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Dorsey‘s trombone. It was my idea to make my voice work in the same way as a trombonist or violin—not sounding like them, but “playing” the voice like those instruments.

Few singers have impacted American music as profoundly as Frank Sinatra. In a career that spanned six decades and more than 1,200 songs, the charming singer from Hoboken perfected an intimate croon that generations of musicians have since tried to emulate. What most of them don’t know is this: You probably can’t sing like Sinatra. But you can train like him. While Sinatra was blessed with a rich baritone voice, his real talent was in understanding that singing was a full body experience, not just mastering a tilt of the voice or slip of the vowel, but bringing the emotion behind every word to life. In this way, Sinatra—even in his later years—was a voracious student. In 1936, he began studying under John Quinlan: an operatic tenor and vocal coach with whom he would later publish Tips on Popular Singing—one of the rarest and most sought-after pieces of Sinatra memorabilia of all time. The

thirty-two-page booklet (released in 1941) offers sound advice for any singer, with chapters on how to care for the throat, the art of breathing, and Sinatra’s favorite vocal exercises. Scattered between them are tips.

Extended phrases, then, became a hallmark of Sinatra’s style. He claimed that he practiced underwater lap swimming to build his lung capacity to hold longer notes. He also developed crystalline diction, a very slight Hoboken accent softening “r” sounds, and learned—in service of the lyrics—how to draw out the four semi-vowels that can be sustained in song: M, N, L and R.

Sinatra’s choice of arrangers also put him at the head of the class. He worked with Axel Stordahl, Billy May, Johnny Mandel, Don Costa, Claus Ogerman and—most famously—the brilliant Nelson Riddle. Sinatra selected his repertoire with great care, and the tunes he chose possessed high quality. But, it was his interpretations of those songs that helped make them durable. He also pioneered the collation of songs by theme— love, loss, dancing—and these “concept albums” became an essential part of his recording career and legacy.

One of Sinatra’s favorites: Sing a seven-note arpeggio—to the words, “Let us wander by the bay”—through all twelve keys, something he did himself throughout his career. Another: Listen closely to as many different singers as possible to find phrasing and diction worth emulating, as he had with his own early boss, Tommy Dorsey. The thing that influenced Sinatra the most, he wrote, was the way that Dorsey played his trombone:

In later years, Sinatra credited Quinlan with teaching him something else that is nowhere mentioned in Tips on Popular Singing: “You can’t sing what you don’t understand.” Sinatra learned that to achieve the emotional and dramatic potential of his material, he had to understand—truly comprehend—the songwriter’s lyrics: both their emotional intent, and their dramatic potential.

“For a time, a very long time, Frank Sinatra turned the singing of the American song into an art form,” lyricist and critic Gene Lees once wrote. “His collected output must be considered a national treasure.” At the Smithsonian, where I have worked for thirty years, we specialize in interpreting and protecting those enduring treasures. And, as we celebrate his 100th anniversary, there’s no doubt that the singer known simply as “The Voice” has earned his spot among them.

He would take a musical phrase and play it all the way through without breathing, for eight, ten, maybe sixteen bars. How in the hell did he do it? Why couldn’t a singer do that, too? Fascinated, I began to listen to other soloists. I bought every Jascha Heifetz record I could find, and listened to him play the violin hour after hour. His constant bowing, where you never heard a break, carried the melody line straight on through, just like

“Every song he sings is understandable and, most of all, believable, which is the ultimate in theater,” Duke Ellington once said of the singer. Sinatra’s convincing delivery, his personal, instantly identifiable sound and his mastery of the microphone—you never felt as if he was singing to a mass audience, but instead, as though he was singing intimately and directly to you—allowed him to instantly connect with audiences.

John Edward Hasse is the long-time curator of American music at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, where he founded Jazz Appreciation Month. His books include Beyond Category: The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington, Jazz: The First Century, and Discover Jazz.


Dorsey‘s trombone. It was my idea to make my voice work in the same way as a trombonist or violin—not sounding like them, but “playing” the voice like those instruments.

Few singers have impacted American music as profoundly as Frank Sinatra. In a career that spanned six decades and more than 1,200 songs, the charming singer from Hoboken perfected an intimate croon that generations of musicians have since tried to emulate. What most of them don’t know is this: You probably can’t sing like Sinatra. But you can train like him. While Sinatra was blessed with a rich baritone voice, his real talent was in understanding that singing was a full body experience, not just mastering a tilt of the voice or slip of the vowel, but bringing the emotion behind every word to life. In this way, Sinatra—even in his later years—was a voracious student. In 1936, he began studying under John Quinlan: an operatic tenor and vocal coach with whom he would later publish Tips on Popular Singing—one of the rarest and most sought-after pieces of Sinatra memorabilia of all time. The

thirty-two-page booklet (released in 1941) offers sound advice for any singer, with chapters on how to care for the throat, the art of breathing, and Sinatra’s favorite vocal exercises. Scattered between them are tips.

