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PRODUCTIVE URBAN LANDSCAPES This study focuses on the conjunction between the built environment and agriculture in order that our urban centers may be redesigned into sustainable productive landscapes. Field analysis: Montgomery, AL Written and edited by: Jennifer Smith


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

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The writer and editor thanks and acknowledges the contributors for their sustained efforts during the preparation of this publication. I thank the Auburn University School of Architecture for their knowledge, skills, and resources provided for the last five years in the program. Even more, I give a special thanks to professors who offered insight throughout the development of the project. I gratefully acknowledge Professor Magdalena Garmaz as studio professor, project advisor, and life mentor. Her role in my architectural development is immeasurable. Thanks to Professor Behzad Nakhjavan for his depth of architectural insight and inquiry. Special thanks to Professor David Hill for his breadth of knowledge in urban agriculture, site redevelopment, diagrammatic skills, as well as initial research. I also thank those who reviewed, critiqued, or guided my project from early stages of inquiry and research to design development. Your collaboration allowed this project to evolve into these final pages. Thank you.


CONTENTS

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Preface: A Sustainable Urban Design Strategy

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Thesis Statement

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Architectural Explorations

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intimacy light universal elemental sequence

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Index of Drawings

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Place: Montgomery as site location

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Agricultural Research

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Networks: Montgomery Infrastructure

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Program: Urban Agriculture

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Excerpt from Walden

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PREFACE A Sustainable Urban Design Strategy

Overlaying the sustainable concept of Productive Urban Landscapes with the spatial concept of Continuous Landscapes proposes a new urban design strategy which would change the appearance of contemporary cities towards an unprecedented naturalism. Continuous Productive Urban Landscapes will be open landscapes productive in economical and sociological and environmental terms. They will be placed within an urban-scale concept offering the host city a variety of lifestyle advantages. CPULs will be city-traversing open spaces running continuously through the built urban environment, thereby connecting all kinds of existing inner-city open spaces and relating, finally, to the surrounding rural area. Vegetation, air, the horizon, as well as people, will be able to flow into the city and out of it. Partially, the city will become open and wild.

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CPULs will be green, natural and topographical (except when they happen on buildings), low, slow and socially active, tactile, seasonal and healthy. They will be well-connected walking landscapes. Depending on their individual settings and the urban fragment used, CPULs will read as parks or urban forests, green lungs or wilderness, axes of movement and journey, or places for reflection, cultural gathering and social play. They will be containers for an assembly of various activities that do not happen in buildings. CPULs will not be about knocking cities down or erasing urban tissue; they do not seek a tabula rosa from which to grow. Instead, they will build on and over characteristics inherent to the city by overlaying and interweaving a multiuser landscape strategy to present and newly reclaimed open space. Very importantly, they will exist alongside a wide range of open urban space types, complimenting their designation and design and adding a new sustainable component to the city. CPULs will adapt to the various ways in which individual cities develop by tailoring their type and layout to specific urban conditions and fulfilling their own requirements in a loose and inventive manner. Every CPUL and every fragment within it will build up their own individual, constantly changing character. CPULs will be productive in various ways, offering space for leisure and recreational activities, access routes, urban green lungs, etc. But most uniquely, they will be productive by providing open space for urban agriculture, for the inner-urban and peri-urban growing food. The urban land itself, as well as the activity happening on it, will become productive: occupants will act and produce on the ground and with the ground. Vegetation will appear ever new and ever exciting: it will get harvested, grow back, get harvested again, grow again, grow differently, grow less or more, grow earlier, later, it will seasonally change size, color, texture, and smell... Whilst there are various examples in contemporary urban design of establishing green links or open space similar to continuous landscapes, the aspect of agricultural production, of the rural, will add not only an important new spatial quality to the city, but also socio-economic and environmental qualities.


Why CPULs?

Continuous Productive Urban Landscapes are about urban food growing and local consumption. They will include livestock, but consist largely of vegetation which is locally managed: mainly organic vegetables, fruit and trees, planted in rows, planted in groups, fields, patches, etc. Vegetation will be chosen for its inherent extractable energy (i.e. it can be eaten) or its material quality (i.e. it can be worn), then grown, harvested, traded and consumed. The main production will be carried out by local occupants who rent the land and work it commercially within an individually defined local framework. Cities that decide to support this concept of organic local farming, trading and seasonal consumption will never be fully self-sufficient in food production. They will be required to bring food into the city from the hinterland, but less of it and in a more focused, need-oriented way. (Viljoen, CPULs) v

0 years An established city with no productive landscapes

(Viljoen, CPULs)

15 years Identifying continuous landscapes

35 years Inserting productive urban landscapes

50 years Feeding the city


Thesis

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his study focuses on the conjunction between the built environment and agriculture in order that our urban centers may be redesigned into sustainable productive landscapes.

