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Certificate Program in World Art History Art is all around us. It excites us, enriches our lives, and enlivens our imaginations. But to truly appreciate any work of art, we need to understand the context and culture in which it was produced. That’s why Smithsonian Associates offers an exciting certificate program in World Art History. The wide-ranging offerings are designed to provide a global perspective on art and architecture and draw on the Smithsonian’s world-class collections and the rich resources of other Washington institutions.

You love art. Now become the expert you’ve always wanted to be. The core courses and electives in our program are selected from among Smithsonian Associates’ ongoing courses, seminars, study tours, and studio art classes. Look for “World Art History Certificate” throughout the program guide to see current listings. Complete the program requirements at your own pace. Credits are counted from the day of program registration and are not given retroactively. Register now and receive invitations for special tours and informal gatherings with course leaders and other program participants.

To learn more about the Smithsonian Associates certificate program in World Art History, visit SmithsonianAssociates.org/ArtCertificate

Left column, from the top: Fresco of the Libyan Sibyl, ca. 1511, Sistine Chapel, by Michelangelo; Taj Mahal, completed 1643, Agra, India; The Young Ladies of Avignon, 1907, by Pablo Picasso; Equestrian ceramic figure; ca. 13th–15th centuries; Mali; second column; Lou Ruvo Brain Institute, 2010, by Frank Gehry, Las Vegas; The Calf-Bearer, ca. 570 B.C.; Athens, Greece; Girl with a Pearl Earring, ca. 1665, by Johannes Vermeer; Before the Ballet, ca. 1892, Edgar Degas


Dear Friends and Members, ’See you around the Mall’ is how I often close these monthly letters, but it would be more accurate to just say ‘See you around’ because every day, Associates’ members depart on dozens of local, regional, and national study tours to explore locations far beyond the National Mall. These expert-led, educationally focused study tours give us backstage passes to Wolf Trap and teach us the fascinating history and science at Oak Ridge National Labs. We sail aboard Chesapeake Bay schooners and ride in vintage railroad cars; travelers go behind the scenes at the Corning Museum of Glass and wander inside artists’ studios and Frank Lloyd Wright’s architectural masterworks. We admire landscapes as near as the Shenandoahs and as far away as the Badlands of the Dakota Territory. Each program deepens and personalizes the history, culture, art, science, and natural beauty of our world.

November 2019 Trending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Studio Art . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Member Benefits . . . . . . 54 Helpful Information . . . . 56

I invite you to study the exciting new lineup of overnight tours planned for 2020 (pp. 2-3). Join us on a journey south to experience the delights of Nashville; stop in North Carolina to catch some games in historic baseball stadiums (and enjoy delicious barbecue); welcome spring in stunning gardens in the Bronx; and immerse yourself in the history of California’s Gold Rush country. It’s always good to see you—whether on the Mall or beyond! From the top: Hot glass demonstration at the Corning Museum of Glass; Theodore Roosevelt National Park in South Dakota; the Sultana, a Chesapeake Bay schooner

Frederica R. Adelman, Director adelmanf@si.edu Programs with this icon put a spotlight on the Smithsonian facebook.com/smithsonianassociates twitter.com/smithsonianTSA Smithsonian Associates (USPS 043-210) Vol. 48, No. 3, November 2019. Published monthly by Smithsonian Associates, Smithsonian Institution, 1100 Jefferson Drive, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20560. Periodicals postage paid at Washington, DC. and at additional mailing offices. Vesna Gjaja, Director of Marketing and Membership; Cecelia Reed, Editor; Robert A. Sacheli, Copywriter; Ric Garcia, Visual Specialist. Copyright 2019 by the Smithsonian Associates. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Smithsonian Associates, P.O. Box 23293, Washington, D.C. 20026-3293. Printed in the U.S.A. on recyclable paper.

instagram.com/smithsonianassociates issuu.com/smithsonianassociatesprograms

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A New Year of Delightful Destinations Overnight Tours for 2020 Our study tours are designed for people who want more than just a getaway: They offer one-of-a-kind experiences combined with opportunities to gain new insights into the topics that fascinate you. Whether you’re a fan of history, art, music, science, nature, or architecture—or simply love exploring new places— these expert-led excursions offer a year’s worth of tempting travels. Several of

The Bronx in Bloom

our most popular tours return to the schedule, offering you another chance to

May 3–4; on sale Jan. 1

join us on these adventures—before they sell out again!

Spring is the perfect time to discover the beauty and the history of New York City’s northernmost borough, from the stunning gardens of Wave Hill along the Hudson to Edgar Allan Poe’s cottage.

Note: Tour dates and content are subject to change.

A Trio of Museum Gems

Leader: Richard Selden

An Artful Weekend in New York Sat., Jan. 11–Sun., Jan. 12; see p. 36

Hiking in the Shenandoahs

Enjoy an escape to Manhattan that includes the Neue Gallery, Morgan Library and Museum, and Frick Collection—and a night on the town for yourself.

May 17–18; on sale Feb. 1 Celebrate the beauty of Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park as you hike its trails, in spring. Take in the panoramas from Skyland, your lodge nestled along Skyline Drive.

Leader: Ursula Rehn Wolfman

Leader: Keith Tomlinson

OUT D L SO

The Road to Nashville March 22–28; on sale Dec. 1 Music City USA is a cultural melting pot, and this journey south offers a blend of attractions from outstanding country music performances to a major museum exhibition of Turner paintings. Leader: Richard Selden

The Philadelphia Flower Show

Exploring Frank Loyd Wright

March 1–2; on sale Dec. 1

May 31–June 1; on sale Feb. 1

The spectacular displays at the nation’s top floral event are even more beautiful without the crowds. A private viewing before opening hours is just one of the special features of this visit to the 2020 edition of the show, themed Riviera Holiday.

Appreciate Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterwork anew during a late spring visit to the house. See other significant Wright modernist architecture at Kentuck Knob and the cluster of houses at Polymath Park designed by the architect and one of his apprentices. Leader: Bill Keene

The Best of Brooklyn April 19–20; on sale Jan. 1 Brooklyn offers plenty of delights for lovers of art, music, nature, and food. An arts journalist and former Brooklynite introduces you to several of its top attractions. Leader: Richard Selden

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SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


Theodore Roosevelt’s North Dakota

A Mountain Rail Extravaganza

Sept. 19–23; on sale April 1

June 5–7; on sale March 1

Fly west and experience the wild beauty of the Dakota Territory that shaped young Theodore Roosevelt’s course as a conservationist and naturalist.

Stunning spring vistas, vintage locomotives, and West Virginia history are on the itinerary for a weekend spent riding the Cass Scenic Railroad and other mountain routes. Leader: Joe Nevin

Leader: Melanie Choukas-Bradley

A Berkshires Summer Sampler July 2020 The scenic and historic Berkshire hills of western Massachusetts are alive with music, art, and theatre. A 5-day tour offers a splendid sampling of cultural attractions in the region. Leader: Richard Selden

Gold-Rush California

Spring in the Brandywine River Valley

Fall 2020 In the late 1840s, the dream of riches drew hundreds of thousands to California—and shaped the history of the state and the American West. A 7-day tour immerses you in the places where the adventure unfolded.

June 14–15; on sale Feb. 1 The beautiful Brandywine region is the ideal destination for lovers of art, grand houses and gardens, American history— and used books.

Leader: Garrett Peck

Leader: Hayden Mathews

An Artful Weekend in New York August 2020 Here’s a perfect getaway for art aficionados: Take in a trio of museum exhibitions, enjoy an evening on your own, and stay at a grand Jazz Age hotel. Leader: Ursula Rehn Wolfman

Wonders by Wright Play Ball—Carolina Style! July 1–5; on sale March 1 Minor-league baseball in North Carolina reflects the game at its most authentic. Head to Bull Durham country with the authors of Fodor’s Baseball Vacations to experience games in historic stadiums, meet coaches and players, and savor some great barbecue.

Buffalo and Beyond

Autumn in Hyde Park

August 28–31; on sale April 1

Fall 2020

In the early 20th century, Frank Lloyd Wright and his contemporaries turned Buffalo into a showcase for some of the most dazzling and innovative public and private architecture. A 4-day tour surveys this rich heritage.

Follow the Hudson to FDR’s family home and presidential library, Eleanor Roosevelt’s Val-Kill Cottage, the opulent Vanderbilt Mansion, and the Culinary Institute of America. Leader: Bill Keene

Leader: Bill Keene

Leaders: Peggy Engel and Bruce Adams

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A Diversity of Flavors

Daniela Moriera

How Foreign-born Chefs Are Redefining American Cuisine Bin Lu

With Tasting Today, foreign-born chefs are heading the kitchens in some of America’s most exciting restaurants. The compelling stories of 40 immigrant chefs, from tackling economic injustice to reshaping restaurant culture and menus, are in a new cookbook, A Place at the Table: New American Recipes from the Nation’s Top Foreign-Born Chefs. The book’s editor Gabrielle Langholtz joins local chefs Bin Lu (Pineapple and Pearls), Carlos Delgado (China Chilcano), Pichet Ong (Brothers and Sisters), Erik Bruner-Yang (Brothers and Sisters, Maketto, and Spoken English), Diego Galicia (Mixtli in San Antonio, TX), and Daniela Moriera (Timber Pizza), to discuss how talented immigrants are transforming the dining-out scene. Maria Godoy of NPR’s The Salt moderates. A Place at the Table (Prestel) is available for sale and signing.

Maria Godoy

Diego Galicia

Erik Bruner-Yang

Carlos Delgado

Pichet Ong

Sun., Nov. 3, 3 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-285; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

Café Society Where New York’s Brightest Made the Scene With Cocktails From Prohibition through the 1950s, the rich and famous gathered at The Stork Club, 21 Club, El Morocco, and other swank nightspots. They were dubbed the Café Society by columnists who hung on their every glittering move. Join author and cocktail historian Philip Greene in a spirited look at the culture of these legendary venues through the lens of the great drinks developed and savored there. Enjoy a sampling of four cocktails: the 21 Club Cocktail, the Stork Club Cocktail, the El Morocco Cocktail, and the Julius Special. Mon., Nov. 4, 6:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0463; Members $50; Nonmembers $65

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STUDIO ART

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

What Makes Mrs. Maisel So Marvelous? Amazon Prime’s award-winning drama-comedy “The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel” finds Miriam “Midge” Maisel and her family trying to turn their seemingly perfect lives in 1950s New York into the lives they actually want. The show about a jilted wife and mother turned standup comic has propelled star Rachel Brosnahan into the center of the pop-culture spotlight and is now must-stream TV. Stef Woods, an American University’s American Studies program faculty member, explores the show’s character relationships and portrayals of such issues as feminism, religion, marriage, and career; as well as how it depicts the period’s stand-up comedy circuit. Woods also shares key plot points Rachel Brosnahan as Mrs. Maisel in Amazon Studio’s hit show and a look into the third season. Thurs., Nov. 7, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-013; all tickets $25

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Home Cooking, Cuban-style

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Lunch at Cuba Libre

Hot Lunch at Cuba Libre The best food in Cuba can be found in paladares, small private restaurants generally run out of family homes. They are acclaimed for the bold flavors and fresh ingredients found in a wide range of tempting dishes, from the homey sopa de tamal to the exotic green mango-chayote escabeche. Dishes from the paladores have been collected in Cuba Cooks: Recipes and Secrets from the Cuban Paladares and Their Chefs, co-authored by Guillermo Pernot, chef-partner at Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar. Savor Cuba Libre dishes at a lunch specially prepared and presented by Chef Pernot. Cuba Cooks (Rizzoli International Publications) is available for sale and signing.

Tapa de Salmón

Papa Rellena

Mojito-cured salmon, piquillo allioli

Potato croquettes filled with goat picadillo, with sweet guajillo pepper sauce, crispy onions, and Manchego crema

Buñuelo de Espinaca Spinach fritters, goat cheese ranch dressing

Ropa Vieja de Pato Braised pulled duck with sweet peppers, grilled onions, and Hawaiian tostón

Pez en Salsa de Coco Pan-roasted corvina in a fresh coconut milk–cilantro sauce

Ensalada de Calabaza Steamed West Indian calabaza squash, Spanish olive oil

Puré de Boniato Double-whipped white sweet potato, ginger, and peppers

Flan de Queso Cheese flan, candied guava

Wed., Nov. 13, 12 p.m.; Cuba Libre, 801 9th St., NW (Metro: Gallery Place-Chinatown, Red/Yellow/Green lines); CODE 1J0-012; Members $65; Nonmembers $75 (registration closes 5 p.m., Nov. 6)

Nightcaps

Ben Folds: An Unconventional Icon

The Perfect Ending

Singer-songwriter Ben Folds, former front man of Ben Folds Five, defies genres. He has collaborated with artists as diverse as Sara Bareilles, Regina Spektor, and William Shatner; was a judge on NBC’s “The SingOff ”; and composed a Billboard-topping concerto. A champion for arts education and music therapy, he is chairman of ArtsVote 2020, holding presidential candidates accountable on arts issue. In a converstaion with NPR Music editor and reviewer Stephen Thompson, Folds draws on his bestselling memoir A Dream Ben Folds About Lightning Bugs: A Life of Music and Cheap Lessons (Ballantine Books) as he recalls painful professional and personal setbacks, and how his unwavering dream of a creative life kept him moving forward. His memoir is available for sale and signing.

Do you wonder which cocktail is ideal to close your dinner parties? Or perhaps you simply want a drink that’s worthy of being the perfect way to close the day. Join Kara Newman, spirits editor of Wine Enthusiast and cocktail consultant, for a discussion on the nightcap’s history—and what bartenders think of when they designate a drink as a nightcap. A guided tasting of nightcap-style drinks and light refreshments are a perfect way to close the program. Newman’s book Nightcap: More Than 40 Cocktails to Close Out Any Evening (Chronicle Books) is available for sale and signing. Fri., Nov. 15, 7 p.m.; Ripley Center; all participants must be 21 or over; CODE 1L0-289; Members $35; Nonmembers $50 Some cocktail ingredients courtesy D.C.-based Don Ciccio & Figli

ANTONIS ACHILLEOS

JOE VAUGHN

With Tasting

Tues., Dec. 3, 6:45 p.m.; Rasmuson Theater, American Indian Museum; CODE 1L0-287; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

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With Tasting

Women represent more than half of culinary school graduates but claim just 21 percent of head-chef roles in America. What’s behind the imbalance? The answer is plenty. For her new book, Women on Food, editor Charlotte Druckman surveyed esteemed food journalists, chefs, critics, and Carla Hall thinkers, among them Nigella Lawson, Diana Henry, Soleil Ho, Samin Nosrat, and Rachael Ray. In conversation with chef and television personality Carla Hall, Druckman discusses some of the issues the industry professionals weighed in on: the #MeToo movement, workplace gender bias, the underrepresentation of women of color in leadership, and the evolution of food writing. Women on Food (Abrams Press) is available for sale and signing. Wed., Dec. 11, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-292; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

SAMMY TODD DYESS

MELANIE DUNEA

Women on Food

Charlotte Druckman

ART

Bryan and Michael Voltaggio on the Flavors of the Chesapeake

MELISSA HOM

Putting It All on the Table

SCIENCE

Known for their appearances on “Top Chef ” and their restaurants in Maryland and California, chefs Bryan and Michael Voltaggio launched their third restaurant together in early 2019. The brothers named it Estuary in the spirit of the Chesapeake Bay, a source of ingredients and inspiration for these Maryland natives. Bryan Voltaggio Estuary at the Conrad DC in City Center offers a reimagined approach to the distinct flavors that have traditionally been part of the watershed’s offerings. In conversation with Washington Post food reporter Tim Carman, the Voltaggios discuss their journey from their hometown of Frederick, Maryland, to “Top Chef ” fame; how they created Estuary’s menu; and what it’s like to cook with family. After the program, enjoy a small bite from Estuary. Tues., Dec. 17, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-298; Members $30; Nonmembers $45 Michael Voltaggio

Smithsonian Associates

Hoop of Life with Ty Defoe With his vivid presence as a performer, Ty Defoe recounts an eloquent story of life. He uses the ritual Hoop Dance to explore Native American stories framed by traditional and contemporary culture, history, and values. Fri., Nov. 1 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Baird Auditorium, Natural History Museum

Full show descriptions on our website

Grandma’s Thanksgiving Visit This musical play with puppets and a great big heart brings the whole audience into the family with singing, finger play, and call-and-response as we all give thanks for being together. Thurs, Nov. 21 and Fri., Nov. 22 Mon., Nov. 25 and Tues., Nov. 26 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Discovery Theater, Ripley Center

DiscoveryTheater.org

Generous support for Discovery Theater is provided by The Nora Roberts Foundation, Smithsonian Women's Committee, Smithsonian Youth Access Grants Program and Sommer endowment.

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SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.

SAMMY TODD DYESS

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Statement of Ownership Statement of ownership, management, and circulation (required by 39 USC 3685) of the Smithsonian Associate for the year ending September 30, 2019. The Smithsonian Associate is owned and published by The Smithsonian Associates, Smithsonian Institution, 1100 Jefferson Drive, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20560-0701, under publication number 043210. The annual subscription price is $14. Cecelia Reed is the Editor. All offices of the Publisher, including those of the editors and the business office, are located at 1100 Jefferson Drive, S.W., Washington, D.C. 205600701. The Smithsonian Associates is a nonprofit organization, and the purpose, function, and nonprofit status of the organization and the exempt status for federal income tax purposes have not changed during the preceding 12 months. There are no known bondholders, mortgages, or other security holders owning or holding one percent or more of the total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities. The average numbers of copies of each issue during the preceding 12 months are: (A) Total number of copies printed: 19,166; (B) Paid circulation: (1) Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, and counter sales: None; (2) Mail subscriptions: 17,466; (C) Total paid circulation: 17,466; (D) Free distribution by mail (samples, complimentary): None; (E) Free distribution outside the mail: 956; (F) Total free distribution: 956;(G) Total distribution: 18,422; (H) Copies not distributed: (1) Office use, leftovers, spoiled: 744; (2) Returns from new agents: None; (I) Total: 19,166. The actual number of copies of the single issue published nearest to filing date is: (A) Total number of copies printed: 19,075; (B) Paid circulation: (1) Sales through dealers and carriers, vendors, and counter sales: None; (2) Paid or requested mail subscriptions: 17,375; (C) Total paid or requested subscriptions: 17,375; (D) Free distribution by mail: None; (E) Free distribution outside the mail: 1,647; (F) Total free distribution: 1,647; (G) Total distribution: 19,022; (H) Copies not distributed: (1) Office use, leftovers, spoiled: 53; (2) Returns from new agents: None; (I) Total: 19,075. I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete. Patricia J. Dwyer, Associate Director of Finance and Administration, Smithsonian Associates

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The Domesday Book William the Conqueror’s Great Survey Nineteen years after the Battle of Hastings made him Facsimile of the Domesday Book king of England, William the Conqueror ordered an inquest be made in every shire into the landowners, peasants, slaves, moveable property and fiscal resources of the realm. These records were collected, edited, and compiled into two volumes that became known colloquially as the Domesday Book, and its authority on matters of land tenure was incontestable. Historians and genealogists still look to it for information about the early history of English life. Medieval historian Richard Abels, professor emeritus of the United States Naval Academy, explores the history of this extraordinary document and what it reveals about the governance, society, and economy of late 11thcentury England. Mon., Nov. 4, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-457; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

The Reverse Underground Railroad Slavery and Kidnapping in Pre-Civil War America

for purchase (cash only) in

In the decades before the Civil War a clandestine network of human traffickers and slave traders stole away thousands of free African Americans from the northern states in order to sell them into slavery in the Deep South. Solomon Northup chronicled his capture and enslavement in Twelve Years a Slave. But very little is known about the trade’s conductors and agents whose identities still remain a secret. Historian Richard Bell examines this heinous practice and the actions of state and city governments to end it. His book Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped “A Northern Freeman Enslaved by Northern Hands” from Into Slavery and The American Anti-Slavery Almanac, 1839 Their Astonishing Odyssey Home (Simon & Schuster) is available for sale and signing.

outside our offices on

Wed., Nov. 6, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-052; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Arriving Hungry? Snacks are available

the Ripley Center concourse Mondays–Thursdays, 6–7:15 p.m.