Extended phrases, then, became a hallmark of Sinatra’s style. He claimed that he practiced underwater lap swimming to build his lung capacity to hold longer notes. He also developed crystalline diction, a very slight Hoboken accent softening “r” sounds, and learned—in service of the lyrics—how to draw out the four semi-vowels that can be sustained in song: M, N, L and R.

Sinatra’s choice of arrangers also put him at the head of the class. He worked with Axel Stordahl, Billy May, Johnny Mandel, Don Costa, Claus Ogerman and—most famously—the brilliant Nelson Riddle. Sinatra selected his repertoire with great care, and the tunes he chose possessed high quality. But, it was his interpretations of those songs that helped make them durable. He also pioneered the collation of songs by theme— love, loss, dancing—and these “concept albums” became an essential part of his recording career and legacy.

One of Sinatra’s favorites: Sing a seven-note arpeggio—to the words, “Let us wander by the bay”—through all twelve keys, something he did himself throughout his career. Another: Listen closely to as many different singers as possible to find phrasing and diction worth emulating, as he had with his own early boss, Tommy Dorsey. The thing that influenced Sinatra the most, he wrote, was the way that Dorsey played his trombone:

In later years, Sinatra credited Quinlan with teaching him something else that is nowhere mentioned in Tips on Popular Singing: “You can’t sing what you don’t understand.” Sinatra learned that to achieve the emotional and dramatic potential of his material, he had to understand—truly comprehend—the songwriter’s lyrics: both their emotional intent, and their dramatic potential.

“For a time, a very long time, Frank Sinatra turned the singing of the American song into an art form,” lyricist and critic Gene Lees once wrote. “His collected output must be considered a national treasure.” At the Smithsonian, where I have worked for thirty years, we specialize in interpreting and protecting those enduring treasures. And, as we celebrate his 100th anniversary, there’s no doubt that the singer known simply as “The Voice” has earned his spot among them.

He would take a musical phrase and play it all the way through without breathing, for eight, ten, maybe sixteen bars. How in the hell did he do it? Why couldn’t a singer do that, too? Fascinated, I began to listen to other soloists. I bought every Jascha Heifetz record I could find, and listened to him play the violin hour after hour. His constant bowing, where you never heard a break, carried the melody line straight on through, just like

“Every song he sings is understandable and, most of all, believable, which is the ultimate in theater,” Duke Ellington once said of the singer. Sinatra’s convincing delivery, his personal, instantly identifiable sound and his mastery of the microphone—you never felt as if he was singing to a mass audience, but instead, as though he was singing intimately and directly to you—allowed him to instantly connect with audiences.

John Edward Hasse is the long-time curator of American music at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, where he founded Jazz Appreciation Month. His books include Beyond Category: The Life and Genius of Duke Ellington, Jazz: The First Century, and Discover Jazz.


1.

Be Careful, It’s My Heart (I. Berlin) 2:42 (*)(†)

Frank Sinatra with Tommy Dorsey & his Orchestra rec. 6/7/42, Bernardsville, NJ

2.

Your Hit Parade Opening & I’ve Heard That Song Before (S. Cahn-J. Styne) 3:36 (†)(#)

Frank Sinatra with Mark Warnow & the Hit Parade Orchestra rec. 2/27/43; from rehearsal for CBS’s Your Hit Parade (Lucky Strike)

4.

It Can’t Be Wrong

(M. Steiner-K. Gannon) 1:39 (*)(∆)

Frank Sinatra with Mark Warnow & his Orchestra rec. ca. February 1943; from the War Manpower Commission’s War Jobs program

8.

I Won’t Dance

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 1/15/47; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(J. Kern-O. Hammerstein II) 2:21 (*)(†)

On the Atchison Topeka & the Santa Fe 9.

(H. Warren-J. Mercer) 1:52 (*)(∆)

5.

14.

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 3/26/47; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

15.

Just One of Those Things (C. Porter) 1:25 (*)(†)

10.

Lover Come Back to Me

Frank Sinatra and Lillian Raimondi with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 11/28/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 10/24/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

11.