Exploration of this idea Montgomery, Alabama


Architectural Explorations

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NIVERSAL

Main Entry: 1uni•ver•sal Pronunciation: yü-n - v r-s l Function: adjective 01 including or covering all or a whole collectively or distributively without limit or exception; especially : available equitably to all members of a society 02 adapted or adjustable to meet varied requirements (as of use, shape, or size) Text: Synonyms OMNIPRESENT, allover, ubiquitous, general, common, generic

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ASS

Main Entry: mass Function: noun 01 a quantity or aggregate of matter usually of considerable size b (1) : EXPANSE, BULK (2) : massive quality or effect (3) : the principal part or main body (4) : AGGREGATE, WHOLE 02 a large quantity, amount, or number

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NTIMACY

Main Entry: in•ti•ma•cy Pronunciation: in-t -m -s Function: noun 01 the state of being intimate : FAMILIARITY or MEMORY 02 something of a personal or private nature Text: Synonyms ACQUAINTANCE 1, experience, familiarity, inwardness

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URFACE

Main Entry: sur•face Pronunciation: s r-f s Function: noun 01 the exterior or upper boundary of an object or body 02 a : the external or superficial aspect of something b : an external part or layer

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ARTICULAR

Main Entry: 1par•tic•u•lar Pronunciation: p (r)- ti-ky -l r, -k( -)l r Function: adjective 01 of, relating to, or being a single person or thing 02 obsolete : PARTIAL 03 of, relating to, or concerned with details Synonyms SINGLE 2, lone, one, only, separate, sole, solitary, unique

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ESIGNdesign

Design that is good by doing good. It is design that knows no social or cultural boundaries yet reflects unique qualities of place.

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OMMUNAL

Main Entry: com•mu•nal Pronunciation: k - myü-n l, kämy -n l Function: adjective 01 of or relating to one or more communes 02 of or relating to a community 03 a : characterized by collective ownership and use of property b: participated in, shared, or used in common by members of a group or community 04 of, relating to, or based on racial or cultural groups Text: Synonyms COMMON 1, conjoint, conjunct, intermutual, joint, mutual, public, shared

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A T U R A L LIGHT

“All material in nature, the mountains and the streams and the air and we, are made of Light which has been spent, and this crumpled mass called material casts a shadow, and the shadow belongs to Light.” _Louis Kahn

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Main Entry: in路ti路ma路cy Pronunciation: in-t-m-s Function: noun Date: 1641 01 the state of being intimate : FAMILIARITY 02 something of a personal or private nature


“If I were asked to name the chief benefit of the house, I should say: the house shelters day-dreaming, the house protects the dreamer, the house allows one to dream in peace.� Gaston Bachelard

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he intimate is anything that is familiar to the individual. While the familiar is different for each person, it is indeed possible to create spatial dynamics that encourage reflection and pause. The space rendered to the right exists so that one may remember. The individual is enwrapped in a place other than their physical location. They are enwrapped in memory. It is that memory which is familiar, and therefore, intimate.


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b monostary, rome intimacy within architecture is not dependant on materials, style, or the like. space that evokes intimacy relies on spatial boundaries that envelope the human heart.

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Main Entry: 1light Pronunciation: lt Function: noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English loht; akin to Old High German lioht light, Latin luc-, lux light, lucre to shine, Greek leukos white Date: before 12th century 01 something that makes vision possible b : the sensation aroused by stimulation of the visual receptors 02 a source of light: as a : a celestial body CANDLE c : an electric light 03 a particular illumination 04 something that enlightens or informs <shed some light on the problem> 05 a medium (as a window) through which light is admitted


