. Shea is a bass and guitar player, singer and songwriter. He played in various venues around Rhode Island and New England, including the youth guitar ensemble at King Richard’s Fair in Connecticut. Shea has continued to expand his repertoire, studying blues and rock and learning flamenco and jazz technique from renowned guitarist Maurice Cohan. Caitlin performs show tunes, classical, pop, Motown, blues, country and standards. In 2006 she won the Monadnock Idol talent contest. Caitlin played Fantine in the High Mowing Production of “Les Miserables.” She performed “Dido’s Lament” with Mark Ferguson’s Sinfonietta and “Trouble in Mind” and “Jackson” with Jonah Tolchin at Nashua’s Studio 99. The band will play two sets with a brief intermission. Suggested donation of $15 for adults will be used for tuition assistance. Students will be admitted at no cost. For more information, contact Heather Cochrane, or call her at 603 654-2391 ext. 105.

— ELISE MACDONALD

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

10


More Notes Student News continued

Quietly Practicing Shea Vaccaro ‘10 practiced the Roue Cyr Wheel on a winter’s afternoon.

And Perhaps a Little Bit Louder Students enjoyed the Valentine’s Day dance, hosted by the sophomore class, on February 11.

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

11


More Notes from the Athletic Director

WINTER SPORTS AWARDS will be held on March 17 at 6:30p.m. in the Big Room. ALL ARE WELCOME!

Girls Basketball Team An, Do Young ‘11 Crocetti, Michelle ‘10 Falk, Zoë ‘10 Graham, Fiona ‘13 Marcial, Stella ‘13 Ment, Jazmin ‘10 Mullen, Amanda ‘10 Oliver, Ona ‘13 Renaud, Mackenzie ‘12 Susskind, Lilliana ‘10 Takahashi, Fana ‘10 Tasoulis, Piper ‘10 Tucker, Madeline ‘10 van Dam, Jessica ‘10

The Courtside View The girls basketball team lost a heartbreaker to New Hampton, 28 - 25. From the outset the girls played outstanding man-to-man defense. We hustled all over the floor, forcing New Hampton into numerous mistakes. Unfortunately we could not take advantage on the offensive side of the ball, missing at least ten lay ups and were down 8 - 2. The girls continued to battle and were able to tie the score at 11, led by Do Young’s 3-point play and Mackenzie’s 4 points. The score at halftime was 15 - 11 New Hampton. The second half was a back and forth battle with both teams making plays to stay in the game. The game came down to one play with 5 seconds left, but Zoë’s 3-pointer missed the mark at the end. The girls were lead by Zoë (8 points, 6+ rebounds), Michelle (7 points, 3 offensive rebounds), Mackenzie (5 point and several steals), Do Young (3 points and tough defense), Madeline (2 points, 6+ rebounds), Amanda (who did an outstanding job of shutting down New Hampton’s best player) and Jazmin (8+ turnovers). The Wednesday before our trip to Kimberton, the girls dropped a very tough game to Phillips Exeter, lowering their record to 6 - 3. We began with a strong defense but were unable to make any open shots and fell behind at halftime 12 - 3. In the second half things picked up as we switched to a full court press and were able to get back in the game. We were led by Madeline (10 points, 5 rebounds), Jazmin (3 points and several steals), Mackenzie (2 points and several steals) and Zoë and Amanda, both with double-digit rebounds. Fana, Do Young and Michelle also played strong defensive games. On Friday night, the girls defeated Green Meadow in the first game of the Kimberton Tournament, 27 - 11. We dominated the game with our smothering defense, as we owned the boards and forced countless turnovers and bad shots. On the offensive side, we moved the ball quickly and took good shots. Leading the way were Zoë (6 points, 8 rebounds), Mackenzie (6 points, 5 steals) and Amanda (5 points, 10+ rebounds). Madeline and Jazmin chipped in with 4 points each and Piper had 2 points. Jazmin, Fana, Mackenzie and Do Young controlled the offense with good decision making and passing. The rookies (Ona, Stella and Fiona) played well when on the floor. On Saturday, the girls lost to an undefeated Kimberton, 37 - 20. We came out a bit intimidated and it showed in our first half play, as we fell behind 22 - 4. In the second half, the girls came out with renewed energy and went into full court press, making the score 22 12. Jazmin, Fana, Amanda, Mackenzie, Do Young and Zoë continued to press, forcing turnovers by Kimberton, as they went on a 6 - 5 run to cut the score to 27 - 18. Kimberton then went on 10 - 2 run to seal the deal. The girls played their hearts out in the second half and made it a game. Leading the way were Mackenzie and Jazmin with 6 points each and