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Victoria: From Teen Queen to Matriarch of Europe CASTLE MUSEUM, GOTHA, GERMANY

When 18-year-old Victoria came to the throne, England was on the brink of industrial expansion, economic progress, and the establishment of an empire. How could a young woman with no experience or training in governance rule a troubled nation through turbulent times? Throughout her reign, the duties and powers of the monarch decreased. But Victoria used her influence as a constitutional monarch to oversee the establishment of the British Empire and the modernization of her nation. She occupied the throne for more than 60 years and changed England, Europe, and the world. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger explores Victoria’s life and reign, tracing the steps that transformed the young, inexperienced, and initially ineffective young queen into one of the most iconic monarchs of all time. 9:30 a.m. A Difficult Beginning 11 a.m. A Family on the Throne 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. The Widow, the Nation, and the Empire 3 p.m. Becoming “The Queen” Sat., Nov. 9, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-045; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

The Civil War in Arlington County

Although Gettysburg is often cited as the Civil War’s most important battle, it was the fall of Vicksburg that sealed the fate of the Confederacy. Lincoln said that the war could not be won until the city was taken, as Vicksburg was the last stronghold of the Confederacy on the Mississippi River, preventing shipping between the Union-controlled Midwest and New Orleans and the Gulf of Mexico. Over the course of a yearlong campaign, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant unsuccessfully tried various ways to take Vicksburg and lost thousands of men in the efforts. He eventually succeeded through a siege that starved the city’s defenders and forced them to surrender on July 4, 1863. Drawing on his new book, Vicksburg: Grant’s Campaign That Broke the Confederacy, Donald L. Miller tells the story of the longest and most decisive military campaign of the Civil War. Thurs., Nov. 7, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-283; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Vicksburg The Campaign That Broke the Confederacy

Queen Victoria, 1845, by Alexander Melville

Now urbanized, Virginia’s Arlington County was known as Alexandria County at the time of the Civil War. Its farms and orchards were home to OUT of fewer a population D L SO than 1,500, the majority of whom were proUnion. During the struggle between the Soldiers gathered near log block house near Fort states, however, this Corcoran in Arlington, ca. 1862, Barnard & Gibson pastoral county on photographer the doorstep of Washington, D.C., became an often overlooked setting for the political power struggles engulfing the nation. The site of some 22 forts, the area was overrun with 150,000 Union troops that encamped in the area at various times throughout the four-year period. Beginning at the S. Dillon Ripley Center for a slide presentation, historian Dakota Springston leads this tour that focuses on life in Arlington County during and after the Civil War. Sites of many forts are viewed, and Springston points out the location of Mathew Brady’s photo “saloon,” where soldiers could have their tintypes (images) made; homes that served as hospitals; a Confederate outpost; and the Reconstruction Era Freedmen’s Village. DAY TOUR Sat., Nov. 9, 10:15 a.m.–5 p.m.; by bus; lunch at local restaurant included; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-006; Members $140; Nonmembers $190

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Orville Wright’s Redemption The Story Behind the First Military Airplane The 1909 Wright Flyer was the first airplane designed for military use, and its successful demonstration by the Wright brothers to the United States Army at Fort Myer, Virginia, was captured on film, which existed for years only as a jumbled set of clips. Aviation writer and filmmaker Paul Glenshaw finally edited the clips into a 13-minute film. His work also tells a more personal story: Orville Wright’s recovery and comeback after an accident in 1908 during another sales demonstration, when Wright’s passenger, an Army lieutenant, was the first airplane fatality. Glenshaw narrates the film’s screening as he brings to life the story of this transformative moment in military, aviation, and local history. Wed., Nov. 13, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-001; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

Orville Wright piloting Military Flyer, 1909, Fort Myer, Virginia

Exclusive Member Tours COURTESY AFRICAN ART MUSEUM

Did you know that Smithsonian Associates offers exclusive complimentary tours for our members? Space is very limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Registration is limited to two guests per account, two times a year. If you are unable to use the tickets you’ve reserved, please contact Customer Service at least 24 hours in advance so that we may offer them to other members. Failure to do so will result in the reservation counting as a used benefit.

Tours last 1 hour; members only; free, but require registration: call 202-633-3030 COURTESY NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

The Outwin 2019: American Portraiture Today

Miss Everything (Unsuppressed Deliverance), 2013, by Amy Sherald

The exhibition The Outwin 2019: American Portraiture Today presents the artwork of the 46 finalists for the fifth triennial Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition. Amy Sherald, winner of the 2016 competition, was selected to paint Michelle Obama’s portrait, now on exhibit in the NPG. Tues., Nov. 12, 1 p.m.; CODE 1E0-204; National Portrait Gallery

COURTESY THE ANDERSON HOUSE

Anderson House

Revolutionary War powder horn, engraved with scenes of the siege of Boston in 1775

Anderson House was built between 1902 and 1905 for American diplomat Larz Anderson and his wife, Isabel Weld Perkins. Designed in the Beaux-Arts style, the house was used by the Andersons to entertain the social and political elite of this and other countries, as well as to showcase the couple’s collection of fine art and historic artifacts acquired during their extensive travels. Wed., Nov. 20, 12 p.m.; CODE 1E0-206; Anderson House

Wedding Souvenirs, by Njideka Akunyili Crosby, born 1983, Nigeria

I Am… Contemporary Women Artists of Africa I Am…Contemporary Women Artists of Africa is an exhibition featuring modern and contemporary work by 27 artists selected from the African Art Museum’s permanent collection. It offers a wide array of media, formats, styles, and subjects, and includes videos, sculpture, textiles, ceramics, paintings and photography. Thurs., Nov. 14, 1:20 p.m.; CODE 1E0-205; African Art Museum

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DC Museums Salute the Suffragists Tracing the Path to the Voting Booth Part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative

NATIONAL WOMAN'S PARTY COLLECTION

With the impending centennial of the passage of the 19th Amendment, several Washington museums are spotlighting the decades-long struggle for women’s suffrage in special exhibitions. Join tour guide Kathleen Bashian to view them and explore how the movement achieved that goal. Tour the Belmont-Paul Women’s Equality National Monument, the historic Capitol Hill house that once served as the headquarters of the National Woman’s Party. Rebecca Roberts, author of Suffragists in Washington, D.C.: The Graphic for the Library of 1913 Parade and the Fight for the Vote, discusses Congress exhibition Shall Not Be Denied: Women the groundbreaking event that brought the Fight for the Vote movement to a new level of public consciousness: the first civil rights march to use the Suffragist and feminist nation’s capital as a backdrop. Alice Paul celebrates Visits to three exhibitions expand and deepen ratification of the 19th the story of how women successfully fought for amendment in 1920 the vote, and how the legacy of the suffrage movement still resonates in American life: Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight For the Vote at the Library of Congress; Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence at the Portrait Gallery; and Rightfully Hers: American Woman and the Vote at the National Archives. DAY TOUR Wed., Nov. 13, 8:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; by bus; lunch at local restaurant; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-007; Members $145; Nonmembers $195

Mongolia: From Genghis to Kubilai Khan

Statue of Genghis Khan, Badain Jaran desert

A little more than 800 years ago, an ambitious and forward-thinking warrior named Temujin united a collection of nomadic cultures inhabiting the Mongolian steppe into a supra-tribal confederation. In doing so, he became known as Chinggis (Genghis) Khan—the “Oceanic” or “Universal” ruler of a vast world empire. He and his descendants paved the way for the momentous expansion of the Mongol world empire into Central Asia, the Middle East, Russia, and parts of Europe. Chinggis Khan’s grandson, Khubilai Khan (1215–1294), became the first Mongol to rule over all of China proper. In this day-long program, George Mason University historian Michael Chang traces the historical evolution of the Mongol empire from its emergence on the steppe to the conquest of China. 10 a.m. Steppe Society and the Rise of Chinggis Khan (1160–1206) 11:30 a.m. Forging the Mongol World Empire (1206–1260) 12:45 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:45 p.m. Khubilai Khan and the Conquest of China 3 p.m. Chinese Society Under Mongol Rule (1270–1368) Sat., Nov. 16, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-471; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 Map showing movement of Genghis Khan and his generals in their efforts to expand the Mongolian Empire in the early 13th century

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What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1.5–2 hours, including Q&A

J’Accuse! The Dreyfus Affair and Its Aftermath On Jan. 5, 1895, a shocking spectacle took place in the courtyard of the Parisian Ecole Militaire as Alfred Dreyfus, a young Jewish officer, was publicly degraded and denounced with cries of “Jew” and “Judas”. Found guilty of treason, he was sentenced to life imprisonment in Devil’s Island penal colony. A 12-year struggle to free Dreyfus included new evidence exposing the actual traitor, and the role of the press, most famously for publishing novelist Emile Zola’s denunciation of Front page of the newspaper L’Aurore with the the French army for this miscarriage letter written by Émile Zola, January 13, 1898 of justice. Historian Ralph Nurnberger examines the Dreyfus affair and its far-reaching ramifications including anti-Semitism’s expansion in Europe and the difficulties minorities face when seeking justice in pluralist societies.

Presidents and the Space Program How Kennedy, Nixon, and Reagan Set the Trajectory Key decisions made by Presidents Kennedy, Nixon, and Reagan set the course for the American space program for a half-century. In 1961, Kennedy’s goal to make America a leader in space by sending a man to the Moon was achieved by Apollo 11. Nixon’s ambitions for NASA were less lofty and less costly, and the space shuttle became its centerpiece. Under Reagan, NASA fulfilled its post-Apollo ambition to develop a space station.

Mon., Nov. 18, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-468; Members $30; Nonmembers $45 International Space Station

NATIONAL ARCHIVES

The Battle of Britain The Battle of Britain was a high-stakes contest between the Royal Air Force and the Luftwaffe over the skies of England. Britain possessed an effective air defense system and first-rate fighter pilots, while Germany was beset with an air force depleted by its victory over France as its army and navy prepared to invade Britain by sea. George Mason University Aircraft spotter in London during the Battle of Britain historian Kevin Matthews reevaluates this dramatic story and discusses how the RAF won control of the skies and forced the Nazis to abandon their invasion of Britain. This was one of the war’s critical turning points, and as much as any other factor, made possible the Allied victory five years later.

John M. Logsdon, founder of George Washington University’s Space Policy Institute, discusses the impact of presidential leadership on America’s space program. INSIDE SCIENCE Tues., Nov. 19, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-288; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

Read issues of the Smithsonian Associates member program guide at any time at issuu.com/smithsonianassociatesprograms

Thurs., Nov. 21, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-469; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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Researching Your Genealogy: A Journey of Self-Discovery Every family has stories about their roots, but are they true? Professional genealogist John Colletta provides practical information and time-saving advice to get you started on the adventure of discovering your own personal history. Unraveling the past from scraps of evidence in old records, maps, newspapers and photographs is fascinating detective work, but linking generation to generation is only half the challenge. Learning about your ancestors as human beings filled with goals and aspirations, personality quirks, and character flaws is the other half. By reconstructing their lives, you learn about who you are and why– because it’s all in the genes.

9:30 a.m. Essential Groundwork: Family interviews, internet, Library of Congress 11 a.m. Our Fabulous National Archives: Censuses, military records, immigration and naturalization records 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Exploring Ancestral Territory: Marriage and real estate, courthouse, cemetery and religious records 3 p.m. Honing Your Skills: Evaluating evidence, assembling materials, writing the narrative Sat., Dec. 7, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-055; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 Noeth Family, Buffalo, NY, 1901

Delayed Justice

Classical Music and American Foreign Relations

The Hunt for Hitler’s Hidden Soldiers in America

Thurs., Dec. 5, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-294; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

A Complicated Duet LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

In 1990, in a basement archive in Prague, two American historians made a startling discovery: Hitler’s SS had run a school in the Polish village of Trawniki that trained a roving army to kill Poland’s Jews. Washington Post investigative reporter Debbie Cenziper tells the story of two Jewish orphans from Poland who settled in the U.S. and then learned several “Trawniki Men” had as well. She describes how a team of prosecutors and historians fought to hold the men accountable for their crimes and remove them from American soil. Cenziper’s book Citizen 865: The Hunt for Hitler’s Hidden Soldiers in America (Hachette Books) is available for purchase and signing.

There was a time in the 20th century when classical music occupied a prominent place in the nation’s culture and politics. Author Jonathan Rosenberg discusses how their nationality and political beliefs influenced treatment of classical musicians during the two world wars. He explores the imprisonment and dismissal of German musicians during World War I; the role of Russian music in strengthening the World War II Leonard Bernstein at Carnegie Hall, 1940s; U.S.–Soviet alliance; and the photo by William Gottlieb targeting of prominent American musicians as communists during the Cold War—while some orchestras were allowed to perform behind the Iron Curtain. Rosenberg’s book Dangerous Melodies: Classical Music in America from the Great War Through the Cold War (W.W. Norton) is available for sale and signing. Tues., Dec. 10, 12 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE: 1A0-097; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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Barack and Joe

The Gilded Steinway

The Making of a Presidential Friendship

Music in Theodore Roosevelt’s White House

Thurs., Dec. 12, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0293; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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In collaboration with the White House Historical Association BARACK OBAMA PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY/PETE SOUZA

Joe Biden and Barack Obama were a study in sharply contrasting styles. Wary of each other at first, they became friends and a strong team during two terms filled with historic moments, from devastating economic crisis and racial confrontations to war in Afghanistan and the dawn of same-sex marriage nationwide. Biden was the president’s chief adviser, and Obama relied on Biden’s foreign affairs expertise and legislative experience. President Barack Obama and Author Steve Vice President Joe Biden Levingston offers a new look at the Obama presidency and its legacy in his new book, Barack and Joe: The Making of an Extraordinary Partnership. Barack and Joe (Hachette Books) is available for purchase and signing.

With Performance The rich musical life of TR’s White House was distinguished by a number of firsts, including the first East Room piano, presented by Steinway and Sons to the president in 1903. It is a work of art: Covered in gold leaf decorated with the coats of arms Great pianists of the time performed on of the 13 original states, the muses the Steinway piano in TR’s White House grace a painting under its lid. The piano is now in the collection of the Smithsonian’s American History Museum. Author and musicologist Elise Kirk offers an overview of Roosevelt-era music, highlighted by a performance on a Steinway-built replica of the original piano. Participants receive a copy of Kirk’s book Music in the White House from the 18th to the 21st Centuries (White House Historical Association). Thurs., Dec. 12, 6:30 p.m.; Decatur House, 748 Jackson Place, NW; CODE 1K0-003; Members $65; Nonmembers $85

Old Town Alexandria A Holiday Staycation Treat yourself to a holiday-season overnight getaway in Alexandria’s historic district. It’s the perfect way to experience its colonial architecture, museums, fine dining, the waterfront, and of course, a little shopping. Stay at The Alexandrian, a boutique-style hotel where the décor offers a charming contemporary spin on classic 18th-century styles. Meet tour leader Garrett Peck, an author and historian, for a welcome lunch in one of the hotel’s private rooms. Then, head out for an afternoon walk along Old Town’s waterfront that offers insights into the city’s historic link to the Potomac, and a chance to contrast historic warehouses with the most recent waterside developHoliday lights along King Street, Alexandria ments. After a visit to the Alexandria Archeology Museum and the Torpedo Factory Art Center, the ideal spot for one-of-a kind gifts, enjoy a festive holiday dinner, followed by a walk along King Street to enjoy the seasonal lights at Market Square. After breakfast the next day, walk to the Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum. Lunch at Gadsby’s Tavern and Museum, evocative of Alexandria’s colonial era. More history is in store on a walk through George Washington’s home town that concludes your staycation.

K. SUMMERER/VISIT ALEXANDRIA

M. ENRIQUEZ/VISIT ALEXANDRIA

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WHITE HOUSE HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION

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OVERNIGHT TOUR Sun., Dec. 15–Mon., Dec. 16; meet at 11 a.m. at The Alexandrian Hotel, 480 King Street; tour includes no motor transportation; tour limited to 25 participants; detailed information on website; CODE 1NN-ALX; Members $545; Nonmembers $725 NOVEMBER 2019 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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The Making of England: From the Viking Wars to King Cnut A thousand years ago, Danish king Cnut the Great penned his Letter to the English People, casting him as an upholder of English law and tradition. His declaration followed a series of Viking attacks on Britain that began with a small-scale raid in 787 A.D., accelerated six years later with the destruction of the holy island of Lindisfarne, and extended into two centuries of wars that concluded with Cnut, a Danish warlord, reinventing himself as a Christian Anglo-Saxon king. Britain had been a 14th century Medieval illumination from the Chronica Majora depicting Kings Edmund Ironside (left) and Cnut (right) patchwork of Anglo-Saxon and Celtic kingdoms at the onset of the Viking wars. By their conclusion, much of Britain was consolidated into a single one, England. Historian Richard Abels explores the role of the Viking wars in its creation. JAN 8 From Raids to Conquest (787–874) JAN 15 The Reign of Alfred the Great (871–899) JAN 22 Establishing the Kingdom of England (899–978) JAN 29 The Second Viking War and the Danish Conquest (978–1020) 4 sessions; Wed., Jan. 8–29, 12–2 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-478; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Fact vs. Fiction People love the Middle Ages. But do they really know them? The period still lives with us today, reflected in re-enactment groups and Renaissance faires, Late 13th century French manuscript hit television shows illustration depicting the three classes such as “Game of of the times—cleric, knight, and workman Thrones,” and bestselling games like Chivalry. But popular culture presents a skewed version of the era that is often based on outdated preconceptions of this millennium. Medievalist Paul B. Sturtevant, editor-in-chief of The Public Medievalist, reveals a medieval world that holds surprises for amateurs and history buffs alike. Learn what and who really is “medieval,” and hear stories of people who didn’t just break the medieval mold, but demonstrate that the mold may not be what you always thought. Thurs., Jan. 16, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-021; Members $20; Nonmembers $30; Students with valid ID $15

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The Day Prohibition Began Thirteen Awful Years of the Noble Experiment America’s “noble experiment” of Prohibition began on January 16, 1920, after a century of agitation by the temperance movement to create a dry, sober nation. What started as a measure to prevent soldiers from drinking quickly became a constitutional amendment to ban the manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcohol. As bootleggers catered to the thirst for booze, organized crime dramatically undermined the noble experiment. The experiment ended with the repeal of the 21st Amendment in 1933. Celebrate the centennial of Prohibition with author and historian Garrett Peck during a cocktail-driven journey through history. Sample Prohibition-era cocktails (legally).

With Cocktail Tasting

Thurs. Jan 16, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; participants must be 21 or older with ID; CODE 1L0-297; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Liquor is poured into a sewer following a raid during the height of Prohibition

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.

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Medieval History

BRITISH LIBRARY

England in 878


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Amelia Earhart Part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

The Birth of the OSS Before the CIA there was the OSS—the Office of Strategic Services. Authorized by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941, he installed charismatic lawyer William “Wild Bill” Donovan as head of the nation’s first peacetime intelligence organization. The agency’s unlikeliest of recruits–among them, historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr., film director John Ford, and Harvard scholar Ralph Bunche—worked with safecrackers, forgers, OSS Detachment 101 helped to parachutists, mountain climbers, liberate Rangoon in 1945 and others, carrying out the war’s boldest covert operations. For example, they supported French Resistance forces, blew up bridges, ran a guerrilla army in Burma, and helped a group planning to assassinate Hitler. Randy Burkett, a career CIA directorate of operations, traces the colorful history of the OSS.

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Wed., Jan. 22, 6:45–8:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-473; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

On May 21, 1937, aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart set out to become the first woman to fly around the world. She and her navigator, Fred Noonan, had flown more than 22,000 miles when, on July 2, they disappeared over the Pacific Ocean, en route to Howland Island. Their disappearance has remained one the 20th century’s greatest unsolved mystery. But is that the only reason Earhart is to be remembered? Disappearance theories aside, when Earhart went missing, the world lost a pioneering woman of intriguing complexity and tremendous courage.