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he light would not know its immeasurable power without the dark to give it meaning. Light cannot be known when presented alone. When blemished by a shadow; however, it becomes something quite extraordinary. A contrast lies between the light and the dark, which forces one to measure, to inquire, to linger upon why the shadow exists. Without which, how could we ever value the gift of light?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;All material in nature, the mountains and the streams and the air and we, are made of Light which has been spent, and this crumpled mass called material casts a shadow, and the shadow belongs to Light.â&#x20AC;? Louis Kahn


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a physical light and space studies graphite pencil drawings produced through the layering of dark over dark light remains where darkness does not occupy

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c abstract light and space studies graphite pencil


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a the gnuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s room, coffee house black and white photography light as a medium for the creation of space

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light + space

It has recently been on my mind that the way in which one understands space indeed has little to do with notions on place. There is an integral spirit in space that ignores boundaries of location and expanses of time. Space forbids to be defined solely on such architectural controls. I pause to explain that while space is dependent on the constructs of structure, material, technology, and the like, there is something more that stretches beyond the architectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reign. A space may be defined as small or large, intimate or distant, serene or vibrant. I think these experiential qualities; however, are reliant on variables, rather than controls, to give them their meaning. What I am suggesting is that space demands more than a formal architecture. It demands something that will evoke awareness of it being a space. Let me illustrate an example here: The architect conceives of a small roomâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;suitable in size for merely one or two people. The room desires to be punctured by light that may enter and give definition to its walls. Without the light projecting on surfaces of wall and floor and ceiling, the room lingers in darkness and remains unknown to the human heart. The room resolves that its sole mean for discovery is to have one collide with the surrounding walls, scuffing their toes in order to identify spatial boundaries. What if; however, an opening was cut into the wall depth so that now both light and shadow may blemish the interior? It is in homage to this puncture of light that space may be understood, for space is designed by something transcending the architect. Indeed, it is defined by something outside the space entirely. The casting of light informs one of the smallness of the room.

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d steven holl architects architectural works emphasizing light and perforation he utilizes light and shadow as a means of defining spatial boundaries


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Main Entry: 1uni路ver路sal Pronunciation: y眉-n-vr-sl Function: adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin universalis, from universum universe Date: 14th century 01 including or covering all or a whole collectively or distributively without limit or exception; especially : available equitably to all members of a society <uni versal health coverage> 02 present or occurring everywhere b : existent or operative everywhere or under all conditions <uni versal cultural patterns> 03 embracing a major part or the greatest portion as of mankind) <a universal state> <universal prac tices> b : comprehensively broad and versatile <a universal genius> 04 adapted or adjustable to meet varied require ments (as of use, shape, or size)


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ithin every system there is an overarching idea or umbrella that contains the details and specifics of its structure. The larger idea is constant and unchanging. It is carved within the details; however, that one finds variances; they are flexible in order to adapt to dynamic situations. For instance, there is the need for a window, an aperture embedded within the wall depth. This is a constant. Once constructed and put in place, it will be there until removal. The variance is the light that projects itself onto the interior surfaces. It is uncontrollable on a day-to-day basis, and moreover, unpredictable as to the intensity of its rays. The universal is necessary for good architecture. It is the particular; however, that captivates the human soul.


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conceptual model the spatial model represented above made use a wood 1â&#x20AC;?x1â&#x20AC;? piece of trim that was then cut in section into multiple pieces of various depth dimensions the wooden trim was specific and particular, the multiple pieces derived from the trim; however, are universal in this instance, the universal derives from the particular


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Main Entry: el路e路men路tal Pronunciation: e-l-men-tl Function: adjective Date: 15th century 01 of, relating to, or being an element; specifically : existing as an uncombined chemical element b (1) : of, relating to, or being the basic or essential constituent of something : FUNDAMENTAL <elemental biological needs> (2) : SIMPLE, UNCOMPLICATED <elemental food> c : of, relating to, or dealing with the rudiments of something : ELEMENTARY <taught elemental crafts to the children> d : forming an integral part : INHERENT <an elemental sense of rhythm> 02 of, relating to, or resembling a great force of nature <the rains come with elemental violence> <elemental passions>


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elemental diagrams a-f diagramming the horizon line g-h interior and exterior i-j rural and urban k-l selection process

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hrough the diagrammatic process, one is able to reduce a complex series of thoughts and ideas, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s its elemental or abstracted form. Abstract, after all, is the reduction of something originally far more complicated. The purpose of a diagram is to present a clear understanding of particular aspect of the object being studied. Moreover, through a series of diagrams that overlay and complement one another, additive information on the object of study may reveal a network of linked information. Therefore, it is important to recognize what the diagram is attempting to represent, and analyze whether or not the drawing is communicating those ideas in the most successful form.

