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LITTLE KOREA


LITTLE KOREA es Iconic Dish ecipes & Cult R

AW L Y BILL


INTRODUCTION P. 7

Kimchi Side dishes Jeon Meat dishes Rice & Noodles Soups & Stews Braised & Steamed Desserts Sauces & Condiments P. 10

P. 30

P. 56

P. 74

P. 104

P. 134

P. 154

P. 180

THE KOREAN PANTRY P. 212 INDEX P. 218

P. 200


A N YO U N G H A S E YO ! (HELLO!)

The first time I really fell hard for Korean food was at a friend’s birthday dinner at a Korean BBQ restaurant. Ten of us were gathered around a charcoal grill set into the middle of the table, surrounded by a lavish spread of meats and vegetables. The whole experience was a riot ...

I could feel the heat from the grill on my face, the aromatic smoke lingering in the air after the fat and juices dripped onto the smouldering charcoal. Everyone around the table was a little flushed, attempting to fan themselves with menus, grill meat on the BBQ and down cold beer all at the same time. The restaurant was hot, smoky and noisy, and yet I was in heaven. I loved the whole idea of sharing a communal meal where everyone played a small part in the cooking. It encouraged interaction and brought a sense of unity. Since then, my love for ‘Seoul food’ has grown into an obsession with all the elements of Korean cuisine. As in many parts of Asia, Korean food is largely centred around rice, vegetables and meats. A notable feature of traditional Korean meals is the number of banchan (Korean side dishes). A humble home-cooked meal would usually include around three banchan, and up to twelve for a royal feast.

Koreans have mastered the art of food fermentation, a method practised for centuries as a way to preserve food for long periods of time. Kimchi is definitely the most well-known fermented Korean dish, and most likely the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Korean food in general. Kimchi sits at the very heart of Korean food culture, with South Koreans eating more than 20 kilograms (44 pounds) of kimchi each year. While the dish is widely recognised as spicy fermented cabbage, there are actually more than 150 variations, with that number growing every year. In this cookbook, you will find recipes to help you master this simple yet incredibly rewarding preserving method. Kimchi is extremely addictive – it’s a good thing that it’s also really good for you – you’ll never be without a few jars of this umamifilled treat in your fridge again.

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Introduction


In these pages you will find a plethora of mouthwatering recipes to tantalise your tastebuds, from simple home-cooked meals to indulgent Korean street food – including the only KFC anyone should be eating: Korean fried chicken! I love fried chicken in any form, but Korean fried chicken takes it to a whole new level. To do my love for KFC justice, you will find not one, but four different Korean fried chicken recipes in this book.

It has been an epic and completely delicious journey writing this cookbook, from researching recipes, writing, cooking and testing, to photographing and styling every single dish. You should have seen my fridge, it was filled with all kinds of kimchi fermenting in containers everywhere! It was a humbling experience and I’m so glad that I get to share what I know about this incredible cuisine with you all.

K A M SA H A M N I DA ! (THANK YOU!)


I H C M I

K

) S E L K IC

(P cipes ~6 Re

Cabbage kimchi

Baechu kimchi Radish kimchi

Kkakdugi Radish water kimchi

Dongchimi Stuffed cucumber kimchi

Oi sobagi Spring onion kimchi

Pa kimchi Garlic chive kimchi

Buchu kimchi


KIMCHI (PICKLES)

Kimchi is probably the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Korean food. Which is fair enough. Kimchi is loved. It’s the national dish of Korea and a staple in any Korean kitchen; a traditional side dish served to accompany a full meal. This humble dish of fermented vegetables is at the very heart of Korean food culture and has manifested itself in Korean daily life. There are hundreds of varieties of kimchi made with different vegetables; some will take weeks to ferment while the others can be eaten right away. Whichever kimchi you choose to make, this ‘Seoul food’ will transport you straight to Korea.


CA B BAG E K I M C H I BAECHU KIMCHI Among the hundreds of varieties of kimchi made with different vegetables, napa (Chinese) cabbage kimchi is the most common. Almost every household in Korea will have a jar of cabbage kimchi sitting in the fridge or in an underground cellar, fermenting away. And every family will have their own closely guarded secret recipe for the best kimchi. I have to say, my version is pretty darn good, too! Don’t be intimidated by the long recipe, kimchi is actually quite straightforward to make. There are six stages: salting the cabbage, turning the cabbage, rinsing, marinating the radish, rubbing the chilli paste onto the cabbage, and fermentation, so you just have to allow yourself plenty of time (at least half a day) in the kitchen to make it. Also, kimchi will taste so much better after being fermented for at least 2 weeks – it’s a waiting game, but the reward is so worth it.

Makes approx. 2.5 kg (5½ lb); enough to serve 12–15 people

1 Chinese or napa cabbage (about 2 kg/4 lb 6 oz) 315 g (11 oz/1 cup) coarse cooking salt 450 g (1 lb/2 cups) Korean radish, peeled 4 spring onions (scallions) 
 Kimchi chilli paste (see below) K I M C H I C H I L L I PA S T E

cloves from 1 garlic bulb (about 10), peeled 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled 1 onion, quartered 40 g (1½ oz/½ cup) Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) (see Notes) 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup) fish sauce 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar EQUIPMENT

First, make the kimchi chilli paste. Put the garlic, ginger and onion in a blender or food processor and blend on high speed to form a fine paste. Transfer to a large mixing bowl. Add the chilli flakes, fish sauce and sugar, and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Use immediately or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator up to 2 weeks. Salting

1 x 12 litre (405 fl oz/48 cup) stainless steel mixing bowl 1 large colander 1 pair of food preparation gloves 1 x 4 litre (135 fl oz/16 cups) airtight container 4 x 475 ml (16 fl oz) steralised mason jars with lids (optional)

Halve the cabbage lengthways from root to tip. Cut each half in half again so that you end up with quarters. Give the cabbage segments a quick wash and tease the leaves apart gently from the core, being careful not to tear them, and rinse to remove any dirt. Shake off any excess water and set aside. Working with one quarter at a time, place the cabbage on a flat surface with the outermost leaf on the bottom. You will need 80 g (2¾ oz/¼ cup) salt per quarter. Starting from the bottom leaf, generously sprinkle salt over the thickest parts of the cabbage, using less salt on the leafy parts. Place the salted cabbage segment in a large mixing bowl. Repeat with the remaining cabbage and salt. Once all the cabbage segments are salted and sitting in the bowl (stack them on top of each other if necessary), pour in 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cups) water. Press down to ensure the segments are completely covered, then set aside to pickle for 4–6 hours. ›

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NOTES

Turning Every 1–2 hours, rotate the cabbage segments to ensure each piece is thoroughly coated in the pickling liquid. The cabbage is ready when the thickest parts are soft and bendable. Rinsing Thoroughly rinse the cabbage under cold running water three times. Squeeze each segment to remove as much water as possible then transfer to a colander, cut side down, to drip-dry while you prepare the chilli paste. Marinating the radish Cut the radish into matchsticks about 5 mm (¼ in) wide and 5 cm (2 in) long. Place in a large bowl. Cut the spring onions into 2.5 cm (1 in) lengths and add to the bowl. Add the kimchi chilli paste and stir until well combined. Set aside for 1 hour to marinate. After an hour, the radish will have softened and you should have a loose, wet paste. Rubbing Transfer the cabbage segments, cut side up, to a baking tray. Working with one segment at a time, spread one-quarter of the radish chilli paste evenly over the cabbage leaves, starting from the outermost leaf. Wear food preparation gloves if necessary to protect your hands from the chilli.

Gochugaru, or Korean chilli flakes (also called Korean chilli pepper powder), is widely used in Korean dishes. It usually comes in two forms: coarse chilli flakes or fine powder. The coarse chilli flakes are used throughout this cookbook. This paste is very pungent because of the amount of garlic used. You can use less garlic if you don’t want it to be too strong.

1.

Quarter the cabbage lengthways.

2.

Wash the cabbage and tease the leaves apart.

3.

Generously sprinkle the cabbage with salt.

4.

Pickle the cabbage for 4–6 hours.

5.

Combine spring onion, radish and chilli paste.

6.

Spread the outer cabbage leaf with the paste.

8.

Leave the cabbage to ferment for 2 days.

9.

Your kimchi is ready to eat!

The kimchi keeps well in the fridge for a minimum of 1–2 months. If it begins to taste sour, use it to make Kimchi fried rice (page 117), Kimchi pancakes with pork belly (page 69) or Kimchi stew (page 149). If it has turned mouldy and fizzy, discard it.

Once the cabbage is well coated in the chilli paste, fold the leaf part of the cabbage over towards the stem to form a nicely wrapped parcel. Transfer the parcel, cut side down, to an airtight container. Repeat with the remaining cabbage segments, packing each one snugly into the container. Rinse the baking tray with 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) water to loosen any leftover chilli paste. Add any loose cabbage leaves to the tray, stir briefly, then pour everything into the container over the cabbage segments. Seal the container with a lid. Fermentation Place the container in a cool spot away from direct sunlight and leave to ferment for 2 days. The kimchi will ferment more quickly during the summer and more slowly during the cooler months. After 2 days, pack each cabbage segment into a mason jar, seal tightly, and store in the refrigerator. The kimchi will be ready to eat after 2 days, but the flavours will continue to develop the longer it is stored. To serve When you are ready to eat, remove the kimchi from the jar. Use a pair of kitchen scissors to cut off as many leaves as you want, then return the remaining cabbage to the jar. Cut the kimchi into 2.5 cm (1 in) pieces to serve.

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Coat all the leaves liberally in the chilli paste.


RADISH KIMCHI KKAKDUGI

Makes approx. 1 kg (2 lb 3 oz)

Radish kimchi is probably my second favourite after napa cabbage kimchi (page 15). Like all kimchi, the flavours continue to evolve over the course of its fermentation. It starts off vibrant and fresh with a pungent aroma from the fish sauce, then it mellows out after a few weeks and the sweetness of the radish starts to come through. As it continues to mature, the fermentation will turn sugar into lactic acid, giving the kimchi that distinctive tangy and sharp taste. I love these cubes of pickled radish – they’re spicy and tangy with a nice crunch, the perfect match for fried food like Korean Fried Chicken (page 86).

1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) Korean radish, peeled 2 tablespoons coarse cooking salt 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 5–6 garlic cloves, crushed 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped 25 g (1 oz/⅓ cup) Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup) fish sauce

Cut the radish into 2 cm (¾ in) cubes and place in a large bowl. Add the salt and sugar and mix well. Set aside to pickle for 30 minutes, then drain and return the radish to the bowl. Add the garlic, ginger, chilli flakes and fish sauce and mix, using your hands, until the radish is well coated. Fill a few sterilised glass jars to the brim with the kimchi. Press down to remove any air bubbles, then seal the jars with tight-fitting lids. Store the jars in a cool place away from direct sunlight and leave to ferment for 2 days. Transfer to the refrigerator and store for up to 1 month.

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R A D I S H WAT E R KIMCHI DONGCHIMI

Fills 1 x 6 litre (202 fl oz/25 cup) jar

Dongchimi (which means ‘winter water kimchi’) is not your typical kimchi. It’s a mild, water-based kimchi typically made in late autumn when the radishes (preferably small baby radishes) are in season and at their peak in terms of flavour and sweetness. It is then fermented for several weeks, ready to be eaten in the winter months. This kimchi soup is not only tasty, but the fermentation produces good bacteria that helps promote digestion. A bowl of dongchimi is usually served with a full meal as an appetiser and palate cleanser. The tangy broth can also be used as the soup base for Naengmyeon (page 110).

1 x 2 kg (4 lb 6 oz) Korean radish, peeled (see Note) 80 g (2¾ oz/¼ cup) coarse cooking salt 6–8 garlic cloves, thinly sliced ½ onion, thinly sliced 3 spring onions (scallions), cut into 10 cm (4 in) lengths 4 green chillies, trimmed and cut into 3 segments 1 Nashi or Asian pear, unpeeled, washed NOTE

Cut the radish crossways into four equal portions. Cut each portion into quarters. Transfer to a large mixing bowl. Sprinkle the salt over the radish and toss to coat with your hands. Leave to sit for 30–40 minutes, until the radish has softened and released some of its liquid. Drain the liquid into a jug using a fine-mesh sieve.

Most Korean radishes are quite large, and must be sliced in order to fit in a jar. If you can find small ones, just pickle the whole radish without peeling. Whole pickled radishes will keep longer than sliced radishes.

Put the salted radish into one 6 litre (202 fl oz/25 cup) sterilised glass jar or two smaller jars, then top with the garlic, onion, spring onion, green chilli and, finally, the pear. Mix together 2.25 litres (76 fl oz/9 cups) water with the reserved pickling liquid and pour into the jar. Seal tightly, and ferment at room temperature away from direct sunlight for 2 days. After 2 days, taste the liquid and adjust the seasoning accordingly. If it’s too salty, add more water. If it’s not salty enough, add more salt and stir to dissolve. Leave to ferment for another day and taste again. It should be a little salty, sweet, sour, garlicky and hot from the chillies. Once you are happy with the flavours, transfer the jar to the refrigerator and chill before serving. It will keep in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. Serve one piece of radish per portion. Take the radish out of the jar and slice thinly. Place the sliced radish in a small soup bowl and top with some of the garlic, onion, spring onion and chilli. Give the liquid in the jar a quick stir, then ladle some of the liquid over the radish and serve chilled.

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STUFFED CUCUMBER KIMCHI OI SOBAGI If you love pickled cucumbers, then you will love this stuffed cucumber kimchi. It’s delicious, crunchy and refreshing – a perfect snack during summer. Oi Sobagi ferments quite quickly compared with other types of kimchi and it doesn’t keep well, so it’s best to make just enough for a meal and eat it straight away.

Makes approx. 1 kg (2 lb 3 oz)

1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) dill or Kirby (short) cucumbers 2 tablespoons coarse cooking salt 2 bunches of Garlic chive kimchi (Buchu kimchi) (page 29) 1 onion, thinly sliced

Wash the cucumbers and shake off any excess water. Top and tail the cucumbers, then cut in half crossways. Stand the cucumbers upright, cut side down, and slice lengthways into quarters, stopping about 1 cm (½ in) short of the base so the quarters are still attached at the base. Transfer to a large mixing bowl and set aside. Add 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cups) water to a large saucepan and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the salt and stir until dissolved. Remove from the heat and pour the hot salted water over the cucumbers. Put a small plate over the cucumbers to keep them fully submerged and leave to steep for 2 hours. Drain, and rinse the cucumbers in cold water twice. Cut the garlic chive kimchi (wear food preparation gloves if necessary) into 2 cm (1 in) lengths, then add to the cucumbers with the onion. Using your hands, massage the mixture until the cucumbers are thoroughly coated. Stuff each cucumber half with about 1 tablespoon of the garlic chive kimchi. Press the cucumber quarters together to secure the kimchi inside, then transfer to an airtight container. Eat the stuffed cucumber kimchi straight away, or store in the refrigerator for 3–5 days. The longer you leave it, the more the flavours will develop.

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SPRING ONION KIMCHI PA KIMCHI

Makes approx. 350 g (12½ oz)

Not all kimchi takes time to prepare and ferment. This spring onion kimchi is so simple to make and can be served immediately. For this recipe, it’s best to use the young, skinny green onions that are soft and sweet, rather than the big fat stalks (which will be tough). This dish is perfect for any almost-wilted spring onions you might have languishing in your refrigerator – don’t throw them away; make this kimchi instead.

300 g (10½ oz) spring onions (scallions) 50 g (1¾ oz/¼ cup) Kimchi chilli paste (page 15)

Wash the spring onions thoroughly to get rid of any dirt, then shake off the excess water. Trim the root ends and any wilted leaves. Transfer the spring onions to a baking tray and pour over the chilli paste. Using your hands (wear food preparation gloves if necessary), rub the chilli paste all over the spring onions until well coated. Cut the spring onions in half. Eat straight away or leave the kimchi to ferment at room temperature in an airtight container for 1–2 days, then refrigerate for 2–3 weeks. To serve, grab a bunch of spring onions and cut them into 5–10 cm (2–4 in) lengths. Serve as a side dish with a full meal.

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GARLIC CHIVE KIMCHI BUCHU KIMCHI

Makes 450 g (1 lb)

Just like the Spring onion kimchi on page 26, this garlic chive kimchi doesn’t need fermentation and can be eaten straight away. This dish is often eaten during spring and summer when the garlic chives are in abundance. It goes really well with meat dishes.

450 g (1 lb) garlic chives 100 g (3½ oz/½ cup) Kimchi chilli paste (page 15) toasted sesame seeds, to garnish (optional)

Put the garlic chives in a large bowl and cover with water. Gently shake to remove any dirt stuck between the leaves. Drain, and repeat. Shake off any excess water. Return the chives to the bowl, and add the kimchi chilli paste. Using your hands, gently rub the paste over the chives to evenly coat them. Leave to stand at room temperature for 2–3 hours or until the chives have marinated and softened. Eat straight away or store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. When you’re ready to serve, cut the chives into 5 cm (2 in) lengths. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds, if using, and serve as a side dish.

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Sautéed zucchini

Hobak muchim Seasoned soybean sprouts

Kongnamul muchim Seasoned English spinach

Sigeumchi muchim

E D I S S E H S I D es p i c e R 3 1 ~

Sautéed fernbrake

Gosari namul Sautéed bellflower root

Doraji namul Corn cheese

Konchijeu Spicy cucumber salad

Oi muchim Seasoned mung bean sprouts

Sukju namul Stir-fried radish

Mu namul Seaweed and cucumber salad

Myeok oi muchim Seasoned seaweed

Gim muchim Stir-fried fish cake

Eomuk bokkeum Seaweed egg roll

Gim gyeran mari


SIDE DISHES

When you dine at a Korean restaurant, often the first plates to arrive will be banchan, which literally means ‘side dishes’. Banchan is an essential part of any Korean meal. Typically, the basic table setting for a Korean meal consists of cooked rice, soup, sauces, main dishes and an array of banchan. There are many different types of banchan according to the various methods of cooking, including namul (steamed, marinated or stir-fried vegetables), bokkeum (stir-fried with sauce), jorim (simmered in a seasoned broth), jjim (steamed), jeon (pan-fried) and even kimchi (fermented). A humble home-cooked meal will usually be accompanied by three or four of these side dishes, while a formal meal can feature up to twelve banchan.


SAU T É E D Z U C C H I N I HOBAK MUCHIM Many banchan (Korean side dishes) are extremely easy to prepare, this sautéed zucchini included. This recipe can be whipped up in a matter of minutes with just a few ingredients. Hobak muchim can also be used as one of the toppings for Bibimbap (page 114).