National Air and Space Museum Curator Dorothy Cochrane examines Earhart’s accomplishments and shortcomings, and why her legacy still challenges and inspires today. Thurs., Jan. 30, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-296; Members $20; Nonmembers, $30

Amelia Earhart

A View from Inside: The CIA and FBI In Collaboration with the International Spy Museum

The CIA and FBI are both tasked with protecting our country. They are often portrayed as strained colleagues, but what is it really like inside these iconic institutions? CIA and FBI veterans discuss their professional roles and how these closely guarded organizations operate. Mike German, a former FBI agent, discusses the post-9/11 FBI’s failure to view white-nationalist violence and white-collar crime as legitimate security threats. Darrell M. Blocker, a veteran of the CIA’s clandestine service, discusses spy training, the difficulties of collaborating with other countries on spy education, and the challenges of being chief of all clandestine service operations in sub-Saharan Africa. Former FBI assistant director and special agent

Cassandra Chandler managed, directed, and led criminal, terrorism, and cybercrimes investigations and foreign intelligence activities. She led the redesign of the Bureau’s new agent’s training program. James Olson, an expert on finding spies, reviews the threats posed by Chinese, Russian, and Cuban spy services, and how the CIA catches individuals spying on their own countries. FEB 5 21st-Century Security Threats FEB 12 The Spy Whisperer FEB 19 An Agent for Change FEB 26 The Spy Finder 4 sessions; Wed., Feb. 5–26, 10:15–11:45 a.m.; International Spy Museum, 700 L’Enfant Plaza, SW (Metro: Yellow, Green, Blue, Orange, and Silver lines); CODE 1M2-064; Members $80; Nonmembers $130

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The World of the Crusades: Holy War and Jihad When the Byzantine Emperor Alexius called on Pope Urban II to send him aid against the Turks, he had no idea that he was setting in motion a movement that we now call the Crusades. What caused tens of thousands of Europeans to travel more than a thousand miles to try to reclaim Christian territory and, perhaps more importantly, save their souls? The Europeans who settled in the Holy Land brought many Western-style institutions and customs with them, but they

also acclimated in surprising ways to the very different culture they found there. The Muslim response to the Christian challenge was hampered by political infighting, but ultimately, local leaders were able to rally enough support to drive the last crusaders from Middle Eastern soil. Historian Jennifer Paxton explores the origins of the Crusades, the complex relations between crusaders and their opponents, and their legacy for the modern world. 9:30 a.m. Just-War Theory and the Origins of the Crusades 11 a.m. The First Crusade 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. The Rise of Jihad 3 p.m. Crusading Redefined Sat., Feb. 8, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-065; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Attack of the Crusaders on Constantinople, Geoffreoy de Villehardouin, Venice, ca. 1330

Three Reasons to Support Smithsonian Associates 1. You want us to continue our long tradition of excellence in programming. 2. Basic memberships and tickets cover only a portion of our costs. 3. We receive no federal funding.

To learn more about levels of support and insider benefits, visit our website: SmithonianAssociates.org/levels or call 202–633–3030 (M–F, 9–5) Demonstrate your support today. The returns will exceed your expectations.

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Smithsonian Chamber Music Society JACLYN NASH/SMITHSONIAN

2019–2020 Season The 43rd season of the Smithsonian Chamber Music Society features masterpieces from the late 16th to the mid-20th centuries, played on some of the world’s most highly prized musical instruments. Concerts take place in the American History Museum’s intimate Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, and the repertoire ranges from acclaimed masterworks to obscure gems by lesser-known composers. Veteran SCMS musicians are joined in several of the programs by Smithsonian Chamber Music Society Fellows, participants in a new educational initiative for musicians under 30. Kenneth Slowik, the ensemble’s artistic director, curates a series of talks prior to many programs, shedding light on the music and the featured composers.

Axelrod String Quartet

Fortepiano by Thomas & Barbara Wolf, The Plains, VA, 2009; after Johann Schantz, Vienna, ca. 1800

Stradivarius and Amati

TOMMY LAVERGNE

HUGH TALMAN

Marilyn McDonald violin

Marc Destrubé violin

Smithsonian Chamber Music Society audiences have the unparalleled experience of being able to hear two magnificent quartets of instruments—one made by Antonio Stradivari, the other by his teacher Nicolò Amati—in this popular three-concert series. The Axelrod String Quartet continues its Haydn programming with three of the ingenious quartets of his Op. 50, complemented by quartets from leading 20thcentury exponents of the genre, Béla Bartók, Dmitri Shostakovich, and Benjamin Britten. The ASQ’s original violist, Steven Dann, returns to perform the last of Mozart’s six viola quintets in November, and the January program concludes with the first of Beethoven’s groundbreaking quartets dedicated to the Russian Prince Razumovsky. In May, the Omer Quartet joins the Axelrod players in a gala all-Stradivarius-andAmati reading of Felix Mendelssohn’s precocious Octet in E-flat Major. Subscribers to either Axelrod series are offered admission to the lectures and concerts of the Smithsonian Haydn Academy, an intensive week in early January during which a dozen exceptional young players work with members of the Axelrod, Smithson, Artaria, New Esterházy, Eybler, and Diderot quartets to explore the 18 quartets of Haydn’s Opp. 9, 17, and 20, ca. 1769–1772. Sat., Nov. 2 (CODE 1P0-696) Haydn: Quartet in F-sharp Minor, Op. 50, No. 4; Shostakovich: Quartet No. 3 in F Major, Op. 73; Mozart: Quintet in E-flat Major, K614; with Steven Dann, viola

James Dunham viola

Kenneth Slowik violoncello

Axelrod Quartet 3-CONCERT SERIES: Concerts 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music; American History Museum

Saturdays Series: CODE BPR8; Members $66; Nonmembers $90 (Sunday series sold out) Individual Concerts: Members $27; Nonmembers $35

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Sat., Jan. 25 (CODE 1P0-697) Sun., Jan. 26 (CODE 1P0-700) Haydn: Quartet in D Major, Op. 50, No. 6 (“The Frog”); Britten: Quartet No. 2 in C Major, Op. 36; Beethoven: Quartet in F Major, Op. 59, No. 1, Razumovsky

Sat., May 9 (CODE 1P0-698) Haydn: Quartet in C Major, Op. 50, No. 2; Bartók: Quartet No. 6, Sz 114; Mendelssohn: Octet in E-flat Major, Op. 20 with the Omer Quartet: Mason Yu and Erica Tursi, violins; Jinsung Hong, viola; Alexander Cox, violoncello Programs and artists subject to change.

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Masterworks of Five Centuries Smithsonian Chamber Players; Consort of Viols November’s Schubertiade pairs the haunting sounds of the early clarinet and horn with Aaron Sheehan’s tenor. The Smithsonian Consort of Viols returns early in the new year with a program illustrating the diversity of English consort pieces built on the cantus firmus framework of the In Nomine. Three spring concerts follow up the Bach-Haydn-Mozart subseries of last season. In the first, San Francisco Conservatory professor of violin Ian Swensen and Kenneth Slowik offer selections including Bach’s Fifth Brandenburg Concerto, joined by five Smithsonian Chamber Music Society Fellows. The second features Elizabeth Blumenstock, one of the concertmasters of Smithsonian Chamber Music Society concerts are held the Bay Area’s inventive Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra; and the third, Axelrod in the intimate Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Quartet’s Marc Destrubé. Slowik and Naoko Takao play a four-hands program on Music, American History Museum two contrasting early-19th-century pianos in February. The season’s second Schubertiade, in March, brings back the multi-faceted Mark Fewer for readings of the monumental C Major Fantasy and, with three SCMS Fellows, the ebullient “Trout” Quintet. Fellows also join Slowik, Vera Beths, and Steven Dann for a program that includes the original sextet version of Transfigured Night. Schubert: Sonata in A Minor, D385; Auf dem Strom, D943; Sonata in A Major, D574; Der Hirt auf dem Felsen, D965 Smithsonian Chamber Players: Catherine Manson, violin; William Purvis, horn; Eric Hoeprich, clarinet; Kenneth Slowik, fortepiano, with Aaron Sheehan, tenor TWO OPTIONS: Sat., Nov. 16 (CODE 1P0-680); Sun., Nov. 17 (CODE 1P0-688); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 In Nomine Cantus firmus consorts by William Byrd, Osbert Parsley, Nicholas Strogers, Christopher Tye, Clement Woodcock, Alfonso Ferrabosco, and Henry Purcell Smithsonian Consort of Viols: Kenneth Slowik, Lucine Musaelian, Zoe Weiss, Catherine Slowik, Arnie Tanimoto, viols, with Chelsea Bernstein and Thomas MacCracken TWO OPTIONS: Sat., Jan. 4 (CODE 1P0-681); Sun., Jan. 5 (CODE 1P0-689); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Haydn: Sonata in B Minor, Hob. XVI: 32; J.S. Bach: Partita in D Major, BWV 828; Sonata in B Minor, BWV 1014; Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D Major, BWV 1050 Smithsonian Chamber Players: Ian Swensen, violin; Kenneth Slowik, harpsichord, with SCMS Fellows TWO OPTIONS: Sat., Feb. 1 (CODE 1P0-682); Sun., Feb. 2 (CODE 1P0-690); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Mozart: Sonatas in D Major, K381/123ac; C Major K521; Schubert: Four Polonaises, D599; Grand Duo, D812 Smithsonian Chamber Players: Naoko Takao and Kenneth Slowik, fortepiano four hands Sat., Feb. 15; concert at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talk at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; CODE 1P0-683; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

J.S. Bach: Partita in A Minor, BWV 827; Sonata in E Major, BWV 1016; Haydn: Sonata in D Major, Hob. XVI: 42; Mozart: Sonata in G Major, K379/373a Smithsonian Chamber Players: Elizabeth Blumenstock, violin; Kenneth Slowik, harpsichord and fortepiano Sun., Feb. 23; concert at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talk at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; CODE 1P0-691; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Schubert: Fantasy in C Major, D934; Quintet in A Major, D667, “The Trout” Smithsonian Chamber Players: Mark Fewer, violin; Kenneth Slowik, fortepiano, with SCMS Fellows TWO OPTIONS: Sat., March 7 (CODE 1P0-684); Sun., March 8 (CODE 1P0-692); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Schubert: Quartet in A Minor, D804, “Rosamunde”; Schoenberg: Verklärte Nacht, Op. 4 Smithsonian Chamber Players: Vera Beths, violin; Steven Dann, viola; Kenneth Slowik, violoncello, with SCMS Fellows TWO OPTIONS: Sat., March 28 (CODE 1P0-685); Sun., March 29 (CODE 1P0-693); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 J.S. Bach: Partita in G Major, BWV 829; Sonata in C Minor, BWV 1017; Haydn: Sonata in E Minor, Hob. XVI: 34; Mozart: Sonata in D Major, K306/300l Smithsonian Chamber Players: Marc Destrubé, violin; Kenneth Slowik, harpsichord and fortepiano TWO OPTIONS: Sat., April 18 (CODE 1P0-686); Sun., April 19 (CODE 1P0-694); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Programs and artists subject to change.

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HUGH TALMAN/SMITHSONIAN

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PETER SCHAAF

What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow Co-presented with The Washington Chorus

In his acclaimed What Makes It Great? programs, beloved educator and former NPR music commentator Rob Kapilow “gets audiences in tune with classical music at a deeper level than they ever thought possible” (Los Angeles Times). In a three-part format, Kapilow explores a great musical masterpiece with the audience. Next, the piece is performed in its entirety, followed by a Q&A with the audience and performers.

Mozart: Requiem in D minor, K 626 (featuring singers from The Washington Chorus) Sun., Nov. 10, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Museum; CODE 1P0-705; $25

American Songbook (featuring singers from The Washington Chorus) Sun., Feb. 23, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Museum; CODE 1P0-706; $25

Beethoven: String Quartet No. 16 in F Major, Op. 135 (musicians TBD) Sun., May 17, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Museum; CODE 1P0-707; $25

Rob Kapilow

Save when you subscribe to the 3-CONCERT SERIES: 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Museum; CODE BPS2; $60

Emerson String Quartet 2019–2020 season The Emerson String Quartet (violinists Eugene Drucker and Philip Setzer, violist Lawrence Dutton, and cellist Paul Watkins) has maintained its stature as one of the world’s premier chamber music ensembles for more than four decades. It has made more than 30 acclaimed recordings and has been honored with nine Grammys® (including two for Best Classical Album), three Gramophone Awards, and the Avery Fisher Prize. This is the 41st season the Quartet is performing at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C.

Fanny Mendelssohn: String Quartet in E-flat Major; Bartok: String Quartet No. 3; Dvorak: String Quartet No. 10 in E-flat Major, Op. 51 Sun., Nov. 3, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Building; CODE 1P0-702; Members $50; Nonmembers $60 Mozart: String Quartet No. 21 in D, K. 575 (“King of Prussia”); Bartok: String Quartet No. 1; Dvorak: String Quartet No. 12 in F Major, Op. 96 (“American”) Sun., Dec. 8, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Building; CODE 1P0-703; Members $50; Nonmembers $60 Barber: String Quartet, Op. 11 (with famous Adagio in second movement); Beethoven: String Quartet No. 4 in C minor, Op 18; Bartok: String Quartet No. 6 Sun., April 5, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Building; CODE 1P0-704; Members $50; Nonmembers $60

Emerson String Quartet

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Save when you subscribe to the 3-CONCERT SERIES: Sun., Nov. 3, Sun., Dec. 8, Sun., April 5; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Building; all performances 6:30 p.m.; CODE BPS1; Members $135; Nonmembers $162 All programs subject to change.

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Death and Beyond Comparative Reflections on World Religious Traditions

CIVIC MUSEUM OF SANSEPOLCRO

Issues of death, dying, and the meaning of life—and the afterlife—hold key places in the belief systems of the major religious traditions of the world. Graham M. Schweig, a professor of philosophy and religion at Christopher Newport University, surveys differing visions of these themes, as well as conceptions of the soul and the human struggle for purpose and meaning, from a variety of Eastern and Western cultural perspectives. Stories, teachings, and rituals from the major faiths, as well as contemporary interpretations, are examined to illuminate the ultimate life event: death. 9:30 a.m. Overview: Comparative Religions and Life After Death 11 a.m. Semitic Traditions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own)

Buddhist wheel of life, Baodingshan historic site, Sichuan, China; ca. 1177–1249

1:30 p.m. East Asian Traditions: Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, Buddhism

The Resurrection of Jesus Christ, ca. 1465, by Piero della Francesca

3 p.m. South Asian Traditions and Modern Reflections: Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism

Sat., Nov. 9, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-053; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

A Conversation with Katie Couric

The New Joy of Cooking

John P. McGovern Award Presentation Evening

There are nearly 20 million copies of Joy of Cooking in print today. Originally self-published in 1931 by Irma S. Rombauer, the newest edition of this American kitchen bible has now been updated and revised by her great-grandson John Becker and his wife Megan Scott. It includes 600 new recipes, from vegan and vegetarian recipes to making cold-brew coffee and kombucha as well as standards like brownies, roast turkey, and apple pie. Appearing for the first time are American regional favorites such as gooey butter cake, hotsmoked salmon, Cajun dirty rice, Chicago-style deep-dish pizza, and Utica greens. Joy of Cooking (Scribner) is available for sale and signing.

Katie Couric has long commanded America’s attention. Her 40 year-career includes anchor posts on the “Today” show and CBS’s nightly news program, as well as a producer, author, documentary film maker, and founder of her own media company. Couric has leveraged that visibility to bring attention to issues that matter to her, most notably in her advocacy for cancer awareness. Katie Couric She is one of the founders of Stand Up to Cancer and the National Colorectal Research Alliance. Projects of Katie Couric Media have explored how our idea of gender has evolved; the stories of successful women in a variety of professional fields; and how we approach some of the most divisive subjects present throughout our nation. For using her voice to encourage important conversations about issues that touch American lives, Couric is the recipient of the John P. McGovern Award presented by Smithsonian Associates. The award provides a platform to address issues of national and global importance that bridge the sciences and humanities. The award presentation highlights an evening in which Couric talks to April Ryan, White House correspondent for American Urban Radio Networks, about her career and the causes she supports. Tues., Nov. 12, 6:45 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Museum; CODE 1L0-295; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

A Family Recipe

Thurs., Nov. 14, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-284; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

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50 Authors 50 States

Imagining the Southwest BOOK DISCUSSIONS

The American Southwest occupies a central place in the country’s literary imagination. It’s a region in which multiple cultures meet and sometimes clash, and where evidence of ancient peoples informs the landscape, Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English department at Georgetown University, leads informal discussions about novels that offer rich and varied portraits of the Southwest and the people who inhabit it. Read each book prior to class. Sherry and cookies are available for refreshment. Bless Me, Ultima (1972) by Rodolfo Anaya follows the experiences of a young boy growing up in New Mexico in the late 1940s. Mon., Nov. 18, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-465B; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

In Animal Dreams (1990) by Barbara Kingsolver, a woman returns to Arizona to confront her past and face her ailing, distant father. Mon., Dec. 16, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-465C; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

All the Pretty Horses (1992) by Cormac McCarthy tells the story of a 16-year old boy who runs away to Mexico to live as an itinerant cowboy. Mon., Jan. 27, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-465D; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

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Lidia Bastianich An Italian Classic Since Lidia Bastianich opened the doors to Felidia on Manhattan’s Upper East Side in 1981, it has been revered as one of the country’s best Italian restaurants. Get some insights into Felidia’s storied history as Bastianich talks to the Washington Post’s Mary Beth Albright about her close-knit family, her professional ascent, and the dedication and passion for food that led to multiple restaurants, best-selling cookbooks, and 20 years as host of her own cooking show on public television. The ticket price includes a copy of Felidia (Knopf), Bastianich’s new cookbook written Lidia Bastianich with her longtime executive chef Fortunato Nicotra that includes recipes that capture the spirit of the restaurant’s menu. Mon., Nov. 18, 6:45 p.m.; Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery; CODE 1L0-286; Members $50; Nonmembers $60

The Journey of the Mask Masks have played a role in cultures and societies almost since the dawn of humankind. Symbols of power, mystery, and disguise, they also can bring their users closer to nature, the spiritual world, and the realms of ancestors. The tradition is global, linking inhabitants of the steppes of Mongolia and the jungles of South America with Mexican celebrants of the Day of the Dead and First Nation tribal dancers. National Geographic photographer Chris Rainier has traveled the world in search of the answer to why we wear masks. He draws on his stunning images as he A sacred Buddhist dance mask from Bhutan; photo by Chris Rainier unravels what has kept us connected to masks across time. Rainier’s book Mask (Earth Aware Editions) is available for sale and signing. Wed., Nov. 20, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-016; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Fellini’s Italy: Along the Via Emilia Journey with food historian Francine Segan to Rimini and Modena, cities along the ancient Via Emilia in the EmiliaRomagna region. Learn how the region inspired native son, director Federico Fellini, as well as travelers drawn by the food, culture, and chic beaches. The Fellini-focused itinerary in Rimini includes a neighborhood filled with colorful Fellini-inspired frescoes; the beautiful Piazza Cavour, re-created for Amarcord and 8½; the magnificent Grand Hotel di Rimini, which captivated Fellini as a boy; and plans for Fellini’s 2020 centenary. Fellini declared “Life is a mix of magic and pasta”—found in glorious abundance in Modena’s famed cuisine, from street food to the celebrated Osteria Francescana restaurant. Afterward, enjoy tastings of regional specialties.

With Tasting

Wed., Dec. 4, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-472; Members $45; Nonmembers $55 Rimini cityscape

Tastings courtesy of Italianproducts.com

The Sound of Music at 60

TONI FRISSELL/LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The Musical That’s One of Our Favorite Things On November 16, 1959, the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre opened its doors for the opening night of The Sound of Music, the 11th and final collaboration of the great songwriting team of Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein. Mary Martin headlined the show about an Austrian family of singers who escaped the Nazi regime on the eve of World War II. The show was a smash, and the 1966 film adaptation starring Julie Andrews, became Hollywood’s most popular musical. Drawing on film clips, recordings, interviews, and more, pianist and American music specialist Robert Wyatt highlights the making and production of the beloved and enduring show.

Mary Martin during production of the Broadway musical The Sound of Music, 1959

Thurs., Dec. 5, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-056; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

PLEASE NOTE: You may be photographed or recorded for educational and promotional purposes when you attend a Smithsonian Associates event. We encourage you to share your experience through a photo or post on social media during or after a program—and ask that you tag Smithsonian Associates when you do. If you use your phone, do it with consideration for both fellow audience members and presenters. Please restrict your photography to photos of the presentation and do not take pictures of audience members unless you have explicit permission. Full recording of any program is not permitted. A photo ID may be required at some Smithsonian Associates’ venues.