How Deep Is The Ocean

16. Porgy & Bess Medley: Summertime/It Ain’t Necessarily So/ Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess?

In the Blue of Evening

Frank Sinatra with David Broekman & the Treasury Ensemble rec. ca. November 1942; from the U.S. Treasury Department’s Treasury Song Parade #93

Frank Sinatra and the Bobby Tucker Singers with Raymond Scott & his Orchestra rec. 7/9/43; from CBS’s Broadway Bandbox (sustaining)

Without A Song

(S. Romberg-O. Hammerstein II) 3:55 (*)(∆)

Frank Sinatra with David Broekman & the Treasury Ensemble rec. ca. 1943; from the U.S. Treasury Department’s Treasury Song Parade #337

6. Empty Saddles (B. Hill) 2:06 (*)(∆)

Frank Sinatra and the Andrews Sisters with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 11/14/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(I. Berlin) 2:19 (*)(†)

12. I Should Care (S. Cahn-J. Styne) 2:13 (*)

Frank Sinatra with the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra rec. 8/4/45; from Armed Forces Radio’s Academy Night at the Hollywood Bowl/Music for the Wounded

19. Ballerina (Dance,

Ballerina Dance)

(B. Russell-C. Sigman) 2:13 (*)(∆) Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. ca. March 1948; from Armed Forces Radio’s Your Hit Parade

If This Isn’t Love

(B. Lane-E. Y. Harburg) 1:43 (*)(∆)

(T. Adair-A. D’Artega) 3:10 (*)(†)(#)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. ca. January 1945; from The March of Dimes 1945 Fund Appeal

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 9/19/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(V. Youmans-B. Rose-E. Eliscu 2:19 (*)(†)

13. The Trolley Song (H. Martin-R. Blane) 3:05 (∆)

3. I Get A Kick Out Of You (C. Porter) 5:50 (*)(†)

7.

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 11/7/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(G. Gershwin-I. Gershwin-D. Heyward) 5:07 (*)(∆)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 4/10/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

17.

I’ll Get By

Frank Sinatra with Mark Warnow & the Hit Parade Orchestra rec. 5/6/44; from CBS’s Your Hit Parade (Lucky Strike)

18.

Till The End of Time

Frank Sinatra with Harry James & his Music Makers rec. 10/5/45; from CBS’s The Danny Kaye Show (Pabst Blue Ribbon)

20.

I Found A New Baby

Frank Sinatra with Nat ‘King’ Cole & his Trio, featuring Nat Cole (piano) rec. 11/28/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(S. Williams-J. Palmer) 2:33 (*)(∆)

21. Guest Star Show Opening & Powder Your Face with Sunshine

(C. Lombardo-S. Rochinski) 2:12 (*)(∆) Del Sharbutt (Announcer); Frank Sinatra and chorus with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. ca. May 1949; from the U.S. Treasury Department’s Guest Star #112 22.

You’ll Always Be the One I Love (T. Freeman-S. Skylar) 2:10 (*)(†)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 10/30/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

23.

The House I Live In

(F. Ahlert-R. Turk) 3:01 (*)(∆)

(F. Chopin-B. Kaye-T. Mossman) 3:05 (*)(∆)

(L. Allen & E. Robinson) 4:23 (*)(#)

Mervyn LeRoy (Introduction); Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 3/13/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)


1.

Be Careful, It’s My Heart (I. Berlin) 2:42 (*)(†)

Frank Sinatra with Tommy Dorsey & his Orchestra rec. 6/7/42, Bernardsville, NJ

2.

Your Hit Parade Opening & I’ve Heard That Song Before (S. Cahn-J. Styne) 3:36 (†)(#)

Frank Sinatra with Mark Warnow & the Hit Parade Orchestra rec. 2/27/43; from rehearsal for CBS’s Your Hit Parade (Lucky Strike)

4.

It Can’t Be Wrong

(M. Steiner-K. Gannon) 1:39 (*)(∆)

Frank Sinatra with Mark Warnow & his Orchestra rec. ca. February 1943; from the War Manpower Commission’s War Jobs program

8.

I Won’t Dance

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 1/15/47; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(J. Kern-O. Hammerstein II) 2:21 (*)(†)

On the Atchison Topeka & the Santa Fe 9.

(H. Warren-J. Mercer) 1:52 (*)(∆)

5.

14.

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 3/26/47; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

15.

Just One of Those Things (C. Porter) 1:25 (*)(†)

10.

Lover Come Back to Me

Frank Sinatra and Lillian Raimondi with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 11/28/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 10/24/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

11.

