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Dear Friends and Members, From artists’ studios in 1950s New York to war-torn Gettysburg and from London’s East End during the Blitz to today’s criminal forensics labs, women both famous and unsung, have left indelible marks. We are proud to shed light on their stories in celebration of Women’s History Month and the ongoing Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story. Meet a pair of writers who draw on their own lives for inspiration: Judith Viorst shares her distinctively wry late-life wisdom (p. 2) and forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs reveals how her career informs her crime novels’ fictional heroine’s professional activities (p. 2). Discover the real-life stories of a painter, jazz musician, social activist, and naturalist whose achievements have remained too long in the shadows of history (p. 8). Learn about five gutsy women artists who claimed their place in the abstract expressionist movement in 1950s New York City (p. 50).

March 2020 Trending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45 Studio Art . . . . . . . . . . . .54 Member Benefits . . . . . .68 Helpful Information . . . .70

Follow in the footsteps of the women whose bravery and tenacity took them to the battlefield at Gettysburg to search for loved ones and minister to the dying (p. 6). Celebrate the matriarchs of working-class East End London who carried on even as WWII arrived at their front doors (p. 21). In studio art classes, discover the legacy of two remarkable groups of creative women: Alabama’s Gee’s Bend quilt makers (p. 61) and the British Arts and Crafts–era embroiderers (p. 49). We hope you’ll come to these programs that amplify the Smithsonian’s ongoing initiative to give voice to the stories of women’s achievements—in this and every month. Frederica R. Adelman, Director adelmanf@si.edu

From the top: Mary Lou Williams, ca. 1946, by William P. Gottlieb; Gettysburg Women’s Memorial; Factory workers in London’s East End, 1948

Programs with this icon put a spotlight on the Smithsonian facebook.com/smithsonianassociates twitter.com/smithsonianTSA

Smithsonian Associates (USPS 043-210) Vol.48, No. 7, March 2020. Published monthly by Smithsonian Associates, Smithsonian Institution, 1100 Jefferson Drive, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20560. Periodicals postage paid at Washington, DC. and at additional mailing offices. Vesna Gjaja, Director of Marketing and Membership; Cecelia Reed, Editor; Robert A. Sacheli, Copywriter; Ric Garcia, Visual Specialist. ©2020 by the Smithsonian Associates. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Smithsonian Associates, P.O. Box 23293, Washington, D.C. 20026-3293. Printed in the U.S.A. on recyclable paper.

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REY LOPEZ

Meet Best-Selling Authors Author Erik Larson on Churchill’s Darkest Year

Sopporo ramen

Sapporo-Style Ramen A Regional Rage While ramen has been one of the most common foods in Japan for decades, it has surged in popularity in the U.S. only recently. Japanese foodies take their ramen very OUT 32 D seriously: There are approximately L SO distinct regional variations in the country, and just a few of those can be found stateside. Sapporo is one of Japan’s most competitive ramen markets. Its distinctive ramen characteristics include a rich, Chintan stock; thick curly, chewy, and flavorful aged noodles; and wok preparation. The team behind D.C.’s popular Bantam King, Daikaya, and Haikan restaurants, including partner chef Katsuya Fukushima and partner Daisuke Utagawa, discuss Sapporo ramen’s basics, demonstrate how they prepare its components, and suggest how best to enjoy it. They are joined by Takashi Nishiyama, president of legendary noodle company Nishiyama Seimen Ltd. Then, sit down to lunch at the Haikan restaurant in Shaw.

With Lunch

Sat., March 7, 10 a.m.–12 p.m.; Haikan, 805 V Street N.W. (U Street/AfricanAmerican Civil War/Cardozo Metro, Green/Yellow line); Members $85; Nonmembers $100

What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1.5–2 hours, including Q&A

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On Winston Churchill’s first day as prime minister, Adolf OUT LD Hitler invaded Holland and Belgium and beganSaO yearlong bombing campaign, killing 45,000 Britons. It was up to Churchill to unite his country and persuade President Franklin Roosevelt that Britain was a worthy ally, in the fight to the end. Drawing on his newest book, The Splendid and the Vile, Erik Larson—author of bestseller Devil in the White City—creates a vivid portrait of London and Churchill during the Blitz. He explains how, in the face of unrelenting horror, Churchill’s eloquence, courage, and perseverance bound a country together. Mon., March 16, 6:45 p.m.; Lisner Auditorium, George Washington University; CODE 1L0-307; all tickets $40; a copy of The Splendid and the Vile (Crown) included in ticket price

