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Archaeologist If you’ve ever been accused of living in the past, then perhaps you should put your fascination with the past to good use and become an archaeologist. From unearthing the skeletons of people who walked the Earth thousands of years ago, to uncovering the remains of houses that once stood centuries before, archaeologists study how people lived in the past by finding and examining the remains of previous civilisations. The field of archaeology is one of the more popular, accessible forms of science out there. Captivating everyone from high school students to seniors, archaeologists have been responsible for recovering items from the Titanic, discovering the tomb of Tutankhamun and uncovering the devastation of Pompeii. Archaeologists also found the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Rosetta Stone, and the Tomb of Sunken Skulls. Unsurprisingly, the life of an archaeologist is absolutely nothing like the life of Indiana Jones. The reality of archaeology is very different from Hollywood representations. Pulling yourself out of a pit of snakes, outsmarting bad guys with guns, and being chased by arrowwielding natives just doesn’t figure in the life of an archaeologist. Using a leather whip and wearing a fedora hat also isn’t necessary. Sure, some get to work on archaeological digs in exotic places throughout their careers, but many hours are spent sitting at a desk writing papers, reading journals and sifting through research. Attending conferences is another less thrilling part of the job. Over the course of decades, the career of an archaeologist can be quite varied. Many archaeologists work at universities as lecturers and in other academic roles, others write books, some lead expeditions to complete field work in remote places, and the rare, lucky few progress into television work hosting shows on

archaeology and history. Archaeologists often advise governments and engineers on building projects, and work with cultural institutions like museums and galleries to put together exhibitions and programs. As a career, this branch of science requires years and years of study. Apart from academic study, archaeologists must also develop the technical skills needed to participate on excavation sites and to work in laboratories. From using geographic information systems to record finds, to conducting laboratory tests such as radiocarbon dating, as well as having the skills to clean and preserve the artefacts, this is a career that requires a very broad skill set. At the end of their career, an archaeologist ends up a very wellrounded individual. Part educator, part writer, part curator, part excavator, this is a science role perfect for passionate time travellers with a fascination for all things old and musty. No, you don’t get to crack a whip like Indiana Jones but you might end up uncovering a relic that changes our understanding of a place or people. Pretty cool, right?

The lowdown

Education or qualifications: Degree in archaeology is required, with postgraduate qualifications highly regarded. Experience required: Experience working in the field on archaeological sites and digs is necessary. Training: Archaeologists receive training on field-work techniques while completing their degrees and interning at places such as museums. Restrictions: None.

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I can get paid for that?  

NOTE: This e-gallery is for press purposes only. No images or other copyrighted materials seen here may be reproduced. Contact patrick@smi...

I can get paid for that?  

NOTE: This e-gallery is for press purposes only. No images or other copyrighted materials seen here may be reproduced. Contact patrick@smi...

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