How Deep Is The Ocean

16. Porgy & Bess Medley: Summertime/It Ain’t Necessarily So/ Bess, Oh Where’s My Bess?

In the Blue of Evening

Frank Sinatra with David Broekman & the Treasury Ensemble rec. ca. November 1942; from the U.S. Treasury Department’s Treasury Song Parade #93

Frank Sinatra and the Bobby Tucker Singers with Raymond Scott & his Orchestra rec. 7/9/43; from CBS’s Broadway Bandbox (sustaining)

Without A Song

(S. Romberg-O. Hammerstein II) 3:55 (*)(∆)

Frank Sinatra with David Broekman & the Treasury Ensemble rec. ca. 1943; from the U.S. Treasury Department’s Treasury Song Parade #337

6. Empty Saddles (B. Hill) 2:06 (*)(∆)

Frank Sinatra and the Andrews Sisters with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 11/14/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(I. Berlin) 2:19 (*)(†)

12. I Should Care (S. Cahn-J. Styne) 2:13 (*)

Frank Sinatra with the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra rec. 8/4/45; from Armed Forces Radio’s Academy Night at the Hollywood Bowl/Music for the Wounded

19. Ballerina (Dance,

Ballerina Dance)

(B. Russell-C. Sigman) 2:13 (*)(∆) Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. ca. March 1948; from Armed Forces Radio’s Your Hit Parade

If This Isn’t Love

(B. Lane-E. Y. Harburg) 1:43 (*)(∆)

(T. Adair-A. D’Artega) 3:10 (*)(†)(#)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. ca. January 1945; from The March of Dimes 1945 Fund Appeal

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 9/19/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(V. Youmans-B. Rose-E. Eliscu 2:19 (*)(†)

13. The Trolley Song (H. Martin-R. Blane) 3:05 (∆)

3. I Get A Kick Out Of You (C. Porter) 5:50 (*)(†)

7.

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 11/7/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(G. Gershwin-I. Gershwin-D. Heyward) 5:07 (*)(∆)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 4/10/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

17.

I’ll Get By

Frank Sinatra with Mark Warnow & the Hit Parade Orchestra rec. 5/6/44; from CBS’s Your Hit Parade (Lucky Strike)

18.

Till The End of Time

Frank Sinatra with Harry James & his Music Makers rec. 10/5/45; from CBS’s The Danny Kaye Show (Pabst Blue Ribbon)

20.

I Found A New Baby

Frank Sinatra with Nat ‘King’ Cole & his Trio, featuring Nat Cole (piano) rec. 11/28/45; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

(S. Williams-J. Palmer) 2:33 (*)(∆)

21. Guest Star Show Opening & Powder Your Face with Sunshine

(C. Lombardo-S. Rochinski) 2:12 (*)(∆) Del Sharbutt (Announcer); Frank Sinatra and chorus with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. ca. May 1949; from the U.S. Treasury Department’s Guest Star #112 22.

You’ll Always Be the One I Love (T. Freeman-S. Skylar) 2:10 (*)(†)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 10/30/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

23.

The House I Live In

(F. Ahlert-R. Turk) 3:01 (*)(∆)

(F. Chopin-B. Kaye-T. Mossman) 3:05 (*)(∆)

(L. Allen & E. Robinson) 4:23 (*)(#)

Mervyn LeRoy (Introduction); Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 3/13/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)


24.

Over the Rainbow

(H. Arlen-E. Y. Harburg) 4:05 (*)

Frank Sinatra and The Pied Pipers with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 1/2/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

25.

You’ll Never Walk Alone (R. Rodgers-O. Hammerstein II) 3:24 (*) Frank Sinatra with the Ken Lane Singers and Robert Emmett Dolan & his Orchestra rec. 10/5/45; from Birds Eye Open House with Dinah Shore (Birds Eye)

26.