The diagrams created are approached in three ways: 01 The first set of diagrams are created as a series within one specific idea to communicate. In this case, the diagrams are meant to be read collectively, for the individual drawings do not fully convey the meaning alone. 02 The second approach is to again create a series of diagrams; however, this time each diagram may stand on its own. With the topographic landscape drawings, for example, each topography may stand alone and represent a particular idea. As a collection there is the heightened awareness of the different characterizations of the topography. 03 Finally, there is the diagram of opposites. In order to emphasize a point, two drawings that contrast one another are side by side in order to represent an argument. Since each represents a specific idea, they may stand alone as an individual diagram, yet when placed together one is more conscious of their value, for a counterpart is also presented.

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Main Entry: 1se路quence Pronunciation: s-kwn(t)s, -kwen(t)s Function: noun Date: 14th century 01 a continuous or connected series: an extended series of poems united by a single theme <a sonnet sequence> b : three or more playing cards usually of the same suit in consecutive order of rank c : a succes sion of repetitions of a melodic phrase or har monic pattern each in a new position : a suc cession of related shots or scenes develop ing a single subject or phase of a film story (2) : EPISODE 02 order of succession b : an arrangement of the tenses of successive verbs in a sen tence designed to express a coherent rela tionship especially between main and subor dinate parts 03 continuity of progression <the narrative sequence>


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rt and modern thinking is no longer an either/or. Modern art basically is both/and. It presents two truths that are complementary and existing simultaneously--or three or four or five truths at once. This throws a wrench in the whole works, in a way. It suggests an entirely different idea of social organization. Take your Time: A Conversation, Olafur Eliasson and Robert Irwin This section is a study on art and design as an additive process. The works presented reveal space and place in a sequential manner. It is here that understandings are derived from multiple aspects of one thing or one place.


documentation of a public space through the sequencing of drawings, one is provided a more holistic representation of a particular space and place. by utilizing varying techniques, each drawing reads multiple perspectives of a single idea.

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28 documentation of a private space

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reflection:

A man sits in an auditorium hall crowded with people waiting, anxiously, for the start of a concert. As he sits, he realizes that he does not know anyone else in the hall and is quite aware of them not knowing him either. The room is loud, bursting with conversation—remarks on saving seats, being late or early to the event, a friend who couldn’t come for one reason or another. A woman slides in front of the man’s seat, knocking his knees as she shu¬¬ffles to her nearby seat down the row. Then, there is a change—the lights dim, the conversations die down, the woman finds her seat. The auditorium is greeted by the strum of bow on string. A violin has consumed the room. While the space remains loud, it is filled with sound in a new way, an intimate way. There is now a private dialogue between the musician and the man. A large room has been made small by the touch of music

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Main Entry: 1in·dex Pronunciation: in-deks Function: noun Inflected Form(s): plural in·dex·es or in·di·ces \-d-sz\ Etymology: Latin indic-, index, from indicare to indicate Date: 1561 01 a device (as the pointer on a scale or the gnomon of a sun dial) that serves to indicate a value or quantity b : something (as a physical feature or a mode of expression) that leads one to a particular fact or conclusion : INDICATION 02 a list (as of bibliographical information or citations to a body of literature) arranged usually in alphabetical order of some specified datum (as author, subject, or key word): as a : a list of items (as topics or names) treated in a printed work that gives for each item the page number where it may be found b : THUMB INDEX c : a bibliographical analysis of groups of publications that is usually published periodically d : a list of publicly traded companies and their stock prices 03 a character <fist> used to direct attention to a note or para graph -- called also fist


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light study 01 index of drawings


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light study 02


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light study 03


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light study 04


re-scan image

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light study 05


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light study 06


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light study 07


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light study 10


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rchitecture is, at its core, a question. It is an inquiry into the systems that comprise the world as we know it. Its raison d’être is to provide a framework through which humanity may begin to question the existing set of circumstances in which we find ourselves. Architecture should, therefore, have that indefinable presence of what we refer to as wonder. This is a necessity due to our need to seek truth, our need to question, and our satisfaction in finding new answers to old problems. Possibly this is why many refer to architects as “problem-solvers;” one cannot deny its sense of appropriateness.