Serves 4

2 zucchini (courgettes), unpeeled, washed ⅛ teaspoon salt, plus extra for seasoning 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

Cut the zucchini crossways into 3 mm (⅛ in) thick slices and transfer to a bowl. Add the salt and give it a quick toss, then set aside for 1 hour. Strain the zucchini in a fine-mesh sieve.

S E A S O N E D S OY B E A N SPROUTS KONGNAMUL MUCHIM One of the most common dishes in Korean cuisine, Kongnamul muchim is served with almost every meal. This dish is mildly seasoned to enhance the natural nutty flavour of the sprouts. It is also a classic topping for Bibimbap (page 114), adding a wonderful crunch to the dish.

Serves 4

1 teaspoon salt 450 g (1 lb) soybean sprouts 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 1 tablespoon fish sauce, or to taste 2 teaspoons sesame oil

Prepare a bowl of iced water and set aside. Combine 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cups) water and the salt in a large saucepan and bring to the boil over medium–high heat. Add the bean sprouts and boil, covered, for 5 minutes or until softened and translucent. Do not remove the lid during cooking or the sprouts will have an unpleasant aftertaste. Once cooked, drain them immediately and refresh in the iced water for 5 minutes to stop the cooking process. Drain, shaking off any excess water, and transfer to a mixing bowl.

Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the zucchini and fry gently for 2–3 minutes or until just tender. Add the garlic, 2 tablespoons water and season to taste with salt. Sauté for another minute or until the zucchini is softened but not mushy. Transfer to a serving plate and serve at room temperature.

Add the garlic, sesame seeds, spring onion, fish sauce and sesame oil and mix everything together well. Serve immediately, or store in the refrigerator in an airtight container for up to 2 days. NOTES

It is very important not to remove the lid while cooking the soybean sprouts, or they will have an unpleasant raw aftertaste. Just reduce the heat if the water is boiling over. For a spicy version, add 2 teaspoons Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) to the mix.

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SEASONED ENGLISH S P I N AC H SIGEUMCHI MUCHIM This side dish is a no brainer. Sigeumchi muchim is blanched English spinach seasoned with soy sauce, garlic and sesame oil. It doesn’t get any simpler than that. It’s quick, delicious and good for you, too.

SAU T É E D FERNBRAKE GOSARI NAMUL

Serves 4

250–300 g (9–10½ oz/5–6 cups) English spinach (about 1 bunch) 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds salt, to taste

Serves 4

Gosari are the young stems of fernbrake or bracken, sometimes also dubbed ‘the beef of the mountains’ due to its high protein content. Gosari namul is ubiquitous during festive holidays, prized for its chewy texture and earthy flavour. It’s also a common topping for Bibimbap (page 114).

Prepare a bowl of iced water and set aside. Wash the spinach under cold running water to remove any dirt. Shake off any excess water, then set aside.

Put the dried fernbrake in a heatproof bowl. Bring 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cups) water to the boil in a kettle and pour the boiling water over the fernbrake. Leave to steep for at least 1 hour to rehydrate the fernbrake. Drain, and transfer the fernbrake to a large saucepan. Cover the fernbrake with water, add a pinch of salt and bring to the boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium–high and boil for 10 minutes or until the fernbrake has softened.

Bring a large saucepan of water to a rolling boil over high heat. Blanch the spinach for 30 seconds, then drain and immediately refresh in the iced water to stop the cooking process. Leave to chill in the water for 10 minutes, then drain and trim off the roots. Spread the spinach out on a chopping board, then cut the stems and leaves into 5 cm (2 in) lengths. Gather the spinach with both hands and squeeze firmly to remove any excess water. Loosen up the leaves and transfer to a mixing bowl.

50 g (1¾ oz, about 2 handfuls) dried fernbrake (see Note) pinch of salt, for blanching 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons mirin 1 teaspoon caster (superfine) sugar 2 spring onions (scallions), thinly sliced freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1 tablespoon sesame oil toasted sesame seeds, to garnish

Drain and rinse the fernbrake twice under cold running water. Squeeze the fernbrake gently to remove as much water as possible and set aside. Line up the stems of fernbrake, trim off any woody bits and discard, then cut the stems into 10 cm (4 in) lengths.

Add the garlic, sesame oil and sesame seeds and toss everything together with your hands. Season to taste with salt and serve right away or store in the refrigerator in an airtight container for up to 2 days.

Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and fernbracke and sauté for 3 minutes or until fragrant. Add the soy sauce, mirin, sugar and spring onion, and sauté for another 3 minutes or until the fernbrake has softened and most of the liquid has evaporated. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Remove from the heat, season with pepper to taste and add the sesame oil. Give it a quick stir, then leave to cool to room temperature before serving, garnished with sesame seeds. NOTE

Fernbrake (gosari in Korean) is also called bracken. You can find it at any Korean grocery store. It usually comes dried and is sold by the packet.

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SAU T É E D B E L L F LOW E R R O OT DORAJI NAMUL In Korea, the root of the doraji (bellflower) plant is a popular ingredient in salads and traditional cuisine, and has also long been used in herbal medicine because of its health benefits. The root is crunchy yet chewy once cooked, and can be quite bitter if not prepared properly – make sure you don’t skip the salting step as it’s essential to remove the bitterness from the roots.

Serves 4

100 g (3½ oz) dried bellflower roots (see Note) 1 tablespoon coarse cooking salt 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 2 teaspoons fish sauce 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 1 spring onion (scallion), green part only, thinly sliced

Soak the dried bellflower roots in water for 8–12 hours, or overnight, to rehydrate. The next day, drain the water. The hydrated roots should be about 5 mm (¼ in) thick. If there are any larger pieces, split them into thinner strips. Transfer the roots to a large bowl, sprinkle with the salt and mix well. Rub the roots against a chopping board for a couple of minutes to help remove the bitterness. Rinse the roots under cold running water a couple of times, then squeeze out as much water as possible. Set aside. Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Sauté the bellflower roots for 3–4 minutes or until lightly browned. Add the fish sauce and 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) water, and sauté for a further 8–10 minutes or until the water has evaporated and the bellflower roots have turned slightly opaque. Add the garlic and spring onion and give it a quick stir, then turn off the heat. Transfer to a serving plate and allow to cool to room temperature before serving. NOTE

Bellflower root (doraji in Korean) is also known as balloon flower or platycodon. You can find it at any Korean grocery store. It usually comes in dried form and is sold by the packet.

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Sautéed fernbrake Sautéed zucchini

Seasoned soybean sprouts

Seasoned English spinach

Sautéed bellflower root


CORN CHEESE KONCHIJEU

Serves 4

This dish is a must-order every time I go to a Korean BBQ restaurant. Although it’s often served as a side dish, it is most popular as a bar snack, or anju. Sweet corn kernels covered in stretchy cheese washed down with cold beer. What’s not to love? Make this for your next Korean dinner party!

Heat the grill (broiler) setting of your oven to medium. 
 Melt the butter in a small cast-iron or ovenproof frying pan over medium heat. Add the corn kernels and fry for 3 minutes. Add the spring onion, give it a quick stir, then remove from the heat. 


20 g (¾ oz) unsalted butter 1 x 420 g (15 oz) tin corn kernels, drained and rinsed 2 spring onions (scallions), thinly sliced 1 tablespoon mayonnaise 2 teaspoons caster (superfine) sugar salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 100 g (3½ oz/⅔ cup) shredded mozzarella cheese cayenne pepper, for sprinkling (optional)

Add the mayonnaise and sugar, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Mix well, then sprinkle the cheese over the corn. 
 Transfer the frying pan to the top shelf of the oven and grill for 5–8 minutes or until the cheese has melted and turned golden brown in places. 
 Remove from the oven and sprinkle with a little cayenne pepper, if using. Rest for 5 minutes and serve hot, with a cold beer. 


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S P I CY C U C U M B E R SAL AD OI MUCHIM A great banchan (Korean side dish) for summer. This spicy cucumber salad is refreshing yet tingling–spicy on the tastebuds. It pairs well with cold noodle soups like Janchi guksu (page 118) or Naengmyeon (page 110). This dish is best made fresh and eaten on the same day.

Cut the cucumbers in half lengthways, then cut each half on an angle into thin slices. Combine the cucumber slices in a bowl with the remaining ingredients. Toss everything together with your hands until well combined. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary.

Serves 4

2 Lebanese or Kirby (short) cucumbers, washed 2 teaspoons Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 teaspoon fish sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil ½ spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

Another effortless yet flavoursome banchan (Korean side dish), sukju namul is simply blanched mung bean sprouts that have been seasoned with fish sauce, garlic and lots of sesame oil. However, it is very important not to overcook the sprouts, or they will be too soft, mushy and inedible.

Serve 4

450 g (1 lb) mung bean sprouts 2 teaspoons fish sauce 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 1 tablespoon sesame oil 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

Prepare a bowl of iced water and set aside. Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil over high heat. Add the mung bean sprouts and blanch for 1 minute. Drain, then immediately refresh in the iced water to stop the cooking process. Leave to chill in the water for 2 minutes, then drain and gently squeeze the sprouts to remove any excess water.

Transfer to a serving bowl and leave to sit for 1 hour to allow the flavours to develop. Serve at room temperature.

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SEASONED MUNG BEAN SPROUTS SUKJU NAMUL

Transfer the sprouts to a mixing bowl, add the remaining ingredients and toss everything together until well combined. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary, then serve chilled or at room temperature. Store any leftovers in the refrigerator in an airtight container for 2–3 days.

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STIR-FRIED RADISH MU NAMUL Korean radish (mu in Korean) is a variety of white radish (daikon) with a firm crisp flesh and a slightly sweet and peppery flavour. Mu are both tasty and extremely nutritious. This stir-fried preparation is a quick way to throw together a fantastic side dish using up any leftover radish you may have in the fridge.

Serves 4

250 g (9 oz) Korean radish 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 teaspoon caster (superfine) sugar 2 teaspoons fish sauce 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

Wash and peel the radish, then cut it into matchsticks about 5 mm (¼ in) wide and 5 cm (2 in) long.

S E AW E E D A N D CU CUMBER SAL AD MYEOK OI MUCHIM This is a traditional banchan (Korean side dish) that you don’t often see in restaurants but is common in home kitchens. It has a sharp tangy flavour from the vinegar and the seaweed is packed with umami. It’s a nice refreshing salad to cut through spicy food like Kimchi stew (page 149) or Cheesy fire chicken (page 79).

Serves 4

30 g (1 oz) dried wakame seaweed (see Notes) 1 Lebanese or Kirby (short) cucumber 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar ½ teaspoon salt 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) white vinegar

Soak the dried seaweed in a bowl of cold water for 20–30 minutes to rehydrate. Drain, and rinse thoroughly under cold running water to remove any excess salt. Gently squeeze the seaweed to remove any excess water and transfer to a bowl.

Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the radish and stir-fry for 4–5 minutes or until translucent. Add the garlic, sugar, fish sauce and 2 tablespoons water. Give it a quick stir, cover with a lid, and reduce the heat to medium–low. Simmer for 3–4 minutes or until the radish has softened and most of the liquid has evaporated. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary.

Cut the cucumber in half lengthways, then cut each half on an angle into thin slices. Add the sliced cucumber and remaining ingredients to the seaweed. Mix well to combine, then transfer to the refrigerator to chill for 20 minutes.

Add the spring onion and sesame seeds and mix well, then remove from the heat. Transfer to a serving plate and serve at room temperature. Store any leftovers in the refrigerator in an airtight container for 2–3 days.

Serve chilled. Store any leftovers in the refrigerator in an airtight container for 2–3 days. NOTES

Dried wakame seaweed is available from Asian grocery stores. This salad goes well with cold noodle dishes like Festive noodle soup (Janchi guksu) (page 118).

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SEASONED S E AW E E D GIM MUCHIM

STIR-FRIED F I S H CA K E EOMUK BOKKEUM

Serves 4

Gim muchim is a seaweed salad that needs no cooking at all. All you have to do is to rehydrate the dried seaweed then season well with soy sauce and sesame oil and you have a practically instant side dish to go with any meal.

8 dried seaweed laver (doljaban) sheets (see Note) 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon sesame oil 2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds

Stack the seaweed sheets together, tear them into small chunks then place them in a bowl.

Serves 4

Fish cake (eomuk in Korean) is a processed seafood product made of a mixture of seafood such as fish, prawns (shrimp) and squid. The traditional Korean fish cake is thin and rectangular, but nowadays fish cakes come in many different shapes, sizes and flavours. They are absolutely one of my favourite street foods in Korea.

Place the sliced fish cake in a heatproof bowl and cover with boiling water for 1 minute. Drain, then set aside.

Add the remaining ingredients and use your hands to mix everything together until well combined. Gradually all the moisture will be absorbed by the seaweed. Loosen up the mixture if the seaweed sticks together in a big clump. Transfer to a serving plate and serve at room temperature.

200 g (7 oz) piece Korean fish cake, thinly sliced (see Notes) 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 1 tablespoon soy sauce 2 teaspoons fish sauce 2 teaspoons caster (superfine) sugar 1 tablespoon mirin 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds 1 teaspoon sesame oil

Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan over medium–high heat. Add the sliced fish cake and fry for 1–2 minutes or until lightly browned. Add the soy sauce, fish sauce, sugar, mirin, garlic and spring onion and fry for another 2 minutes, until the garlic is fragrant and the sauce has almost evaporated. Remove from the heat, add the toasted sesame seeds and sesame oil, and give it a quick stir. Transfer to a serving plate.

Store any leftovers in the refrigerator in an airtight container for up to 1 week. NOTE

Dried seaweed laver, or doljaban in Korean, is very similar to nori (seaweed) sheets, which are used to make Korean sushi rolls (page 128). Doljaban is usually thicker and coarser, which is why it is used in salads. You can find it at any Asian grocery store.

Serve warm or at room temperature. Store any leftovers in the refrigerator in an airtight container for up to 1 week. Reheat before serving. NOTES

There is a wide range of fish cakes available at Asian and Korean grocery stores. For this recipe, it is best to use fish cakes in a sheet or rectangle as the other shapes (balls or rolls) are better suited to noodle soups. You can make a spicy version of this dish by adding 1–2 tablespoons Korean chilli paste (gochujang) to the sauce.

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Seasoned mung bean sprouts

Seaweed and cucumber salad

Spicy cucumber salad

Stir-fried fish cake

Stir-fried radish

Seasoned seaweed


S E AW E E D E G G R O L L GIM GYERAN MARI Gyeran mari, which literally means ‘rolled eggs’, is a Korean-style rolled omelette. It is super easy to make and absolutely delicious. It’s a popular side dish, especially as a lunch box item. Whenever I see an egg roll in my lunch box, I tend save it for last so I can savour it slowly.

Serves 2

3 eggs 2 teaspoons mirin pinch of salt 1 teaspoon vegetable oil 1 nori (seaweed) sheet

Whisk the eggs and mirin together in a small bowl until well combined with no traces of egg white left in the mixture. Add a pinch of salt and whisk to combine. Heat the vegetable oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium–low heat. Use a paper towel to spread the oil evenly over the base of the pan. Pour in the beaten egg mixture and swirl the pan around to spread the mixture out to the edges of the pan. After 2–3 minutes, the omelette will start to set but the surface should still be wet. Place the nori sheet on top. Cook for another 2 minutes or until the surface is just set but still slightly wet. Using a spatula, lift one side of the omelette and fold it over the seaweed by 5 cm (2 in). Continue folding to form a log. Transfer the egg log to a chopping board. Leave to cool for 5 minutes, then slice into 2 cm (¾ in) bite-sized pieces and serve. NOTE

The omelette should still be a little wet on the surface when you start folding. This will help to set it into a log once it has been rolled and make it easier to cut.

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N O JE KES

A C N (PA IT TERS) & FR s e p i c e R 5 ~

Korean pancake mix

Jeon garu Spring onion pancake

Pajeon Seafood spring onion pancakes

Haemul pajeon Kimchi pancakes with pork belly

Kimchi jeon Fritters

Jeon


JEON (PANCAKES AND FRITTERS)

Jeon usually refers to dishes made from vegetables, minced fish or meat that are coated in batter and then pan-fried. These dishes include savoury pancakes, fritters and even sweet desserts. Jeon can be served as an appetiser, a banchan (side dish), an anju (a snack served with alcohol) or just snacks on their own. Crispy fried on the outside and tender on the inside, jeon are always hard to resist.


KO R E A N PA N C A K E M I X JEON GARU

Makes two 18–20 cm (7–8 in) pancakes

The key to a good jeon is the batter. It shouldn’t be too thin, instead just thick enough to hold the ingredients together. Pan-frying slowly will yield a nice golden crispy pancake that is still soft and chewy (but not soggy) in the middle. These days most Koreans would just use storebought pancake mix as it is convenient, but this recipe will come in handy when you get those midnight cravings.

110 g (4 oz/¾ cup) plain (all-purpose) flour 2 tablespoons rice flour 2 tablespoons cornflour (cornstarch) ¼ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon baking powder 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped 1 egg, lightly beaten

Sift all the dry ingredients into a mixing bowl and stir to combine. Add the garlic and ginger, 185 ml (6 fl oz/¾ cup) iced water and the egg, and whisk until the batter is smooth with no lumps. Add a little more water to loosen the batter if necessary. It should be thick but still runny with the consistency of pouring cream. Use this batter to make any of the pancakes in this chapter.

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SPRING ONION PA N C A K E PAJEON

Makes 2

Pajeon is one of the most popular and basic Korean pancakes and it only takes a few minutes to whip up a couple of these bad boys for a snack or appetiser. It’s best to use the young skinny spring onions for this recipe, as old ones can be pretty tough.

Korean pancake mix (Jeon garu) (page 60) 4 spring onions (scallions) vegetable oil, for frying

Prepare the pancake mix, following the recipe on page 60, then set aside. Trim the roots off the spring onions and cut into 8–10 cm (3¼–4 in) lengths. If the white parts are thick, split them in half lengthways. Heat 2 tablespoons vegetable oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Give the batter a quick stir then ladle half of the batter into the pan. Use the back of the ladle to spread the batter out to the edges of the pan. Lay half the spring onions in a single layer on top of the batter. Fry the pancake for 4–5 minutes or until golden brown on the bottom. Use a wide spatula to flip the pancake over. Cook for a further 4–5 minutes, until golden brown. Transfer the pancake to a baking tray lined with paper towel to catch any excess oil. Repeat with the remaining batter and spring onions. Cut the pancakes into large squares and serve warm. NOTE

You can also make Garlic chive pancakes (Buchu jeon) by substituting the spring onions for 50 g (1¾ oz) garlic chives. They are just as good.