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

12


More Notes Athletics continued

several steals. Also chipping in were Madeline (2 points, 6 rebounds), Amanda (2 points, 10+ rebounds and 4 steals), Zoë (8 rebounds) and Do Young and Fana with 2 points and several steals. On Sunday we played the girls All-Star game. Our three All-Stars were Zoë, Madeline and Jazmin. All three girls played well in the game. Then came the three point shooting contest. Madeline and Mackenzie won the first round with Madeline making 5 “threes” and Mackenzie with 4 “threes.” Both girls went into the second round looking to win. They were defeated but did not go down without a fight, as they each made three shots in the second round. —Coach Solito

Boys Basketball Team Badger, Dillon ‘10 Cogswell, Josh ‘12 Conley, Seamus ‘11 McGuire, Dan ‘10 Meissner, Gus ‘10 Schmidt, Brian ‘10 Son, In Woo ‘12 Tolchin, Jonah ‘11 Vaccaro, Tolin ‘12 Wass, Taggert ‘10 Wilson, Max ‘11 Wilson, Nick ‘13

During the first week of February, injuries and school commitments resulted in a shorthanded team. However, the boys still managed to win two out of three games. The team traveled to Phillips Exeter and was defeated 45-31, our lowest score of the season. This was a disappointing outcome as a full team would have certainly resulted in a win. Dillon scored 18 points and Tolin added an additional 9, but poor rebounding and a lack of presence cost High Mowing this game. Next, the boys travelled to New Hampton and demolished the JV squad 70-27. Dillon scored 38 points, a season high, as High Mowing cruised through this lopsided affair. Only six players were in attendance, but they all made the stat sheet. Jonah had 8 points, Nick, Dan and Gus added 7 points each and Taggart contributed an additional 3 points. Saturday found the boys team at Proctor Academy for the second time this season—with the exact same result: a 14 point victory, 52-38. Tolin paced the boys with his best offensive performance of the year, scoring 19 points. This included 5 three-pointers. Gus and Nick played their best games to date, contributing 9 and 7 points respectively. Dillon scored 17 points and controlled the flow of the game throughout. Proctor closed to within two scores in the second half, but we switched to full court pressure and ran away with the game. The boys also travelled to Kimberton, PA over President’s Day weekend for the annual Waldorf School Tournament where they played two of the most exciting games of the season. In the first game, we played the Hawthorne Valley School and came up on the short side of a 55-52 score. Dillon had the best hands, scoring 23 points. His last shot would have tied the game, but it clanked off the rim and we lost by three points. Max scored 13 points and Brian made 8. The next day we faced the Green Meadow School and were able to hang on for a 43-40 victory. With seconds left in the game and clinging to a one-point lead, Max was fouled

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

13


More Notes Athletics continued

DON’T FORGET: 6:30p.m. on March 17 is the date of the Winter Sports Awards. COME HONOR OUR ATHLETES!

while going for a basket and went to the ground. Gus substituted for the two free throws and—with nerves of steel—sank both to seal the win. Max had 16 points, Dillon scored 12, Brian made 8 and Tolin added another 5. On Sunday, Dillon, Max and Brian competed in the All-Star game. It was another exciting affair with the lead changing hands several times. All three boys played big roles in the game, but Brian was the hero of the day when he sank a buzzer-beating threepointer at the end of the game, giving his squad the win. The Wednesday after Kimberton, High Mowing faced an undefeated Holderness—the best team in our league. Holderness jumped on top from the start and built a ten-point lead at halftime. But, we did not give in and battled back in the second half to force overtime. As the game was tied with a few seconds left in overtime, there was a scramble for a loose ball and a Holderness player came up with it—launching a prayer as the buzzer sounded. The three-pointer went in and we went down, 63-60. The Holderness coach said it was the most exciting game of the season. Max scored 22 points, Dillon made 13 and Nick had his best game of the season, scoring 9 points. Next, the boys travelled north for back-to-back games against Cardigan Mountain and Kimball Union. We came out of the gates strong and built a 37-15 halftime lead against Cardigan, cruising in the second half to a 60-33 win. Brian lead the way with 21 points, Max and Dillon added 12 points each and Gus put in 8, as High Mowing finally had a game in which they could breathe easy. The next afternoon, we took on Kimball Union in a low scoring, defensive game which found the teams knotted at 17 at halftime. We did not give in, however, and out-played Kimball Union in the second half, holding them to just ten points. The final score was 36-27 as we improved to an 11-5 record for the season. Brian lead the way with 16 points, Dillon had 13 and Max added 7. —Coach Wilson