The Farm, 1921, by Joan Miró

Memoir: Art from Life A Creative Writing Workshop Visual art can offer rich inspiration for writing, just as writing can deepen your connection to a work of art. Join Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s popular Writing Salon, for a close look at Joan Miro’s The Farm to discover how memory informs the painting and can inspire reflective writing. Participants engage with the art through multi-sensory exploration, word sketching, and diverse writing prompts designed to discover inspiring aspects of the painting and to uncover new potentials as writers. Sun., Dec. 8, 1–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-0TQ; Members $35; Nonmembers $45

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Buone Feste! How Italy Celebrates Christmas Italy has many of the most beautiful and meaningful celebrations of the Christmas season to be found anywhere. These festivities extend from the feast day of Saint Nicholas (December 6) to Epiphany (January 6). Each region of the country celebrates with festive local traditions that are as much about the place as the holiday. Fred Plotkin, an expert on everything Italian, presents a delightful look at the magic that is Christmas in Italy. Discover Naples’ elaborate presepi (Nativity cribs), the role of La Scala in Milan’s festivities, and Venice’s Befana (Italy’s Santa Claus), who enters majestically aboard a large boat on the Grand Canal. Distinctive local baked goods mark the season, from the gubana cakes of Udine and Trieste (made with grappa, nuts, and dried fruit) to Sicily’s tiny almond-based sweets. Rome’s bancarelle (colorful stalls) and zampognari (bagpipeplaying shepherds) enhance the city’s holiday atmosphere. And finally, at the Vatican the pope celebrates the season with masses and rituals viewed around the world. A holiday reception features Italian-inspired specialties.

With Reception

Mon., Dec. 9, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-054; Members $75; Nonmembers $90 Christmas lights in Rimini

Holiday Magic at the White House

Languages are integral to our identity, heritage, and humanity. There are roughly 7,000 languages spoken in the world today, but it’s estimated that without intervention more than half of them will disappear by the end of this A pro-Occitan language demonstration century. The rapid loss of in Béziers, France language diversity is larger than current extinction rates in mammals, fish, birds, and plants combined. Mary Linn, curator of cultural and linguistic revitalization for the Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, explains how indigenous languages are linked to health, education, and employment, as well as their vital connection to the continuity of knowledge and cultural practices. She examines the forces threatening endangered languages, and the efforts to combat them. Tues., Dec. 10, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-018; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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ANA-MARIA POGGIO

Vital Voices: Endangered Languages in a Changing World

The Brightest Season at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue Coleen Christian Burke, a professional decorator who was a 2014 White House design partner, draws from her experience and her book Christmas with the First Ladies to offer a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the White House preparing for the holidays. Burke surveys the evolution of White House holiday traditions, from Benjamin Harrison’s first tree to modern residents’ more elaborate approaches, and describes the meticulous planning behind White House holiday themes (2014’s “A Children’s Winter Wonderland” featured 57 trees). She also displays samples of crafted ornaments, including Betty Ford’s cardinal clothespins and Michelle Obama’s hanging envelopes, and demonstrates how to make Laura Bush’s ornament topiary tree for your own celebration. Enjoy some holiday cookies after the program. Sun., Dec. 15, 2 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-019; Members $35; Nonmembers $45 Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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SAFIYA GALLAGHAN

Smithsonian Boomers Chorus Legends of Song Join fellow pop-music lovers in a choral program celebrating the legends

With Performance of song. Do you sing Elvis hits in the shower, croon along with the

NORWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

Beatles when you’re stuck in traffic, know every word of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” or Billy Joel’s “Piano Man”, or have a knockout kitchen version of your favorite Motown classic? It’s time to find a bigger stage! Join the Boomers Chorus, a program geared for people ages 55 and above who love to sing—and there’s no experience required. Ernest Johnson, veteran choral conductor and music educator, leads the ensemble in arrangements of the hits you know and love. The final song list may include favorites by Elvis Presley, the Beatles, Temptations, Supremes, Beach Boys, Billy Joel, Michael Jackson, and others, selected and arranged by the conductor to fit the group’s specific vocal and musical abilities. The experience is designed for singers of all skill levels. General instruction in vocal techniques includes exercises in healthy breath management for singing and improving tone and range. Basic music reading instruction included as music is rehearsed. 8 sessions plus performance; Tues., Jan. 14–March 3, 6:45–8:30 p.m.; free public performance Tues., March 10, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE BPS3; all tickets $100

Choral conductor Ernest Johnson gets the singers rockin’ The chorus performs

This program is made possible through generous funding from Aroha Philanthropies.

DC Theatre Preview 2020 Hosted in Partnership with theatreWashington

The 2020 season in Washington theatre promises plenty of excitement, surprises, and outstanding performances on local stages large and small. Top local arts writers Tim Treanor (DC Theatre Scene), Chris Klimek (Washington City Paper), and Rosa Cartagena (Washingtonian and DC Metro Theatre Arts) share their picks on the hottest tickets in town, what’s worth the price, and what artists to watch in the new season. Synetic Theatre’s latest movement-based interpretations of classic stories, a sure-to-beprovocative world premiere at Woolly Mammoth and Arena Stage’s offerings for its 60th season—not to mention Signature’s distinctive take on musicals—there’s always much to choose from among the region’s more than 80 producing theaters. Tues., Jan. 14, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-020; Members $20; Nonmembers $30; Students with valid ID $15

NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE NETHERLANDS

Louis Armstrong: American Icon Say the name Louis Armstrong and you’re instantly able to conjure the sound of his warm, gravelly voice and his trumpet playing in “What a Wonderful World” or “Hello, Dolly!” Smithsonian curator emeritus of American music and author John Edward Hasse provides a film and video portrait of the legendary Armstrong. Born in poverty in 1901 in New Orleans, in his 20s he revolutionized jazz, with generations of musicians and singers following his lead on how to swing, scat, and solo. His frequent tours abroad earned him the nickname “Ambassador Satch.” Fellow musician Tony Bennett summed up his legacy, noting, “The bottom line [for] any country is ‘What did we contribute to the world?’ We contributed Louis Armstrong.”

Louis Armstrong in Amsterdam, 1965

Thurs., Feb. 13, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-067; Members $30; Nonmembers $45 NOVEMBER 2019 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC

Beethoven: The Musical Milestones His was an amazing life of discovery and challenge, reflected in the music he created— first for the piano, and then in chamber music, symphonic, and choral compositions. Beginning as a student of Haydn’s in 1800, Beethoven was rebellious from the start. Inspired by the French Revolution, he imbued pieces such as the “Eroica” Symphony with its ideals as he stretched Viennese classicism to the limit. As deafness began to encroach, he addressed it directly and defiantly, especially in his stunning Fifth Symphony. He went on to compose the most dramatic music of the age, and even the music he composed when he was totally deaf challenged musicians and audiences with their new dimensions of expressive freedom. In a six-session series, classical music and opera scholar Saul Lilienstein reviews the moments in which Beethoven successively leapt into the future, from the Pathétique and Moonlight sonatas to the Ninth Symphony and the final quartets. Each session is highlighted by DVD and CD recordings of excerpts of Beethoven’s most beloved masterpieces. JAN 21 The Student Flexes His Muscles JAN 28 A Revolution in Sound and Spirit FEB 4 Dealing with Deafness

Ludwig van Beethoven, ca. 1819, after the work by Joseph Karl Stieler

FEB 11 Master of the Variation FEB 18 An Orchestral and Choral Synthesis FEB 25 Reaching for All the Notes Saul Lilienstein

6 sessions; Tues., Jan. 21–Feb. 25, 12–1:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-060; Members $100; Nonmembers $150

Neighborhoods of Barcelona, Milan, and Berlin Discovering Hidden Gems Barcelona, Milan, and Berlin have been crucibles of culture and experimentation for centuries, instrumental in changing the course of European history. They’ve also long been magnets for talented and unconventional residents, many of whom gravitate to distinctive and colorful neighborhoods overlooked by visitors.

Park Guell, Barcelona

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Milan

Fred Plotkin, a popular Smithsonian speaker on culture, history, and music, shares what he’s found on his walks through these cities: churches, theaters, specialty shops, restaurants, cafes and unusual museums just a stone’s throw from world-famous landmarks. When overtourism threatened the special character of several Barcelona neighborhoods, citizens worked to preserve evidence of their culture, which continues to resonate in many places, from restaurants and churches to an ancient cemetery.

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Trendy Milan has always attracted and cultivated genius. The legacy of Leonardo da Vinci is found in many aspects of the city’s landscape, which offers surprises from eco-friendly apartment towers covered in vegetation to Puccini’s barbershop. Berlin has changed more radically than any city in Europe.

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Brandenburg Gate, Berlin

Evidence of its tormented past exists beside abundant green zones, offbeat museums, the best food hall in Europe, and more. JAN 23 Barcelona FEB 27 Milan MAR 19 Berlin 3 sessions; Thurs., Jan. 23, Feb. 27, and March 19, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-061; Members $90; Nonmembers $130

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Literary London

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

In the Footsteps of its Writers London is a writer’s city where poets, playwrights, and novelists have found welcome. Drawn to its lively intellectual scene, diverse figures including Byron, Oscar Wilde, Charles Dickens, and Virginia Woolf made London the center of the literary world for decades. In neighborhoods from Chelsea to Bloomsbury, these writers and their friends and colleagues nourished— and also critiqued—one another and their work. British social historian Virginia Newmyer and Susan Willen, emeritus professor of English from George Washington University, delve into the literary contributions and distinctive worlds of some of city’s authors and their close friends, exploring the houses and clubs, parks and gardens, art galleries, and favorite restaurants that defined the cultural milieu of their London.

Virginia Woolf, 1902, by George Charles Beresford

9:30 a.m. Three Urban Romantics: Byron, Shelley, and Keats 11 a.m. Taking the Stage: Wilde and Shaw 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Exploring London with Dickens and Woolf Oscar Wilde, ca. 1882, by Napoleon Sarony

Sat., Jan. 25, 9:30 a.m.–3 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-477; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

LOCATION CHANGES Programs occasionally move to a different location from the one published on tickets. We do our best to inform ticket holders of location changes by mail, phone, and email. You are advised to confirm the location by calling 202-633-3030 (M–F; 9–5) or visiting SmithsonianAssociates.org

Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Paul In an absorbing day of illustrated lectures, archaeologist Jodi Magness, an expert in early Judaism, examines a variety of aspects of Jewish belief in the late Second Temple period (1st century B.C.–1st century A.D.) in Palestine and the Diaspora. Magness offers an overview of the characteristics of Judaism in the time of Jesus and the apostle Paul, and how Jews of the era interacted with and worshiped the God of Israel; explores the meaning and significance of the Dead Sea scrolls; explains how religious practices in modern India provide insights into how ancient Jews and others interacted with their gods; and surveys the literary and archaeological evidence left by ancient Jewish communities in Asia Minor. 9:30 a.m. What Is Ancient Judaism?

Thousands gather at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem

11 a.m. Dead Sea Scrolls 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Modern India as a Window into Ancient Judaism Jodi Magness stands on the eastern wall of an ancient synagogue at Huqoq, Israel

3 p.m. Ancient Jewish Communities of Asia Minor Sat., Feb. 1, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-063; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

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Artificial Intelligence Will It Go to Your Head Someday?

Mario Livio Is God a Mathematician?

Imagine brain enhancements that can, for example, make you a math genius or boost your efficiency. It may sound like science fiction, but cognitive scientist Susan Schneider says brain microchips and other techniques to integrate humans with artificial intelligence are under development. AI, she predicts, will inevitably go inside the head, providing seamless access to our devices, the cloud, and more. Schneider addresses the implications of AI in our lives, and how to ensure it develops in a way that promotes human flourishing. Her book Artificial You: AI and the Future of Your Mind (Princeton University Press) is available for sale and signing.

For centuries, scientists and philosophers have marveled at how the seemingly abstract discipline, mathematics, could so perfectly explain the natural world. This evening, astrophysicist Mario Livio examines the ways in which mathematics has often made predictions, for example, about the existence of then unknown subatomic particles, which were later proven to exist. He also discusses an intriguing question that has challenged mathematicians, physicists, psychologists, and philosophers: Is mathematics ultimately a Illustration by William Blake, 1794 discovery, or a mere invention of the human mind? Livio also shares fascinating stories and insights of renowned mathematicians, from Pythagoras to Penrose, and from Galileo to Gödel, who have shaped our ideas about mathematics and the philosophy of mathematics.

INSIDE SCIENCE Tues., Nov. 12, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-095; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

INSIDE SCIENCE Thurs., Nov. 14, 6:45 p.m.; Ring Auditorium, Hirshhorn Museum; CODE 1M2-050; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

SETH SHOSTAK/SETI INSTITUTE

Are We Alone? The Search for Life Beyond Earth Kelly Beatty, senior editor of Sky & Telescope magazine, traces a scientific quest that reaches back in time and across the vastness of space. He explores how life arose on Earth and hosts a dizzying array of lifeforms able to exist in extreme conditions not unlike those we might expect to find elsewhere. And a handful of worlds in our own solar system have characteristics that might be conducive to life. Beatty follows the efforts of astronomers to find Earth-like worlds orbiting other stars and also recaps the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI), which seeks to intercept transmissions from distant technologically advanced civilizations. The Allen Telescope Array, a joint effort by the SETI Institute and the Radio Astronomy Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley

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INSIDE SCIENCE Tues., Dec. 10, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-291; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.

THE BRITISH MUSEUM

What’s Inside Science? It’s an ongoing series of expert-led programming. It is also a community of like-minded people who have the opportunity to participate in a lively online learning exchange. Visit smithsonianassociates.org/science


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Language and Aging A Resilient Relationship Language is our constant companion throughout our lifetime and, compared with other aspects of cognition, it seems to be fairly resilient to the process of aging. Cognitive scientist Roger Kreuz examines why language ability shapes our lives throughout its course. He explains that apparent changes in an older person’s language ability are actually produced by declines in such other cognitive processes as memory and perception. He also looks at how changes in the cognitive processes underlying language ability influence listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Kreuz’s book Changing Minds: How Aging Affects Language and How Language Affects Aging (MIT Press), coauthored with Richard Roberts, is available for sale and signing.

SCIENCE EVENT HORIZON TELESCOPE COLLABORATION

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Black Holes A New Look Astronomers and computer scientists recently made history by accomplishing what was previously thought to be impossible: They captured an image of a black hole’s silhouette. Carrie Fitzgerald, professor of astronomy The first image of a black hole, April, 2019 and director of the Montgomery College Astronomical Observatory, explains the nature of black holes by delving into the major ideas of relativity and the fundamentals of gravity. From spacetime to time dilation, travel through a cosmic journey to the center of a black hole. Learn how scientists test the predictions of general relativity and about the latest research into gravitational waves. Fitzgerald also explores the threshold between science and science fiction with a brief look at hyperspace, wormholes, and warp drive.

INSIDE SCIENCE Wed., Dec. 18, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-098; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

INSIDE SCIENCE Mon., Jan. 13, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-099; all tickets $30

The New Brain Science

With WebMD’s John Whyte In Collaboration with WebMD

How Brainwave Research Is Shaping the Future

A good night’s sleep might be a dream for some, but the importance of sleep and how it impacts our overall health is a reality for all. John Whyte, WebMD’s chief medical officer, presents the latest research about sleep, including strategies that help to improve sleep. Can too little sleep—or even too much sleep—be a sign of a serious health John Whyte condition? How do sleep disorders affect quality of life? How much sleep is best for you, and what might your sleep pattern tell about your overall health? Whyte answers these questions and more and shares a sleep quiz that reveals if you’re getting enough quality sleep.

Analyzing brainwaves has been possible for nearly a century, but neuroscientists are now widening their awareness of the wealth of information brainwaves can hold about who we are—and that information’s power. Neuroscientist R. Douglas Fields explores how information drawn from the new brain science may reveal hidden signifiers of mental illness and neurological disorders; brainwaves’ potential role in improving cognitive performance and heath; and their use in controlling devices from prosthetic limbs to fighter drones. He also considers future possibilities opened by brainwave research. His book Electric Brain (BenBella Books) is available for sale and signing.

INSIDE SCIENCE Wed., Jan. 29, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-100; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

MOSHE ZUSMAN

The Science of Sleep

INSIDE SCIENCE Wed., Feb. 5, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-022; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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Smithsonian Associates offers a certificate program in World Art History. Core courses and electives are selected from our courses, seminars, study tours, and studio art classes. Look for “World Art History Certificate” throughout the program guide. Get started today. NOTE: Registration is year round. Credits are counted from day of registration and are not given retroactively.

SmithsonianAssociates.org/ArtCertificate

MUNCH MUSEUM, OSLO, NORWAY

Girl with a Pearl Earring, ca. 1665, by Johannes Vermeer

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Scandinavian Art and Architecture Modern Aesthetic and Traditional Heart Scandinavians are renowned internationally for their modern aesthetic and innovations in architecture and design. At the same time, they are passionate about preserving their past. Explore the creative contributions of noted artists, architects, and designers reflected in the region’s beautiful capitals with Karin Alexis, an independent art and architectural historian who is an expert on Scandinavian and Nordic art and culture.

With Nordic-themed Lunch

9:30 a.m. Stockholm, Venice of the North: Royal Palace and Drottingholm Palace; artists Anders Zorn, Carl Larsson, and Carl Milles 11 a.m. Copenhagen, Queen of the North: Medieval churches, Renaissance castles, baroque palaces; Tivoli Gardens; midcentury Danish modern design 12:15 p.m. Lunch (Nordic-themed meal) 1:15 p.m. Helsinki, Bold Spirit of the North: Senate Square’s cathedral, Saarinen’s Helsinki Central railway station, Aalto’s modernist Finlandia Hall

One of several versions of The Scream, 1910, by

Edvard Munch 2:45 p.m. Oslo and Reykjavik, From Leif Erikson to Modernism: Viking Ship Museum; Munch Museum; (Gustav) Vigeland Park’s sculptures, Hallgrímskirkja church, Harpa Concert Hall

Sat., Nov. 2, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-046; Members $110; Nonmembers $160

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

The ability to derive meaning from what we see is an essential skill in a culture saturated with images. Using outstanding works from the history of art as well as images from popular culture, art historian Lisa Passaglia Bauman focuses on how art communicates, how to analyze and interpret it, and how we can see it as a cultural product that reveals something about the society that produced it. You’ll learn to think of visual elements as the vocabulary of art that helps determine its content: line, shape, space, texture, and color. Discover the principles of design—unity, balance, scale, emphasis—that guide the arrangement of art’s visual vocabulary and help explain why some arrangements work better than others. See how clues to a work’s meaning are often communicated in the language of symbols. Finally, acquire some tips that help take the anxiety out of trying to fully comprehend and appreciate a work of art. 9:30 a.m. The Visual Elements of Art 11 a.m. The Principles of Design 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Iconography: Understanding Symbols and Meaning 2:30 p.m. Is There a Correct Way To Appreciate Art? The Annunciation (detail), ca. 1436, by Jan van Eyck

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Sat., Nov. 16, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0470; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Dynamism of a Dog on a Leash, 1912, by Giacomo Balla

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.

ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY

Visual Literacy: The Art of Seeing


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METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Heroes Enthroned in Tapestry Heroes of the Bible, of great empires, and of legend, are captured in a renowned ensemble of tapestries at the Met Cloisters. Woven around 1400, the Nine Heroes Tapestries were first exhibited in 1949, a time when 20thcentury heroes were very King Arthur (from the Nine Heroes Tapmuch on the minds of the estries), ca. 1400, South Netherlandish public. This year, the Met embarked on a campaign to conserve these medieval treasures, which depict images of iconic leaders who span the centuries in clothing reminiscent of the period in which the tapestries were created. Met Cloisters senior curator Barbara Drake Boehm explores the tapestries’ history, shares the conservation’s progress, and considers the tapestries’ message about leadership and heroism in an era of onscreen superheroes. Fri., Nov. 8, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-011; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

ART

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Prince Albert’s Vision of Progress The Crystal Palace Exhibition of 1851 Great Britain’s transformation into an industrialized nation beginning in the 18th century was explored in an exhibition, The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations in London in 1851. The brainchild of Prince Albert, it was popularly known as the Crystal Palace Exhibition for its magnificent iron and glass building, and became a paradigm for international exhibitions or world’s fairs. In fact, the Museum of Manufactures, begun with objects from the Crystal Palace, later became the Victoria and Albert Museum. Art historian Morna O’Neill examines the Crystal Palace’s role in the development of museums specializing in decorative art and industry. Afterward, enjoy Lithograph by William Simpson of the Grand teatime sweets and Entrance of the Crystal Palace, 1851 sparkling wine.