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SEAFOOD SPRING O N I O N PA N C A K E S HAEMUL PAJEON Once you’ve mastered the basic Pajeon on page 63, it’s time to get a little fancy and bring some seafood to the party. This pancake is my absolute favourite and is also one of the most popular variations at any Korean restaurant. The crispy pancake studded with an array of seafood brings a great range of textures and flavours.

Makes 2

Korean pancake mix (Jeon garu) (page 60) 4 spring onions (scallions) vegetable oil, for frying 200 g (7 oz/1 cup) mixed seafood 1 egg, lightly beaten Spicy soy and spring onion sauce (Yangnyeomjang) (page 209), to serve

Prepare the pancake mix, following the recipe on page 60, then set aside. Trim the roots off the spring onions, then cut into 5 cm (2 in) lengths. If the white parts are thick, split them in half lengthways. Heat 2 tablespoons vegetable oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Add half the seafood and fry for 2 minutes, until slightly browned. Spoon half of the beaten egg over the seafood. Give the batter a quick stir then ladle half of the batter into the pan. Use the back of the ladle to spread the batter out to the edges of the pan. Lay half the spring onions in a single layer on top of the batter. Fry the pancake for 4–5 minutes or until golden brown on the bottom. Use a wide spatula to flip the pancake over. Add another tablespoon of oil, press the pancake down with the back of the spatula, and cook for a further 4–5 minutes, until golden brown. Transfer the pancake to a baking tray lined with paper towel to catch any excess oil. Repeat with the remaining batter and ingredients. Serve immediately, allowing people to tear bits of pancake off with chopsticks. Serve the soy and spring onion dipping sauce on the side.

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K I M C H I PA N C A K E S W I T H P O R K B E L LY KIMCHI JEON When you have a jar of kimchi fermenting away in the refrigerator for weeks, the time will come to cut some up and make kimchi jeon. This spicy pancake is the perfect comfort food on a cold rainy day. You can make a simple vegetarian version just by adding kimchi, but I love the addition of crispy pork belly.

Prepare the pancake mix, adding the kimchi juice and enough water to make a smooth, pourable batter. Add the sliced kimchi, reserving some to garnish. Stir to combine and set aside.

Serves 4

Korean pancake mix (Jeon garu) (page 60) 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) kimchi juice 150 g (5½ oz/1 cup) Cabbage kimchi (Baechu kimchi) (page 15), thinly sliced vegetable oil, for frying 100 g (3½ oz) pork belly, thinly sliced
 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced

Heat 2 tablespoons vegetable oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Fry the pork belly slices for 2–3 minutes until lightly browned. Give the batter a quick stir then ladle half of the batter over the pork belly. Use the back of the ladle to spread the batter out to the edges of the pan. Fry the pancake for 4–5 minutes or until browned on the bottom. Use a wide spatula to flip the pancake over. Add another tablespoon of oil, press the pancake down with the back of the spatula and cook for further 4–5 minutes until browned. Transfer the pancake to a baking tray lined with paper towel to catch any excess oil. Repeat with the remaining batter and ingredients. To serve, garnish both pancakes with the spring onion and reserved kimchi.

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FRIT TERS JEON

Serves 8–10

Jeon isn’t all about pancakes – we’ve got fritters, too! During celebratory occasions like birthdays, festive holidays or even dinner parties, instead of serving potato crisps, dips and crackers, Koreans are all about serving an array of fritters as finger food.

To make the zucchini fritters, cut the zucchini into 5 mm (¼ in) thick rounds. Place them in a bowl, sprinkle with the salt, and toss well. Spread them out in a single layer on a baking tray and set aside for 10 minutes to draw out some of the moisture. Rinse, and spread them out on paper towels to dry. Set aside, ready for frying. For the fish fritters, lay the fillets flat on a chopping board. Starting from one end, slice the fillets on an angle into 1 cm (½ in) thick slices. Transfer to a baking tray, season with salt and pepper on both sides, and set aside, ready for frying. To make the beef fritters, combine all the ingredients in a large bowl and mix well until the mixture is sticky and pasty, about 2–3 minutes. Set aside half of the mixture for the green chilli fritters. Roll a heaped tablespoon of the remaining beef mixture into a ball, then press it down to make a small patty. Transfer to a baking tray lined with baking paper, then repeat with the remaining mince. Set aside, ready for frying.

150 g (5½ oz/1 cup) plain (all-purpose) flour 3 eggs, lightly beaten vegetable oil, for frying salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste Spicy soy and spring onion sauce (Yangnyeomjang) (page 209), to serve

Working in small batches, dredge the fish pieces in the flour, dusting off any excess, then dip in the beaten egg. If the frying pan seems dry, add another tablespoon of oil. Fry the fish for 2–3 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Remove to the wire rack and leave to drain. Repeat the process with the beef patties, frying for 2–3 minutes on each side, and the stuffed chillies. Serve immediately or at room temperature with the Spicy soy and spring onion sauce.

ZUCCHINI FRIT TERS (HOBAK JEON)

2 zucchini (courgettes) 1 teaspoon salt FISH FRIT TERS (SSAENGSEON JEON)

BEEF FRIT TERS (DONGGEURANG D DA E N G )

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) minced (ground) beef ½ carrot, finely chopped ½ onion, finely chopped 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled and finely grated 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1 egg, lightly beaten STUFFED CHILLI FRIT TERS (GO CHU JEON)

250 g (9 oz) skinless cod fish fillets, or other firm white-fleshed fish such as ling, sole or haddock salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

10 large green chillies 250 g (9 oz) of the Beef fritter mixture (Donggeurang ddaeng) (see above)

For the stuffed chilli fritters, trim the stems off the chillies and slice them in half lengthways. Discard the seeds and membranes, then cut the chillies in half crossways. Stuff each chilli half with 2 teaspoons of the reserved beef mixture. Transfer them to a baking tray lined with baking paper, ready for frying. Set up a dusting station. Place the flour in a shallow bowl, and put the beaten egg in another shallow bowl. Heat 2 tablespoons vegetable oil in a frying pan over medium–high heat. Start with the zucchini. Working with a few slices at a time, dredge the zucchini in the flour, dusting off any excess, then dip in the beaten egg and transfer to the frying pan. Cook for 2 minutes on each side or until golden brown. Transfer to a wire rack with paper towels underneath to catch the excess oil. ›

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Garlic chives pancakes Zucchini fritters

Beef fritters

Fish fritters

Stuffed chilli fritters


Cheesy fire chicken

Chijeu buldak Spicy garlic-fried chicken

Kkanpunggi Soy-marinated barbecued beef

T A ME ES H S I D es p i c e R 1 1 ~

Bulgogi Barbecued beef short ribs

Galbi KFC 4 ways

Huraideu chikin Beef meatball skewers

Tteok galbi wanja Tornado potato hot dog stick

Hoeoligamja Stir-fried spicy pork

Jeyuk bokkeum Spicy stir-fried octopus

Nakji bokkeum Spicy barbecued pork

Daeji bulgogi Grilled barbecued pork belly

Samgyeopsal gui


MEAT

If you’re on a diet, I’m telling you now – this chapter is not for you. This chapter is all about those delectable, mouth-watering, indulgent Korean dishes that are meaty, cheesy, spicy (actually, super spicy!), plus all the deep-fried crunchy goodness that will make your heart sing. From scrumptious Korean BBQ to awesome street eats, just make sure you have plenty of cold beer to wash these down.


CHEESY FIRE CHICKEN CHIJEU BULDAK

Serves 4–6

It’s said that many Koreans eat extremely spicy food as a stress relief and this dish sure will numb the pain of a sorry soul. Buldak literally means ‘fire chicken’ and that is no exaggeration – it is super, super hot! In recent years, some genius decided to tone down the spiciness by covering it in cheese! Since then, the popularity of this cheesy, spicy chicken dish has sky-rocketed worldwide. But consider yourself warned, it is definitely not for the faint hearted.

1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) skinless, boneless chicken thigh fillets, trimmed and cut into bite-sized pieces 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 250 g (9 oz/1⅔ cup) shredded mozzarella cheese 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 2 heads cos (romaine) or butter lettuce MARINADE

To make the marinade, combine all the ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Add the chicken to the marinade and mix until the meat is completely coated. Cover, and leave to marinate in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour. Heat the vegetable oil in a large non-stick frying pan or wok over high heat. Add the chicken and stir-fry for 5 minutes. Add 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) water, reduce the heat to medium and simmer, covered, for another 5 minutes. Remove the lid and increase the heat to medium–high, stirring continuously until the sauce has reduced and thickened, about 2–3 minutes. Heat your grill (broiler) setting of your oven to high. Sprinkle half the cheese over the bottom of a heavy cast-iron pan, then arrange the chicken on top. Scatter the remaining cheese over the chicken and place the pan on the top rack of the oven. Grill for 5 minutes or until the top begins to brown and blister.

40 g (1½ oz/½ cup) Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 70 g (2½ oz/¼ cup) Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 2 tablespoons Korean rice syrup (ssalyeot) or corn syrup, glucose or honey 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon sesame oil ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped 5 cm (2 in) piece of ginger, peeled and finely grated

Remove from the oven and garnish with the spring onion. Tear the lettuce into leaves and use them to wrap up the chicken like san choy bao.

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S P I CY G A R L I C - F R I E D CHICKEN KKANPUNGGI

Serves 4

Inspired by Chinese Kung Pao chicken, this fusion dish is delicious and dangerously addictive. The crunchy morsels of golden chicken nuggets are coated in spicy sweet-and-sour glaze then tossed together with crispy leek and toasted peanuts. I know the recipe says serves four, but I can easily smash this whole dish on my own.

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) skinless, boneless chicken thigh fillets, trimmed and cut into bite-sized pieces 3 cm (1¼ in) piece of ginger, peeled and finely grated 2 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons mirin ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 180 g (6½ oz/1 cup) potato starch 1 egg vegetable oil, for frying ½ onion, finely diced 5 dried red chillies, cut into 2 cm (¾ in) pieces 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 2 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons caster (superfine) sugar 1 tablespoon white vinegar 1 tablespoon cornflour (cornstarch), mixed with 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) water 50 g (1¾ oz/⅓ cup) peanuts, skinned and toasted

Combine the chicken, ginger, soy sauce, mirin and pepper in a large bowl. Mix well, then leave to marinate in the refrigerator for 1 hour. To make the chilli oil, heat the oil in a frying pan over medium heat. Add the garlic and ginger and stir-fry for 2 minutes or until the garlic is slightly charred. Add the leek and fry for another 3 minutes or until the leek has turned golden and crispy. Using a pair of tongs, remove the garlic, ginger and leek from the hot oil and reserve. Now add the chilli flakes to the hot oil and cook for 1 minute, then turn off the heat and leave the oil to infuse for a few minutes. Strain the oil through a fine-mesh sieve into a heatproof bowl and set aside. Discard the chilli flakes. Add the potato starch and egg to the chicken and use your hands to massage the meat until it is well coated. Heat 2.5 cm (1 in) vegetable oil in a wok over medium–high heat until it reaches 175°C (345°F) when tested with a cooking thermometer. Working in batches, fry the chicken, turning occasionally, until it is golden brown and crunchy, about 5 minutes. Remove and transfer to a wire rack with paper towel underneath to catch the excess oil. Pour the oil out of the wok and wipe it clean with paper towel. Heat the chilli oil in the same wok over medium–high heat. Add the onion and stir-fry for 2 minutes or until it is soft and translucent. Add the dried chilli and spring onion and stir-fry for another minute. Add the soy sauce, sugar and white vinegar, and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Pour the cornflour mixture into the sauce and stir continuously until smooth and the sauce has thickened.

CHILLI OIL (GOCHUGILEUM)

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) vegetable oil 5 garlic cloves, halved lengthways 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced 1 leek, white part only, cut into thin strips 1 tablespoon dried chilli flakes

Return the chicken, fried garlic, ginger and leek to the wok, and stir in the peanuts. Mix until the chicken is nicely coated in the sauce, then transfer to a serving plate and serve immediately with steamed rice and a cold beer.

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S OY- M A R I N AT E D BARBECUED BEEF BULGOGI Korean BBQ is easy to fall for. The novelty of hands-on grilling over charcoal right at the dining table always makes for a fun dining experience. As soon as the meat is cooked, just pick it up and pop it straight into your mouth.

Bulgogi is a must for any Korean BBQ – the thinly sliced beef is marinated in a sweet soy sauce marinade that will caramelise as soon as it hits the grill. Imbued with the smoky flavour from the charcoal, it’s hard to beat.

Cut the beef in half lengthways into two long strips, then slice each half against the grain into 3 mm (⅛ in) thick slices. Combine the beef slices, onion, if using, and spring onion in a large bowl and set aside.

Serves 4–6

1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) beef tenderloin or rib eye (see Note) 1 onion, sliced (optional) 3 spring onions (scallions), cut into 5 cm (2 in) lengths Spicy dipping sauce (Ssamjang) (page 208), to serve MARINADE

5 garlic cloves, crushed 2 tablespoons caster (superfine) sugar 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 2 tablespoons mirin 1 tablespoon sesame oil 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

To make the marinade, put all the ingredients in a bowl and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Pour the marinade over the beef and, using your hands (wear food preparation gloves if necessary), mix until well combined. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to marinate in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour. Heat your barbecue to high, or set a chargrill pan over high heat. Working in batches, chargrill the beef for 1–2 minutes each side until caramelised. Serve the barbecued beef with the spicy dipping sauce and a big bowl of steamed rice. NOTE

If you freeze your beef for about 1 hour before slicing it, it will be much easier to cut thinly.

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BARBECUED BEEF SHORT RIBS GALBI Dubbed ‘The King of all Korean BBQ’, galbi is another must-have for any Korean BBQ gathering. The ingenious way of filleting the meat from the rib into a long thin strip of meat – but leaving the bone still attached – means it won’t take long to cook at all. It takes some practice to fillet the rib, so take your time and treat it with care. Trim any fat and silver skin from the ribs, then cut the beef between the ribs into individual pieces. Place a rib, bone side down, on a chopping board. Starting from one side of the rib, carefully tease the meat away from the bone with a very sharp knife without separating it completely. Leave one end of the meat still attached to the bone like a hinge. Open out the meat from the rib (like opening a book), and butterfly the meat part into a long, flat strip, about 5 mm (¼ in) thick. Repeat with the remaining rib pieces then place them in a large bowl. To make the marinade, combine all the ingredients in a food processor and blend to a purée. Pour the marinade over the ribs and mix well using your hands.

Serves 4–6

1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) beef short ribs Soy and wasabi dipping sauce (Ganjang wasabi) (page 210), to serve MARINADE

½ onion, peeled 1 Nashi or Asian pear, peeled and cored 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled and finely grated 2 tablespoons caster (superfine) sugar 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) mirin 2 tablespoons sesame oil ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Take a rib bone, roll the meat back around the bone into a scroll, then place it back in the bowl. Repeat with the remaining ribs, so they are sitting neat and tidy in the marinade. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and transfer to refrigerator to marinate for 2 hours, or preferably overnight. Take the ribs out of the refrigerator at least 1 hour prior to cooking to allow them to come to room temperature. Heat your barbecue to high, or set a chargrill pan over high heat. Place the rib pieces on the barbecue, unrolling them into long strips so they cook evenly. Grill the meat, turning occasionally, for 2–3 minutes or until slightly charred and caramelised on each side. Cut the meat into bite-sized chunks with a pair of kitchen scissors. Serve immediately with the soy and wasabi dipping sauce. NOTE

If you prefer, you can also wrap the meat in a cos (romaine) lettuce leaf with a little sliced raw garlic and a drizzle of Spicy dipping sauce (Ssamjang) (page 208), which is similar to Braised pork belly wraps (Bossam) (page 174).

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K F C 4 WAYS HURAIDEU CHIKIN

Serves 4

I love KFC so much, I could write a whole book about it! And I am not talking about Colonel Sanders and his eleven secret herbs and spices. I am talking about Korean fried chicken. When I first discovered Korean fried chicken, it was a revelation: the coating is flakey and crunchy, the skin is thin and crispy, and the meat is super juicy and tender. But wait, Koreans even smother their fried chicken with amazing sauces (and cheese powder!), taking the KFC game to a whole new level.

Cut the chicken wings into three parts: the meaty drumette, the wingette and the tip. Discard the tips or reserve them for another recipe. Put the chicken in a large bowl, add the salt, pepper and ginger and mix everything together well using your hands. Put the potato starch in another bowl and dredge the chicken pieces firmly in the starch until completely coated. Shake off any excess. If there is any starch left, dredge the chicken again until all the starch has been used. Set aside for 10 minutes. Heat about 5 cm (2 in) vegetable oil in a large heavy-based saucepan or Dutch oven until it reaches 165°C (330°F) when tested with a cooking thermometer. Working in batches, fry the chicken for 10–12 minutes until light golden brown. Use tongs to turn the wings over occasionally to stop them sticking together. Remove the chicken from the oil and transfer to a wire rack with paper towel underneath to catch the excess oil. Bring the oil temperature back to 165°C (330°F). Working in batches, fry the chicken a second time until is it deep golden brown and super crunchy, about 12–15 minutes. Remove and transfer to a wire rack with paper towel underneath to catch the excess oil.

1.5 kg (3 lb 5 oz) chicken wings, washed and patted dry ½ teaspoon salt, plus extra for seasoning ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 cm (½ in) piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped 180 g (6½ oz/1 cup) potato starch vegetable oil, for frying

Add the fried chicken to the wok and give it a quick stir to coat it in the sauce. Transfer to a serving plate, garnish with sesame seeds, and serve immediately. Alternatively, serve the fried chicken on its own with the sweet and spicy sauce on the side for dipping.


S W E E T A N D S P I CY ( YA N G N Y E O M )

If you are making the wasabi and spring onion version, make the glaze while the chicken is cooking. Combine the soy sauce, sugar, mirin, garlic and rice syrup in a medium saucepan and bring to the boil over medium–high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 2–3 minutes or until the sauce has thickened. Remove from the heat, add the sesame oil and wasabi paste and whisk until combined. 


1 tablespoon vegetable oil 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 1 tablespoon white vinegar 1 tablespoon Korean rice syrup (ssalyeot) or corn syrup, glucose or honey 2 tablespoons caster (superfine) sugar toasted sesame seeds, to garnish S N OW C H E E S E ( N U N K KO C H )

For the snow cheese variation, transfer the fried chicken to a large mixing bowl. Sprinkle over the cheese powder and toss the bowl a few times until the chicken is well coated. Transfer to a large serving plate, sprinkle with extra cheese powder, and serve immediately.