Life Lessons with Judith Viorst From Under 9 to Nearing 90 For generations of readers, Judith Viorst’s Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day is a benchmark book. Parents and children alike identify with the 1972 tale about a young boy whose day goes from bad to worse, and, for all its humor, examined some of the real difficulties of growing up. Her decade-focused poetry books observe adulting with as much fun and insights. Viorst shares her wry wisdom on aging, growth, and change; guilt and control; love, marriage, and parenting; and definitions of happiness later in life. Nearing 90 and Other Comedies of Late Life (Simon & Schuster) is available for sale and signing. Mon., March 16; 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-499; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Forensic Anthropologist Kathy Reichs A Novel Approach to Crime Fiction Forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs is known for crime-fiction novels featuring forensic anthropologist Temperance (Bones) Brennan. She also produced the TV series “Bones,” inspired by the character. In the latest novel, A Conspiracy of Bones, Brennan must discover the identity of a faceless corpse, its connection to a decade-old missing child case, and why the dead man had her cell phone number. Reichs discusses the challenges of translating real-life drama into fiction, and a career that includes an expert witness role in the Casey Anthony trial and as investigator at Ground Zero. A Conspiracy of Bones (Scribner) is available for signing after the program. Wed., March 18, 6:45 p.m.; Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art; CODE 1L0305; Members $40, Nonmembers $50 (includes price of book)

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Wine Regions of France and Italy A Sommelier’s Guide with Erik Segelbaum Join Food and Wine magazine’s 2019 Sommelier of the Year Erik Segelbaum in an interactive workshop series designed to boost the wine IQ of both novices and seasoned aficionados, covering four world-renowned regions where French and Italian wines are produced. In tastings and talks Segelbaum offers new insights, unravels misconceptions, offers tips on navigating restaurant wine lists, tackling food and wine pairings, and more useful topics for wine lovers. Bordeaux is all about the blend—and the distinctions between wines from the Left Bank and the Right Bank of the Gironde Estuary. Segelbaum explores the grapes of Bordeaux and leads tastings through classic regional blends including white Bordeaux, reds from selected Left- and Right-Bank appellations, and the dessert wines of Sauternes and Barsac. Burgundy is arguably one of Erik Segelbaum the most complex wine regions in the world. Segelbaum offers clear explanations about classifications including Grand Cru, Premier Cru, and Villages and what they really mean. He discusses other significant wine regions of Burgundy including the Côte Challonaise, Macconais, and Beaujolais. Northern Italy is the start of Segelbaum’s two-part exploration of Italian winemaking from top to “toe,” with an examination of winemaking regions

With Tastings

including Piedmont, Lombardy, and the TreVenezie (Friuli-VenezieGiulia); and an introduction to the alpine whites of the northeast. Central and Southern Italy is home to the temperate regions the Marche and Tuscany, where Sangiovese tops the list of favorites. The hot Mediterranean south produces the rich concentrated wines of Puglia and the fresh and bright wines of Sicily. Bordeaux TWO OPTIONS: Fri., March 13, 6:45– 8:45 p.m. (CODE 1L0-314); Sat., March 14, 3–5 p.m. OUT Center; Members $85; D (CODE 1L0-315); Ripley L O S Nonmembers $100 Northern Italy TWO OPTIONS: Fri., March 27, 6:45–8:45 p.m. (CODE 1L0-318); Sat., March 28, 3–5 p.m. (CODE 1L0-319); Ripley Center; Members $85; Nonmembers $100 Central and Southern Italy TWO OPTIONS: Fri., April 24, 6:45–8:45 p.m. (CODE 1L0-320); Sat., April 25, 3–5 p.m. (CODE 1L0-321); Ripley Center; Members $85; Nonmembers $100 Burgundy TWO OPTIONS: Fri., May 1, 6:45–8:45 p.m. (CODE 1L0-316); Sat., May 2, 3–5 p.m. (CODE 1L0-317); Ripley Center; Members $85; Nonmembers $100 Participants must be 21 years or older.

Announcing a Special Partnership between Smithsonian Associates and SCORE

SCORE DC Small Business Workshops MAY 13 Starting a Business: Begin with a One-Page Plan JUN 10 Learn To Create Your Own Marketing Plan JUN 18 Financing Your Small Business SEPT 17 Advertising on Social Media OCT 21 How To Sell on Amazon: A Beginner’s Guide For more than 50 years, SCORE has served as America’s premier nonprofit source of business mentoring and education. The SCORE DC Small Business Workshops are designed for anyone who is looking to start or grow a small business, or is just thinking about it. Find full information and register at washingtondc.score.org/SAWorkshops Wed., May 13; Wed., June 10; Thurs., June 18; Thurs., Sept. 17; Wed., Oct. 21; 6 p.m.–9 p.m.; Ripley Center; cost per session: Members $40 (use PROMO Code SAMEMBER); Nonmembers $50 This partnership program is supported by a generous gift from Ed Falkowitz and Linda Meer.