building an architecture

Le Corbusier stated, “Before having a certain look, the building is a certain way of looking” (Wigley, 2). From the context of his thoughts, one can gather that Corbusier was differentiating between the characteristics that constitute a building verse those that relate to an architecture. The building is the physical: it is the material, the square footage, the ornamentation, and so on. The architecture; however, is something quite different and much less definable. Architecture is that which moves the spirit. It is that wondrous something that provides opportunity for a new way of looking at the world. It seems to be something like this: if you need glasses and refuse to wear them, all that you see will be out of focus. If, however, you place lenses in front of your eyes, your vision has been corrected. Now, your whole means of looking at the world has changed. Architecture should provide the lenses that alter your perspective of the world. Louis Kahn furthers this appeal by recalling, “I once learned that a good question is greater than the most brilliant answer.” Architecture may not provide answers, but it should provide moments of pause. Pause for you, the onlooker, to ponder, reflect, and alas, come to your own conclusions. The answer really is not the most important thing; what matters, is that you stopped to ask the question in the first place. Without posing the question, of course, no conclusion could ever be reached. What should be noted here is the necessity for architecture to provide those moments of pause within the daily routine. The physical building may spark this pause; however, what happens next is something quite immaterial. Your mind is transported somewhere else by the vehicle of architecture. You have cleared all the clutter from your thoughts for but a moment to dream of something different—to wonder. Gaston Bachlard reflects upon the “house” as a place and states, “If I were asked to name the chief benefit of the house, I should say: the house shelters day-dreaming, the house protects the dreamer, the house allows one to dream in peace.” The house allows you to imagine a different world—imagine positive change is indeed possible. Therefore, the goal of the architect is to cause humanity to ask a question. It is really quite simple. I am not underestimating the architect’s job; his work is complex and interdisciplinary. It is filled with philosophies on the construction of space and the dynamics of human activity. It demands hours of contemplation and more hours still of drawing up the built environment, only to tear it apart, and redraw it once more. Nevertheless, at the conclusion of all this, if the building does not provide a lens for looking at the world, if it does not provoke the onlooker to wonder, it has failed miserably. If; however, the daydreamer is allowed a moment to dream, a building has become an architecture.

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Main Entry: 1place Pronunciation: pls Function: noun Date: 13th century 01 physical environment : SPACE b : a way for admission or transit c : physical surroundings : ATMOSPHERE 02 a particular region, center of population, or location <a nice place to visit> b : a building, part of a building, or area occupied as a home <our summer place> 03 relative position in a scale or series: as a : position in a social scale <kept them in their place> b : a step in a sequence <in the first place, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s none of your business> c : a position at the conclu sion of a competition <finished in last place>


Development Growth

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1958

montgomery, al development growth urban shift to the east deterioration of urban core density

1973


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1984

1998


Density Comparison

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London

1 mile

Rome


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Chicago

Montgomery


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Main Entry: ag·ri·cul·ture Pronunciation: ag-ri-kuhl-cher Function: noun Date: 1425–75 01 the science, art, or occupation concerned with cultivating land, raising crops, and feeding, breeding, and raising live stock; farming 02 the production of crops, livestock, or poultry 03 agronomy


“Slow food at the local level is about the creation of new types of crops, new ways of preparing food, the use of new types of ingredients, as well as new local shops and restaurants.” Slow Food Almanac

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Alabama Agriculture 01 wheat Recent decrease in wheat production due to low profitability.

04 pecans Since 1910 there has been a steady rise in pecan orchard acreage. Farms are typically focused in South and Central Alabama.

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02 fruits + veggies Recent decrease in fruit and vegetable production due to low profitability. USDAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Organic Program is working with farmers to increase local markets and sustain vegetable and fruit productions by allowing they demand premium prices.

03 soybeans Alabama is one of the national leaders in soybean production.

05 peanuts Since 1910 there has also been a steady rise in peanut farming. Modern peanut farming usually takes up 2,000 acres with 3 to 4 workers.

06 peaches Peaches are mostly grown in the Upper Coastal Plain region of Alabama (i.e. Montgomery County).


08 corn The future of Alabama’s agricultural industry expects to see a rise in corn production as a resource for alternative fuels, such as ethanol and bio-diesel.