WA S A B I A N D S P R I N G O N I O N ( WA S A B I PA D A L )

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 55 g (2 oz/¼ cup) caster (superfine) sugar 2 tablespoons mirin 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 1 tablespoon Korean rice syrup (ssalyeot) or corn syrup, glucose or honey ½ teaspoon sesame oil 2 teaspoons wasabi paste 2 spring onions (scallions), thinly sliced

Place the fried chicken in a large mixing bowl and pour over 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) of the wasabi glaze. Toss in the bowl a few times until the chicken is well coated, adding a little more glaze if necessary. Transfer to a large serving plate and garnish with the spring onion. Serve immediately. NOTE

‘Snow cheese’ is a Korean cheddar cheese seasoning commonly used for fried chicken and noodle dishes. You can find it at Korean grocery stores or online.

20 g (¾ oz/¼ cup) Korean cheese powder or cheddar cheese powder, plus extra to serve (see Note)

Season the fried chicken generously with salt and serve immediately or try one of the variations below.
 While the chicken is cooking, make the sweet and spicy sauce. Heat the oil in a large non-stick frying pan or wok over medium–high heat. Add the garlic and stir-fry for 1 minute or until fragrant. Add the soy sauce, chilli paste, vinegar, rice syrup and sugar, and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 2–3 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened and reduced by half. 
›

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Original Wasabi and spring onion

Snow cheese

Sweet and spicy


B E E F M E AT B A L L SKEWERS TTEOK GALBI WANJA Originally a royal dish, tteok galbi wanja is now popular all over Korea. The name literally translates as ‘rice cake ribs’ as the traditional dish was made by cutting and mincing the beef, then forming it into rice cake shapes around the rib bones. Nowadays, it’s more commonly made as meatballs on a bamboo skewer, but it is still absolutely one of my favourite Korean street foods.

Serves 4

1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) beef rib or chuck steak (see Note) 75 g (2¾ oz/½ cup) plain (all-purpose) flour 2 tablespoons olive oil 125 g (4½ oz/½ cup) mayonnaise 1 garlic clove, crushed 1 tablespoon dill pickle juice MARINADE

Remove the meat from the bone using a sharp knife. Discard the bone then grind the meat using a meat grinder. If you are mincing by hand, cut the meat into thin strips first, then again crossways into smaller pieces. Rock the knife blade back and forth until the meat resembled a coarse paste. Transfer the beef to a mixing bowl and set aside. To make the marinade, combine all the ingredients in a bowl and mix well. Pour the marinade over the mince and, using your hands, knead the mince for about 3 minutes or until well combined and sticky. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to marinate in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours, or preferably overnight. Roll a heaped tablespoon of the mince into a golf ball-sized meatball. Put the flour in a bowl and dredge the meatball in flour, shaking off any excess. Transfer to a baking tray. Repeat until all the mince has been used. Heat the olive oil in a frying pan over medium heat. In small batches, fry the meatballs for 3–4 minutes until thoroughly cooked and slightly charred on the outside. Thread three to four meatballs onto bamboo skewers until all the meatballs have been used, then line them up on a baking tray. Heat the grill (broiler) setting of your oven to medium. Transfer the meatballs to the oven and grill for 10 minutes, turning once.

4 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons caster (superfine) sugar 2 tablespoons mirin 3 tablespoons grated Nashi or Asian pear, or Pink Lady apple ½ onion, peeled and finely diced 2 spring onions (scallions), finely sliced 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled and finely grated 1 tablespoon sesame oil ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon red chilli pepper powder 1 tablespoon Korean chilli paste (gochujang) EQUIPMENT

Bamboo skewers, pre-soaked in hot water for 10 minutes

Meanwhile, combine the mayonnaise, garlic and dill pickle juice in a small bowl and mix well. Remove the meatball skewers from oven, transfer to a serving plate, and drizzle with the mayonnaise. Serve immediately. NOTE

If you prefer, use minced (ground) beef and skip step one of the method.

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T O R N A D O P O TAT O HOT D O G STICKS HOEOLIGAMJA When East meets West, sometimes what you get is a hot dog wrapped in a spiral cut potato, battered, then deep-fried to a nice golden crisp. There’s no point in fighting it.

To make the batter, whisk the egg with 250 ml (8½ fl oz/1 cup) iced water in a bowl until combined. A little at a time, sprinkle the flour into the egg mixture, whisking continuously. Be careful not to over-whisk, as a few lumps of flour in the batter will give you nice crispy bits once fried. Pour the batter into a jug and refrigerate until ready to use. Wash the potatoes and pat them dry with paper towel. Using a potato spiral cutter, cut the potatoes into long spirals according to manufacturer’s instructions. Using an apple corer, punch a hole through the centre of the potatoes lengthways. Then cut each potato in half to make two spirals.

Makes 4

2 medium-sized floury potatoes, such as russets or colibans, skin on 4 hot dog sausages vegetable oil, for frying salt, for seasoning T E M P U R A B AT T E R

1 egg 150 g (5½ oz/1 cup) plain (all-purpose) flour, sifted EQUIPMENT

4 bamboo skewers, pre-soaked in hot water for 10 minutes

Insert one bamboo skewer lengthways through each sausage until the tip of the skewer comes out the other end. Thread each sausage through the hole of a potato spiral, then gently spread out the potato layers like an accordion and wrap them around the whole sausage. Secure the potato in place by piercing the top layer of potato with a skewer. Heat 5 cm (2 in) vegetable oil in a deep-fryer or large wok over medium–high heat until it reaches 190°C (375°F) when tested with a cooking thermometer. Give the batter a quick stir. Holding a potato skewer over a large container, pour some of the batter over the skewer until fully coated, allowing the excess to drip back into the container. Carefully lower the skewer into hot oil and flash-fry for 2 minutes, turning occasionally, until the potato is golden and crispy. Remove and transfer to a wire rack with paper towel underneath to catch the excess oil. Repeat with the remaining skewers. To serve, season the potato skewers with salt while they are still hot and serve immediately on their own or with sauces of your choice, such as ketchup, mayonnaise or mustard. NOTE

It is important that the oil is hot enough to flash-fry the potato quickly. If it is not, the hot dog will start to expand and the skin will split, causing the potato spiral to fall apart.

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STIR-FRIED S P I CY P O R K JEYUK BOKKEUM

Serves 4–6

Want to get your fork into some pork? This stir-fried spicy dish is loved by young and old. It’s a very easy recipe to prepare – and go ahead and cook extra to keep in the fridge for lunch or dinner the next day; this reheats like a dream.

1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) pork shoulder 1 onion, thinly sliced 3 spring onions (scallions), cut into 5 cm (2 in) lengths vegetable oil, for frying MARINADE

Put the pork in the freezer for about 1 hour to allow it to partially freeze and firm up, then slice the pork against the grain into 3 mm (⅛ in) thick slices. Combine the sliced pork, onion and spring onion in a large bowl and set aside. To make the marinade, combine all the ingredients in bowl and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Pour the marinade over the pork and, using your hands (wear food preparation gloves if necessary), rub the marinade into the meat until it is well coated. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to marinate in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour. Heat 2 tablespoons vegetable oil in a large frying pan or wok over high heat. Stir-fry the pork, in batches, for 3–4 minutes or until well browned and caramelised. Add a little more oil between batches if necessary. Serve the spicy pork with a big bowl of steamed rice. Alternatively, wrap it up in cos (romaine) lettuce leaves with perilla leaves and Spicy dipping sauce (Ssamjang) (page 208) and chow it down like san choy bao.

LITTLE KO R E A

135 g (5 oz/½ cup) Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 1 tablespoon Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 2 tablespoons rice (or white) vinegar 2 tablespoons caster (superfine) sugar 1 tablespoon Korean rice syrup (ssalyeot) or corn syrup, glucose or honey 2 tablespoons sesame oil 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped 5 cm (2 in) piece of ginger, peeled and finely grated

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S P I CY S T I R - F R I E D O CTOPUS NAKJI BOKKEUM Koreans love octopus, some even eat it raw (and still alive!). But don’t worry, we won’t go to that extreme – the baby octopus in this recipe is perfectly cooked in a gochujang hot sauce. This dish is very spicy, a perfect winter treat for those who like it hot.

To clean the octopus, make a cut between the head and the tentacles. Turn the head inside out and clean out all the innards. For the tentacles, cut them in half then trim off the eyes and the beak. Put them in a bowl, add the salt, then use your hands to rub the octopus for 2–3 minutes to clean the suction cups. Once tiny bubbles form on the suction cups, rinse the octopus under cold water two or three times, then drain and set aside. To make the marinade, combine all the ingredients in a bowl and mix until the sugar has dissolved. Add the marinade to the octopus and stir until the octopus is well coated. Set aside to marinate for 10 minutes. Heat the vegetable oil in a frying pan or wok over medium–high heat. Stir-fry the onion for 2 minutes or until soft and translucent. Add the marinated octopus, scraping all the marinade from the bowl into the pan. Stir-fry for another 3 minutes or until the octopus is just cooked through. Add the spring onion, stir-fry for another 30 seconds, then remove from the heat and transfer to a serving bowl. Garnish with sesame seeds and extra spring onion and serve immediately with steamed rice.

Serves 2–3

300 g (10½ oz) baby octopus (about 10–12) (see Notes) 1 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ½ onion, thinly sliced 2 spring onions (scallions), cut into 5 cm (2 in) lengths, plus extra thinly sliced onions, to garnish toasted sesame seeds, to garnish MARINADE

2 tablespoons Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 1 tablespoon Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 1 tablespoon Korean rice syrup (ssalyeot) or corn syrup, glucose or honey 2 tablespoons sesame oil 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped

NOTES

You can substitute octopus with squid, just cut them into bite-sized pieces and score them. It is very important not to overcook the octopus or it will be rubbery and chewy.

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S P I CY B A R B E C U E D PORK DAEJI BULGOGI Daeji bulgogi is a great alternative to the more common beef bulgogi on page 83. It uses pork marinated in a sweet and spicy marinade. For this dish, it is best to use pork that is a little bit fatty, such as pork belly or shoulder, as the fat will render and caramelise, turning into delicious smoky crispy bits.

To make the marinade, combine all the ingredients in a food processor and blend to a purée. Put the sliced pork in a large bowl and pour over the marinade. Using your hands, mix everything together until the pork is well coated. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to marinate in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. Heat your barbecue to high, or set a chargrill pan over high heat. Working in batches, grill the pork belly for 2–3 minutes or until caramelised on both sides. Serve immediately with steamed rice and some dishes from the Side dishes chapter (pages 30–55). Alternatively, serve it like Grilled barbecued pork belly (Samgyeopsal gui) (page 103) or Braised pork belly wraps (Bossam) (page 174) by wrapping the spicy barbecued pork in lettuce leaves.

LITTLE KO R E A

Serves 4–6

1.5 kg (3 lb 5 oz) skinless pork belly, cut into 3 mm (⅛ in) slices sesame oil, for greasing MARINADE

1 Nashi or Asian pear, cored ½ onion 5 garlic cloves, peeled 5 cm (2 in) piece of ginger, peeled 1 spring onion (scallion) 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 1 tablespoon Korean rice syrup (ssalyeot) or corn syrup, glucose or honey 1 tablespoon sesame oil 70 g (2½ oz/¼ cup) Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 2 tablespoons Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru)

100


GRILLED BARBECUED P ORK B E L LY SAMGYEOPSAL GUI If spicy food is not your thing, then this is a great alternative pork dish to the very hot Daeji bulgogi on page 100. This dish is perfect for a Korean BBQ dinner party – just set everything up at the dining table and ask everyone to cook the meat on the grill themselves. Don’t forget to throw some Bulgogi (page 83) and Galbi (page 84) on the barbecue too!

Set up a Korean barbecue grill plate on a portable gas stove in the centre of the dining table. Arrange all the fresh ingredients, pork belly and sauces in separate plates and place them next to the grill.

Serves 4–6

2 heads cos (romaine) lettuce, leaves washed and drained 100 g (3½ oz) packet perilla leaves (about 12–14) 6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 2 green chillies, thinly sliced 1.5 kg (3 lb 5 oz) skinless pork belly, cut into 3 mm (⅛ in) slices Spicy dipping sauce (Ssamjang) (page 208), to serve Salt and pepper dipping sauce (Gireumjang) (page 211), to serve sesame oil, for greasing

Heat the grill plate until it is smoking hot, then brush the hot plate with some sesame oil. Grill the pork belly on the hot plate for 2 minutes on each side, until cooked and slightly browned. Wrap one or two pieces of pork belly in lettuce and perilla leaves, then top with sliced garlic and chilli and your choice of sauces. NOTE

If you do not have a Korean barbecue grill plate, just grill the pork belly on the barbecue or in a chargrill pan, then serve as above.

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Sweet potato glass noodles

Japchae Chilled buckwheat noodle soup

Naengmyeon Korean mixed rice bowl

Bibimbap Kimchi fried rice

Kimchi bokkeum bap Festive noodle soup

Janchi guksu Sashimi rice bowl

Hoedeopbap Spicy cold buckwheat noodles

es p i c e R 0 1 ~

Bibim naengmyeon Spicy mixed noodles

Bibim guksu Korean sushi rolls

Gimbap Pan-fried spicy rice cakes

Tteokbokki


RICE & NO ODEL S

Rice is so central to Korean food culture that the word for cooked rice, bap, is pretty much synonymous with ‘meal’ or food in general. Koreans tend to favour a shorter-grain white rice that’s often a little on the sticky side. There’s a wide variety of noodles in Korea, made from a range of different ingredients including sweet potato, rice, wheat, buckwheat and cornstarch. Noodle dishes are referred to as guksu or myeon.


S W E E T P O TAT O GLASS NOODLES JAPCHAE Japchae has to be the most popular noodle dish in Korea. It is made with sweet potato glass noodles tossed together with beef strips and lots of vegetables. Some may mistakenly think of Japchae as a stir-fried noodle dish which can result in an unpleasant oil aroma and greasy mouth feel. The best way is to prepare it is like a salad – by tossing the noodles with the cooked ingredients. Japchae is traditionally served with rice, but I prefer to have it as a side dish to go with some grilled meat.

To make the dressing, whisk together all the ingredients in a small bowl until the sugar has dissolved. Cut the sweet potato starch noodles in half using a pair of kitchen scissors. Bring a saucepan of water to a rolling boil over high heat. Add the noodles and cook according to the packet instructions until soft and chewy. Drain the noodles and rinse under cold running water until chilled. Combine the noodles with 2 tablespoons of the dressing in a large bowl and mix well. Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a large non-stick frying pan or wok over medium heat. Add the noodles and stir-fry for 3–4 minutes or until the noodles are translucent. Return the noodles to the bowl. In the same pan, heat another tablespoon of oil, add the onion and spring onion and stir-fry for 1 minute, until the onion is a little translucent. Add the carrot and stir-fry for another minute, then transfer to the bowl with the noodles.

Serves 4

170 g (6 oz) sweet potato starch noodles (dangmyeon) vegetable oil, for frying 1 onion, thinly sliced 1 spring onion (scallion), cut into 5 cm (2 in) lengths 1 medium carrot, cut into thin matchsticks 4–5 dried shiitake mushrooms, soaked in warm water for 2–3 hours, cut into strips 110 g (4 oz) Soy-marinated barbecued beef (Bulgogi) (page 83), uncooked ½ quantity Seasoned English spinach (Sigeumchi muchim) (page 36) DRESSING

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 2 tablespoons sesame oil 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds

Add 1–2 teaspoons of oil to the same pan, add the mushrooms and bulgogi, and stir-fry for 2–3 minutes or until the beef has browned. Add to the noodles. Add the seasoned spinach to the noodle bowl, pour over the remaining dressing, and toss everything together with your hands. Taste and adjust the seasoning accordingly. Pile onto a large serving plate and serve warm.

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CHILLED B U C K W H E AT NOODLE SOUP NAENGMYEON

Serves 4

This dish is just the thing on a hot summer’s day. Naengmyeon is buckwheat noodles served in a bowl of chilled beef broth that is refreshingly tart and tangy. Traditionally, the long noodles would be eaten without being cut as they symbolised longevity of life and good health. So take a deep breath and have a good slurp! If you prefer your noodles with a bit of heat, check out the recipe for Bibim naengmyeon on page 124.

To make the beef broth, combine all the ingredients in a large stockpot. Add 3 litres (101 fl oz/12 cups) water and bring to the boil over high heat. Skim off any impurities that rise to the surface, then reduce the heat to medium–low. Cover with a lid (leaving it slightly ajar) and simmer for 1 hour or until the beef is tender. Remove the beef from the stock and allow the beef and stock to cool to room temperature. Wrap the beef in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for at least 4 hours, or preferably overnight. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve into a large airtight container. Add all the ingredients for the soup base and stir until the sugar has dissolved. The soup should taste sharp, tart and mildly sweet. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Seal the container with a lid, and transfer to the refrigerator to chill for at least 4 hours, or preferably overnight. To speed up the chilling process, you can place the stock in the freezer for 1–2 hours, until it becomes slushy but not frozen.

1 x 624 g (1 lb 6 oz) packet dried Naengmyeon buckwheat noodles 2 hard-boiled eggs, halved hot English mustard, to serve

Cook the buckwheat noodles according to the packet instructions. Prepare an ice bath while the noodles are cooking. Once cooked, drain the noodles and immediately plunge them into the iced water to stop the cooking process. Drain, and divide the noodles among four bowls.

BEEF BROTH

To each bowl, add some pickled cucumber and radish, a few slices of beef and half a boiled egg. Divide the chilled soup among the bowls. Serve cold with hot mustard.

300 g (10½ oz) beef brisket ½ onion, halved 1 green apple, halved 5 garlic cloves, peeled 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, thinly sliced 1 teaspoon black peppercorns 2 spring onions (scallions), white parts only 1 teaspoon salt

NOTE

If using dongchimi broth in the soup base, simply replace 500 ml (17 fl oz/2 cups) of the beef stock with the dongchimi broth and use less vinegar and salt in the soup. For this noodle dish, you can also add a few slices of Nashi or Asian pear if they are in season.