With Light Reception

Sun., Nov. 17, 1:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-002; Members $35; Nonmembers $50

COURTESY VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Edward Hopper and the American Hotel COURTESY VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

Western Motel, 1957, by Edward Hopper; Yale University Art Gallery, bequest of Stephen C. Clark

Check in to Edward Hopper’s hotels, motels, tourist homes, and boarding houses in the first investigation T of the celebrated artist’s images of hospitality U O settings. The selected paintOLD ings and S works on paper on view in the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts’ exhibition Edward Hopper and the American Hotel explore the role of hotels in the cultural landscape of the early to mid-

20th century as reflected in the painter’s distinctive vision. The exhibition is enhanced by simulated spaces and other immersive design elements, and also includes rarely seen diaries and postcards that provide personal travelogues, as told by Hopper’s wife, Josephine. The tour is led by art historian Bonita Billman. DAY TOUR Sun., Nov. 17, 8:30 a.m.–7 p.m.; by bus; lunch at the museum’s Marble Hall; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-008; Members $155; Nonmembers $205

Hotel Lobby, 1943, by Edward Hopper; Indianapolis Museum of Art, William Ray Adams Memorial Collection

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EXHIBITION IMAGES COURTESY THE WALTERS ART MUSEUM

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Charles Rennie Mackintosh at the Walters Baltimore-based arts journalist Richard Selden leads a tour to the Walters Art Museum, where the exhibition Designing the New: Charles Rennie Mackintosh and the Glasgow Style celebrates the 150th anniversary of the birth of the revolutionary Scottish architect who defined a unique vision of art nouveau design. T including furniture, posters, textiles, architecFeaturing a variety OofUmedia D L tural drawings, books, and ceramics, the exhibition presents Mackintosh’s O S work in the context of his key predecessors, contemporaries, and the international influences from which they drew inspiration, including Japanese sword guards, Islamic tiles, and extraordinary book bindings. Participants also visit the furniture galleries at the Maryland Historical Society, which include many pieces of veneered and painted furniture from the early 19th century, the golden age of Baltimore furniture production. The May Queen, 1900, by Margaret Macdonald

DAY TOUR Sat., Nov. 23, 8:30 a.m–6 p.m.; by bus; lunch in the historic Alexander Brown restaurant; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-009; Members $160; Nonmembers $210

Chair, 1904, by Charles Rennie Mackintosh

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit

The Architecture of Reuse Lessons from European Cities Europeans have spent centuries integrating the architectural legacies of their cities into buildings both new and old. Today, for example, Roman music lovers attend summer concerts in the Teatro di Marcello, whose arched colonnades dating from 1 B.C. wrap around a 19thcentury apartment building that was once a Musée d’Orsay 16th-century palazzo. The facade of the city’s stock exchange incorporates Corinthian columns from a temple dedicated to the Emperor Hadrian, built on the site in A.D. 144. Milanese architect Gae Aulenti transformed a Parisian beaux-arts railway station into the stunning Musée d’Orsay. Architect Paola Lugli addresses how historic buildings can survive and thrive through modern adaptations and re-purposing.

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

The House of Medici The Art of Power The Medici were one of the longest lasting-dynasties in history. One of Europe’s most wealthy and powerful families, the Medici were bankers to some of the Continent’s most important rulers, including the pope. But perhaps their most enduring legacy is as patrons of the arts. Donatello, Brunelleschi, Fra Angelico, Botticelli, and Michelangelo enjoyed Medici largesse. Florentine monuments such as the Basilica of San Lorenzo and the Medici Palace are testimony to their patronage. Iconic works such as Donatello’s bronze David or Botticelli’s Birth of Venus began as Medici commissions. Early Renaissance specialist Rocky Ruggiero explores these benefactors of art and the uses of its power. Thurs., Dec. 12, Panoramic view of interior cupola of the Medici 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0- Chapels, Florence, Italy 014; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Wed., Dec. 4, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-017; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

Introduction to American Art From the glorious vistas of American landscape painting to the bold splashes and strokes of abstract expressionism, American artists have captured the nation’s enormous energy and tumultuous growth. Art historian Bonita Billman introduces major artists and Niagara, 1857, by Frederic Edwin Church movements in American painting from the late 18th century to the art being produced in the United States in our time, revealing the connections between historical changes and artistic choices.

ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

TRENDING

FRI., DEC 6 6:30 p.m. Early American Art: West, Copley, Stuart SAT., DEC 7 9:30 a.m. Landscape Painting: Cole, Durand, Church, Bierstadt, Moran 11 a.m. Realism and Impressionism: Eakins, Whistler, Homer Cassatt, Sargent 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Early Modernism: Davis, Hopper, O’Keeffe, Wood, Benton 3 p.m. Modern and Contemporary Art: Pollock, Rothko, Motherwell, Hockney, Warhol American Gothic, 1930, by Grant Wood

Yuletide at Winterthur and Longwood Gardens Splendid architecture and decorative arts, glorious gardens, and spectacular holiday decorations indoors and out are just some of the reasons why visits to two of the Brandywine Valley’s favorite destinations offer an ideal way to spend a December day. Begin at Winterthur, the lavish Henry Francis duPont estate near Wilmington, Delaware. An array of bedrooms, parlors, dining rooms, and drawing rooms are decorated for the season, with elaborate trees and trimmings set against the house’s period furnishings and extensive collection of fine and decorative arts. After lunch at Winterthur cafeteria, join a curator for a short introduction to the blockbuster exhibition of costumes created for “The Crown”, followed by some time to explore on your own. An evening visit to nearby Longwood Gardens offers time on your own to relax, wander the grounds, and take in the spectacular seasonal decorations. The famed holiday garden light display features hundreds of sparkling snowflakes, twinkling tree forms, and illuminated fountains. Architecture and urban studies speHoliday interior at Winterthur cialist Bill Keene is your guide. Lunch is included at Winterthur; free time is allotted at Longwood Gardens for dinner on your own. DAY TOUR Fri., Dec. 13 (CODE 1ND-B11), 8 a.m.–10 p.m.; by bus; lunch included at Winterthur; dinner on your own at Longwood Gardens; detailed information on website; Members $170; Nonmembers $220

Seasonal lights at Longwood Gardens

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CAROL DEGUISEPPI/LONGWOOD

COURTESY OF WINTERTHUR

2 sessions; Fri., Dec. 6, 6:30–8:30 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 7, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-057; Members $120; Nonmembers $185


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GALLERIA BORGHESE, ROME

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Renaissance Pleasure Palaces

Sick Bacchus, ca. 1593, by Caravaggio

PALAZZO FARNESE, ROME

The Art of the Sensual Life Renaissance Italians emulated ancient Romans, building art-filled suburban villas used as havens from the pressures of urban life, allowing them to indulge in a voluptuous and relaxed luxury. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, explores the history, legends, design, and art of three of the most beautiful and well-preserved of these villas. The first Renaissance pleasure palace, Villa Farnesina (1505), was decorated with works such as Raphael’s fresco of Galatea and Giulio Romano’s Loggia of Psyche, which delighted many a pope and international ruler. Palazzo Te (1525), built by the Gonzaga family, was a favored getaway for the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. Portraits of the Gonzagas’ prized horses as well as paintings of the myth of Psyche adorned the villa. Two sublime statues by famed sculptor Bernini—Apollo and Daphne and Pluto and Persephone—graced the Villa Borghese (1607). Bernini’s often-sensual art clearly suited his patron, Cardinal Scipione Borghese, a legendary art collector. 10 a.m. Villa Farnesina, Rome 11:15 a.m. Palazzo Te, Mantua The Triumph of Bacchus and Ariadne, ca. 1597, by Annibale Carracci

12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Bernini in the Villa Borghese, Rome 2:45 p.m. Caravaggio in the Villa Borghese Sat., Dec. 14, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-015; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

Introduction to Western Art From the Great Pyramids to the Pantheon The key to understanding the inspiration for monuments found in our modern world is through an overview of ancient material culture. Art historian Renee Gondek leads an insightful survey of the paintings, sculptures, and architecture produced in ancient Egypt and the Greek and Roman worlds. Journey down the Nile during the third and second millennia B.C. and discover the ritual complexes of the pharaohs, such as the Great Pyramids at Giza. Study the archaeological remains of the earliest Greeks including the palace of Knossos on Crete (reportedly the home of mythical King Minos) to treasures found in The bull-leaping fresco at Knossos palace, Crete Mycenaen graves. Examine the development of Greek art from koroi and korai figures to the famous Euphronios krater (an artifact restored to Italy after decades in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art). Learn about imperial monuments like the Ara Pacis, Column of Trajan, Pantheon, and Arch of Constantine, and ancient frescoes that adorned the spacious dwellings of the Roman elite. JAN 6 Ancient Egypt JAN 13 The Aegean Bronze Age JAN 27 Archaic to Hellenistic Greece FEB 3 The Roman World 4 sessions; Mon., Jan. 6–Feb. 3; no class Jan. 20, 12–2 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-475; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

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Greek temple to Castor and Pollux, Agrigento, Sicily

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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SMITHSONIAN ARCHIVES OF AMERICAN ART

Muses and Mews Artists and Their Cats Expressive or aloof, affectionate or enigmatic, cats’ complicated characters make them compelling artists’ muses. Mary Savig, curator of manuscripts at the Smithsonian Archives of American Art, explores these quirky relationships

Charles E. Buckley’s birthday card for March Lion the cat, March 24, 1950

in her book, Artful Cats. Savig highlights fascinating images in which artists such as Jasper Johns, Frank Stella, Louise Nevelson, Georgia O’Keeffe, Romare Bearden, and others show off their artful cats. Images and other materials from the Archives complement her celebration of our feline familiars. Stay for some snacks and cat-themed crafts. Leave with an artist-inspired enamel cat pin. Artful Cats: Discoveries from the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art (Princeton Architectural Press) is available for sale and signing. Tues., Dec. 17, 7 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-096; all tickets $25

World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

The popular style of 19th-century French painting known as impressionism—filled with color, light, and scintillating brushwork—was an act of extreme rebellion when it appeared in the 1870s. For artists to depict fleeting sensations of rain, a sunrise, or a human gesture was shocking to other artists, art lovers, and critics who had been taught that fine art should focus on timeless and unchanging subject matter. The work of these modern masters—notably Monet, Renoir, Degas, Cassatt, and Morisot—led in turn to the radical art of the post-impressionists. During the 1880s and ’90s Seurat, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Van Gogh used vivid colors and form to depict subjects from the real world, but in ways were not always fully realistic. In an illustrated two-part program, art historian Nancy G. Heller explores the sources, masterpieces, and later influences of these rebels, including their impact on early 20th-century art. JAN 10 (FRI) 6:30 p.m. Edouard Manet and the Transition to Impressionism 7:30 p.m. Monet the Master JAN 11 (SAT) 9:30 a.m. Beautiful Women in Lovely Settings: The art of Renoir

Waterlilies, 1906, by Claude Monet

11 a.m. Ballerinas and Bathers: Edgar Degas’ dancers 12 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Post-Impressionism I: Structuring Color, Space, and Form: Seurat and Cézanne

Self-Portrait, 1889, by Paul Gauguin

3 p.m. Post-Impressionism II: Expressing Emotions Through Stylization: Gauguin and Van Gogh 2 sessions; Fri., Jan. 10, 6:30–8:30 p.m., and Sat., Jan. 11, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-059; Members $120; Nonmembers $185

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OHARA MUSEUM OF ART

Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Painting in France


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NEUE GALERIE

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

A Trio of Museum Gems Treat yourself to an art-filled weekend escape to Manhattan that gives you plenty of time to take in guided visits of three distinctive and stunning smaller museums. Art historian Ursula Rehn Wolfman leads the tour, which offers the rare opportunity to visit the famed Neue Gallery before it opens to the public. Housed in a beautiful T art and 1914 mansion on Museum Mile, the gallery focuses on German and Austrian OU D L design from 1890Sto 1950, with works by Klimt, O Schiele, Hoffmann, Beckmann, and artists of the expressionist movement and the Bauhaus. The Morgan Library and Museum—a Renaissance-inspired private library designed for Pierpont Morgan in 1904—houses illuminated manuscripts, rare books, literary, historical, and Adele Bloch-Bauer, 1907, by Gustav Klimt music manuscripts, and drawings. Gilded Age figure Henry Clay Frick’s former residence is now the Frick Collection, a museum and research center whose holdings grew from the Old Master paintings and European sculpture and decorative arts acquired by Frick. Accommodations are in the historic Roosevelt Hotel in midtown Manhattan—an ideal base for a Morgan Library & Museum Saturday evening on your own. OVERNIGHT TOUR Sat., Jan. 11, 8:30 a.m.–Sun., Jan. 12, 10:30 p.m.; by bus; Saturday boxed lunch en route and Sunday breakfast and early supper at Brass Rail included; purchase of trip insurance recommended; detailed information on website; CODE 1NN-TMG; Members $565; Nonmembers $720

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Marcel Duchamp Enfant Terrible and Innovative Genius Regarded as one of the most important, innovative, and influential, artists of the 20th century, Marcel Duchamp (1887– 1968) created paintings, sculptures, and objects that go well beyond conventional labels. His revolutionary work anticipated artistic movements as diverse as pop and conceptual art and kinetic sculpture. Duchamp’s deliberate outrageousness caused controversy, from the urinal-as-sculpture Fountain to Nude Descending A Staircase No. 2, a cause célèbre at New York’s 1913 Armory Show. Art historian Nancy G. Heller traces Duchamp’s life and art, focusing on the importance of a selection of his key works. Marcel Duchamp as ”Rrose Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara Sélavy", one of his alter egos, 1921, and Aaron Levine Collection is on photo by Man Ray view at the Hirshhorn Museum beginning November 9. Thurs., Jan. 9, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-058; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

World Art History Certificate Program elective: Earn ½ credit

Crafting the Buddha’s Image The image of Buddha is one of the world’s most recognized religious symbols, but its origins are shrouded in mystery. For 500 years after his death in 483 B.C., his followers avoided creating any image of him. Where did the famous likeness come from and why did it take so long to be created? 5th c. Buddha statue, Sarnath, Rob DeCaroli, professor of India art history at George Mason University explains how likenesses and effigies held a special cultural importance in India. The connection they often forged between artistic images and their viewers presented potential challenges to depicting the Buddha. DeCaroli illuminates the historical events that led to the acceptance of the Buddha’s image.

SARNATH MUSEUM

GRAHAM HABER

An Artful Weekend in New York

Wed., Jan. 15, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-476; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

America in the booming post-Civil War decades was a place of contradictions and dichotomies. Great economic growth defined the period, which was ruled by robber barons, magnates who gained tremendous wealth in railways and communications, and in industries like iron, oil, coal, and steel. The nouveaux riches used their wealth to build opulent homes and vacation “cottages,” buy expensive clothes and art, and take up recreational activities as never before, from polo to pampering pets. A portrait painted by John Singer Sargent became an important status symbol.

CLIVEDEN HOUSE, ENGLAND

The Gilded Age Social critic Thorstein Veblen coined the term “conspicuous consumption” to represent this spending, and Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner dubbed the era the Gilded Age, when serious societal ills were hidden by a gilt façade. Some of America’s monied class, though, also used their wealth to improve the country’s big cities with libraries, museums, theatres, and parks. That philanthropy is also a part of the Gilded Age’s complex story. Art historian Bonita Billman explores the dramatic distance between the lives of the upper crust and those on the other end of the social and economic scales in the years between 1870 and 1910. 9:30 a.m. How the Other Half Lives 11 a.m. Gilded Gotham 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) Portrait of Mrs. Waldorf Astor (née Nancy Langhorne), 1908, by John Singer Sargent

The Breakers, a Vanderbilt mansion in Newport, Rhode Island

1:30 p.m. Cottages and Country Houses 3 p.m. Idle Hours

Sat., Jan. 25, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-062; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

PRADO MUSEUM

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

The Golden Age of Spanish Art Spanish art’s golden age—as exemplified in works by artists from El Greco to Velázquez—reflects a complex set of forces that combined humanist philosophies from 15th century Italy with medieval ideas reinforced by the Catholic church and the Counter-Reformation. From the mid-16th to mid-17th centuries, Spanish Habsburgs and other aristocrats became some of the most avid and discerning art lovers in Europe. They brought to Spain and supported the work of numerous artists from Northern Europe and Italy, resulting in cultural exchanges that were instrumental in the flourishing of new approaches to art, in genres from portraiture to still-life painting, among Spain’s leading painters. Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine provides an overview of the era and the enduring achievements of Spanish artists—from El Greco and Murillo to Velázquez—who found their inspiration in it. 10 a.m. The Dawn of the Golden Age 11:15 a.m. Versions of Spirituality 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Velázquez: Painter, Courtier, Philosopher 2:30 p.m. Symbolic Images: From Still Life to Allegory Fri., Feb. 7, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-479; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Las Meninas, 1656, by Diego Velazquez

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Ancient Egypt Through Its Art, Architecture, and Archaeology The secret to understanding the daily life and culture of ancient Egypt under its great rulers and pharaohs is right before our eyes—in its art and architecture. Using evidence from the most recent archaeological discoveries, Egyptologist Jacquelyn Williamson surveys the social and historical realities of this civilization from its early pyramids through the art created under King Akhenaten, whose rejection of religious traditions birthed new artistic conventions. Williamson examines the religious influences that provide the driving force behind the origins of all Egyptian art and architecture. She looks at the triumphs of the artists and architects of the 4th Dynasty, ˆwho captured the period’s kings and elite in elegant statuary and memorialized them though the engineering marvels of the The Great Sphinx monument (1397–1388, B.C.) and a pyramids. pyramid at Giza

Contrasting the discord and anxiety of the Middle Period with the wealth and stability of the 18th Dynasty, she illustrates how distinctive art and architecture sprang from each era. Finally, Williamson traces how the monotheism embraced by Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti upended millennia of religious beliefs and inspired some of the most visually arresting art works in history. 9:30 a.m. Understanding Egyptian Art: The Origins of an Artistic Tradition 11 a.m. Wonder and Majesty: The Art of the 4th Dynasty 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own)

Egyptian Goddess Maat, 664-332 B.C. WALTERS ART GALLERY

1:30 p.m. The Elegance of Discord and the Beauty of Empire 3 p.m. The Art of Heresy: Akhenaten and Nefertiti Sat., Feb. 8, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-066; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Indian Art and Calligraphy An Immersive Exploration FREER GALLERY OF ART

Experience how the interplay of art, language, and music shaped the culture, religions, and history of India and the South Asian subcontinent. Join artist and museum docent Sushmita Mazumdar in the Freer|Sackler Galleries and in the classroom for detailed looks at artworks and objects and the opportunity to try your hand at calligraphy inspired by them.

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MAR 1 The Vasanta Vilasa: View the 15th-century scroll with its verses in Devnagari script MAR 8 The Tibetan Shrine Room: View Tibetan Buddhist art and practice writing Bengali script MAR 15 A Quatrefoil Box: Write the Taj Mahal’s name in the Persian and Devnagari scripts MAR 22 The Bodhisattva White Avalokiteshvara: View the elegant 14thcentury sculpture; write the god’s Sanskrit name in the Devnagari script

Vasanta Vilasa (a poem on Spring) (detail), 1451, Guajarat, India Bodhisattva White Avalokiteshvara, 14th century, Nepal

FEB 23 The Seated Ganesha: Sketch a 12th-century stone sculpture of the Hindu god Ganesha

MAR 29 The Child Saint Sambandar: Examine a 12th-century bronze sculpture of the child saint Sambandar; explore the written Tamil language in calligraphy

6 sessions; 3 hours each; Sun., Feb. 23–March. 29, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XM; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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HOLIDAY WORKSHOPS

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Knitting for Beginners Making a Scarf for the Holidays

Needle Felting for the Holidays Elves and Ornaments

Get in introduction to knitting fundamentals in this class, from casting on to binding off, and you’ll be ready to knit a scarf for yourself or as a gift.

Explore the art of sculpting, embellishing, and painting with a felting needle while you create a sprightly elf and an ornament of your own design. Light holiday refreshments and seasonal music complete a fun afternoon.