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Bagel and Lox: An Edible Icon

Sustainable Eating

What’s better than fresh-cured smoked salmon piled atop a toasted bagel schmeared with cream cheese? Historian Ted Merwin bites into the cultural history of this beloved breakfast sandwich, revealing why it’s a Jewish tradition, and what makes some bagels superior to others. (Is it really the New York City water?) Local purveyors Andrew Dana and Daniela Moreira of Call Your Mother Jewish Deli explain the basics of their bagel-making process, and Nina Damato of Blue Circle Foods delves into their process for making lox. Stay for a bite of Call Your Mother bagels and Blue Circle Foods lox.

Conscious Choices for Eating More Plants

With Tasting

Sun., March 29, 11 a.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-103; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Part of the Smithsonian Earth Optimism Initiative Is organic really worth it? What do fair trade, biodynamic, or cage-free labels mean? Health and nutrition expert Sophie Egan says that making informed choices is the key to being a conscious eater. She addresses that topic in discussion with owners Kate Jacoby and chef Richard Landau (Vedge and Fancy Radish); co-founders Ran Nussbacher and chef Dennis Friedman (plantbased, fast casual Shouk restaurants); and Joe Yonan, Washington Post food and dining editor. Yonan’s Cool Beans: The Ultimate Guide to Cooking With the World’s Most Versatile Plant-Based Protein (Ten Speed Press) and Egan’s How to Be a Conscious Eater: Making Food Choices That Are Good for You, Others, and the Planet (Workman) are available for sale and signing. Thurs., April 16, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-108; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Traveling Smarter

The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the Smithsonian.

Travel Scams and How To Avoid Them

Thurs., May 21, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-042; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

Artisan Bread Making Tradition and Innovation Find out what’s in store for bread making when top bakers mix it up in lively conversation with Washington Post food video host and editor Mary Beth Albright. Daniel Leader (founder, Bread Alone Bakery), Mark Furstenberg (owner, Bread Furst), Francisco Migoya (head chef, Modernist Cuisine), and Melissa Weller, (head baker, High Street on Hudson) explore artisan bread’s evolution, from advances in wheat farming to the baking process itself, and Three types of baguettes in the share tips on achieving professional Living Bread cookbook results at home. Stay for samples from Bread Alone and Bread Furst. Leader’s book Living Bread: Tradition and Innovation in Artisan Bread Making (Avery) is available for signing. Co-author Migoya’s 5-volume Modernist Bread can be pre-ordered.

With Tasting

JOERG LEHMANN

You help an elderly man in Paris after a fall—and now your wallet’s gone. A student in China invites you to an art show where you purchase a “one-ofa-kind” piece—you later spot in every gift shop. That shore excursion during your cruise sounds great, until unexpected fees show up. Washington Post travel writer Andrea Sachs, Pauline Frommer, editorial director of Frommer’s Travel Guides, and Yolanda Parra, director of American citizen services and crisis management for the U.S. State Department, discuss how to avoid pervasive travel scams and legal but unethical travel industry practices. Knowing what to watch out for makes you less vulnerable—and your travels far safer and enjoyable.

Thurs., May 28, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1A0-114; Ripley Center; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1.5–2 hours, including Q&A

The Constitution and the Declaration of Independence A Contrary View Have we gotten the principles of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution all wrong? Kermit Roosevelt, Constitutional law professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s law school and descendant of Theodore Roosevelt, challenges the conventional view that these hallowed documents tell us who we are. Rather than a steady realization of principles established during the nation’s founding, he argues, America’s story is one of repeated failure and reinvention. He explains why our America was not born with the Revolution, why we cannot trace our ideals back to the Founders, and how we have rejected the central ideal of the Declaration—and yet why the Constitution remains an articulation of American ideals. Tues., March 3, 6:45 p.m.; Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art; CODE 1H0-482; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Understanding the Celtic World The ancient Celts terrified the Greeks and Romans, but the modern-day revival of Celtic music and art charms millions of people around the world. But what makes something “Celtic”? Modern scholarship has transformed our understanding about the people known to the classical world as the Celts. Historian Jennifer Paxton reveals that the traits we associate with them—their language, their art, and their customs—may not come from one ethnic group, but coalesced among peoples in northwestern Europe pushed to the margins by Romans. Interest in the Celts, revived in the 16th century, later influenced Ireland’s independence struggle, and cultural nationalism’s rise in Wales and Scotland. Today, from the “Celtic Tiger” to Celtic Woman, the legacy endures.

NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

Wed., March 4, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-071; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Green Man and May Queen at a bonfire during the Beltane Fire Festival in Edinburgh

The Worlds of Benjamin Franklin Born to a humble family in Boston in 1706, Franklin’s rise to prominence and power, first in Philadelphia and then on the Continent, was nothing short of meteoric. His very public achievements—in business, science, philanthropy, politics, and diplomacy—were remarkable in his day, and even more so by the standards T of our own. OUremain Yet his many contradictions both puzzling and glaring: He was a proud British subject D L SOhe was an American revolutionary. He was a loving husband and father, and a until the moment notorious flirt. He was a longtime slaveowner who condemned the practice in old age. Historian Richard Bell explores the many faces of the ever-fascinating Franklin. Tues., March 10, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-072; Members $30; Nonmembers $45 Benjamin Franklin, ca. 1785, by Joseph Siffred Duplessis

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Ireland’s Fight for Freedom

Father of Europe Charles the Great, king of the Franks (r. 768–814), known to the French as Charlemagne, rose to power after the fall of the Roman Empire. During his reign, he waged constant brutal warfare, creating an empire comprising UT northern Italy, France, OGermany, D L O S and Catalonia. At the same time he was also a great patron of the arts, learning, and religion. The Carolingian Renaissance he Emperor Charlemagne (detail), supported preserved the classical ca. 1513, by Albrecht Dürer world’s legacy into the Middle Ages and beyond. Charlemagne embodies the paradoxes of the early Middle Ages, known popularly (and misleadingly) as the Dark Ages. Historian Richard Abels explores the man and the myth of the so-called Father of Europe.

To wage their bitter war with the powerful British Empire from 1919 to 1921, Irish nationalists turned to novel tactics to avoid directly confronting Britain’s overwhelming military power. The Irish Republican Army’s strategies included assassinations, hit-and-run raids, and urban guerrilla warfare. Another idea—counter-states or selfgoverning institutions—robbed the British of their claim as General Michael Collins inspects a Ireland’s legitimate government. soldier, 1922 Historian Kevin Matthews discusses how this war set the standard for other independence struggles in the 20th century. He examines how the Irish gained their freedom, but at a price: Ireland’s partition, leaving six northeastern counties under British rule—an ongoing source of conflict.

Thurs., March 12, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-495; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Tues., March 17, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-493; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Women in Wartime Stories from Gettysburg Part of the Smithsonian’s American Women’s History Initiative They came from the neighboring Pennsylvania countryside and states as far away as Wisconsin. Many sought to learn the fate of husbands and family members, and others were drawn to provide solace to strangers. The bravery and life-changing actions of thousands of disparate women amid the horrors of the Civil War’s bloodiest battle are often overlooked by history. Author Chuck Raasch retells some of their compelling stories on the sites on which they unfolded at Gettysburg National Military Park. The tour also includes the Gettysburg Museum and Visitors Center, a screening of the film New Birth of Freedom, and a viewing of Gettysburg National Park Visitor Center the historic Gettysburg Cyclorama, a fully restored version of the epic 19th-century painting, 377 feet in circumference. Raasch is the author of Imperfect Union: A Father’s Search for His Son in the Aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg. DAY TOUR Sat., March 21, 8:30 a.m.–6 p.m.; by bus; detailed information on website; lunch at nearby restaurant; CODE 1ND-014; Members $155; Nonmembers $205

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The Women’s Memorial depicts Elizabeth Thorn, caretaker of Gettysburg's Evergreen Cemetery, who buried 91 soldiers after the Battle of Gettysburg

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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European Microstates

Democracy Today

Survival of the Smallest

A Promise in Peril

In an age of nation-states, Europe contains the world’s largest collection of a dozen countries that are literally too small to appear on most maps of the continent. One of them is the last remaining relic of the medieval Holy Roman Empire; another is the first country outside the Iron Curtain to elect a communist government; another uses a language spoken nowhere else in the world; the smallest actually consists of two tiny pieces located 400 miles apart; and the (once powerful) next smallest disappeared from the map for nearly a century. Historian Charles Ingrao delves into these miscrostates’ remarkable resilience, examining the historical forces that shaped them.

For more than two centuries our country has accepted the efficacy of democracy without question. United we stood in rejecting and ultimately defeating in turn the proponents of monarchism, fascism, and communism. Today, however, emerging threats to democratic practices in this country and around the world—including populist movements, disregard of rule of law, and attacks on freedom of expression—call for a serious examination of what is right and wrong with democracy. Historian Charles Ingrao compares democracy with competing forms of government, examines the attributes of healthy democracies, and considers what can be done to strengthen modern democratic institutions in danger of retreat.