PICKLED CUCUMBER ( O I JA N G -A J J I )

1 Lebanese or Kirby (short) cucumber ¼ teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons caster (superfine) sugar 2 tablespoons white vinegar PICKLED RADISH (MUSAENGCHAE)

200 g (7 oz) Korean radish, peeled 
 ¼ teaspoon salt 2 teaspoons caster (superfine) sugar 2 tablespoons white vinegar

SOUP BASE

2 tablespoons soy sauce 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup) white vinegar 60 g (2 oz) caster (superfine) sugar 
 3 teaspoons salt 500 ml (17 fl oz/2 cups) Radish water kimchi (Dongchimi) broth (page 22) (optional; see Note)

To make the pickled cucumber, cut the cucumber in half lengthways then slice each half on an angle into 3 mm (⅛ in) thick slices. Transfer to a bowl, then add the salt and sugar. Toss to combine, leave to sit for 10 minutes, then add the vinegar and mix well. Refrigerate until ready to use. For the pickled radishes, thinly slice the radish then stack the slices up and cut into 2 cm (¾ in) wide strips. Transfer to a bowl, then add the salt and sugar. Toss to combine, leave to sit for 10 minutes, then add the vinegar and mix well. Refrigerate until ready to use. Take the beef out of the refrigerator and slice it thinly against the grain. ›

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CHILLED B U C K W H E AT NOODLE SOUP NAENGMYEON


KO R E A N M I X E D R I C E B OW L BIBIMBAP

Serves 4

Bibimbap literally means ‘mixed rice’. Typically, a bibimbap is put together by using all the leftover banchan (Korean side dishes) you have sitting in the fridge so you can add as much or as little of the toppings as you like. It’s one of Korea’s most famous dishes and it’s not hard to see why. The simplicity of the dish and the clean flavours from the seasoned vegetables makes it healthy, nourishing comfort food at its best.

Prepare all the vegetable toppings in advance. You can make them a day ahead and refrigerate until ready to use. Rinse the rice two or three times under cold running water to remove some of the starch. Cook the rice in a rice cooker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. To make the beef bulgogi, slice the beef into 5 mm (¼ in) thick strips and add them to a bowl with the soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil, garlic and sesame seeds. Mix until well combined, then set aside to marinate for 20 minutes. Heat the vegetable oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium–high heat. Fry the eggs, sunny side up, for about 2 minutes then remove and set aside. In the same pan, stir-fry the beef for 4–5 minutes, until browned. Remove from the heat and leave to cool to room temperature.

440 g (15½ oz/2 cups) short-grain rice 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 4 eggs Bibim sauce (Bibimjang) (page 204), to serve V E G E TA B L E T O P P I N G S

Seasoned soybean sprouts (Kongnamul muchim) (page 35) Seasoned English spinach (Sigeumchi muchim) (page 36) Sautéed zucchini (Hobak muchim) (page 34) Sautéed fernbrake (Gosari namul) (page 37) Sautéed bellflower root (Doraji namul) (page 38) BEEF BULGO GI

220 g (8 oz) beef rib eye or scotch fillet 1 tablespoon soy sauce 2 teaspoons caster (superfine) sugar 2 teaspoons sesame oil 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

To assemble, place 185 g (6½ oz/1 cup) cooked rice in each serving bowl. Arrange the vegetable toppings and beef over the rice, then place a fried egg on top. Serve with a big dollop of the bibim sauce on the side.

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KIMCHI FRIED RICE KIMCHI BOKKEUM BAP

Serves 2

Since you can usually throw kimchi fried rice together using leftovers it’s an amazingly easy, quick and economical dish – and still packs a big flavour punch. It’s a real favourite with uni students who are living on a low budget. Usually when I am feeling too lazy to cook, kimchi fried rice will come to the rescue.

Heat the vegetable oil in a large frying pan or wok over medium–high heat. Add the garlic and stir-fry for 1 minute until fragrant. Add the kimchi and stir-fry for another minute. Add the rice and use the back of a wooden spoon to break up any clumps. Add the kimchi juice and chilli paste and stir-fry for 3–4 minutes until well combined. Reduce the heat if the rice begins to stick to the bottom of the pan.

2 tablespoons vegetable oil 2 garlic cloves, crushed 150 g (5½ oz/1 cup) Cabbage kimchi (Baechu kimchi) (page 15), roughly chopped 500 g (1 lb 2 oz/2⅔ cups) cooked short-grain rice (see Notes) 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) kimchi juice 2 tablespoons Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 2 teaspoons sesame oil salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 2 fried eggs, sunny-side up, to serve

Add the sesame oil and season with salt and pepper to taste. Add half the spring onion, mix well, then divide the fried rice between two rice bowls. Garnish with the remaining spring onion and top each bowl with a fried egg. Serve immediately. NOTES

When making fried rice, it is best to cook the rice a day ahead then refrigerate overnight to draw out any excess moisture. That way, the rice will be drier and easier to cook as opposed to freshly cooked rice, which often turns soggy when you try to stir-fry it. You can also make a fancy version of this kimchi fried rice by adding thin slices of pork belly, bacon or even SPAM.

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FESTIVE NOODLE SOUP JANCHI GUKSU Janchi guksu means ‘banquet dish’ and traditionally it’s prepared for special occasions like holidays, wedding feasts and birthday parties. But every day can be a holiday when you’ve got a big bowl of festive noodles to warm the body and soul. Cut the zucchini in half lengthways, then cut each half on an angle into thin 3 mm  (⅛ in) slices. Combine the sliced zucchini and salt in a bowl, mix well, and set aside for 10 minutes. Use your hands to squeeze out as much liquid as possible from  the zucchini. Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a frying pan over medium heat and sauté the zucchini for 1–2 minutes, until softened. Transfer to a plate.

Serves 4

1 zucchini (courgette) 1 teaspoon salt, plus extra for sautéing 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) vegetable oil 1 bunch English spinach, rinsed and cut into 5 cm (2 in) lengths 2 eggs, beaten Anchovy and kelp stock (Dashima myeolchi yuksu) (page 139) 450 g (1 lb) thin wheat flour noodles (somyeon) 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds Spicy soy and spring onion sauce (Yangnyeomjang) (page 209), to serve

Heat another tablespoon of oil in the same frying pan and cook the spinach for 1 minute, until softened. Season to taste with salt and stir-fry for another minute, then transfer to the plate with the zucchini. Heat the remaining oil in the same frying pan, add the beaten egg, then swirl the pan around to spread the egg into a thin layer. Fry for 2 minutes, then flip the omelette over and fry for another minute or until lightly golden. Transfer the omelette to a chopping board and cut into thin strips. Transfer to the plate with the spinach and zucchini. Bring the anchovy and kelp stock to a simmer over low heat, ready for serving. Prepare a large bowl of iced water and set aside. Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil over high heat and cook the wheat flour noodles according to the packet instructions. Drain, then immediately refresh in the iced water to stop the cooking process. Leave to chill for 2–3 minutes. Briefly stir the noodles around in the water to loosen them up, then drain. Divide the noodles among four serving bowls. Pour ladles of hot stock into each bowl, then top the noodles with the zucchini, spinach and egg. Garnish with sesame seeds and serve with spicy soy and spring onion sauce on the side.

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SASHIMI RICE B OW L HOEDEOPBAP

Serves 2

This sashimi rice bowl is the perfect lunch for a summer’s day when it’s too hot to eat a cooked meal. There’s very little you need to do with this dish, simply serve the fresh salad and raw sashimi on a bed of steamed rice and call it done.

Cook the rice in a rice cooker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Slice the salmon into 5 mm (¼ in) thick slices, then wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve.

220 g (8 oz/1 cup) short-grain rice (see Notes) 220 g (8 oz) fresh sashimi-grade salmon 1 carrot, cut into thin matchsticks ½ cos (romaine) lettuce, thinly shredded ¼ red onion, thinly sliced 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced toasted sesame seeds, to garnish Bibim sauce (Bibimjang) (page 204), to serve

To assemble, divide the rice between two serving bowls. Top with the carrot, lettuce and onion, and then place the salmon in the centre. Garnish with the spring onion and sesame seeds, and serve with bibim sauce on the side. NOTES

It is difficult to cook a small quantity of rice in a rice cooker. The 220 g (8 oz/1 cup) of rice in this recipe will yield about 555–740 g (1 lb 4 oz–1 lb 10 oz/3–4 cups) cooked rice. Store the leftover rice in the refrigerator and use it to make Kimchi fried rice (Kimchi bokkeum bap) (page 117). Instead of bibim sauce, you can serve this dish with Spicy soy and spring onion sauce (Yangnyeomjang) (page 209).

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S P I CY C O L D B U C K W H E AT NOODLES BIBIM NAENGMYEON

Serves 4

This is the spicy version of Naengmyeon (page 110). Instead of a broth, Bibim naengmyeon is served with a spicy gochujang sauce. Did you know that eating spicy food will make you perspire, which will help cool your body down? This dish is surprisingly refreshing on a hot day.

To make the beef broth, combine all the ingredients in a large stockpot. Add 3 litres (101 fl oz/12 cups) water and bring to the boil over high heat. Skim off any impurities that rise to the surface, then reduce the heat to medium–low. Cover with a lid (leaving it slightly ajar), and simmer for 1 hour, until the beef is tender. Remove the beef from the stock and set aside to cool to room temperature. Wrap the beef in plastic wrap and chill in refrigerator for at least 4 hours, or preferably overnight. Strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve into a large airtight container. Reserve 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) of the broth to make the sauce. You can discard the rest of the broth or keep it to make Chilled buckwheat noodle soup (Naengmyeon) (page 110). To make the spicy sauce, combine all the ingredients in a food processor and blend to a fine purée. Refrigerate until needed. Take the beef out of the refrigerator and slice it thinly against the grain. Cook the noodles according to the packet instructions. Prepare an ice bath while the noodles are cooking. Once cooked, drain the noodles and immediately plunge them into the iced water to stop the cooking process. Drain, and place the noodles in a bowl. Add the spicy sauce and toss until all the noodles are well coated. Divide the noodles among four serving bowls and top each with some pickled cucumber and radish, a few slices of beef and half a boiled egg. Sprinkle sesame seeds over the top and serve.

LITTLE KO R E A

1 x 624 g (1 lb 6 oz) packet dried Naengmyeon buckwheat noodles Pickled cucumber (Oijang-ajji) (page 110), to serve Pickled radish (Musaengchae) (page 110), to serve 2 hard-boiled eggs, halved and chilled toasted sesame seeds, to garnish BEEF BROTH

300 g (10½ oz) beef brisket ½ onion, halved 1 green apple, halved 5 garlic cloves, peeled 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, thinly sliced 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns 2 spring onions (scallions), white parts only 1 teaspoon salt S P I CY S A U C E

½ Nashi or Asian pear, cored ½ onion, peeled 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) reserved beef broth 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 20 g (¾ oz/¼ cup) Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 2 tablespoons Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 1 tablespoon fish sauce 2 tablespoons white vinegar 2 teaspoons sesame oil

124


S P I CY M I X E D NOODLES BIBIM GUKSU

Serves 2

Same same, but different – this dish is very similar to Bibim naengmyeon (page 124), but uses long, thin wheat noodles instead of buckwheat noodles and is tossed together with fewer ingredients. When you need to make a big bowl of noodles to serve an army at a dinner party, this dish is perfect.

To make the spicy sauce, combine all the ingredients in a bowl and mix until the sugar has dissolved. Refrigerate until ready to use. Prepare a large bowl of iced water and set aside. Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil over high heat. Cook the wheat flour noodles according to the packet instructions. Drain, then immediately refresh the noodles in the iced water to stop the cooking process. Leave to chill for 2–3 minutes. Briefly stir the noodles around in the water to loosen them up, then drain. Transfer the noodles to a large bowl, add the kimchi and spicy sauce and mix until the noodles are well coated in the sauce. Divide the noodles between two serving bowls. Top with the cucumber, half a hard-boiled egg, and sprinkle with sesame seeds to garnish. Serve immediately.

200 g (7 oz) thin wheat flour noodles (somyeon) 75 g (2¾ oz/½ cup) Cabbage kimchi (Baechu kimchi) (page 15), finely chopped ½ Lebanese or Kirby (short) cucumber, cut into matchsticks 1 hard-boiled egg, halved toasted sesame seeds, to garnish S P I CY S A U C E

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) kimchi juice 2 tablespoons Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 2 teaspoons sesame oil 2 teaspoons white vinegar 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds

NOTE

Typically, Bibim guksu is a vegetarian dish. You can make it more substantial by adding lettuce leaves, thinly sliced carrot or shredded cabbage.

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KO R E A N S U S H I ROLLS GIMBAP

Serves 6–8

Gimbap is the Korean take on a sushi roll. They’re not meant to be fancy, more something you would take to a picnic or eat as a quick snack. Sometimes, you can even find street-food vendors selling bite-sized gimbap. The cooked rice used in gimbap is usually plain and not seasoned, but I do prefer to add a hint of rice vinegar to make it a littler tastier.

Cook the rice in a rice cooker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. While the rice is cooking, combine the rice vinegar, sugar and a pinch of salt in a small saucepan and stir over low heat until the sugar has dissolved. Set aside. Once the rice is cooked, spread it out on a baking tray, sprinkle with the rice vinegar mixture and leave to cool to room temperature. Cut the cucumber in half lengthways and use a teaspoon to scrape out the seeds. Cut each half lengthways into 5 mm (¼ in) thick strips and set aside.

440 g (15½ oz/2 cups) short-grain rice 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) rice vinegar 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar salt, to taste 1 Lebanese or Kirby (short) cucumber 1 bunch English spinach, roots trimmed 2 teaspoons sesame oil 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vegetable oil 5 nori (seaweed) sheets 5 strips of pre-cut yellow pickled radish (danmuji) (see Notes) 5 strips of pre-cut barbecued gimbap ham (see Notes) 5 strips of pre-cut seasoned burdock root (see Notes) mayonnaise, soy sauce and wasabi, to serve

Bring a saucepan of water to a rolling boil over medium–high heat. Add the spinach and par-boil for 1 minute. Drain and refresh the spinach under cold running water, then squeeze out as much water as possible using your hands, and place the spinach in a bowl. Season with the sesame oil and a pinch of salt, and mix well. Set aside. Beat the eggs and a pinch of salt in a small bowl. Heat the vegetable oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium–low heat and fry the egg for 2–3 minutes. Once the bottom has set, flip the omelette over and cook for 1 minute on the other side. Once cooked, transfer the omelette to a chopping board and slice into 1 cm (½ in) thick strips. To assemble, place a nori sheet, shiny side down and with the longer side facing you, on a sushi-rolling bamboo mat. Spread about 185 g (6½ oz/1 cup) rice evenly over the nori, leaving a 4 cm (1½ in) edge at the top of the nori sheet. Place one or two strips each of the cucumber, egg, radish, ham and burdock root along the edge that is closest to you, and top with a few spinach leaves. Be careful not to overfill your sushi roll, or you will have trouble rolling it. ›

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Lift the edge of the bamboo mat that is closest to you and roll the nori over the filling away from you. Apply firm pressure to the roll and use your fingers to tuck the filling in as you go. Brush the top edge of the seaweed with a little water, then finish rolling to seal the sushi roll tightly. Repeat with the remaining ingredients to make five rolls. Cut each roll into 2 cm (ž in) thick pieces and serve with mayonnaise, soy sauce or wasabi on the side. NOTE

Yellow pickled radish comes in pre-cut strips or one large chunk. If it is a big chunk, just cut it into 5 mm (Âź in) thick strips. Barbecued gimbap ham, or smoked fish ham, is commonly used for Korean sushi rolls. You can substitute it with smoked ham or even SPAM. Seasoned burdock root, yellow pickled radish and barbecued gimbap ham are all available from Korean grocery stores.

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PA N - F R I E D S P I CY R I C E CA K E S TTEOKBOKKI You will find tteokbokki on almost every corner in Korea, as the chewy rice cakes are a hugely popular street food. Although tteokbokki is usually served in a spicy chilli sauce with fish cakes and other ingredients, I personally prefer the dry version that’s made by pan-frying the rice cakes to a nice caramelised crisp. The flavour is intensified after frying and the crispy–chewy rice cake is utterly satisfying, especially on a cold day.

Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil over medium–high heat. Add the rice cakes and cook for 3 minutes or until soft. Drain, then transfer the rice cakes to a large bowl and drizzle with 1 tablespoon olive oil. Mix well to stop them sticking together, then set aside.

Serves 4

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) packet frozen Korean tubular rice cakes (garaetteok) 1½ tablespoons olive oil 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 70 g (2½ oz/¼ cup) Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 2 teaspoons sesame oil pinch of freshly ground black pepper 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced pinch of toasted sesame seeds

Combine the garlic, chilli flakes, chilli paste, soy sauce, sugar, sesame oil and black pepper in a small bowl, and mix well. Pour over the rice cakes and stir until they are well coated in the marinade. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to marinate at room temperature for at least 1 hour. Heat the remaining olive oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium–high heat. Working in small batches, fry the rice cakes for 2–3 minutes until they are crispy and slightly charred. Turn the rice cakes frequently so they don’t stick to the pan. Toss in the spring onion and sesame seeds, give it a quick stir, then dish up. NOTE

You can also add thin slices of fish cakes to the dish.

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S P U O S

S W STE

s e p i c e R 7 ~

Soybean sprout soup

Kongnamul guk Seaweed and beef soup

Miyeok guk Potato and dumpling soup

Sujebi Fermented soybean stew

Doenjang jjigae Basic kimchi stew

Kimchi jjigae Pork rib kimchi stew

Daeji galbi kimchi jjigae Spicy silken tofu hotpot

Sundubu jjigae


SOUPS & STEWS

In so many cultures, a hearty soup is a comforting remedy when you’re not feeling well or when you need to beat the winter chills. Korea is no exception, with a delicious array of bold, nourishing soups to cure what ails you. Koreans also love their stews, especially their spicy one-pot wonder hotpots. A hotpot is a communal affair where everyone just digs in and fishes out all the delicious goodies. The best possible way to bring friends together.


S OY B E A N SPROUT SOUP KONGNAMUL GUK

Serves 4

Kongnamul guk is the epitome of home-cooked comfort food. This is an everyday soup and most Korean households would normally serve it as part of a simple meal. Making this dish isn’t rocket science, but be careful not to overcook the sprouts so they retain their crunch. You can also add some gochugaru (Korean chilli flakes) to spice thing up a little.

First, prepare the anchovy and kelp stock. Wipe the kelp with a wet paper towel to remove any dirt then place it in a large saucepan with the anchovies. Add 1.5 litres (51 fl oz/6 cups) water and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium–low and simmer for 10 minutes. Remove the kelp and discard it to prevent the stock becoming too salty. Simmer the anchovies for a further 10 minutes, then drain through a fine-mesh sieve into a clean saucepan. Discard the anchovies.