09 cotton Alabama is historically known as the heart of cotton country. 11 timber The Upper Coastal Plain region of Alabama has a large focus on long leaf pine plantations for timber production.

Today, cotton comprises 4% of the overall agriculture industry of Alabama.

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07 cattle 1910 European breeds of beef and dairy cattle were introduced to the Black Belt of Alabama. Cotton Country was transformed into Cattle Country. Today, the cattle industry makes up 11% of Alabama’s overall agriculture.

10 poultry + eggs Today, this is Alabama’s largest agricultural industry at 65%. USDA’s National Organic program aids the egg farmers by allowing them to demand premium prices at local markets.

12 greenhouse crops Today, greenhouse crops make up 8% of Alabama’s overall agricultural industry. Crops consist of a range from fruits and vegetables to herbs.


Cartographic Research Lab, University of Alabama

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Cartographic Research Lab, University of Alabama

Montgomery County Agricultural Maps

change in total number of farms

As Alabamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (and most of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) farm acreage shrinks while individual farms sizes grow and specialize in one area of agricultural production, how are we to create a sustainable and efficient food system?

average farm size in acres

increase

370 to 620

-100 to 0 -200 to -100

265 to 370 180 to 265 90 to 180

greater than -200

Is it responsible to continue marketing kiwis from New Zealand or apples from Washington State, especially when we grow them in Alabama? With gasoline prices steadily increasing and resources likewise consistently decreasing, we must begin to reevaluate the decisions we make in relation to food consumption and production. We must begin to use the agricultural history of Alabama and vast farming knowledge to create a sustainable alternative to our current farming system. Farms should therefore meet the needs of the local community and, if possible, provide resources for areas and regions that cannot produce for themselves (i.e. regions of poor soil conditions or arid climate).


Slow Foodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Fritjof Capra Austria, physicist, systems theorist and writer, put it this way: In recent years, networks have become a major focus of attention in science, in business and also in society at large and throughout a newly emerging global culture. In science, the focus on networks began in the 1920s, when ecologists viewed ecosystems as communities of organisms, linked together in network fashion through feeding relations, and used the concept of food webs to describe these ecological communities. As the network concept became more and more prominent in ecology, systemic thinkers began to use network models at all systems levels, viewing organisms as networks of cells and cells as networks of molecules, just as ecosystems are understood as networks of individual organisms. Correspondingly, the flows of matter and energy through ecosystems were perceived as the continuation of the metabolic pathways through organisms. It is important to understand the fundamental role of networks in the organization of all living system and note the similarities and differences between biological and social networks.

Image: Spinning wool

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Urban Farm Precedents 01 food project boston, ma To create a thoughtful and productive community of youth and adults from diverse backgrounds who work together to build a sustainable food system.

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02 casfs at ucsc santa cruz, ca Researches agriculture and social issues: 01 the political ecology of agrifood systems 02 the impact of alternative food initiatives, such as farm-to-institution programs, community supported agriculture, and farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; markets, on the sustainability of the food system


07 peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s grocery oakland, ca In 2002, Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grocery partnered with the North Oakland Land Trust to save this property from development and transform it from an abandoned and blighted vacant lot into a thriving community garden complete with 8 framed raised beds for medicinal herbs, perennials, flowers and natives plants and 20 vegetable beds that produce an abundance of seasonal produce.

06 mill creek urban farm philadelphia, pa Activities + Education: 01 In addition to growing food for local distribution, MCF is an education center, giving tours to groups and hosting field trips and community skill-share workshops. The farm employs youth in a summer job training program.

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05 just food new york, ny In the city, Just Food tackles deficiencies in food access and security by increasing the production, marketing and distribution of fresh food from community gardens and urban agriculture sites, on the one hand, and promoting Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) initiatives (food-buying clubs), on the other.

03 homeless garden project santa cruz, ca In May of 1990, the Citizens Committee for the Homeless, a Santa Cruz County non-profit, began a new project by opening the gates of an organic garden on Pelton Drive.