2 sessions; 3 hours each; Ann Richards; Mon., Nov. 4 and Nov. 18, 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0TE; Members $75; Nonmembers $95

One 4-hour session; Renate MaileMoskowitz; Sun., Dec. 8, 12 p.m.; $10 supply fee covers cost of materials. CODE 1K0-0TY; Members $65; Nonmembers $85

Holiday Card Workshop Making Memorable Masterpieces

By Karen Cadogan

Create simply elegant holiday greeting cards while learning the tips and techniques of professional card making. Learn to combine sentiments, foreground, masking, and statement embellishments to produce personalized cards

Seasonal Workshops with Smithsonian Gardens Two workshops led by Smithsonian Gardens horticulturist Christine Price-Abelow offer a chance to create your own centerpiece and wreath inspired by the botanical decorations seen in the gardens. Each session begins at the Smithsonian Castle to view the indoor holiday decorations before walking through its bedecked grounds.

Seasonal Wreaths Make a truly spectacular holiday wreath from fresh mixed evergreens, winterberry, holly, and man-made holiday accents and decorative ribbon. Learn fundamentals of design, how to use leftover materials, and the secret to making a perfect bow.

for friends and family. One 3-hour session; Karen Cadogan; Sat., Nov. 16, 2 p.m.; supplies provided including cardstock, ink, ribbon, and more to craft at least 20 cards at home (supply fee of $40 is included in tuition); details on website; CODE 1K0-0XT; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

Thanksgiving Centerpiece Workshop

Have fun while learning the fundamentals of floral design from a Smithsonian Gardens horticulturist. Create a centerpiece for your holiday table and pick up handy tips and tricks. Wine and snacks boost the holiday mood. One 2-hour session; Sarah Tietbohl; Mon., Nov. 25, 6:30 p.m.; all materials and decorative container provided; CODE 1K0-0TN; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

By Renate Maile-Moskowitz

TWO OPTIONS: 1 session, 2.5 hours each; Christine Price-Abelow; all materials and light refreshments provided; Mon., Dec. 16, 10 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0TV) and Tues., Dec. 17, 10 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0TW); Members $85; Nonmembers $95

Seasonal Centerpieces Learn the fundamentals of floral design—along with tips and tricks to create other decorations—as you make a stunning centerpiece for your holiday table. One 2.5-hour session; Christine Price-Abelow; all materials and light refreshments provided; Wed., Dec. 18, 10 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0TX; Members $85; Nonmembers $95 NOVEMBER 2019 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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Pysanky for the Holidays

Memoir: Art from Life

A Ukrainian Egg Decorating Workshop

Visual art can inspire writing, just as writing can deepen your connection to art. View Joan Miro’s The Farm to discover how memory informed it and inspires your own reflective writing through multisensory exploration, word sketching, and writing prompts.

A Creative Writing Workshop

Brighten your holidays with pysanky, colorful eggs decorated with traditional Slavic folk designs. Use a stylus to inscribe motifs on beeswax-covered eggs, which are then dipped in dye.

By Joanna Lohr

One 4-hour session; Joanna Lohr; Sat., Dec. 14, 12 p.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0TZ; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Orchids for the Holidays

One 2.5-hour session; Mary Hall Surface; Sun., Dec. 8, 1 p.m.; details on website; see p. 25 for more information; CODE 1K0-0TQ; Members $35; Nonmembers $45 The Farm, 1921, by Joan Miró

Take a break from the stress of the holiday season. Spend an entertaining and informative afternoon with an orchid expert, learning about the orchid’s history and basic care instructions. Leave with a holiday orchid centerpiece you’ve created.

Introduction to Drawing and Painting Work from still life, architectural interiors, and landscape to become familiar with the fundamentals of drawing and oil painting.

One 2-hour session; Barbara Schmidt; Sun., Dec. 8, 2 p.m.; all materials and light refreshments provided; CODE 1K0-0TS; Members $85; Nonmembers $95 By Max-Karl Winkler

GENERAL

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; MaxKarl Winkler; Fri., Jan. 24–March 13, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UQ; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Color Theory Become familiar with the color wheel, color value, chroma, and hue. Use acrylic paints and colored papers to explore color qualities and movement in shaping composition. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Dan Riesmeyer; Mon., Jan. 27–March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UW; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

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SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Examine concepts and application of composition. Create collages based on art works and themes discussed, and explore connections between formal elements of visual art and art’s emotional impact. Moroccan Café, 1913, by Matisse 4 sessions; 3 hours each; Shahin Talishkan; Thurs., Feb. 20–March 12, 2 p.m.; all supplies included; details on website; CODE 1K0-0UM; Members $155; Nonmembers $175

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.

HERMITAGE MUSEUM

Composition


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ART

Classes are taught by professional artists and teachers. View detailed class descriptions and supply lists at SmithsonianAssociates.org/studio View portfolios of work by our instructors at SmithsonianAssociates.org/artinstructors

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Children’s Book Illustration Workshop

Exploring the Visual Foundations and Traditions of Art

Transform an author’s vision into vivid illustrations by learning the basics of interpreting a story through pictures. Information on working with publishers and protecting art is also discussed.

Apply the science in Renaissance art. Enhance the visual dynamic in drawings using the Golden Ratio, the Rule of Thirds, three-point perspective, or the Fibonacci spiral. 2 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Thurs., March 5 and 12, 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0WA; Members $65; Nonmembers $85

DRAWING

By Lori VanKirk Schue

One 5-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Sat., Nov. 2, 12 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0RU; Members $95; Nonmembers $115

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Introduction to Pastel

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Cezanne-Inspired Still-Life Compositions Weekend Workshop Tap into the wide range of effects possible using colored pencils. Learn layering, blending and buffing strokes to achieve the translucency of watercolors with this dry medium. 2 sessions; 3 hours each; Lori VanKirk Schue; Sun., Sun., Nov. 10 and 17, 1 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0SB; Members $95; Nonmembers $115

Colored Pencils II Workshop Enhance you skill working By Lori VanKirk Schue with the medium of colored pencils. More in-depth techniques are discussed and demonstrated. Students may bring a work in progress or begin a new project in class, if desired. One 4-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Mon., Jan. 27, 11 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0–0VY; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Impressionists favored pastel’s luminosity and color-layering effects. Learn how to achieve the medium’s best effects while working from still-life arrangements. 4 sessions; 4 hours each; Sandra Gobar; Sun., Nov. 3– 24, 10:15 a.m.; supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0SZ; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

Colored Pencils

Still Life with Milk Jug and Fruit, ca. 1900, Paul Cézanne

Drawing on the Right Side of Your Brain Build drawing ability and improve visualization and recording of objects on paper through drawing exercises focusing on edges and space, relationships between objects, and light and shadow. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Shahin Talishkhan; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K0–0UH; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

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Oil Pastels

Beginning Drawing

Become familiar with the basics of using brightly colored, longlasting oil pastels through group technique demonstrations and one-on-one instruction.

Develop basic drawing skills while working with a variety of materials and techniques, Explore geometric forms, volume, and perspective in still-lifes, architecture, and figure drawing.

8 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UX; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

Figure Drawing and Independent Projects Acquire an understanding of advanced elements of composition, anatomy, and artistic direction as you work from live models.

THREE OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Dan Riesmeyer; Tues., Jan. 21–March 10, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0UG; Josh Highter; Sun., Jan. 26–March 22 (no class Feb. 16), 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0UA; Eric Westbrook; Mon., Jan. 27– March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 7:00 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K00UD; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Continued Drawing Refine and expand drawing skills through studio practice in traditional media. Sessions focus on four classic areas: still-life, landscape, portrait, and figure. Students should have completed a beginning drawing course. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Dan Riesmeyer; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 6:30 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K00UK; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Josh Highter; Sun., Jan. 26–March 22 (no class Feb. 16), 1:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; model fees included in tuition; CODE 1K0-0UB; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Manuscript Illumination in the Medieval Tradition

Portrait Drawing

Explore the rich history of manuscript illumination. Use fine-tip markers or colored pencils to produce your own tiny masterpiece in the spirit of the medieval scribes who often depicted animal, plants, and insects to convey deeper meanings.

Create a portrait using charcoal or graphite. Explore the universal proportions of the face and learn how to better observe and record a subject’s features. 6 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Eric Westbrook; Sat., Jan. 25March 7 (no class Feb. 15), 2:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; model fees included in tuition; CODE 1K00WB; Members $200; Nonmembers $230

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By Eric Westbrook

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

One 3-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Mon., Feb. 10, 11 a.m.; details on website; supply fee $10; CODE 1K00VZ; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Drawing In Museums

Traditional Oil Painting Techniques

National Gallery of Art, Freer Gallery of Art, and Smithsonian American Art Museum

Lessons from Museum Masterpieces

Develop rendering and composition skills, and learn the art of copying, by drawing paintings and classical sculptures displayed in the museums.

6 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Paul Glenshaw; Sat., Jan. 25–March 7 (no class Feb. 15), 1:30 p.m.; By student Claire Fuller details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0WF; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

Explore the signature effects of famous artists and draw on their techniques in painting demonstrations and exercises designed to broaden individual skills. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Adrienne Wyman; Sat., Jan. 25– March 21 (no class Feb. 15), 10 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UT; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Student in class

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

PAINTING

Learn To Paint From the Impressionists Somehow, the impressionists captured natural light on canvas. Students view their paintings at the National Gallery of Art, then develop their skills as they create impressionist-inspired works..

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Beginning Oil Painting Explore basic painting techniques including color-mixing, scumbling, and glazing to gain the technical background needed to get started as a painter.

By Shahin Talishkhan

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Shahin Talishkhan; Thurs., Jan. 23–March 12, 6:30 pm.; CODE 1K0-0UN; details and supply list on website; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Techniques in Modernist Painting Class exercises, including stilllife setups and model sessions, teach practical applications of modernism’s concepts and techniques. Develop a visual language through class lectures, demonstrations, and critiques. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Shahin Still life in front of a window at Talishkhan; Weds., Jan. 22– Saint-Raphael, 1919, by Picasso March 11, 1:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UJ; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Adrienne Wyman; Sat., Jan. 25–March 21 (no class Feb. 15); 2 p.m.; details and Student in class supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UU; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Painting Is for Everyone Begin working in the medium of acrylic paints. Learn to mix colors, use brushes, and approach elements of form such as value, texture, line, color, shape, and edges. Explore composition and variation and learn art terminology.

By Chester Kasnowski

8 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Tues., Jan. 21– March 10; 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K00UF; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

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Neuroscience and Art

Watercolor Magic Tricks and Tips

A Creative Connection

Experiment with watercolor paints to achieve surprising results. Use salt, plastic wrap, rice paper, sand, ice, and even liquid soap to create unusual textures in your artwork.

In this painting class, learn about new findings on how our visual system informs and interprets the visible world for us.

TWO OPTIONS:

INSIDE SCIENCE 2 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Thurs., By Chester Kasnowski Jan. 30 and Feb. 6, 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UP; Members $75; Nonmembers $95

One 2-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Fri., Feb. 7, 11 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0VL); 2 p.m. (CODE 1K00VM); supply list and details on website; Members $45; Nonmembers $55 By Lori VanKirk Schue

Touch Painting Release your creativity through your fingertips, using your hands instead of brushes in this adult finger-painting class. Students use acrylic paints to produce artwork.

Introduction to Watercolor Explore basic watercolor techniques and new approaches to painting through classroom demonstration, discussion, and experimentation.

Beautiful Landscapes in Watercolor and Ink

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TWO OPTIONS: One 2-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Mon., March 2, 11 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0XD); 2 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0XE); all supplies included; details on website; Members $35; Nonmembers $45

MIXED-MEDIA

Fabric Printing Using Natural Materials Experiment with hand-printing on fabrics using colorful Akua water-based printmaking ink and natural materials. Practice printmaking techniques on muslin, and later design and hand-print a canvas bag.

Create landscapes rich in atmosphere by developing skills in painting complex foliage and layers of depth, texture, and light. 6 sessions; 3 hours each; Lubna Zahid; Tues., Jan. 21–Feb. 25, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UE; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

By Lori VanKirk Schue

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By David Daniels

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Dave Daniels; Mon., Jan. 27– March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 10:15 a.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K00UC; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

TWO OPTIONS: One 5-hour session; Sue Fierston; Sat., Nov. 2 By Sue Fierston (CODE 1K0-0RH); Sun, March 1 (CODE 1K0-0XQ); 10:30 a.m.; details on website; supply fee $25; Members $65; Nonmembers $75 By Lubna Zahid

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Image Transfers and Photo Alteration

Exploring Book Arts Themes and Variations

Mixed-Media Workshop Use multiple methods for making and using image transfers. Topics include applications, choosing images, materials and techniques, altered photos as standalone artwork, and altered photos with collage. 3 sessions; 5 hours each; Sharon Robinson; Wed., Nov. 6-20, 10:30 a.m.; students provide photos, all other supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0TK; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

By Sharon Robinson

Collage and Mixed-Media Develop collage, mixed-media or assemblage projects. Experiment with color, form, design and the use of text, images, texture, and found objects. TWO COURSE OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; Tues., Jan. 21–March 10, 1:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0VD); Tues., Jan. 21–March 10, 6:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0VE); details and supply list on website; Members $235; Nonmembers $265 INTENSIVE COLLAGE and MIXED-MEDIA WORKSHOP OPTION:

2 sessions; 5 hours each; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; Sat., Feb. 22 and Sun., Feb. 23, 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VC; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

Monoprint Without A Press Create prints using Gelli and other types of plates, plus acrylic paints and other materials. Explore additive and subtractive methods, drawing on the plate, over-printing, and using stamps and other materials to create patterns. 2 sessions; 5 hours each; Sharon Robinson; Wed., Dec. 11 and 18, 10:30 a.m.; all supplies By Sharon Robinson provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0TJ; Members $165; Nonmembers $185

STUDIO ART

Learn techniques to create three standard types of handmade books, then apply creative twists and variations. Projects By Sushmita Mazumdar include an accordion book from watercolor paper, a Japanese stab-bound journal, a flag-themed journal, and single-page folded books (one made with a world map). 3 sessions; 3 hours each; Sushmita Mazumdar; Sun., Nov. 3–17, 2 p.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0TR; Members $125; Nonmembers $145

Exploring Encaustic and Mixed-Media Workshop The encaustic medium can be molded, sculpted, and combined with collage materials. Learn how to incorporate drawings or prints on paper and other collage elements into encaustic paintings. One 6-hour session; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; Sun., March 8, By Marcie Wolf-Hubbard 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VB; Members $125; Nonmembers: $135

Mixed-Media in the Style of Romare Bearden Romare Bearden (1911–1988) is best known for his bold mixed-media collages. Create By Sandra Gobar Bearden-inspired mixed-media compositions using various fabrics, papers, cutouts, stencils and photographs, as well as paint and drawing materials. 3 sessions; 5 hours each; Sandra Gobar; Sun., Jan. 26–Feb. 9, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XG; Members $195; Nonmembers $215 NOVEMBER 2019 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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Off-the-Wall Assemblage

Handmade Cards from the Heart

Enshrine personal mementos in a wooden box that can stand alone or be wall mounted. Explore a range of materials for collage and embellishment, including papers, paint, metal fixtures, charms, wire, beads, and other objects.

In celebration of all kinds of occasions of the heart, offer your special someone a handmade card. Learn card construction, sentiments, masking, and statement embellishments. Create cards in the session and leave with a basic starter kit to make a dozen masterpieces at home.

By Sharon Robinson

4 sessions; 4 hours each; Sharon Robinson; Sat., Feb. 29–March 21, 10 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XH; Members $185; Nonmembers $205

One 3-hour session; Karen Cadogan; Sun., Feb. 2, 1 p.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XL; Members $65; Nonmembers $75 By Karen Cadogan

Animal Portraits

Gyotaku

Create a portrait of your favorite animal or pet. Learn how to capture the subject’s essence and express it on canvas using acrylic paints. Collage and other techniques are discussed as useful additions. Bring a reference photo to class.

The Japanese Art of Printing with Fish

By Lori VanKirk Schue

One 4-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Mon., Feb. 24, 11 a.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0UV; Members $85; Nonmembers $95

By Sue Fierston

This venerable art is accomplished by applying water-based printing inks to a whole fish and pressing it to paper. Create several 12-by-18-inch prints featuring a variety of fish to bring home.

One 5-hour session; Sue Fierston; Sat., Jan. 25, 10:30 a.m.; details on website; supply fee $25; CODE 1K0-0XP; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

Paper Frenzy Use a variety of art and printmaking materials to create a supply of accented papers for collage and other art projects. By Sushmita Mazumdar

Handmade Storybooks Mixed-Media Workshop Explore the many creative ways to use paper while building and binding several books. Use standard bookmaking papers and thread as well as unusual materials such as manila folders and matchboxes. Fill the new books in an afternoon of creative writing and art-making. One 6-hour session; Sushmita Mazumdar; Sat., Feb. 8, 10 a.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; Studio Pause, 4108 4th St. N., Arlington, Virginia (Ballston Metro); onsite parking; CODE 1K00XK; Members $85; Nonmembers $95

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SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

2 sessions; 5 hours each; Sharon Robinson; Fri., Feb. 14 and 21, 10:30 a.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XJ; Members $125; Nonmembers $145 By Sharon Robinson

Connect with us on Social Media facebook.com/ smithsonianstudioarts

instagram.com/ smithsonianassociates

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Alexander Calder and His Marvelous Mobiles With Light Reception Spend a creative afternoon channeling the colorful world of Alexander Calder’s moving art. Make a full-scale group mobile from pre-fabricated pieces and one to take home. Learn how Calder created a new art form with his mobiles and wire sculptures. View participants’ creations at a wine-andcheese “gallery walk.” One 2.5-hour session; Kevin Reese; Sun., Nov. 10, 1:30 p.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0TP; Members $55; Nonmembers $65

SCIENCE

ART

STUDIO ART

Figure Sculpture Learn about clay sculpture techniques, tool use and armatures, and the planes of the human body. Sculpt either a portrait, torso, or full figure using a live model. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; George Tkabladze; Fri., Jan. 24–March 13, 2 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K0-0UR; Members $250; Nonmembers $280 By George Tkabladze

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TRENDING

CALLIGRAPHY

Introduction to Calligraphy The Foundational Hand Learning the basic letterforms of the Foundational Hand opens the door to other calligraphic hands such as Italic and Black Letter. Upper and lower case letters are covered as well as basic layout and design.

Neon Light Sculpture Create your own illuminated object as you learn to bend glass tubing and observe demonstrations of the process of tube bombarding and rare-gas filling. 6 sessions (one 1.5 hour lecture and five 3-hour workshops); Craig Kraft; Tues., Feb. 4, 6:30–8 p.m. and Feb. 11–March 10, 6:30– 9:30 p.m.; $85 supply fee; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WE; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

By Craig Kraft

By Marta Legeckis

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Marta Legeckis; Thurs., Jan. 23–March 12, 10:15 a.m.; all calligraphy supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0UL; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Introduction to Pointed-Pen Calligraphy Beginning Sculpture Sculpt head and face portraits using the medium of clay following hands-on studio practice and demonstrations. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; George Tkabladze; Fri., Jan. 24– March 13, 6:30 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K0-0US; Members $250; Nonmembers $280

Add sophistication to your hand-lettering when you learn the basic strokes of the copperplate script alphabet and practice using nibs in an elbow holder. No experience required, just a steady hand. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Sharmila Karamchandani; Mon., Jan. 27–March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 2 p.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K00XA; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

By George Tkabladze

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The Art of Chinese Calligraphy

When Good Patterns Go Bad

Using Chinese brush and ink, learn to write basic Chinese characters, short phrases, and poems. The traditional signature seal and its history are also discussed.

Avoiding and Fixing Knitting Mistakes Here’s a protocol to follow to detect knitting errors sooner, from dropped stitches to difficult pattern instructions to twisted stitches and more.