250 g (9 oz) soybean sprouts 1 garlic clove, finely chopped 2 tablespoons fish sauce
 salt, to taste 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 2 bird’s eye chillies, thinly sliced A N C H OV Y A N D K E L P S TO C K ( DA S H I M A MYEOLCHI YUKSU)

10 g (¼ oz) dried kelp (about 5–6 small pieces) 30 g (1 oz) medium dried anchovies (about 20)

Bring the stock to the boil over high heat. Rinse the bean sprouts and discard any spoiled sprouts. Add to the stock, cover with a lid (see Note) and reduce the heat to medium. Cook for 10 minutes. Add the garlic, fish sauce and season to taste with salt. Simmer for a further 5 minutes. Ladle the bean sprouts and broth into individual bowls and garnish with spring onion and chilli. Serve hot. NOTE

When boiling the soybean sprouts, it is very important to keep the lid on the whole time without lifting it, otherwise the soup will have an unpleasant aftertaste. If the soup starts to boil over, just reduce the heat.

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S E AW E E D A N D B E E F SOUP MIYEOK GUK Miyeok seaweed – called wakame in Japanese cooking – is packed with umami and nutrients. This soup is associated with birth in Korean culture; it’s usually eaten on birthdays and is traditionally made for new mums to replenish the body.

Serves 4–6

40 g (1½ oz/1 cup) dried wakame seaweed 150 g (5½ oz) gravy beef, brisket or shank, thinly sliced 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons soy sauce

Soak the dried seaweed in a large bowl of cold water for 30 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold running water two or three times, rubbing the seaweed with your hands to remove any excess salt. Drain and squeeze out as much water as possible. You should have about 120 g (4½ oz/3 cups) seaweed once it has been rehydrated. Cut the seaweed into bite-sized pieces and set aside. Combine the sliced beef and 2.5 litres (85 fl oz/10 cups) water in a large stockpot and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Skim off any impurities that rise to the surface. Reduce the heat to medium–low, cover with lid (left slightly ajar) and simmer for 30 minutes. Add the chopped seaweed, garlic and soy sauce and simmer for a further 10 minutes, until the beef is tender. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary.

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P O TAT O A N D DUMPLING SOUP SUJEBI I call this the minestrone of Korea. Sujebi is a comforting and wholesome soup, filled with potatoes and hand-torn dumplings, that’s perfect for cold weather. The dumpling noodles are soft and chewy, and the broth is rich in umami flavour. It’s a big warm hug in a bowl.

To make the dumpling dough, put the flour in a large bowl and make a well in the centre. Add the remaining ingredients and, using a fork, slowly bring everything together to form a soft dough. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface and knead for at least 5 minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic. Form the dough into a ball and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate until ready to use. To make the soup, peel the potatoes and cut into 1 cm (½ in) cubes. Combine the potato and stock in a large saucepan and bring to the boil over medium–high heat. Unwrap the dough and, holding it in one hand, pinch and stretch a small piece of dough from the ball until you have a small 3–4 cm (1¼–1½ in) piece. Tear it off and drop it into the boiling stock. Repeat with the remaining dough.

Serves 4

Cabbage kimchi (Baechu kimchi) (page 15), to serve DUMPLING DOUGH

300 g (10½ oz/2 cups) plain (all-purpose) flour, plus extra for dusting 1 egg 1 tablespoon vegetable oil ½ teaspoon salt SOUP

2 floury potatoes, such as russets or colibans Anchovy and kelp stock (Dashima myeolchi yuksu) (page 139) 1 tablespoon fish sauce 2 spring onions (scallions), cut into 5 cm (2 in) lengths

Cook for 2–3 minutes, stirring occasionally. The dumplings are cooked when they float to the surface. Season with the fish sauce, add the spring onion and mix well. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Ladle the soup into individual bowls and serve hot with the cabbage kimchi.

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FERMENTED S OY B E A N S T E W DOENJANG JJIGAE

Serves 2

Doenjang jjigae is a deliciously funky Korean stew made with fermented soybean paste that never fails to please. Often regarded as the ultimate in comfort food, Korean men, especially of the older generations, swear by this dish. The fermented soybean paste gives the stew a strong earthy flavour a little like miso, which the tofu, enoki mushrooms and zucchini soak up like champs. Top and tail the zucchini then cut them in half lengthways. Slice into 1 cm (½ in) thick slices. Trim the roots off the enoki mushrooms and brush off any dirt. Set aside.

2 zucchini (courgettes) 100 g (3½ oz) enoki mushrooms 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cups) Anchovy and kelp stock (Dashima myeolchi yuksu) (page 139) (see Note) 160 g (5½ oz) Korean fermented soybean paste (doenjang) 2 teaspoons Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 150 g (5½ oz) medium–firm tofu, cut into 2 cm (¾ in) cubes 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced

Pour the anchovy and kelp stock into a Korean stone bowl pot (dolsot) or claypot and bring to a simmer over medium–high heat. Put the soybean paste in a fine-mesh sieve and use the back of a spoon to push the paste through the mesh into the stock. Stir until the paste has dissolved. Add the chilli flakes, zucchini and tofu and bring to the boil for 5 minutes or until the zucchini is soft. Add the enoki mushrooms and spring onion, and boil for another minute. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Serve the stew bubbling away in the pot, with steamed rice on the side. NOTE

You will only need 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cups) of the stock for this recipe, so reserve the rest for other recipes in this chapter.

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BASIC KIMCHI STEW KIMCHI JJIGAE

Serves 2

After your batch of kimchi has been sitting in the refrigerator for months and has started to taste sour, it has reached its prime stage – it’s now perfect to use in kimchi stew. This recipe is simple to make and always hits the spot. If you’d like a more substantial version, try the Pork rib kimchi stew on page 150.

Heat the oil in a Korean stone bowl pot (dolsot) or claypot over medium–high heat. Add the kimchi and garlic and fry for 2–3 minutes, until softened. Add the kimchi juice, chilli flakes and fish sauce, then pour in 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cups) water. Stir, and bring to the boil.

1 tablespoon vegetable oil 300 g (10½ oz/2 cups) Cabbage kimchi (Baechu kimchi) (page 15), roughly chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) kimchi juice 2 tablespoons Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 1 tablespoon fish sauce 150 g (5½ oz) firm tofu, cut into 2 cm (¾ in) cubes

Add the tofu, cover with a lid, and reduce the heat to medium–low. Simmer for 10 minutes, then taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Serve the stew still bubbling away in the pot, with steamed rice on the side. NOTE

You can make a more substantial kimchi stew by adding thin slices of pork belly or seafood, such as calamari rings or prawns (shrimp).

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PORK RIB KIMCHI STEW DAEJI GALBI KIMCHI JJIGAE The pork ribs in this recipe add a fantastic depth of flavour to the Basic kimchi stew (page 149). The longer you simmer the stew, the more tender those ribs will get.

Cut the pork between the ribs into bite-sized pieces and soak in a bowl of cold water for 1 hour. Transfer the ribs to a large saucepan, cover with water and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Boil for 3 minutes, then drain and rinse the ribs under cold running water to remove any impurities. Set aside. Heat the oil in a Korean stone bowl pot (dolsot) or claypot over medium–high heat and fry the kimchi and garlic for 2–3 minutes, until softened. Add the kimchi juice, chilli flakes and fish sauce, then pour in 1 litre (34 fl oz/4 cups) water. Stir, and bring to the boil.

Serves 2

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) pork short ribs 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 300 g (10½ oz/2 cups) Cabbage kimchi (Baechu kimchi) (page 15), roughly chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons kimchi juice 2 tablespoons Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 2 tablespoons fish sauce 150 g (5½ oz) firm tofu, cut into 2 cm (¾ in) cubes

Add the pork ribs, stir to mix well, then reduce the heat to low and simmer, covered, for 1 hour, until pork is tender. Add the tofu and simmer for another 10 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary. Serve the stew still bubbling away in the pot, with steamed rice on the side.

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S P I CY S I L K E N TOFU HOTP OT SUNDUBU JJIGAE

Serves 2

There are few things in this world more inviting than hot pot filled with seafood and silken tofu, bubbling away in a red-hot spicy soup. I just love the wonderful play of textures, with the silky smooth tofu, springy bite of the seafood and the soft zucchini.

Top and tail the zucchini, cut in half lengthways, then cut into 1 cm (½ in) thick slices. Trim the roots off the enoki mushrooms and brush off any dirt. Set aside. Bring the stock to the boil in a Korean stone bowl pot (dolsot) or claypot over medium–high heat. Add the chilli flakes and fish sauce, and stir to mix well. Add the zucchini and mixed seafood and boil for 3 minutes, until the zucchini has softened slightly. Add the silken tofu and use a spoon to break it into smaller pieces. Reduce the heat to medium–low and simmer for 2 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasoning if necessary, adding more chilli flakes if you want the stew extra hot!

1 zucchini (courgette) 100 g (3½ oz) enoki mushrooms
 300 ml (10 fl oz) Anchovy and kelp stock (Dashima myeolchi yuksu) (page 139) 20 g (¾ oz/¼ cup) Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru), or to taste 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) fish sauce 200 g (7 oz) mixed seafood (prawns [shrimp], scallops, mussels, calamari) 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) silken tofu 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1 egg

Remove from the heat, add the spring onion and sesame oil and gently stir to combine. Gently crack the egg into the centre of the pot and serve the stew while it is still bubbling. At the table, break the yolk with chopsticks and stir it into the soup, then dig in. NOTE

You will only need 300 ml (10 fl oz) of the stock for this recipe, so reserve the rest for other recipes in this chapter.

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Braised flounder with radish

Gajami mu jorim Braised tofu

Dubu jorim

D E S AI

BR AMED STE s e p i c e R 9 ~

Steamed eggs

Gyeran jjim Shredded soy-braised beef

Jang jorim Soy-braised chicken wings

Dak nalgi jorim Braised beef short ribs

Galbi jjim Soy-braised potatoes

Gamja jorim Braised pork belly wraps

Bossam Spicy chicken and potato stew

Dak tori tang


BRAISED & STEAMED

Jjim describes Korean dishes that have been steamed or braised. Traditionally, jjim referred to dishes cooked in an earthenware steamer called a siru, but these days the term is more broadly used. These dishes generally involve a protein (tofu, beef, chicken, seafood) that is marinated in a flavoursome sauce, then simmered with some liquid to steam or braise the ingredients.


BRAISED FLOUNDER WITH RADISH GAJAMI MU JORIM Braised fish is very popular in Korean cuisine, and this recipe can be made with just about any fish. I’ve used flounder here, but mackerel is the more traditional choice. The fishy flavour of mackerel can be a little too strong for some (it’s very bony, too!) and the smell can be quite pungent and linger in the house for days after cooking. But if you love a nice intense fish flavour, give the mackerel a go!

Serves 2


1 whole flounder, scaled and gutted (ask your fishmonger to do this for you) (see Notes) 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) Korean radish, peeled (see Notes) Spicy soy and spring onion sauce (Yangnyeomjang) (page 209) 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced

Wash the flounder and pat dry with paper towel. Set on a chopping board and make three even incisions across the top side of the fish. Set aside. Slice the radish into 2 cm (¾ in) thick wedges and spread them out evenly in a widebased frying pan. Mix the spicy soy and spring onion sauce with 2 tablespoons water in a jug, then pour half of the sauce evenly over the radish. Scatter over the sliced ginger, then lay the fish on top. Pour the remaining sauce over the fish. Place the pan over high heat, cover with a lid and bring the sauce to the boil. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 20–30 minutes, basting the fish occasionally with the sauce. It is ready when the radish has softened and the fish is cooked. Garnish with sliced spring onion and serve immediately, either straight from the frying pan or on a serving platter with rice, kimchi and some lettuce leaves. NOTES

Radish is called mu in Korean, which is just like daikon in Japanese. You can find it in any Asian grocery store. Instead of flounder, you can use other firm-fleshed fish like snapper, barramundi or mackerel.

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BRAISED TOFU DUBU JORIM

Serves 2

Tofu is basically a tasty sponge for delicious flavours, with the added bonus of being high in protein. There are many ways to cook tofu, but my favourite is to braise it so it can soak up all the flavourful spicy sauce. This dish is equally good served hot, cold or at room temperature.

300 g (3½ oz) semi-firm tofu, drained Spicy soy and spring onion sauce (Yangnyeomjang) (page 209)

Pat the tofu dry with paper towel and cut into 5 cm (2 in) squares that are 2 cm (¾ in) thick. Place the tofu in an even layer in a wide-based frying pan or clay pot. Pour the sauce over the tofu and toss gently until well coated. Place the pan over medium–high heat, cover with a lid and braise the tofu for about 12–15 minutes or until heated through. Baste the tofu occasionally with the sauce. Serve straight from the pan or transfer to a serving plate. Pair with steamed rice and a few dishes from the Side dishes chapter (pages 30–55). NOTE

This braised tofu is perfect for the winter months. In summer, simply drizzle the sauce over fresh, chilled tofu and serve.

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STEAMED EGGS GYERAN JJIM

Serves 2

This recipe may seem very simple at first glance, but there is a bit of an art to perfecting these savoury steamed eggs. When perfectly cooked, the eggs should be as delicate as soft curd with a silky smooth texture that melts in the mouth.

Bring a saucepan of water to a simmer over medium heat. Set a steamer basket over the pan.

3 eggs 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup) Anchovy and kelp stock (Dashima myeolchi yuksu) (page 139), chilled 1 tablespoon soy sauce ½ teaspoon sesame oil pinch of salt 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced

Combine the eggs, anchovy stock, soy sauce, sesame oil and salt in a bowl, and whisk until just combined. Try not to fluff up the mixture too much so you get a smooth, custardy egg when cooked. Pour the egg mixture into a heatproof serving bowl. Sprinkle half the spring onion over the top and place the bowl in the steamer basket. Cover, and steam for about 15 minutes or until the egg is just set. It should have the texture of jelly and wobble when you shake the bowl gently. Carefully remove the bowl from the steamer and leave to rest for 5 minutes. Sprinkle the remaining spring onion on top and serve warm. NOTE

This simple steamed egg dish is a staple in many Korean households, as well as other variations, with diced prawns (shrimp), crab meat or shiitake mushrooms.

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SHREDDED S OY- B R A I S E D B E E F JANG JORIM This soy-braised beef dish is sweet, salty and garlicky with a hint of spicy kick from the green chillies. It is one of the most beloved banchan (Korean side dishes) to put in a lunchbox. Sometimes I will add hard-boiled eggs to the braise to soak up some of the flavour – they make best snack.

Serves 4

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) gravy beef (see Note) 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup) soy sauce 1 tablespoon mirin 75 g (2¾ oz) caster (superfine) sugar 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns 10–12 garlic cloves, peeled 6–8 large green chillies

Cut the beef into 5–6 cm (2–2½ in) chunks against the grain. Transfer the meat to a large saucepan and fill with enough water to cover. Bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Skim off any impurities that rise to the surface, then reduce the heat to low, cover the pan, and simmer for 1 hour. Test the beef by piercing it with a fork. It should go through with a little resistance. Add the remaining ingredients except the chillies. Bring to the boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to low, remove the lid and simmer for 30 minutes. Meanwhile, cut the chillies in half lengthways and remove the seeds and membranes. Add the chillies to the pot and simmer for a further 15 minutes or until the beef is tender. By now, a fork should easily pierce the meat and the liquid should have reduced to one-third of its original volume. Remove from the heat and, using two forks, shred the meat into bite-sized chunks so it soaks up the sauce. Leave the beef to cool to room temperature, then transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 1 week. Serve the braised beef either chilled, straight from the refrigerator, or reheated in the microwave for 20–30 seconds. It goes well with simple steamed rice. NOTE

You can substitute gravy beef for brisket or shank. The longer the beef mixture sits in the refrigerator, the more robust the flavours will become.

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S OY- B R A I S E D CHICKEN WINGS DAK NALGI JORIM

Serves 2

This is a dish loved by all. It’s especially popular with children and it’s a great addition to a school lunchbox. Whenever I make it, I like to double the quantity and keep the leftovers in the fridge – that way I have lunch or dinner the next day sorted. You just reheat the wings and drizzle that sweet and savoury sauce over some steamed rice.

Using a sharp knife, cut the chicken wings into three parts: the meaty drumette, the wingette and the tip. Save the wing tips for another recipe.

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) chicken wings 100 ml (3½ fl oz) soy sauce 1 tablespoon mirin 55 g (2 oz/¼ cup) caster (superfine) sugar 5 garlic cloves, crushed 1 tablespoon cornflour (cornstarch), mixed with 2 tablespoons water toasted sesame seeds, to garnish 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced

Put the chicken pieces in a large saucepan and fill with 500 ml (17 fl oz/2 cups) water. Add the soy sauce, mirin, sugar and garlic and bring to the boil over medium–high heat. Reduce the heat to low, cover with a lid, leaving it slightly ajar, then simmer for about 1 hour or until the chicken is tender and the skin is soft, like jelly. Pour the cornflour mixture into the sauce and stir gently to thicken. Transfer the chicken to a serving bowl, pour over the sauce and garnish with sesame seeds and spring onion. Serve immediately with steamed rice.

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BRAISED BEEF SHORT RIBS GALBI JJIM

Serves 4

In Korea, this hearty dish is typically served on traditional holidays and special occasions, especially during Chuseok (the mid-autumn harvest festival). The slow braise brings out all of the flavours of the ribs and results in super-tender meat. The carrot, radish and potato all soften nicely in the rich, flavourful sauce.

Cut the beef between the ribs into individual pieces and transfer to a large bowl. Soak the ribs in cold water for 10 minutes, then change the water and soak again. Repeat this process a few more times until the water is clear. Drain, then put the ribs in a large saucepan and cover with water. Boil over high heat for 10 minutes, then drain. Wash the ribs again under cold running water to remove any impurities. Rinse the saucepan and return the ribs to it. Add 1.5 litres (51 fl oz/6 cups) water, then all the remaining ingredients. Cover and bring to the boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to low, remove the lid and simmer for 1 hour or until the beef is tender. Test the beef by piercing it with a fork. It should go through with very little resistance.

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) beef short ribs 3 garlic cloves 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced 200 g (7 oz) Korean radish, peeled and cut into 2.5 cm (1 in) chunks 2 waxy potatoes, such as desiree, Dutch creams or yukon, peeled and quartered 2 carrots, cut into 2 cm (¾ in) thick rounds ½ onion, thinly sliced 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) mirin 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar ¼ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon sesame oil

When you’re ready to serve, scoop the beef and vegetables into a large serving bowl, then ladle over a few spoonfuls of the sauce. Serve hot with steamed rice and a few dishes from the Side dishes chapter (pages 30–55).

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S OY- B R A I S E D P O TAT O E S GAMJA JORIM

Serves 4

A few humble potatoes and some pantry staples are all you need to quickly whip up this side dish. This is simple Korean food at its best.