04 joney valley urban farm birmingham, al Programs: 01 an accredited high school Agriscience program 02 teacher workshops 03 organic gardening and healthy lifestyle programs 04 preschool gardening 05 adult workshops 06 community and nutrition programs

08 pie ranch san francisco, ca Why Pie Ranch? The promise of pie will encourage city youth and adults to come discover the beauty and importance of rapidly disappearing farms to the future of people in the Bay Area, our food security, health and our understanding and appreciation of life and nature.


connections + education

Precedent Yale Sustainable Food Project

teach workshops

on campus organic farm

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We aim to foster a culture that draws meaning and pleasure from the connections among people, land and food, so that students will go into the world knowing how to nourish themselves, their communities and the land. We do this by making food and agriculture an integral part of education and everyday life at Yale: we collaborate with faculty and students to increase academic work related to food and agriculture on campus, we run diverse extra-curricular educational programs, we manage an organic farm on campus, and we direct a sustainable dining program in Yaleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dining halls. In addition, each year we bring in a range of speakersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;authors like Michael Pollan and Eric Schlosser, chefs/activists like Odessa Piper, Ann Cooper and Alice Waters, and food scientist Hal McGee, among othersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to address issues of food, agriculture and sustainability. We teach workshops on topics from baking bread in a wood-fi red oven to winter gardening, believing that a practical education is a necessary supplement to an academic one. Students gain concrete skills through these workshops, but more importantly they are seduced both by the pleasure that comes from engaging in the process that creates their food and by sharing meaningful work with their peers.


What is Slow Food? Slow Food is an idea, a way of living and a way of eating. It is a global, grassroots movement with thousands of members around the world that links the pleasure of food with a commitment to community and the environment.

slow food

Slow Food + Good: The word good can mean a lot of things to a lot of people. For Slow Food, the idea of good means enjoying delicious food created with care from healthy plants and animals. The pleasures of good food can also help to build community and celebrate culture and regional diversity. Slow Food + Clean: When we talk about clean food, we are talking about nutritious food that is as good for the planet as it is for our bodies. It is grown and harvested with methods that have a positive impact on our local ecosystems and promotes biodiversity. Slow Food + Fair: We believe that food is a universal right. Food that is fair should be accessible to all, regardless of income, and produced by people who are treated with dignity and justly compensated for their labor. Slow Food USA + Mission: The organization seeks to create dramatic and lasting change in the food system. We reconnect Americans with the people, traditions, plants, animals, fertile soils and waters that produce our food. We seek to inspire a transformation in food policy, production practices and market forces so that they ensure equity, sustainability and pleasure in the food we eat. Slow Food USA + Activities: Raising public awareness, improving access and encouraging the enjoyment of foods that are local, seasonal and sustainably grown Caring for the land and protecting biodiversity for todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s communities and future generations Performing educational outreach within their communities and working with children in schools and through public programs Identifying, promoting and protecting fruits, vegetables, grains, animal breeds, wild foods and cooking traditions at risk of disappearance Advocating for farmers and artisans who grow, produce, market, prepare and serve wholesome food Promoting the celebration of food as a cornerstone of pleasure, culture and community

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Main Entry: net¡work Pronunciation: net-wurk Function: noun Date: 1550â&#x20AC;&#x201C;60 01 any netlike combination of filaments, lines, veins, passages, or the like: a network of arteries; a network of sewers under the city. 02 a system of interrelated buildings, offices, stations, etc., esp. over a large area or throughout a country, territory, region, etc.: a network of supply depots. 03 an association of individuals having a common interest, formed to provide mutual assistance, helpful information, or the like: a net work of recent college graduates.


site

59 57


Productive Urban Landscape Infrastructure field + restaurant + compost restaurant locations composting sites agricultural fields bike routes additional bike route

58

bike ways through agricultural fields


compost + field compost sites+agricultural fields

distance to compost site walking: 0min

5min

10min

15min

stations located near or at specified composting sites 01 trolley 02 bike taxis 03 bike stations

59


proposed agricultural fields existing parking lots or grass fields +

proposed agricultural fields

+ + +

60

parking lot replacement


field proximity 01

agricultural fields

02

03

04

05

06

composting initiative

proximity to agricultural field if walking: 0min

5min

10min

15min

07 61


compost + field + bicycle pathway through city compost sites agricultural fields

62

bike ways through urban core


neighborhoods

proposed pilot site

sports + toursim commerical district political district

proposed market

institutional district residential district agricultural field

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Main Entry: pro¡gram Pronunciation: proh-gram Function: noun Date: 1625â&#x20AC;&#x201C;35 01 a plan of action to accomplish a specified end: a school lunch program. 02 a planned, coordinated group of activities, procedures, etc., often for a specific purpose, or a facility offering such a series of activities: a drug rehabilitation program; a graduate program in linguistics. 03 a prospectus or syllabus: a program of courses being offered.