BONUS TRACK:

Frank Sinatra Previews The Voice of Frank Sinatra 6:54 (*)

ALL SELECTIONS ARE MONOPHONIC

PRODUCER’S NOTE: These rare broadcast recordings were made prior to the widespread use of magnetic tape and were preserved on 12-and16” lacquer discs. Some are from one-of-a kind rehearsal and air show discs, which have suffered from deterioration. In restoring and remastering this collection, we have reduced as many anomalies as possible without affecting the integrity of the musical performance. We hope that you appreciate and enjoy them for their rarity and importance, and overlook any minor deficiencies in fidelity. (*) Indicates PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED broadcast performance (#) Indicates NEWLY EDITED broadcast performance (∆) Indicates song commercially UNRECORDED by Frank Sinatra (†) Indicates commercially UNRECORDED (alternate) arrangement

Medley:

Someone to Watch Over Me (G. Gershwin-I. Gershwin)/I Don’t Know Why (I Just Do) (F. Ahlert-R. Turk)/These Foolish Things (H. Marvell-J. Strachey-H. Link)/Why Shouldn’t I (C. Porter)/You Go to My Head (H. Gillespie-F. J. Coots)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 5/1/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

DEDICATION This collection is dedicated to the memory of Ken Barnes (1933 – 2015): a true Renaissance man who enriched the literature of popular music through his prolific work as a writer, producer, broadcaster, commentator, filmmaker and friend.

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS Mark Bauman, Jimmy Edwards, Amanda Erlinger & Robert A. Finkelstein PRODUCED BY Charles Pignone & Charles L. Granata EDITING, MASTERING & SONIC RESTORATION Andreas Meyer & Charles L. Granata at Meyer Media Mastering, Queens, NY ARCHIVAL DISC & TAPE TRANSFERS Andreas Meyer (Meyer Media Mastering, Queens, NY); Matt Cavaluzzo (Battery Studios, NYC); Mark Wilder (Battery Studios, NYC); Doug Pomeroy (Pomeroy Audio, Brooklyn, NY); Daniel Hoal (Los Angeles); Ryan Chroninger (The Library of Congress) & Charles L. Granata ARCHIVAL DISC & TAPE RESEARCH Mark Bauman, Anthony Fountain, Marc Kirkeby, Martin M. Melucci, Mike Panico & Marlene Walker-Golden ART DIRECTION & PACKAGE DESIGN Federico Ruiz PROJECT A&R Henry Towns PRODUCT DIRECTION Gina Aciares PROJECT MANAGEMENT Tara Master PROJECT ASSISTANCE Joshua Bresnick, Martin M. Melucci & James Sullivan

VERY SPECIAL THANKS

Gil Aronow, Adam Block, Gretchen Brennison, Ken Barnes, David Dintenfass (Full-Track Productions), Michael Erlinger, Gabby Gibb, Jennifer Goodman, John Gray, Jeremy Holiday, John Edward Hasse, Melinda Hudson, John Jackson, Stacey Kluck, Gene Korf, Scott Korf, A.J. Lambert, Howard Lau, Chris Liedel, Bill Moynihan, Maureen O’Connor, Bob O’Neill, Erik Paparozzi, Jeff Pollack, Michelle Sangenito, Bob Santelli, Matt Schreiber, Jeffrey Schulberg, Toby Silver, Nancy Sinatra, Frank Sinatra, Jr., Tina Sinatra, Timothy J. Smith, Kelly Spinks

THE PRODUCERS

Wish to express our thanks and gratitude to the archivists, researchers, scholars, friends and institutions who assisted with our research, and in procuring the elusive recordings, images and performance/broadcast data included in this collection: Jeffrey Abraham, Robert Bader, Jeanette Bernard, Michael Feinstein, Chris Lewis, Maria Pagano, Ron Simon, Dennis Spragg, Marlene Walker-Golden, the Smithsonian Institution, the Michael Feinstein American Songbook Initiative Archive (Carmel, Indiana), The Paley Center for Media (NYC), The Library of Congress (Washington, D.C., The Glenn Miller Archive at the University of Colorado, & The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center. We are particularly grateful for the participation and assistance of The Library of Congress (Washington, D.C.), and their associates, whose expertise and unwavering dedication to this project has been invaluable, and has added immeasurably to the final product.

This compilation P & C 2015 Sony Music Entertainment / Manufactured by Sony Music Entertainment / 550 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10022-3211 / 88875147142


24.

Over the Rainbow

(H. Arlen-E. Y. Harburg) 4:05 (*)

Frank Sinatra and The Pied Pipers with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 1/2/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

25.

You’ll Never Walk Alone (R. Rodgers-O. Hammerstein II) 3:24 (*) Frank Sinatra with the Ken Lane Singers and Robert Emmett Dolan & his Orchestra rec. 10/5/45; from Birds Eye Open House with Dinah Shore (Birds Eye)

26.