Soak the potato in a bowl of water for 10 minutes to remove any excess starch. Drain, and set aside. Heat the vegetable oil in a large non-stick frying pan over medium heat. Add the potato and sauté for 4–5 minutes or until it turns a little translucent. Add the soy sauce, rice syrup, sugar and 250 ml (8½ fl oz/1 cup) water, and bring to a simmer. Cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the liquid has almost evaporated. The potatoes should be soft when pierced with a knife, but still hold their shape.

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) waxy potatoes, such as desiree, Dutch creams or yukon, cut into 2 cm (¾ in) cubes 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 2 tablespoons Korean rice syrup (ssalyeot) or corn syrup, glucose or honey 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds 2 teaspoons sesame oil

Once cooked, stir in the sesame seeds and sesame oil. Serve warm as a side dish or refrigerate in an airtight container for up to 1 week.

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BRAISED PORK B E L LY W R A P S BOSSAM

Serves 6–8

Bossam is the ultimate in Korean party food. Don’t be fooled by the long recipe, it’s super easy and very straightforward. This dish is a DIY affair – all you have to do is spread out the components on the table for everyone to assemble themselves.

First, braise the pork belly. Combine all the braising stock ingredients in a large stockpot, then top with 2.5 litres (85 fl oz/10 cups) water and add the pork. Place the pot over high heat and bring to a rolling boil. Reduce the heat to medium–low, cover and simmer for 1 hour, turning the pork halfway through. Meanwhile, prepare the radish and oyster kimchi. Peel the radish and cut into matchsticks about 5 cm (2 in) long and 5 mm (¼ in) wide. Combine the radish and salt in a small bowl and leave to sit for 10 minutes. Using your hands, squeeze as much water out of the radish as possible, then return it to the bowl. Add the kimchi paste and massage into the radish using your hands (wear food preparation gloves if necessary). Next, add the oysters and gently stir everything together. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve. To prepare the seasoned spring onions, place the onion in a bowl of chilled water and leave to rest for 10 minutes. Drain, and shake off any excess water. Combine the onion, chilli flakes, soy sauce, sesame oil, rice vinegar and sesame seeds in a bowl, and mix well. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to serve. Once the pork is cooked, remove it from the stock and place it on a baking tray. Cover with foil and leave to rest for 15 minutes. The pork should be tender but still holding its shape. Transfer the pork to a chopping board and cut it into long strips about 8 cm (3¼ in) wide, then slice it into 5 mm thick (¼ in) pieces. Transfer the pork to a serving plate. ›

LITTLE KO R E A

1.5 kg (3 lb 5 oz) piece of pork belly BRAISING STO CK

1 large onion, unpeeled, halved 10 garlic cloves, peeled 2 cm (¾ in) piece of ginger, peeled and thinly sliced 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns 1 tablespoon dark brown sugar 2 tablespoons Korean fermented soybean paste (doenjang)

To serve, set out the pork belly and all the accompaniments on the dining table. Ask everyone to grab some lettuce leaves, top them with whatever they like, then wrap them up like a san choy bao! NOTE

You can prepare the pork belly a day ahead. Cook the pork and leave it to cool to room temperature in the stock. Transfer to the refrigerator overnight. The stock will set into a jelly. When you’re ready to serve, reheat the pork in its stock over medium heat and braise for 15 minutes. Remove the pork from the stock and allow it to rest for 10 minutes before slicing.

TO S E RV E

1 segment Cabbage kimchi (Baechu kimchi) (page 15), cut into bite-sized pieces 1 head cos (romaine) lettuce, leaves picked and rinsed 1 x 100 g (3½ oz) packet perilla leaves 6 garlic cloves, thinly sliced (optional) 2 green chillies, sliced (optional) Spicy dipping sauce (Ssamjang) (page 208)

R A D I S H A N D OYS T E R KIMCHI (GUL MUSAENGCHAE)

450 g (1 lb) Korean radish 2 teaspoons salt 160 g (5½ oz/¾ cup) Kimchi chilli paste (page 15) 12 freshly shucked oysters SEASONED SPRING O N I O N S ( PA J E O R I )

2 spring onions (scallions), shredded into thin strips 1 tablespoon Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 1 tablespoon soy sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil 2 teaspoons rice vinegar 1 teaspoon toasted sesame seeds

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S P I CY C H I C K E N A N D P O TAT O S T E W DAK TORI TANG Dak tori tang, also known as dak bokkeum tang, is a spicy braised chicken dish with potatoes and carrots. Typically, a whole chicken is used but I prefer to use wings and thighs for easy eating and also to save the hassle of cutting up a whole chicken. Allow the chicken to braise in the red spicy sauce nice and slowly and you will be rewarded with succulent, tender chicken and silky soft potatoes.

Serves 4

1 kg (2 lb 3 oz) chicken wings or thigh fillets 1 onion, peeled and quartered 300 g (10½ oz) floury potatoes, such as russets or colibans, peeled and quartered 2 carrots, cut into large chunks 1 spring onion (scallion), thinly sliced MARINADE

Cut the chicken into bite-sized pieces. If using wings, separate them into three parts: the meaty drumette, the wingette and the tip. Discard the tips or reserve them for another recipe. Place the chicken in a large bowl and set aside To make the marinade, combine all the ingredients in a large saucepan and stir until combined. Add the chicken and onion and use your hands (wear food preparation gloves if necessary) to rub the marinade into the meat until well coated. Add 250 ml (8½ fl oz/1 cup) water to the marinade, give it a stir, and bring to the boil over medium–high heat. Cover with a lid and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the chicken is cooked. Stir in the potato and carrot, cover with the lid, then reduce the heat to medium and cook for a further 20 minutes or until the chicken is tender and the potato is soft. Remove the lid and continue simmering for a further 10 minutes until the sauce has reduced slightly.

70 g (2½ oz/¼ cup) Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 2 tablespoons Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) 5 garlic cloves, finely chopped 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 2 tablespoons mirin 1 tablespoon Korean rice syrup (ssalyeot) or corn syrup, glucose or honey 1 tablespoon sesame oil

Transfer the stew to a serving bowl and serve hot, garnished with the spring onion. Serve simply with steamed rice and a few dishes from the Side dishes chapter (pages 30–55).

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Sticky rice dumplings

Chapssaltteok

S T R E S S

D6E Recipes ~

Crispy pancakes

with brown sugar nut filling Hotteok Korean shaved ice dessert

Pat bingsu Honeycomb candy

Ppopgi Cheesy eggy bread

Gyeran ppang Goldfish bread

Bungeoppang


DESSERTS

As in many parts of Asia, Koreans traditionally don’t really do dessert, opting instead for a plate of fruit after a meal. Sweet treats are usually reserved for special holidays or occasions. Some of the sweets in this chapter are relatively new inventions that have taken the Korean street food scene by storm, but there are also a few classics that have been loved by Koreans for generations, reminding them of sweet childhood memories.


STICKY RICE DUMPLINGS CHAPSSALTTEOK

Makes 8

Chapssaltteok is a popular Korean treat akin to Japanese mochi (glutinous rice cake). It’s a sweet and chewy rice cake filled with red bean paste. Typically served as a sweet bite with tea when you have guests, chapssaltteok also make the perfect little gift for friends and family. Put the red beans in a food processor or use a hand-held blender to blend the beans to a fine paste. The paste should be thick, but not wet. Take 2 tablespoons of the paste and roll it into a ball with your hands. Repeat with the remaining paste to make eight balls. Transfer them to a baking tray lined with baking paper and set aside until ready to use.

200 g (7 oz) tinned sweet red (anko) beans STICKY RICE DOUGH

175 g (6 oz/1 cup) glutinous rice flour 55 g (2 oz/¼ cup) caster (superfine) sugar pinch of salt cornflour (cornstarch), for dusting

To make the sticky rice dough, combine the rice flour, sugar and salt in a heatproof bowl and stir to combine. Stirring continuously, gradually add 250 ml (8½ fl oz/1 cup) water in a steady stream. Stir until a thick paste forms. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and transfer to the microwave. Cook the mixture on high for 3 minutes, then carefully remove the bowl (it will be hot) and beat the mixture vigorously with a wooden spoon. The dough should be stretchy and translucent. If it is not, microwave for another 30 seconds and beat again. Continue until you achieve the right consistency, then set aside to cool. Once the dough is cool enough to handle, turn it out onto a surface dusted liberally with cornflour. Sprinkle a little extra cornflour over the top of the dough to prevent it from sticking, then roll the dough out to a 5 mm (¼ in) thickness. Dip the blade of a sharp knife or pizza cutter in some cornflour, then cut out eight even-sized circles about 10 cm (4 in) in diameter. Take one disc of dough and use a pastry brush to gently dust off any excess cornflour. Place a ball of red bean filling in the centre of the disc, then fold the edges over the filling and pinch together to seal. Gently roll it in your hands to form a smooth ball, then place it, seam side down, on a baking tray dusted with cornflour. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling to make eight dumplings. Store the dumplings in an airtight container at room temperature and eat within 1–2 days.

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C R I S P Y PA N C A K E S W I T H B R OW N S U G A R NUT FILLING HOTTEOK If you are ever in Korea, there is absolutely nothing like this awesome street food snack fresh from a vendor. Hotteok is a sweet pancake that is crispy on the outside and chewy on the inside, with a sweet cinnamon and nut filling that is highly addictive.

To make the dough, add 150 ml (5 fl oz) lukewarm water to a bowl and mix in the sugar, yeast and vegetable oil. Stir, and leave to sit for 5 minutes or until the mixture is foamy. Sift the plain and rice flours into a large mixing bowl and stir in the salt. Add the yeast mixture and stir with a fork to form a wet dough. Scrape the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 2–3 minutes until the dough is smooth and elastic. Place the dough back in the bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and leave to prove in a warm place for 1 hour or until the dough has doubled in size.

Makes 4

DOUGH

1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 1 teaspoon dried yeast 1 tablespoon vegetable oil, plus extra for greasing and frying 130 g (4½ oz) plain (all-purpose) flour, plus extra for dusting 80 g (2¾ oz) glutinous rice flour ½ teaspoon salt FILLING

115 g (4 oz/½ cup, firmly packed) light brown sugar ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon 40 g (1½ oz/⅓ cup) walnuts, toasted and finely chopped

To make the filling, place the brown sugar, cinnamon and nuts in a bowl and stir to combine. Set aside until ready to use.

Heat about 250 ml (8½ fl oz/1 cup) vegetable oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Oil a wide spatula by dipping it into the oil in the pan so it won’t stick when flipping the pancakes. Fry two pancakes at a time in the hot oil, seam side down, leaving some space between them so they don’t stick together. Fry for 2 minutes, then carefully flip and fry for another 2 minutes on the other side. If the pancakes start to brown too quickly, reduce the heat to medium–low. Use the spatula to press the pancakes down in the pan so they cook evenly. The pancakes are ready when both sides are golden brown and crispy. Remove the pancakes from the pan and transfer to a wire rack with paper towel underneath to catch the excess oil. Allow the pancakes to cool for 3–5 minutes before eating as the filling will be very hot. NOTE

The hotteok can be stored at room temperature for 1–2 days or in the refrigerator for 1 week. When you’re ready to serve, fry the pancakes in a frying pan over medium heat until warmed through and crispy on both sides. Alternatively, you can warm them in a preheated 200°C (400°F) oven for 10 minutes, or in the microwave.

Once the dough has doubled in size, turn it out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for another 2 minutes. Shape the dough into a log, then divide into four equal pieces. Roll each piece into a ball. Grease both hands with a little bit of vegetable oil. Grab a dough ball and flatten it out by pressing it firmly between the palms of your hands until it is about 5 mm (¼ in) thick. Pinch a 1 cm (½ in) border around the edge of the dough to flatten slightly so that it is not too thick when you fold it over later. Repeat with the remaining balls of dough. Put one-quarter of the nut filling in the centre of each disc of dough. Fold the edges over the filling and pinch together to seal like a parcel. Make sure the filling is completely sealed, otherwise it will leak out when frying. Place the filled dough balls, seam side down, on a baking tray lined with baking paper. Gently flatten the balls with the palm of your hand until they are about 1 cm (½ in) thick. ›

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C R I S PY PA N C A K E S W I T H B R OW N SUGAR NUT FILLING HOTTEOK


KO R E A N S H AV E D I C E DESSERT PAT BINGSU

Serves 1

The best remedy for sweltering summer heat has to be the mountainous pat bingsu – a big pile of shaved ice adorned with sweet red bean paste, chewy rice cake and an array of fruits. It’s a kaleidoscope of flavours and yes, kids will love it. You’ll need an ice shaver to make this dessert.

400 g (14 oz/2 cups) shaved ice (see Note) 100 g (3½ oz/½ cup) tinned sweet red (anko) beans 2 strawberries, hulled and cut into small pieces 1 kiwi fruit, peeled and cut into small pieces 50 g (1¾ oz) Sticky rice dough (page 184), cut into small cubes 1 scoop of vanilla ice cream 2 tablespoons sweetened condensed milk (optional)

Pile the shaved ice in a shallow serving bowl. Scatter over the red beans, strawberry, kiwi fruit and cubes of sticky rice dough. Top with a scoop of ice cream and drizzle with sweetened condensed milk, if using. To eat, mix a little bit of everything with the shaved ice to form a flavoured icy drink and slurp it up! Serve immediately. NOTES

An ice shaver can be found at any department store or online. Unfortunately, food processors and blenders tend to crush the ice rather than shaving it into the thin shards required for this dessert.

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H O N E YC O M B C A N DY PPOPGI

Makes 4

Ppopgi is a popular street snack among children in Korea, because not only it is tasty, but it’s also fun to eat! Ppopgi are made with a shape stamped into the middle and goal is to eat around the outline – if you can nibble the honeycomb or scratch it with a needle into the shape without it cracking, you can treat yourself to another one!

butter, for greasing 115 g (4 oz/½ cup) caster (superfine) sugar ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)

First, set up a stamping station. Cut two sheets of baking paper the same size as a large baking sheet. Use one piece of paper to line the baking sheet and grease the paper well with butter. Grease one side of the other piece of baking paper with butter and set aside. Find a heavy object with a flat surface, such as a wooden chopping board or a couple of heavy cookbooks. You will also need a few cookie cutters in different shapes, ready for stamping. To make the honeycomb, heat the sugar in a saucepan over medium heat until it begins to melt. Swirl the pan around so the sugar melts evenly and doesn’t brown too quickly. Once the sugar has melted and turned a light golden colour, remove it from the heat. Add the bicarbonate of soda and beat vigorously with a wooden spoon until it stops foaming and bubbling. The honeycomb should be a light amber colour. Immediately pour the honeycomb onto the prepared baking sheet in four equal circles about 5 cm (2 in) in diameter. Leave at least 5 cm (2 in) of space between each circle to allow for spreading. Place the second sheet of baking paper over the honeycomb, greased side down, then place a chopping board on top for 5 seconds to weigh down the mixture. Remove the board and the top sheet of baking paper, then use various cookie cutters to stamp different shapes into the honeycomb, being careful not to cut all the way through. Work quickly, while the honeycomb is still malleable. Set aside to cool and harden, then eat the honeycomb immediately or store it in an airtight container. Be sure to layer the honeycomb with baking paper to prevent the candies from sticking together. NOTE

Get creative with this recipe by sprinkling some granulated sugar, toasted sesame seeds or finely crushed nuts onto the baking sheet before pouring the honeycomb. You can also pour the honeycomb over bamboo skewers to make lollipops!

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C H E E S Y E G GY BREAD GYERAN PPANG

Makes 6

A recent Korean street food invention, gyeran ppang literally translates to ‘egg bread’. It’s a hybrid of sweet and savoury, playing tricks with your tastebuds as to whether you’re eating a sweet muffin or a salty– cheesy egg roll. While gyeran ppang is usually eaten as a street food snack, it also makes a great breakfast with some ham or bacon and a drizzle of maple syrup.

50 g (1¾ oz) butter, melted, plus extra for greasing 115 g (4 oz/½ cup) caster (superfine) sugar, plus extra for sprinkling 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup) full-cream (whole) milk ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 8 large eggs 150 g (5½ oz/1 cup) self-raising flour 3 mozzarella sticks, halved

To prepare the batter, combine the butter, sugar, milk, vanilla extract and two eggs in a bowl and whisk to combine. Add the flour and whisk until you have a smooth batter with no lumps. Pour the batter into a jug and set aside. Preheat the oven to 200°C (400°F). Brush the bottom and sides of six 9 x 5 cm (3½ x 2 in) loaf (bar) tins with butter. Half-fill each tin with batter, then place half a cheese stick on top and bake for 10 minutes. Open the oven door and carefully slide the oven rack out. Crack an egg on top of each loaf, then sprinkle some sugar over the top. Slide the rack back into the oven and bake for another 10 minutes or until the eggs are just cooked and the yolks are still slightly runny. Remove the tins from the oven and leave to rest for couple of minutes before gently turning out the loaves. Serve warm.

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GOLDFISH BREAD BUNGEOPPANG Bungeoppang is possibly the most popular sweet street snack in Korea, especially during winter time. The tasty goldfish-shaped treat is the perfect hand warmer when it comes straight out of the pan and is still piping hot. You take a bite of the crispy waffle coating to find a gooey surprise of sweet red bean paste on the inside. Nowadays, they also come with fillings like custard, chocolate and even pizza toppings!

Sift all the dry ingredients into a large bowl. In another bowl, whisk the egg and milk together. Pour the egg mixture into the dry ingredients and whisk until you have a smooth batter with no lumps. Pour the batter through a fine-mesh sieve into a jug. The goldfish mould can make two bread fish at a time. Heat the mould in a frying pan for 2 minutes over medium heat until it is nice and hot, then reduce the heat to low. Carefully open the mould and brush the inside lightly with vegetable oil.

Makes 6 bread fish

100 g (3½ oz/⅔ cup) plain (all-purpose) flour
 45 g (1½ oz/¼ cup) rice flour
 ½ teaspoon salt
 ½ teaspoon bicarbonate of soda (baking soda)
 ½ teaspoon baking powder 
 2 tablespoons caster (superfine) sugar
 1 egg 185 ml (6 fl oz/¾ cup) full-cream (whole) milk 1 tablespoon vegetable oil 3 tablespoons sweet red (anko) bean paste EQUIPMENT

1 x goldfish baking mould

Pour some batter into the fish shapes until they are about one-third full; just enough to cover the bottom. Add 2 teaspoons of red bean paste to the centre of each fish, making sure not to overfill them or the batter will spill out when cooking and won’t seal properly. Pour in enough of the remaining batter to cover the red bean paste and fill the fish shapes. Seal the mould tightly and cook for 3–4 minutes over medium heat, then turn the mould over and cook for another 3 minutes on the other side. Open the mould to check the bread is cooked. It should be golden and crispy on both sides. If it’s not, reseal the mould and cook for another 1–2 minutes, turning regularly, until the bread is cooked. Remove from the heat. Carefully remove the bread fish from the mould and serve while they are still piping hot. Repeat with the remaining batter and bean paste to make six in all. NOTE

Sweet red (anko) bean paste is available from Korean grocery stores. It usually comes as a thick tinned paste.