Program market vendors 01 kiosk-size 02 large markets for prominent sites bicycle taxi centers 01 places to rent and return bicycles for in-town commutes 02 bike trailer attachements available for produce and compost transportation organizational farming 01 one group overseeing agricultural production 02 mostly mass farming of select produce for local restaurants and schools individual plots 01 open to the community 02 large diversity of plants 03 uses european gardening model livestock 01 introduction of limited livestock for educational purposes compost stations 01 linear gradient of composting 02 located on centralized farming locations 03 connect to bicycle centers storage facility 01 tool and equiptment storage food cleaning + prep center 01 connected to storage facility 02 minor packaging required for market and restaurants educational facility 01 pavillion will be used mostly on fair weather days office space 01 space for administrative work on farm site

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Pilot Site Location

tunnel to riverwalk future market sports stadium

trainstation

commerce st bike path 66

historic downtown


pedestrian path bicycle path agriculture tool storage market outdoor market composting livestock bike + tolley station administration + lobby

67


N

site plan

68

upper floor plan upper floor plan

N

scale 3/32” = 1’-0”

ground floor plan ground floor plan scale 3/32” = 1’-0”


Plans + Elevations

north elevation scale 3/32” = 1’-0”

north elevation

+ south elevation scale 3/32” = 1’-0”

south elevation

69

southwest elevation

southwest elevation scale 3/32” = 1’-0”

northeast elevation

northeast elevation scale 3/32” = 1’-0”


Site Sections

70

pecan grove

pedestrian path

bike path

agriculture for local restaurants + market vendors


PRODUCE

section perspective

pedestrian path

community gardens

proposed inner sidewalk

existing outer sidewalk

71


72

greywater system

passive ventilation Section Detail


N

Diagrams

perspective to site

N

73 internal sidewalk

N

passive ventilation


N

Site Program

19 18 17 6

16

4

5

3 74

14

13

7

12

1 8

9 10

15

2

11

1 administration facility 2 bakery + ground floor cafe 3 food preperation facility 4 market vendor area 5 peach + apple orchard 6 service ally + proposed inner sidewalk 7 composting areas 8 community gardens 9 farming for local restaurants + market vendors 10 mobile tool sheds 11 trolley stop + bike center 12 pavilion 13 bike path 14 pedestrian path 15 pecan grove 16 nursery 17 secondary cafe + pre-planting growth 18 ramp 19 educational facility


tool shed [open]

10

75 track system

mobile tool shed above: open right: closed

tool shed [closed]


PRODUCE

left view from corner down commerce street bottom left view from upper level canopy and area for plant maturity bottom market vendor

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17

04


PRODUCE

77

02


I 78

went to the wood because I wished to live deliberately, to front only the essential facts of life, and see if I could not learn what it had to teach, and not, when I came to die, discover that I had not lived. I did not wish to live what was not life, living is so dear; nor did I wish to practice resignation, unless it was quite necessary. I wanted to live deep and suck out all the marrow of life, to live so sturdily and Spartan-like as to put to rest all that was not life, to cut a broad swath and shave close, to drive life into a corner, and reduce it to its lowest terms, and, if it proved to be mean, why then to get the whole and genuine meanness of it, and publish its meanness to the world; or if it were sublime, to know it by experience and be able to give a true account of my next excursion. Excerpt from Henry David Thoreauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Walden


79


live.


Bibliography

01

Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries. www.agi.state.al. Montgomery, AL. May, 2010

02

Holl, Steven. Questions of perception : Phenomenology of Architecture. San Francisco, CA : William Stout, 2006.

03

Kahn, Louis. Louis Kahn : Essential Texts. New York : W.W. Norton, 2003.

04

Pallasmaa, Juhani. The Eyes of the Skin : Architecture and the Senses. London : Academy Editions ; Lanham, MD : Distributed to the trade in the USA by National Book Network, 1996.

05

Slow Food International. 2010. www.slowfood.com

06

Steven Holl Architects. April, 2010. www.stevenholl.com

07

Viljoen, Andre. Continuous Productive Urban Landscapes : designing urban agriculture for sustainable cities. Oxford ; Boston : Architectural Press, 2005.



Productive Urban Landscapes