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Travel writer Envy alert! It’s sickening to think about, but currently there are legions of travel writers all over the world getting paid to do all sorts of very cool things. They are sipping cocktails on superyachts in the Caribbean, witnessing sunrises from the top of Mount Kilimanjaro, eating steaming bowls of pho in Vietnam and snorkelling the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. Some are camped out in tents in Canada’s national parks while others are holed up in European luxury hotels sampling things like pillow menus, the butler service and in-house cheese caves. Being paid to travel the globe rates as one of the most soughtafter careers, yet it’s also one that many people mistakenly believe is out of their reach. Well, know this: travel writers aren’t unicorns. I should know – I am one. But there was a time when I believed that travel writing was nothing more than a mirage. And gee, was I wrong. I’m here to tell you that there are thousands of people currently being paid to go on vacation, so why not you? Whether you choose to forge a freelance career selling your work to the media, nab a coveted in-house role with the travel section of a national newspaper, or build a popular travel blog with thousands of followers, earning a living from travel writing is entirely possible. You can get a degree in journalism, go for an internship with your local newspaper, apply for roles at guidebook publishers, or you can say to hell with all that and just write and pitch your stories to websites, magazines and newspapers. You could even write the next bestseller that takes the literary world by storm and inspires a generation of people to travel. The range of experiences on offer as a travel writer is so varied you’ll never be bored. I’ve been paid to sail to Antarctica on a yacht, walk through the Australian desert, climb mountains in Morocco,

sip tea in Sri Lanka, handfeed giraffes in Africa and sleep in a palace in India. But above all, the greatest gift I’ve been given as a travel writer is the freedom to explore the world and then share it with others through my words and images, followed closely by avoiding the nine-to-five grind. Sure, there are downsides to the job. There’s jet lag, homesickness, airport delays and jealous friends, but that’s a small price to pay for getting paid to travel (plus all the frequent flyer miles are pretty sweet, too).

The lowdown

Education or qualifications: No formal education requirements needed but a degree in journalism or other writing qualifications would help. Experience required: No official experience necessary but, similar to many other publishing and media roles, building up a strong list of published work (or clips) will help with pitching and job seeking. Oh, and without travel experience you aren’t going to be much of a travel writer, so get out there and experience the world. Training: No training necessary. Travel writers with no prior experience get their work published all the time, as do seasoned professionals with 40+ years in the business. Restrictions: If you can travel and write, then you can be a published travel writer.

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I can get paid for that?  

NOTE: This e-gallery is for press purposes only. No images or other copyrighted materials seen here may be reproduced. Contact patrick@smi...

I can get paid for that?  

NOTE: This e-gallery is for press purposes only. No images or other copyrighted materials seen here may be reproduced. Contact patrick@smi...

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