6 sessions; 2.5 hours each; John Wang; Sat., Jan. 25–March 7 (no class Feb. 15), 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UY; Members $185; Nonmembers $215

An Immersive Exploration

This series combines deVasanta Vilasa (a poem on Spring) tailed looks at Indian and (detail), 1451, Guajarat, India South Asian objects and artworks in the Freer and Sackler collections with the opportunity to try your hand at calligraphy inspired by them. 6 sessions; 3 hours each; Sushmita Mazumdar; Sun., Feb. 23– March 29, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XM; Members $195; Nonmembers $225 (see full program details on p. 38)

Quilting Workshop Appliqué and Edges Create a fabric flower garden wall hanging while adding appliqué techniques to your quilt making skills. Learn how to use applied bindings, flanges, self-bindings, facings, and overstitching to finish rectangular and uneven edges. One 4-hour session; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., Nov. 2, 1 p.m.; By Lauren Kingsland details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0SE; Members $55; Nonmembers $65

Knitting for Beginners

FIBER ARTS

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Silk Painting Weekend Workshop After an overview of the history and art of silk painting in the instructor’s home studio (in Lanham, MD), learn the basics, including stretching, diluting, resisting, spotting, salting, wet-on-wet, fabric setting, and vocabulary. Create painted pieces to take home. 2 sessions; 6 hours each; Diane Tuckman; Sat., Nov. 2 and Sun., By Diane Tuckman Nov. 3, 10 a.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0TU; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

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One 3-hour session; Ann Richards; Mon., Dec. 2, 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0TF; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

FREER GALLERY OF ART

Indian Art and Calligraphy

STUDIO ART

ART

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Learn the fundamentals of knitting, including casting on, basic knit and purl stitches, increasing, decreasing, and binding off. Practice basic skills and start an optional knitting project. 6 sessions; 2 hours each; Ann Richards; Mon., Jan. 27–March 9 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WD; Members $125; Nonmembers $145

Knitting Circle In this collaborative class, expand knitting skills through investigative techniques, demonstrations, hands-on projects, and research. Bring a project or an idea for one to the first session. 6 sessions; 2 hours each; Ann Richards; Sun., Jan. 26–March 8 (no class Feb. 16), 2:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WC; Members $125; Nonmembers $145

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Quilting for Beginners

Palestinian WasteCanvas Technique

A Small Handmade Quilt Learn the basics of quilt-making by creating several small quilts while learning the same piecing, appliqĂşe, quilting, and finishing techniques used in larger quilts. 2 sessions; 4 hours each; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., Jan. 25 and Sat., Feb. 1, 12 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VV; Members $85; Nonmembers $105

STUDIO ART

For centuries, Palestinian women have created a traditional longsleeved dress called a thobe, which is first embroidered onto fabric using waste canvas. Learn the technique by transferring a pattern onto an 8 x 10 organic cotton drawstring pouch to take home.

By Wafa Ghnaim

One 3-hour session; Wafa Ghnaim; Sun., Feb. 2, 12 p.m.; details on website; all supplies included; CODE 1K0-0VS; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Palestinian Embroidery 101 Birds of Palestine on Aida Cloth

Mandala Wall Hanging Workshop Eastern sacred design meets Western textile techniques as students create a quilted mandala wall hanging based on the kolam design tradition. Please come and enjoy a peaceful, creative experience.

Recalling the long tradition of Palestinian women working together on embroidery projects, learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch to create a traditional bird motif on aida cloth. Take home an embroidered hoop-mounted design. One 3-hour session; Wafa Ghnaim; Sat., Feb. 29, 12 p.m.; details on website; all supplies included; CODE 1K0-0VT; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

By Wafa Ghnaim

Hand Embroidery for Today

2 sessions; 5 hours each; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., March 7 and 14, By Lauren Kingsland 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VW; Members $110; Nonmembers $130

Learn basic hand embroidery stitches to create modern designs on contemporary fabrics. Explore threads and tools to enhance knits, felted wools, and readymade garments.

Tapestry Weaving

One 4-hour session; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., Feb. 8, 10 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XN; Members $55; Nonmembers $65

Create a miniature woven tapestry on a small frame loom. Class instruction includes basic tapestryweaving techniques such as warping the loom, color mixing and hatching.

By Tea Okropiridze

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Tea Okropiridze; Mon., Jan. 27–March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; details on website; supply fee $40; CODE 1K0-0VF; Members $215; Nonmembers $245

By Lauren Kingsland

Indigo and Shibori Workshop Japan and India have long used brilliant blue indigo dye to apply dramatic patterns to fabric. Working with this timeless natural color, create unique silk scarves using the classic Japanese shibori resist-dyeing technique. One 5-hour session; Trisha Gupta; Fri., Feb. 28, 10:30 a.m.; limited to 14 By Trisha Gupta participants; all supplies included; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XR; Members $95; Nonmembers $105

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Riveted Ring

OTHER MEDIA

Create a stunning ring in sterling silver using a rolling mill, jeweler’s saw, and cold-connection riveting techniques. Imprint a texture onto metal, then cut, form, and rivet your design.

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Jewelry Workshop: Creative Chains Techniques for wire-working, forming, texturing, and fusing are used to create several chain designs. Go home with a necklacelength or bracelet-length piece. One 7-hour session; Mïa Vollkommer; Sat., Nov. 9, 10 By Mïa Vollkommer a.m.; $50 kit fee; details and additional supply list online; CODE 1K0-0TB; Members $120; Nonmembers $130

Stone Settings with Cold Connections Jewelry Workshop Showcase a flat-backed stone or a personal treasure in a cold-connected pendant you design. Construct your mixed-metals piece with piercing, rivets, and a cutand-folded prong setting.

One 5-hour session; Mïa Vollkommer; Sat., Nov. 16, 10 a.m.; metal and wire kit $30; details and additional supply list online; CODE 1K0-0TC; Members $90; Nonmembers $100 By Mïa Vollkommer

Picture Frame Pendant Working with piercing and riveting techniques, choose a design and frame a favorite photo, small artwork, or even a special stamp in a pendant that’s perfect for gift-giving. One 5.5-hour session; Mïa Vollkommer; Sun., Nov. 17, 10:30 a.m.; supply kit fee $55; details and tools list on website; CODE 1K0-0SX; Members $95; Nonmembers $105 By Mïa Vollkommer

One 5.5-hour session; Mïa Vollkommer; Sun., Nov. 10, 10:30 a.m.; supply kit fee $55; details and By Mïa Vollkommer tools list on website; CODE 1K00SW; Members $95; Nonmembers $105

Relief Printing Linocut and Woodblock Design and produce relief prints from techniques of design and transfer through cutting and printing the block.

Wirework Workshop An Abacus Pendant

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Max-Karl Winkler; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VG; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

Create your own colorful “abacus”-style pendant as you learn the techniques of wirework, including forming, hammering, and precision wire-wrapping .

By Mïa Vollkommer

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One 3-hour session; Mïa Vollkommer; Fri., Nov. 15, 12 p.m.; $10 wire kit fee; details and additional supply list online; CODE 1K0-0TA; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

STUDIO ART

ART

By Max-Karl Winkler

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


TRENDING

HISTORY

CULTURE

SCIENCE

Introduction to Indian Textile Printing

Exterior Mosaics in Unglazed Porcelain

Explore the traditions and history of Indian Rajastani textiles, dyeing with natural pigments, and sari woodblocks as you create pieces of textile and printed art. 8 sessions, 2.5 hours each; Trisha Gupta; Sat., Jan. 25–March 21 (no class Feb. 15), By Trisha Gupta 10:15 a.m.; supply fee $65; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XS; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

Retro Meets Modern Work with unglazed porcelains to mimic traditional mosaics with a contemporary flair. Create and grout a onesquare-foot piece for exterior display. TWO OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Bonnie Fitzgerald; Tues., Jan. 28–March 17, 1 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0UZ); Tues., Jan. 28– March 17, 6:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0VA); $80 supply fee; details and supply list on website; Members $245; Nonmembers $275 By Bonnie Fitzgerald

nnnn

Grapevine Basket In this introduction to basket weaving, create a melon-shaped basket with grapevine handle and rim. Use a combination of natural weaving materials and learn ribbing techniques.

STUDIO ART

ART

PHOTOGRAPHY: Beginner

The Joy of Photography An Exploratory Course

TWO OPTIONS: One 3hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Fri., Jan. 24, 11 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0VH); Sat., Feb. 22 (CODE 1K0By Lori VanKirk Schue 0VU); supply fee $35; details and supply list on website; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Learn how to use a digital SLR camera as a creative tool in sessions that cover aperture, shutter speed, metering, exposure, ISO, composition, special effects, and flash photography. TWO OPTIONS: 8 By Marty Kaplan sessions; 3 hours each; Marty Kaplan; Tues., Jan. 21–March 10, 6:30 p.m. (CODE 1K00WQ); Sun., Jan. 26–March 22 (no class Feb. 16), 10:15 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0WP); details on website; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

Heart Basket Use basic weaving techniques including planning and measuring, as you produce a beautiful heart-shaped basket from a complex woven pattern that is deceptively easy to create. TWO OPTIONS: One 3-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Fri., Jan. 31, 11 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0VJ); Sat., Feb. 1, 1 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0VQ); supply fee $35; details and supply list on website; Members $65; Nonmembers $75 By Lori VanKirk Schue

Introduction to Photography Class sessions emphasize the basics: camera functions, exposure, metering, working with natural and artificial light, and composition. Develop technical skill through assignments and offsite photo shoots. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Andargé Asfaw; Tues., Jan. 21– March 10, 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K00XB; details on website; camera By Andargé Asfaw with manual controls and tripod required; Members $225; Nonmembers $255 NOVEMBER 2019 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

51


TRENDING

HISTORY

CULTURE

Introduction to Black-and-White Film Photography and the Darkroom

SCIENCE

ART

STUDIO ART

PHOTOGRAPHY: Experienced iPhone Photography II

Get a grounding in the basics of using a 35mm camera and photo darkroom techniques. Sessions feature lecturedemonstrations, class assignments, critiques, and practical darkroom work.

A quick refresher on the ProCamera app and editing techniques is followed by a shooting session on the National Mall. The workshop ends with classroom critiques and discussion on organizing, posting and printing images.

By Paul Matthai

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Tues., Jan. 21–March 10, 6:30 p.m.; all developing chemicals are provided; CODE 1K0-0WT; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

By Peggy Feerick

One 4-hour session; Peggy Feerick; Sun., Nov. 3, 10 a.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0TM; Members $75; Nonmembers $95

Introduction to Lightroom Weekend Workshops

Introduction to Photography II

Adobe Lightroom is useful for organizing and editing image files. Learn to use it for importing, exporting, deleting, and grouping files; sorting files; attaching keywords; and improving tone, color, and detail. 2 sessions; 4 hours each; Eliot Cohen; Sat., Nov. 23 and Sun., Nov. 24, 9:30 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0SP; Members $225; Nonmembers $245

Understanding Your Digital Mirrorless or SLR Camera

Expand your understanding of photography fundamentals such as lighting, composition, shooting techniques, and gear, and photoediting software. A photo excursion reinforces in-class instruction.

Continued Black-and-White Film Photography and the Darkroom

Moving Beyond Auto Mode This workshop covers ISO, shutter speed, aperture, depth of field, RAW vs. JPEG files, and White Balance. Learn various shooting modes and get handson experience in a practice session on the Mall. FOUR OPTIONS: One 7-hour

session each; Eliot Cohen; Sun., Nov. 10 (CODE 1K0-0SH); Sun., Dec. 8 (CODE 1K0-0SJ); Sun., Jan. 12 (CODE 1K0-0WG); Sun., Feb. 9 (CODE 1K0-0WL); 9:30 a.m.; details on website; Members $210; Nonmembers $260

By Eliot Cohen

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SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

By Andargé Asfaw

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Andargé Asfaw; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0XC; camera with manual controls and tripod required; details and supply list on website; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

Refine black-and-white printing skills and 35mm-camera operation in sessions including lectures, demonstrations, darkroom work, and critiques. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Paul Matthai; Mon., Jan. 27–March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; all developing chemicals included; CODE 1K00WM; Members $235; Nonmembers $265 By Paul Matthai

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


TRENDING

HISTORY

CULTURE

Open Darkroom Plus

SCIENCE

STUDIO ART

ART

On-Location Photography Elevate darkroom skills through small-group lectures, individual instruction, and independent work. Learn about toning, fiber-based printing, dodging and burning, and assessment of print quality.

Sharpen your way of thinking about shooting outdoors. Sessions include lectures on depth of field, exposure adjustments, using a tripod, composition, and natural lighting conditions. Develop shooting strategies on field trips and in critique sessions. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Sun., Jan. 26–March 22 (no class Feb. 16), 1:30 p.m.; field trips Metro accessible; camera with manual controls required; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WS; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

THREE OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Paul Matthai; Thurs., Jan. 23– March 12, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0WN; Joe Yablonsky; Sat., Jan. 25–March 21 (no class Feb. 15), 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0WU; Sat., Jan. 25–March 21 (no class Feb. 15), 1:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0WV; all developing chemicals are provided; details on website; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Photographic Creativity, Design, and Composition Achieving a balance of visual tension in an image creates well-made visual relationships. By Joe Yablonsky Gain a better understanding of compositional elements and their application in lectures and assignments focusing on extended shutter speeds, light graffiti, bokeh templates, and macro photography.

Introduction to Studio Portraiture Produce a portfolio of student and model portraits in this class that focuses on basics such as posing a subject; using highlight and shadow; high key and low key lighting; using a flash meter; and understanding strobe lighting.

5 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Wed., Feb. 5–March 4, 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WX; Members $185; Nonmembers $215

8 sessions; 3 hours each; By Marty Kaplan Marty Kaplan; Mon., Jan. 27– March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; model fees included in tuition; camera with manual controls required; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WR; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Mastering Exposure Develop a greater understanding of exposure modes, exposure compensations, filter exposure factors, bracketing, meterBy Joe Yablonsky ing modes, histograms, zone system, dynamic range, eliminating camera shake, tripods, and some flash concepts. Hone skills through assignments and in-class reviews. 5 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Thurs., Jan. 23–Feb. 20, 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WY; Members $185; Nonmembers $215

Exhibiting and Selling Your Photographs Get your photos seen and sold. Learn about strategies such as juried exhibitions, photo contests, showing in alternative spaces, art festivals, galleries, and websites. Sessions also address photographic portfolios, copyrighting, email marketing, postcards, pricing, printing photos, and matting and framing. One 3-hour session; Joe Yablonsky; Mon., Feb. 10, 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WW; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

Custom Digital Printing and Mat Cutting Printing digital photos and custom cutting mat board windows is explained in sessions that describe online printing labs, paper choices, aspect ratios, mat board choices, and cutter tools. Final assembly of printed photos is done in class. 2 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Mon., March 5 and 12, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0WZ; Members $100; Nonmembers $120

NOVEMBER 2019 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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RISA RYAN

Smithsonian Associates Membership Benefits Smithsonian Associates opens the Smithsonian’s rich and varied resources to our members. When you join Smithsonian Associates you become a part of the largest museum-based cultural and educational program in the world. As an insider, you have unparalleled access to the Smithsonian's world of knowledge—and enjoy a full array of exclusive benefits. Smithsonian Associates, unlike the museums, is not federally funded and relies instead on individual contributions to help bridge the gap between program expenses and ticket revenues. There are many membership options across the Smithsonian Institution, but Smithsonian Associates membership is the ONLY program that directly supports Associates’ programming and outreach efforts, and the only way to access ticket discounts and exclusive benefits at our programs. Effective January 2019

INTRODUCTORY Memberships

54

Promoter–$100

Champion–$80

Associate–$50

When you become a member you’ll be among the first to know about the outstanding programs we

valuable discounts, including savings up to 35% off Smithsonian Associates program tickets, and

Members-only ticket priority before programs go on sale to the public (some exclusions apply)

Eligibility to purchase one ticket per program at the discounted member price (savings up to 35%)

Subscription to the monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide

Access to members-only programs, including the popular annual Breakfast at the Zoo

Access to two complimentary tours of exhibitions throughout the year

Access to free Associates events as available (notification sent via email)

10% discount at SmithsonianStore.com (with a special code) and select Smithsonian museum restaurants

Eligibility to purchase up to four tickets per program at the discounted member price

Priority consideration for waitlisted programs, including study tours (some exclusions apply)

Recognition on the Smithsonian Associates website

bring you every month—which add up to more than 750 opportunities for discovery, enrichment, and learning you’ll find nowhere else. Membership has its benefits: Members receive a range of access to tickets before they go on sale to the general public.

Eligibility to purchase up to six tickets per program at the discounted member price

Smithsonian magazine delivered to your home

Member discounts on Art Collectors Program fine-arts prints

20% discount at SmithsonianStore.com during special Member Days sales


Benefactor–$5,000 and up

Partner–$2,500

Sponsor–$1,000

Patron–$600

Contributor–$300

Advocate–$175

CIRCLE of SUPPORT

ALL OF THE BENEFITS of the Introductory Membership Levels, plus:

Advance digital copy of the monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide

Two complimentary tickets to one exclusive after-hours Mingle at the Museum event

VIP access, activities, and seating at Breakfast at the Zoo

Advance ticket purchasing by phone for high-demand programs, including Smithsonian Summer Camp

Invitation for two to a Smithsonian Insider event during the year

No handling fees on phone purchases

Recognition in the Smithsonian Associates program guide annual donor list and the annual donor plaque at our headquarters on the National Mall

Advance ticket purchasing to select headliner events

Complimentary invitation for two to an exclusive Meeting the Masters reception

Eligibility to participate in special travel programs sponsored by Smithsonian Journeys

Complimentary tickets for two to a lecture or performance (value equal to $30 per ticket or less)

Copy of the Smithsonian’s annual report

Complimentary VIP tickets for two and a parking pass for Breakfast at the Zoo

Reserved seating at most Smithsonian Associates programs

Invitations to backstage meet-and-greets at select Smithsonian Associates programs

Advance ticket purchasing for embassy programs and receptions

Dedicated concierge phone line for inquiries and tickets

Invitation for two to the prestigious Annual Smithsonian Weekend

An exclusive behind-the-scenes tour with a docent

Recognition in the Smithsonian’s annual report

As a member of Smithsonian Associates Circle of Support, you’ll play a vital and valued role in our work. Your contributions to Smithsonian Associates provide the support that enables all of our programs to continue and grow. There’s no better time to consider enhancing the level of your support. Depending on the level you choose, you’ll enjoy enhanced benefits such as early registration for Smithsonian Summer Camp and special programs, reserved seating at sold-out events, and invitations to exclusive receptions with speakers.

Recognition as a sponsor of a selected Smithsonian Associates program

Complimentary VIP tickets for six and two parking passes for Breakfast at the Zoo

Priority seating at all Smithsonian Associates programs

Additional 20% discount on member prices for Art Collectors Program fine-arts prints

Visit smithsonianassociates.org/levels or call 202-633-3030 55


HELPFUL INFORMATION

1 Baird Auditorium Natural History Museum 10th and Constitution Ave., NW Metro: Federal Triangle (Blue/Orange/Silver) 2 Warner Bros. Theater American History Museum 14th and Constitution Ave., NW Metro: Smithsonian station, Mall exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 3 Lisner Auditorium George Washington University 21st and H St., NW Metro: Foggy Bottom/GWU (Blue/Orange/Silver) 4 Meyer Auditorium Freer Gallery of Art 12th and Independence Ave., SW Metro: Smithsonian station, Independence Ave. exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 5 Nan Tucker McEvoy Auditorium Smithsonian American Art Museum 8th and G Sts., NW Metro: Gallery Place-Chinatown (Red, Yellow/Green) 6 Rasmuson Theater American Indian Museum 4th and Independence Ave., SW Metro: L‘Enfant Plaza (Blue/Orange/Silver or Green/Yellow); Maryland Ave./Smithsonian Museums Exit

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7 Renwick Gallery, Grand Salon 1661 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Metro: Farragut North (Red) or Farragut West (Blue/Orange/Silver) 8 Ring Auditorium Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden 7th and Independence Ave., SW Metro: Smithsonian station, Mall exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 9 Ripley Center 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Metro: Smithsonian station, Mall exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 10 Smithsonian Castle 1000 Jefferson Drive, SW Metro: Smithsonian–Mall exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 11 STUDY TOURS BUS PICKUPS Location for most local tours: Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C St., SW (corner of 6th & C); Metro: L’Enfant Plaza–7th & Maryland Ave. exit (Yellow/Green/ Blue/Orange/Silver)

12 U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation Auditorium 701 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Metro: Archives-Navy Memorial (Green/Yellow) 13 Voice of America Auditorium Wilbur J. Cohen Building 330 Independence Ave., SW (enter on C St.); Metro: Federal Center SW (Blue/Orange/Silver) 14 University of the District of Columbia Theater of the Arts (Not shown on map.) 4200 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Metro: Van Ness/UDC (Red line) METRO The Mall entrance of the Smithsonian station closes at 10 p.m. The other entrance, at Independence Ave. and 12th St., SW, closes at midnight and at 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays), as do the Gallery Place and Federal Triangle stations, To be sure not to miss the last train to your destination, call Metro at 202-637-7000 for schedules.