BONUS TRACK:

Frank Sinatra Previews The Voice of Frank Sinatra 6:54 (*)

ALL SELECTIONS ARE MONOPHONIC

PRODUCER’S NOTE: These rare broadcast recordings were made prior to the widespread use of magnetic tape and were preserved on 12-and16” lacquer discs. Some are from one-of-a kind rehearsal and air show discs, which have suffered from deterioration. In restoring and remastering this collection, we have reduced as many anomalies as possible without affecting the integrity of the musical performance. We hope that you appreciate and enjoy them for their rarity and importance, and overlook any minor deficiencies in fidelity. (*) Indicates PREVIOUSLY UNRELEASED broadcast performance (#) Indicates NEWLY EDITED broadcast performance (∆) Indicates song commercially UNRECORDED by Frank Sinatra (†) Indicates commercially UNRECORDED (alternate) arrangement

Medley:

Someone to Watch Over Me (G. Gershwin-I. Gershwin)/I Don’t Know Why (I Just Do) (F. Ahlert-R. Turk)/These Foolish Things (H. Marvell-J. Strachey-H. Link)/Why Shouldn’t I (C. Porter)/You Go to My Head (H. Gillespie-F. J. Coots)

Frank Sinatra with Axel Stordahl & his Orchestra rec. 5/1/46; from CBS’s Songs By Sinatra (Old Gold)

DEDICATION This collection is dedicated to the memory of Ken Barnes (1933 – 2015): a true Renaissance man who enriched the literature of popular music through his prolific work as a writer, producer, broadcaster, commentator, filmmaker and friend.

EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS Mark Bauman, Jimmy Edwards, Amanda Erlinger & Robert A. Finkelstein PRODUCED BY Charles Pignone & Charles L. Granata EDITING, MASTERING & SONIC RESTORATION Andreas Meyer & Charles L. Granata at Meyer Media Mastering, Queens, NY ARCHIVAL DISC & TAPE TRANSFERS Andreas Meyer (Meyer Media Mastering, Queens, NY); Matt Cavaluzzo (Battery Studios, NYC); Mark Wilder (Battery Studios, NYC); Doug Pomeroy (Pomeroy Audio, Brooklyn, NY); Daniel Hoal (Los Angeles); Ryan Chroninger (The Library of Congress) & Charles L. Granata ARCHIVAL DISC & TAPE RESEARCH Mark Bauman, Anthony Fountain, Marc Kirkeby, Martin M. Melucci, Mike Panico & Marlene Walker-Golden ART DIRECTION & PACKAGE DESIGN Federico Ruiz PROJECT A&R Henry Towns PRODUCT DIRECTION Gina Aciares PROJECT MANAGEMENT Tara Master PROJECT ASSISTANCE Joshua Bresnick, Martin M. Melucci & James Sullivan

VERY SPECIAL THANKS

Gil Aronow, Adam Block, Gretchen Brennison, Ken Barnes, David Dintenfass (Full-Track Productions), Michael Erlinger, Gabby Gibb, Jennifer Goodman, John Gray, Jeremy Holiday, John Edward Hasse, Melinda Hudson, John Jackson, Stacey Kluck, Gene Korf, Scott Korf, A.J. Lambert, Howard Lau, Chris Liedel, Bill Moynihan, Maureen O’Connor, Bob O’Neill, Erik Paparozzi, Jeff Pollack, Michelle Sangenito, Bob Santelli, Matt Schreiber, Jeffrey Schulberg, Toby Silver, Nancy Sinatra, Frank Sinatra, Jr., Tina Sinatra, Timothy J. Smith, Kelly Spinks

THE PRODUCERS

Wish to express our thanks and gratitude to the archivists, researchers, scholars, friends and institutions who assisted with our research, and in procuring the elusive recordings, images and performance/broadcast data included in this collection: Jeffrey Abraham, Robert Bader, Jeanette Bernard, Michael Feinstein, Chris Lewis, Maria Pagano, Ron Simon, Dennis Spragg, Marlene Walker-Golden, the Smithsonian Institution, the Michael Feinstein American Songbook Initiative Archive (Carmel, Indiana), The Paley Center for Media (NYC), The Library of Congress (Washington, D.C., The Glenn Miller Archive at the University of Colorado, & The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center. We are particularly grateful for the participation and assistance of The Library of Congress (Washington, D.C.), and their associates, whose expertise and unwavering dedication to this project has been invaluable, and has added immeasurably to the final product.

This compilation P & C 2015 Sony Music Entertainment / Manufactured by Sony Music Entertainment / 550 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10022-3211 / 88875147142


Frank Sinatra: Lost & Found | The Radio Years  

This Exclusive Smithsonian Edition contains 26 remarkable live radio performances with 24 that have never been commercially released.

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