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Bibim sauce

Bibimjang

S E C U A S NDIMENTS

CO

s e p i c e R 7 ~

Spicy seafood sauce

Chojang Spicy dipping sauce

Ssamjang Spicy soy and spring onion sauce

Yangnyeomjang Vinegar soy dipping sauce

Choganjang Soy and wasabi dipping sauce

Ganjang wasabi Salt and pepper dipping sauce

Gireumjang


SAUCES & CONDIMENTS

Sauces and condiments are integral to Korean cuisine – they’re essential for delivering those big punchy flavours and for finishing a dish. A simple Bibim sauce (page 204) is all you need to stir through your Bibimbap (page 114) before eating. The fermented soybean Ssamjang sauce (page 208) is thick like a paste, perfect for food wrapped in leaves so it doesn’t dribble everywhere. There is no right or wrong way to choose which sauce goes with what dish – experiment a bit and you’ll find some pretty exciting combinations.


B I B I M SAU C E BIBIMJANG

Makes approx. 200 ml (7 fl oz)

Even though Bibim sauce is mainly used for Bibimbap (page 114) in Korea, it’s actually a very versatile chilli sauce that you can add to many dishes whenever you feel like something spicy.

135 g (5 oz/½ cup) Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 2 tablespoons sesame oil 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 1 teaspoon white vinegar 1 garlic clove, finely chopped

Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

Makes 250 ml (8½ fl oz/1 cup)

Chojang is a sweet and tangy spicy sauce and a perfect match for seafood. It also makes a wonderful alternative to the traditional wasabi and soy dipping sauce for sashimi. I usually make it to accompany Hoedeopbap (page 123).

135 g (5 oz/½ cup) Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) rice vinegar 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar 2 tablespoons honey 2 garlic cloves, crushed 2 teaspoons sesame oil

Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and stir until the sugar has dissolved.

Use this sauce as a condiment for Korean mixed rice bowl (Bibimbap) (page 114), Sashimi rice bowl (Hoedeopbap) (page 123) and other dishes.

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S P I CY S E A F O O D SAU C E CHOJANG

Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

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Soy and wasabi dipping sauce

Bibim sauce

Spicy dipping sauce

Spicy seafood sauce

Spicy soy and spring onion sauce Vinegar soy dipping sauce


S P I CY D I P P I N G SAU C E SSAMJANG

Makes 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup)

Ssamjang translates to ‘wrap sauce’ as the thick, spicy paste is primarily used as a condiment for leaf-wrapped dishes like Bossam (page 174) and Galbi (page 84). The use of doenjang (fermented soybean paste) means the sauce packs an umami punch that can really elevate meaty flavours to new heights.

60 g (2 oz/¼ cup) Korean fermented soybean paste (doenjang) 2 tablespoons Korean chilli paste (gochujang) 1 garlic clove, crushed 1 teaspoon caster (superfine) sugar 2 teaspoons sesame oil 2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds

S P I CY S OY A N D SPRING ONION SAU C E YANGNYEOMJANG

Makes approx. 190 ml (6½ fl oz)

This soy-based sauce is very versatile – it can be used as a dressing, dipping sauce and as a marinade that works well with tofu, vegetables, meat, dumplings and noodles.

Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and stir until the sugar has dissolved.

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 2 tablespoons rice (or white) vinegar 6 garlic cloves, crushed 2 teaspoons caster (superfine) sugar 2 tablespoons Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru) ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2–3 spring onions (scallions), thinly sliced

Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Use this sauce as a condiment for Braised pork belly wraps (Bossam) (page 174), Barbecued beef short ribs (Galbi) (page 84) and other dishes.

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V I N E G A R S OY D I P P I N G SAU C E CHOGANJANG

Makes approx. 100 ml (3½ fl oz)

This vinegary, spicy soy dipping sauce is essential with Korean fried food like Pajeon (page 63), as well as dumplings, grilled meat or fish. But really, I’ll dip anything into this liquid gold.

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) soy sauce 2 tablespoons rice (or white) vinegar 1 teaspoon Korean chilli flakes (gochugaru)

S A LT A N D P E P P E R D I P P I N G SAU C E GIREUMJANG Is it a sauce? Is it seasoned oil? Gireumjang translates to ‘oil sauce’ and is basically a pinch each of salt and pepper mixed with sesame oil. This dipping sauce is usually paired with grilled pork dishes like Samgyeopsal gui (page 103), but it also works well with beef. You don’t need much, just a light dip in the aromatic sesame oil to elevate the meat flavour.

Serves 1

1 tablespoon sesame oil ½ teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Put all the ingredients in a bowl and stir until combined. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. NOTE

Pour the sesame oil into a small dipping saucer. Add the salt and pepper and stir to mix well.

For those who like it extra hot, add 1 or 2 thinly sliced bird’s eye chillies.

Repeat to make each diner their own little dipping sauce.

S OY A N D WA S A B I D I P P I N G SAU C E GANJANG WASABI To really appreciate the full flavours of grilled meat, it’s best to pair it with a dipping sauce that is not overpowering. This thinned-down sweet soy sauce with a subtle kick of wasabi is a popular choice at Korean BBQ restaurants.

Makes approx. 125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup)

2 tablespoons soy sauce 2 tablespoons mirin 1 teaspoon rice (or white) vinegar 1 tablespoon caster (superfine) sugar a dab of wasabi paste 2 teaspoons finely chopped onion

Combine all the ingredients and 2 tablespoons water in a bowl and stir to dissolve the sugar. Cover and set aside for at least 1 hour to allow the flavours to develop. Serve as it is or strain to remove the onion for a clear sauce. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

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Soy sauce

Waeganjang Fish sauce

Seojang

Korean rice wine

Soju

Korean chilli paste

Gochujang

Sesame oil

Chamgileum Fermented soybean paste

Doenjang

Korean cooking wine

Mirin

White vinegar

Sigcho

Korean chilli flakes

Gochugaru

GLOSSARY 1 LITTLE KO R E A

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The Korean Pantry


GLOSSARY 2

Dried seaweed

Dried anchovies

Miyeok

Myeolchi

Dried shiitake mushrooms

Pyogobeoseos

Sweet potato glass noodles

Dangmyeon

Korean chilli flakes

Sesame seeds

Gochugaru

Kkae

Dried kelp

Dasima

Thin wheat flour noodles

Somyeon

Glutinous rice flour

Chabssalgalu

Sweet red (anko) beans

Pat

Dried nori sheet

Gim

Bellfllower roots

Doraji

Fernbrake

Gosari

Buckwheat noodles

Naengmyeon

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The Korean Pantry


English spinach

Sigeumchi

Cabbage

Baechu

Radish

Mu

Mung bean sprouts

Sugju

Kirby cucumber

Garlic chives

Oi

Buchu

Spring onions

Pa

Soybean sprouts

Tofu for stew

Kongnamul

Dubu

Silken tofu Green chillies Enoki mushrooms

Soondubu

Pusgochu

Paeng-ibeoseos

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The Korean Pantry


A

C

Anchovies, Dried 214 Anchovy and kelp stock  139

Cabbage 216 Cabbage kimchi  15 Cheesy eggy bread  197 Cheesy fire chicken  79

B BARBECUED Barbecued beef short ribs 84 Grilled barbecued pork belly  103 Soy-marinated barbecued beef  83 Spicy barbecued pork  100 Basic kimchi stew  149 BEEF Barbecued beef short ribs  84 Beef meatball skewers  90 Beef fritters  71 Braised beef short ribs  170 Chilled buckwheat noodle soup  110 Korean mixed rice bowl  114 Seaweed and beef soup  140 Shredded soy-braised beef  164 Soy-marinated barbecued beef  83 Spicy cold buckwheat noodles  124 Sweet potato glass noodles  109 Tornado potato hot dog sticks  93 Beef fritters  71 Beef meatball skewers  90 Bellflower root  38, 214 Bellflower, Sautéed root  38 Bibim sauce  204 Braised beef short ribs  170 Braised flounder with radish  159 Braised pork belly wraps  174 Braised tofu  160 Buckwheat Noodles  215

CHICKEN Cheesy fire chicken 79 KFC 4 ways  86 Snow cheese fried chicken  86 Soy-braised chicken wings  167 Spicy chicken and potato stew  178 Spicy garlic-fried chicken  80 Sweet and spicy fried chicken  86 Wasabi and spring onion fried chicken 87 Chilled buckwheat noodle soup  110 Chilli fritters, Stuffed  71 Chilli oil  80 Corn cheese  43 Crispy pancakes with brown sugar nut filling  186 Cucumber salad, Seaweed and  47 Cucumber salad, Spicy  44 Cucumber, Korean  216 Cucumber, Pickled  111

E English spinach 217 English spinach, Seasoned  36 Enoki mushroom  216

F Fermented soybean paste 212 Fermented soybean stew  144 Fernbrake  37, 215 Fernbrake, Sautéed  37 Festive noodle soup  118

FISH & SEAFO OD Braised flounder with radish 159 Fish fritters  70

Fish sauce 213 Radish and oyster kimchi 174 Sashimi rice bowl  123 Seafood spring onion pancakes  64 Spicy seafood sauce  205 Spicy silken tofu hotpot  153 Spicy stir-fried octopus  99 Stir-fried fish cake  51 Flounder with radish, Braised  159 Fried chicken, Snow cheese  86 Fried chicken, Sweet and spicy  86 Fried chicken, Wasabi and spring onion  87 FRIT TERS 70 Beef fritters  71 Fish fritters  70 Stuffed chilli fritters  71 Zucchini fritters  70

G Garlic chive kimchi 29 Garlic chive pancakes  63 Garlic chives  217 Glutinous Rice Flour  215 Goldfish bread  198 Green chillies  216 Grilled barbecued pork belly  103

H Honeycomb candy  194

K Kelp 214 Kelp stock, Anchovy and  139 KFC 4 ways  86

KIMCHI Basic kimchi stew  149 Cabbage kimchi  15 Garlic chive kimchi  29 Kimchi chilli paste  15 Kimchi fried rice  117 Kimchi pancakes with pork belly  69 Kimchi pancakes with pork belly  69 Pork rib kimchi stew  150 Radish and oyster kimchi  174 Radish kimchi  19 Radish water kimchi  22 Spring onion kimchi  26 Stuffed cucumber kimchi  25 KOREAN Chilli flakes  16, 213, 215 Chilli paste  212 Cooking wine  212 Cucumber  216 Mixed rice bowl  114 Pancake mix  60 Rice wine  213 Shaved ice dessert  191 Sushi rolls  128

M Mung bean sprouts 217 Mung bean sprouts, Seasoned  45 Mushroom, Enoki  216 Mushroom, Shiitake  215

N NO ODLES Buckwheat Noodles 215 Chilled buckwheat noodle soup  110 Festive noodle soup  118 Spicy cold buckwheat noodles  124

LITTLE KO R E A

219

Index


Spicy mixed noodles 127 Sweet potato glass noodles  109 Nori sheet  214

Radish, Pickled 111 Radish, Stir-fried  46 Red Beans  214

O P

RICE Kimchi fried rice  117 Korean mixed rice bowl  114 Korean sushi rolls  128 Pan-fried spicy rice cakes  133 Sashimi rice bowl  123 Sticky rice dumplings  184

Pan-fried spicy rice cakes 133 pancake mix, Korean   60

S

PANCAKES Crispy pancakes with brown sugar a nut filling 186

Salt and pepper dipping sauce 211 Sashimi rice bowl  123 Sautéed bellflower root  38 Sautéed fernbrake  37 Sautéed zucchini  34 Seafood spring onion pancakes  64 Seasoned English spinach  36 Seasoned mung bean sprouts  45 Seasoned seaweed  50 Seasoned soybean sprouts  35 Seasoned spring onions  174 Seaweed  214 Seaweed and beef soup  140 Seaweed and cucumber salad  47 Seaweed egg roll  55 Seaweed, Seasoned  50 Sesame oil  213 Sesame seeds  214 Shiitake Mushroom  215 Shredded soy-braised beef  164 Silken tofu  217 Snow cheese  87 Snow cheese fried chicken  86 Soy and wasabi dipping sauce  210 Soy-braised chicken wings  167 Soy-braised potatoes  173 Soy-marinated barbecued beef  83

Oyster kimchi, Radish and 174 Octopus, Spicy stir-fried  99

Garlic chive pancakes 63 Kimchi pancakes with pork belly  69 Korean pancake mix  60 Seafood spring onion pancakes  64 Spring onion pancake  63 Pickled radish  111 P ORK Braised pork belly wraps  174 Grilled barbecued pork belly  103 Kimchi pancakes with pork belly  69 Korean sushi rolls  128 Pork rib kimchi stew  150 Spicy barbecued pork  100 Stir-fried spicy pork  94 Tornado potato hot dog sticks  93 Potato and dumpling soup  143

R Radish 216 Radish kimchi  19 Radish water kimchi  22 Radish and oyster kimchi  174

Soybean paste, Fermented 212 Soybean sprout soup  139 Soybean sprouts  217 Soybean sprouts, Seasoned  35 Spicy barbecued pork  100 Spicy chicken and potato stew  178 Spicy cold buckwheat noodles  124 Spicy cucumber salad  44 Spicy dipping sauce  208 Spicy garlic-fried chicken  80 Spicy mixed noodles  127 Spicy seafood sauce  205 Spicy silken tofu hotpot  153 Spicy soy and spring onion sauce  209 Spicy stir-fried octopus  99 Spring onion  216 Spring onion kimchi  26 Spring onion pancake  63 Spring onions, Seasoned  174 Steamed eggs  163 Sticky rice dumplings  184 Stir-fried fish cake  51 Stir-fried radish  46 Stir-fried spicy pork  94 Stuffed chilli fritters  71 Stuffed cucumber kimchi  25 Sweet and spicy fried chicken  86 Sweet potato glass noodles  109, 215

V Vinegar soy dipping sauce 210 Vinegar, White  213

W Wasabi and spring onion fried chicken 87

Z Zucchini fritters 70 Zucchini, Sautéed  34

T Tempura batter 93 Thin Wheat Flour Noodles  215 Tofu, Braised  160 Tofu for stew  217 Tofu, Silken  217 Tornado potato hot dog sticks  93

LITTLE KO R E A

221

Index


B

E

J

Baechu 216 Baechu kimchi  15 Bibim guksu  127 Bibim naengmyeon  124 Bibimbap  114 Bibimjang  204 Bossam  174 Buchu  217 Buchu jeon  63 Buchu kimchi  29 Bulgogi  83 Bungeoppang  198

Eomuk 51 Eomuk bokkeum  51

Janchi guksu 118 Jang jorim  164 Japchae  109 Jeon  70 Jeon garu  60 Jeyuk bokkeum  94

C Chabssalgalu 215 Chamgileum  213 Chapssaltteok  184 Chijeu buldak  79 Choganjang  210 Chojang  205

D Daeji bulgogi 100 Daeji galbi kimchi jjigae  150 Dak nalgi jorim  167 Dak tori tang  178 Dangmyeon  215 Dashima myeolchi yuksu  139 Dasima  214 Doenjang  212 Doenjang jjigae  144 Dongchimi  22 Donggeurang ddaeng  71 Doraji  38, 214 Doraji namul  38 Dubu  217 Dubu jorim  160

G Gajami mu jorim 159 Galbi  84 Galbi jjim  170 Gamja jorim  173 Ganjang wasabi  210 Gim  214 Gim gyeran mari  55 Gim muchim  50 Gimbap  128 Gireumjang  211 Gochu jeon  71 Gochugaru  16, 213, 215 Gochugileum  80 Gochujang  212 Gosari  37, 215 Gosari namul  37 Gul musaengchae  174 Gyeran jjim  163 Gyeran ppang  197

H Haemul pajeon 64 Hobak jeon  70 Hobak muchim  34 Hoedeopbap  123 Hoeoligamja  93 Hotteok  186 Huraideu chikin  86 Nunkkoch  86 Wasabi padal  87 Yangnyeom  86

K Kimchi bokkeum bap 117 Kimchi jeon  69 Kimchi jjigae  149 Kkae  214 Kkakdugi  19 Kkanpunggi  80 Konchijeu  43 Kongnamul  217 Kongnamul guk  139 Kongnamul muchim  35

M Mirim 212 Miyeok  214 Miyeok guk  140 Mu  216 Mu namul  46 Musaengchae  111 Myeok oi muchim  47 Myeolchi  214

N

Oi muchim 44 Oi sobagi  25 Oijang-ajji  111

P Pa 216 Pa kimchi  26 Paeng-ibeoseos  216 Pajeon  63 Pajeori  174 Pat  214 Pat bingsu  191 Ppopgi  194 Pusgochu  216 Pyogobeoseos  215

S Samgyeopsal gui 103 Seojang  213 Sigcho  213 Sigeumchi  217 Sigeumchi muchim  36 Soju  213 Somyeon  215 Soondubu  217 Ssaengseon jeon  70 Ssamjang  208 Sugju  217 Sujebi  143 Sukju namul  45 Sundubu jjigae  153

Naengmyeon 110, 215 Nakji bokkeum  99

T

O

Tteok galbi wanja 90 Tteokbokki  133 Yangnyeomjang  209

Oi 216 LITTLE KO R E A

223

Korean Index


Published in 2018 by Smith Street Books Collingwood | Melbourne | Australia smithstreetbooks.com ISBN: 978-1-925418-16-3 All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted by any person or entity, in any form or means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, scanning or by any storage and retrieval system, without the prior written permission of the publishers and copyright holders. Copyright text and photography © Billy Law Copyright design © Smith Street Books CIP data is available from the National Library of Australia Publisher: Paul McNally Editor: Andrea O’Connor Design concept: Murray Batten Design layout: Heather Menzies, Studio31 Graphics Photography and styling: Billy Law Printed and bound in China by C&C Offset Printing Co., Ltd. Book 15 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Little Korea  

NOTE: This e-gallery is for press purposes only. No images or other copyrighted materials seen here may be reproduced. Contact patrick@smi...

Little Korea  

NOTE: This e-gallery is for press purposes only. No images or other copyrighted materials seen here may be reproduced. Contact patrick@smi...

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