PARKING Nearby Colonial Parking garages are shown on the map. Some offer $6 parking for our events on weekday evenings after 5:30 p.m. and all day on Saturday and Sunday. Inquire before parking and have your event ticket with you. Parking lot hours vary. Very limited metered parking is available around the Mall ($2 per hour).

smithsonianassociates.org 202-633-3030

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


The Gift of Color Limited-edition prints from the Smithsonian Associates Art Collectors Program capture brilliant and memorable worlds of color—and make great gifts for all occasions. For details, vist ArtCollectorsProgram.org or call 202-633-8680

Full-page ad Museum Moment by Sam Gilliam (detail) Retail: $1800 Members: $1500*

August Breakfast/Maine by Carolyn Brady (detail) Retail: $1200

Members: $800*

Flowers For a Country by Mindy Weisel (detail) Retail: $1200

Members: $1000*

Hopi Eagle Dance by Dan Namingha (detail) Retail: $1200 Members: $900*

Children with Flowers by Elizabeth Catlett (detail) Retail: $1300

Members: $1075*

Blue Moonlight by April Gornik (detail) Retail: $1200

Members: $950*

*Member pricing applies to Promoter level and above

Red Geranium by Robert Kushner (detail) Retail: $1500

Members: $1200*

Piazza San Marco by LeRoy Neiman (detail) Retail: $1200 Members: $950*

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PROGRAMS BY FORMAT (New listings in red) All-Day Programs Victoria: Teen Queen to Matriarch ................................Sat, Nov 9..............8 Mongolia: From Genghis to Khubilai Khan .................Sat, Nov 16 ..........10 Researching Your Genealogy..........................................Sat, Dec 7.............12 The World of the Crusades .............................................Sat, Feb 8.............17 Death and Beyond .............................................................Sat, Nov 9 ............21 Literary London ..................................................................Sat, Jan 25 ..........27 Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Paul ......................Sat, Feb 1.............27 Scandinavian Art and Architecture ..............................Sat, Nov 2 ...........30 Visual Literacy: The Art of Seeing ................................Sat, Nov 16 .........30 Renaissance Pleasure Palaces.......................................Sat, Dec 14..........34 The Gilded Age ...................................................................Sat, Jan 25 ..........37 The Golden Age of Spanish Art .....................................Fri, Feb 7..............37 Ancient Egypt Though Its Art and Architecture .......Sat, Feb 8............38

Courses The Vikings and England .................................................Wed, Jan 8 ...........14 A View from Inside: The CIA and FBI ...........................Wed, Feb 5...........15 Imagining the Southwest.................................................Mon, Nov 18 ........22 Smithsonian Boomers Chorus: Legends of Song .....Tues, Jan 14 ........25 Beethoven: The Musical Milestones .............................Tues, Jan 21........26 Neighborhoods of Barcelona, Milan, and Berlin........Thurs, Jan 23 .....26 Introduction to American Art .........................................Fri, Dec 6.............33 Intro to Western Art ..........................................................Mon, Jan 6 ..........34 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist.........................Fri, Jan 10 ...........35 Indian Art and Calligraphy ..............................................Sun, Feb 23 ........38

HISTORY The Domesday Book .........................................................Mon, Nov 4 ............7 The Reverse Underground Railroad..............................Wed, Nov 6 ............7 Vicksburg..............................................................................Thurs, Nov 7..........8 Orville Wright’s Redemption ...........................................Wed, Nov 13 ..........9 J’Accuse! The Dreyfus Affair ..........................................Mon, Nov 18 .........11 Presidents and the Space Program..............................Tues, Nov 19 ........11 The Battle of Britain..........................................................Thurs, Nov 21.......11 Delayed Justice: Hitler's Soldiers..................................Thurs, Dec 5........12 Classical Music and U.S. Foreign Relations ...............Tues, Dec 10 ........12 Barack and Joe ...................................................................Thurs, Dec 12 ......13 The Gilded Steinway .........................................................Thurs, Dec 12 ......13 Medieval History: Fact vs. Fiction .................................Thurs, Jan 16 ......14 The Day Prohibition Began .............................................Thurs, Jan 16 ......14 Wild Bill’s Secret Agents ..................................................Wed, Jan 22.........15 Amelia Earhart: Legend and Legacy.............................Thurs, Jan 30......15 CULTURE A Conversation with Katie Couric .................................Tues, Nov 12 ........21 The New Joy of Cooking...................................................Thurs, Nov 14 .....21 Lidia Bastianich...................................................................Mon, Nov 18 .......22 The Journey of the Mask..................................................Wed, Nov 20.......22 Fellini’s Italy..........................................................................Wed, Dec 4 .........23 The Sound of Music at 60 ...............................................Thurs, Dec 5.......23 Memoir: Art from Life .......................................................Sun, Dec 8...........23 Buone Feste! Italy Celebrates Christmas ...................Mon, Dec 9..........24 Endangered Languages....................................................Tues, Dec 10 .......24

Lectures

Holiday Magic: The White House...................................Sun, Dec 15 .........24

TRENDING

DC Theatre Preview 2020................................................Tue, Jan 14 ..........25

A Diversity of Flavors .......................................................Sun, Nov 3 .............4

Louis Armstrong.................................................................Thu, Feb 13 .........25

Café Society ........................................................................Mon, Nov 4 ............4 What Makes Mrs. Maisel So Marvelous?.....................Thurs, Nov 7..........4 Home Cooking, Cuban-style...........................................Wed, Nov 13 ..........5 Nightcaps: The Perfect Ending......................................Fri, Nov 15 .............5 Ben Folds: An Unconventional Icon..............................Tues, Dec 3 ...........5 Putting It All on the Table ...............................................Wed, Dec 11 ...........6 Bryan and Michael Voltaggio..........................................Tues, Dec 17..........6

SCIENCE Artificial Intelligence.........................................................Tue, Nov 12 .........28 Mario Livio: Is God a Mathematician?..........................Thurs, Nov 14 .....28 Are We Alone?.....................................................................Tues, Dec 10 .......28 Language and Aging .........................................................Wed, Dec 18 ........29 Black Holes: A New Look .................................................Mon, Jan 13 ........29 The Science of Sleep ........................................................Wed, Jan 29........29 The New Brain Science ....................................................Wed, Feb 5 ..........29

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smithsonianassociates.org 202-633-3030

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


PROGRAMS BY FORMAT (New listings in red) Studio Art ART Drawing, Painting, Fiber Arts, Other Media, Photography..............39-53 Heroes Enthroned in Tapestry .......................................Fri, Nov 8 .............31 Prince Albert’s Vision of Progress ................................Sun, Nov 17..........31 The Architecture of Reuse ..............................................Wed, Dec 4..........32 The House of Medici: The Art of Power ......................Thurs, Dec 12 .....32 Muses and Mews: Artists and Their Cats ...................Tues, Dec 17 .......35 Marcel Duchamp ................................................................Thurs, Jan 9 .......36 Crafting the Buddha’s Image..........................................Wed, Jan 15 ........36

Study Tours The Civil War in Arlington County.................................Sat, Nov 9..............8 Exclusive Member Tours The Outwin 2019 .........................................................Tues, Nov 12..........9 I Am… ............................................................................Thurs, Nov 14........9 Anderson House..........................................................Wed, Nov 20..........9

Performances

DC Museums Salute the Suffragists............................Wed, Nov 13 ........10

Smithsonian Chamber Music Society (SCMS)

Old Town Alexandria: Holiday Staycation....................Sun, Dec 15 .........13

Axelrod String Quartet ........................Sat, Nov 2..................................18

Edward Hopper and the American Hotel ....................Sun, Nov 17..........31

Masterworks of Five Centuries..........Sat, Nov 16, Sun, Nov 17 .......19

Charles Rennie Mackintosh at the Walters................Sat, Nov 23 .........32

Emerson String Quartet ...................................................Sun, Nov 3 ..........20

Winterthur and Longwood Gardens ............................Sat, Dec 7............33

What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow .....................Sun, Nov 10 ........20

A Trio of Museum Gems ..................................................Sat, Jan 11...........36

PROGRAMS BY DATE NOVEMBER Sat, Nov 2

Sun, Nov 3

SCMS Axelrod Quartet Sat concert series ...........18

The Outwin 2019 (Member Tour) ..................................9

Scandinavian Art and Architecture .......................30

A Conversation with Katie Couric ...........................21

A Diversity of Flavors...................................................4

Artificial Intelligence..................................................28

Emerson String Quartet............................................20 Mon, Nov 4

Tues, Nov 12

Wed, Nov 13

Home Cooking, Cuban-style ......................................5

Café Society ...................................................................4

Orville Wright’s Redemption ......................................9

The Domesday Book .....................................................7

DC Museums Salute the Suffragists .....................10

Wed, Nov 6

The Reverse Underground Railroad..........................7

Thurs, Nov 7

What Makes Mrs. Maisel So Marvelous? ................4

The New Joy of Cooking............................................21

Vicksburg.........................................................................8

Mario Livio: Is God a Mathematician?...................28

Thurs, Nov 14

I Am… (Member Tour) ......................................................9

Fri, Nov 8

Heroes Enthroned in Tapestry .................................31

Fri, Nov 15

Nightcaps: The Perfect Ending .................................5

Sat, Nov 9

Victoria: Teen Queen to Matriarch ...........................8

Sat, Nov 16

Mongolia: From Genghis to Khubilai Khan ...........10

Sun, Nov 10

The Civil War in Arlington County ............................8

SCMS Masterworks of Five Centuries...................19

Death and Beyond .......................................................21

Visual Literacy: The Art of Seeing .........................30

What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow..............20

Sun, Nov 17

SCMS Masterworks of Five Centuries...................19 Prince Albert’s Vision of Progress ..........................31 Edward Hopper and the American Hotel ..............31

NOVEMBER 2019 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

59


PROGRAMS BY DATE Mon, Nov 18

J’Accuse! The Dreyfus Affair ....................................11

JANUARY

Imagining the Southwest..........................................22

Mon, Jan 6

Intro to Western Art ...................................................34

Lidia Bastianich ...........................................................22

Wed, Jan 8

The Vikings and England...........................................14

Thu, Jan 9

Marcel Duchamp.........................................................36

Fri, Jan 10

Impressionist and Post-Impressionist ..................35

Sat, Jan 11

A Trio of Museum Gems ...........................................36

Mon, Jan 13

Black Holes: A New Look ..........................................29

Tues, Jan 14

DC Theatre Preview 2020.........................................25

Tues, Nov 19

Presidents and the Space Program ........................11

Wed, Nov 20

Anderson House (Member Tour) ...................................9 The Journey of the Mask ..........................................22

Thurs, Nov 21

The Battle of Britain....................................................11

Sat, Nov 23

Charles Rennie Mackintosh at the Walters .........32

DECEMBER Tues, Dec 3

Ben Folds: An Unconventional Icon .........................5

Wed, Dec 4

Fellini’s Italy..................................................................23

Thurs, Dec 5

Smithsonian Boomers Chorus.................................25 Wed, Jan 15

Crafting the Buddha’s Image ..................................36

Thurs, Jan 16

Medieval History: Fact vs. Fiction...........................14 The Day Prohibition Began .......................................14

Tue, Jan 21

Beethoven: The Musical Milestones ......................26

The Architecture of Reuse .......................................32

Wed, Jan 22

Wild Bill’s Secret Agents............................................15

Delayed Justice: Hitler's Soldiers............................12

Thurs, Jan 23

Neighborhoods of Barcelona,

The Sound of Music at 60 ........................................23 Fri, Dec 6

Introduction to American Art ..................................33

Sat, Dec 7

Researching Your Genealogy....................................12 Winterthur and Longwood Gardens ......................33

Milan, and Berlin..................................................26 Sat, Jan 25

Literary London ...........................................................27 The Gilded Age ............................................................37

Wed, Jan 29

The Science of Sleep .................................................29

Thu, Jan 30

Amelia Earhart: Legend and Legacy.......................15

Sun, Dec 8

Memoir: Art from Life ................................................23

Mon, Dec 9

Buone Feste! Italy Celebrates Christmas ............24

Tues, Dec 10

Classical Music and U.S. Foreign Relations .........12

FEBRUARY

Endangered Languages .............................................24

Sat, Feb 1

Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Paul................27

Wed, Feb 5

A View from Inside: The CIA and FBI.....................15

Are We Alone? .............................................................28 Wed, Dec 11

Putting It All on the Table...........................................6

Thurs, Dec 12

Barack and Joe ............................................................13

The New Brain Science .............................................29 Fri, Feb 7

The Golden Age of Spanish Art ..............................37

Sat, Feb 8

The World of the Crusades .......................................17

The Gilded Steinway ...................................................13 The House of Medici: The Art of Power................32 Sat, Dec 14

Renaissance Pleasure Palaces................................34

Sun, Dec 15

Old Town Alexandria: Holiday Staycation .............13

Ancient Egypt: Its Art and Architecture...............38 Thurs, Feb 13

Louis Armstrong..........................................................25

Sun, Feb 23

Indian Art And Calligraphy.......................................38

Holiday Magic: The White House ............................24 Tues, Dec 17

Bryan and Michael Voltaggio .....................................6 Muses and Mews: Artists and Their Cats ............35

Wed, Dec 18

60

Language and Aging ..................................................29

smithsonianassociates.org 202-633-3030

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


MEMBERSHIP Depending on your level of support, you will receive special benefits, including significant savings on most Smithsonian Associates program tickets; a monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide; discounts at museum shops and restaurants; notices about behind-the-scenes tours and special receptions with world-class speakers; and much more! Visit SmithsonianAssociates.org/join or call 202-633-3030 for more information. Join today!

TICKETS

DONATE NOW!

Online.......................SmithsonianAssociates.org Email ........................Customerservice@SmithsonianAssociates.org Phone..........................202-633-3030 Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–5 p.m.; Fax 202-786-2536

202-633-3030 SmithsonianAssociates.org/levels

Mail .............................Smithsonian Associates, P.O. Box 23293, Washington, D.C. 20026-3293 In person ...................Mon.– Fri., 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr., S.W., Suite 3077, Washington, D.C. 20560 Fees............................There is a $3 nonrefundable per ticket processing fee on all tickets, except for Members-Only free events, Summer Camps, Smithsonian Sleepovers, and Discovery Theater. Please note that programs with multiple sessions have discounted processing fees applied to each individual session and charged as one fee. There is an additional $3 nonrefundable per order handling fee on phone orders.

REFUNDS are only issued when a program is canceled or if it sells out before we receive your order.

CREDIT TO YOUR SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES ACCOUNT Credit for cancellations or exchanges are only available for programs that cost more than $40. If in compliance with the specific guidelines below, credit is issued to your Smithsonian Associates account, not your credit card. Credits are non-transferable. Programs and Studio Arts Classes If a program or studio arts class is more than $40, and you wish to cancel your tickets or exchange them for another program, please contact Customer Service in writing (email, mail, or fax) at least two weeks before the program date to request a credit. (See contact information above.) Please note that there is a $10 cancellation fee, as well as a cost adjustment when there is a price difference between the programs. Courses To receive credit to your Smithsonian Associates account for a course, (excluding studio arts classes), please contact Customer Service in writing (email, mail, or fax) at least two weeks before the first session. Credit will also be issued within two weekdays after the first session, provided that Customer Service is contacted in writing

CHANGES IN PUBLISHED SCHEDULES Smithsonian Associates reserves the right to cancel, substitute speakers and session topics within a course, and reschedule or relocate any program, if needed. Occasionally, a time, date, or location of a program must change after it has been published or tickets have been mailed. Participants are notified by phone, email, or mail. Be sure to check our website SmithsonianAssociates.org for latest updates, or call 202-633-3030 during business hours for information.

(email, mail, or fax) within that period. Credit will be prorated to reflect the cost of the first session. No credit will be given after the first session. Overnight Study Tours To receive credit to your Smithsonian Associates account for an overnight tour, please contact Customer Service in writing (email, mail, or fax) at least 45 days before the tour date. At that point, there is a $10 cancellation fee. If your request is received between 44 and 15 days before the tour, cancellation fee is $100. No credit will be issued for cancellations received fewer than 15 days before the tour date. The cost of some components of tickets— such as entrance fees, theater tickets, food programs and meals, and some forms of transportation, may not be credited.

the educational and promotional purposes of Smithsonian Institution and Smithsonian Associates. Filming and/or photographing by participants at Smithsonian Associates programs is not permitted. VISITORS WITH DISABILITIES Smithsonian Associates seeks to make activities accessible to people with disabilities. Patrons with disabilities are encouraged to call before registering for programs to inquire about the accessibility of the presentations and locations. For information or to request accessibility assistance, please call 202-633-3030 (VOICE) or send an email to customerservice@SmithsonianAssociates.org

We also reserve the right to refuse to register any individual or to require any participant to withdraw from an activity if the Smithsonian Interpreters for programs are provided free of charge. Smithsonian representative deems such action to be in the best interests of the Associates will make arrangements if requests are made at least two health, safety, or welfare of the group or the participant. weeks in advance of the program. TICKETS AT THE DOOR Tickets are available (on a first-come, MOVING? Please write us with your new information and allow 6 weeks first-served basis) at the door for some Smithsonian Associates for the change to take effect. programs. Call 202-633-3030 to be sure that the program is not already sold out. No discounts applicable to tickets sold at the door. HAVE QUESTIONS? Call Customer Service at 202-633-3030 M–F, GROUP DISCOUNTS Group discounts (for 10 or more) are available for some programs. Please call 202-633-3030 for details. PHOTOGRAPHING AND RECORDING PROGRAMS Participants at Smithsonian Associates programs may be photographed or filmed for

9–5, or stop by our office at 1100 Jefferson Drive, S.W., Suite 3077, (west of the Smithsonian Castle), between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays. (Metro: Blue/Orange/Silver line, Smithsonian–Mall exit)


The New Joy of Cooking

Are We Alone?

Seasonal Wreaths

Thurs., Nov. 14 (p. 21)

Tues., Dec. 10 (p. 28)

with Smithsonian Gardens Dec. 16, Dec. 17 (p. 39)

Save $10 on membership!* *One-time-only offer. This offer only applies to new Smithsonian Associates memberships at the introductory level (Associate, Champion, and Promoter). The offer does not apply to previous membership purchases or new Smithsonian Associates memberships at the Circle of Support levels. This discount is not redeemable for cash and may only be used for online or phone membership purchases.

Call 202-633-3030 (M-F, 9-5) or visit SmithsonianAssociates.org/save to redeem.

French Impressionism and Post-Impressionism Fri., Jan. 10–Sat., Jan. 11 (p. 35)

Science of Sleep

The CIA and FBI

With WebMD’s John Whyte Wed., Jan. 29 (p. 29)

4 sessions Wed., Feb. 5–26 (p. 15)

Additional Offer Save $20 on your next ticket order!** Offer ends Dec. 15, 2019 **Offer valid through Dec. 15, 2019. One-time-only offer. Discount offer does not apply to previous purchases, membership dues, gift certificates, tickets for Discovery Theater, Smithsonian Summer Camp, Smithsonian Sleepovers, Craft2Wear, or Smithsonian Craft Show. Additional exclusions may apply. This discount is not redeemable for cash and may only be used for online or phone purchases. Membership not required to take advantage of this offer.

Call 202-633-3030 (M-F, 9-5) or visit SmithsonianAssociates.org/offer to redeem.

Profile for Smithsonian Associates

Save $10 on membership! Smithsonian Associates Nov. 2019 program guide  

Save $20 on your next ticket order. Act by Dec. 15th ! Links in this guide will give a one-time $20 ticket discount on our website for the w...

Save $10 on membership! Smithsonian Associates Nov. 2019 program guide  

Save $20 on your next ticket order. Act by Dec. 15th ! Links in this guide will give a one-time $20 ticket discount on our website for the w...