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

We continue to receive feedback on our new website: Please send

Suzan Moffett

www.

highmowing.org

your thoughts (and point out any errors we might have missed). We appreciate your comments.

| February 25, 2010

|

14


More Notes Naturalist News

Reaching a Higher Level The photo below shows a select group of students. They are the senior naturalist students who have been recognized—and honored with the gift of a trade blanket—for their achievements in the Naturalist Program. To receive one of these beautiful blankets, a student must be proficient in a wide range of skills. Recipients have achieved a high level of knowledge, which places them in a unique group of naturalist students, past and present. These students often maintain a special connection with each other over the years ... long after their High Mowing days are over. —Keith Badger

A NATURAL CONNECTION: Shown left to right are Martin Schuster ‘10, Will Talbot ‘10, Dillon Badger ‘10, Keith Badger, Matt McLean ‘10, Shea Vaccaro ‘10, Matthias Fuëll ‘10 and Aidan Blansfield ‘10.

TRACKING MYSTERY #4: Here is the track and trail of this week’s mystery animal

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

THE ANSWER TO TRACKING MYSTERY #3: River Otter

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

15


More Notes

March

Upcoming Events Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

for more calendar items:

Event Details

Parent Association Meeting

www.

highmowing.org

The next meeting of the Parent Association will be held on Thursday, March 25 at the home of Ellen and Phil Friel, at 94 Christian Hill Rd., in Amherst, NH. Contact the Friel’s at 603 673-0320. We will begin with a potluck meal at 6:15p.m. The Meeting will follow at 7:00p.m. All are welcome!

More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

16


More Notes

MORE NOTES is published throughout the school year by High Mowing School. If you would like to have an item considered for publication, please submit it to: ntichanuk@highmowing.org

Submission deadlines: March 22 April 5 April 19 May 24 June 7

Community Passover Seder: March 28

Uncle Fran’s Breakfast

March 20, 7:00p.m.

A benefit concert for High Mowing

High Mowing School 222 Isaac Frye Highway Wilton, NH 03086 603 654-2391

www.highmowing.org

with blues/progressive rock band Uncle Fran’s Breakfast

Suggested donation for adults: $15; students: free. Contact Heather Cochrane for more information.

High Mowing invites you to an EcoSeder on Sunday, March 28. This Seder will be based on the traditional Jewish Passover ritual that recalls individual strivings towards personal and societal freedom. We will experience this through song, ritual and storytelling. Melanie Grubman, High Mowing’s Dorm Intern, will be leading us in this unique observance. She has been leading EcoSeders and creative Jewish rituals for the past nine years. The Seder will begin at 5:00p.m. and includes dinner. It will conclude around 7:00p.m. An RSVP and a $15 donation for food are required. Hope to see you there! Please contact Melanie at 510 375-1657 Board of Trustees Meetings Scheduled Just a reminder that the dates for upcoming board meetings have been set: April 17, 2010 June 19, 2010 - Alumni/ae Weekend. September 18, 2010

Nancy Tichanuk

November 11 - 13, 2010 - Faculty meeting on Thursday, class visits on Friday and Board Meeting on Saturday.

Development Director:

February 12, 2011 - Tentative date.

Heather Cochrane

— Alexis Pittman, apittman@tellink.net

Editor and Designer:

THURSDAY:

Community Bulletin Board Hilltop Circus Presents: Out of the Blue

February 25, 7p.m. FRIDAY: February 26,

10a.m. + 7p.m. SATURDAY: February 27, 2p.m.

Circus past and circus present collide “Out of the Blue” in this year’s Hilltop Circus at Pine Hill Waldorf School. Come join the Pine Hill middle school circus troupe as they take you from the fanfare of a medieval court to the circus of corporate America. Juggling jesters dueling with acrobatic executives pose the question: “Are love and laughter alive in the year 2010?” Enjoy the show as they work out the answer through stilt-walking, tightrope, clown acts and more. For more information about the Hilltop Circus, visit www.pinehill.org More Notes from High Mowing School

|

www.highmowing.org

| February 25, 2010

|

17


More Notes February 25, 2010