Tues., March 24, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0030; Members $25; Nonmember $35

Thurs., March 26, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-031; Members $35; Nonmembers $45 The royal family residence, a medieval castle in Vaduz, Liechtenstein

A History of the British Royal Family Early Legends to Modern Monarchs Britain boasts one of the eighth-longest monarchies in the world, and certainly the most famous. Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger traces a path through the twists and turns of the royals and rebels who have ruled England for nearly a thousand years. She explores how rulers used personality and politics to establish dynasties and leave a lasting mark on the nation’s history. Learn how family feuds, religious battles, and a changing world shaped the faces and functions of the British monarchy. From King Arthur to William the Conqueror and Richard the Lionheart, from Henry IV to Henry VIII, and from the kings of Early and Medieval England into modern times, Lloyd Stanger summons the monarchs who waged historic wars on battlefields and in bedchambers to secure the crown, the ultimate prize. MAR 26 Legends and Leaders of Early and Medieval England APR 2 Roses, Reformation, and the Renaissance APR 9 Divisions and Unions: Civil War and the Creation of Great Britain APR 16 The Sun Never Sets: Ruling the British Empire APR 23 Monarchy for Modern Times 5 sessions; Thurs., March 26–April 23, 10:30 a.m.– 12:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-074; Members $100; Nonmembers $150

Title page illustration of The Boy's King Arthur, 1922, by N.C. Wyeth

The British royal family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, 2013

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Forgotten No More: Rediscovering Remarkable Women

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

Part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative For centuries, women have been making strides in their professions, but their work has often been overlooked, uncredited, or forgotten by time. Celebrate Women’s History Month by spending a fascinating day with four experts who bring to light remarkable women who lived in the shadows of history far too long. Art historian Barrett Tilney traces the journey of Judith Leyster (1609–1660) who gained remarkable professional success as a woman in a competitive, male-dominated art market. Historian Robyn Muncy spotlights some of the women active in social movements in this country who aimed to diminish inequalities of wealth and power in the early 20th century. Women in blues and jazz have long made significant contributions to music—while not always being taken seriously as artists. Mary Lou Williams, ca. 1946, by Michele L. Simms-Burton, DownBeat magazine reviewer, William P. Gottlieb discusses the challenges many women faced trying to achieve recognition. Biology professor Kay Etheridge examines the life and work of Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717) an artist and naturalist who revolutionized what would become the field of ecology. 9:30 a.m. Judith Leyster: A Star in Her Time 11 a.m. Pioneers in Progressive Politics 12:15 Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Women in Blues and Jazz: From Footnotes to High Notes Self-Portrait, ca. 1630, by Judith Leyster

2:45 p.m. Maria Sibylla Merian: A Biologist to the Bone

Sat., March 28, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-032; Members $90; Nonmembers $140; Students with ID $50

Sears Houses of Arlington From 1908 to 1940, Sears Roebuck & Co. sold more than 70,000 of its prefabricated Modern Homes kits, affordable dwellings assembled on site that offered Americans of moderate means the chance to own an up-to-date house. Arlington County, which saw a boom in its growth during the 1920s, boasts a significant collection of these kit houses. After an introductory slide presentation at the Ripley Center, Ad for a Sears house historian Dakota Springston leads a bus tour through historic Virginia neighborhoods in search of these structures. View the exteriors of approximately 50 Sears homes representing some 50 different models that range from the single-story “Sunlight” to the magnificent 10-room “Woodland” model. Springston discusses the rail and trolley lines that provided transportation for Sears products, laborers, and residents; and how A Sears house in Arlington these rapidly growing developments at the time these houses were built replaced formerly agrarian communities. Sun., March 29 , 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; by bus from the Ripley Center; lunch at nearby restaurant; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-B13; Members $125; Nonmembers $175

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Leadership in Crisis Defining Moments of Modern Presidencies Crises that occur during their time in office can pose a supreme challenge to presidents. Franklin Roosevelt’s initiatives to end the Depression, John F. Kennedy’s management of the Cuban Missile Crisis, George W. Bush’s response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11, and Donald Trump’s handling of impeachment are all examples of such defining crises, according to journalist Ken Walsh. Walsh discusses what we have learned about presidential attributes and skills that matter most in trying times. His book Presidential Leadership in Crisis: Defining Moments of the Modern Presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to Donald Trump (Routledge) is available for sale and signing. Tues., March 31, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center: CODE 1H0-498; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Exploring World Heritage Sites in Asia There are 269 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout Asia. Each of them offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. This series offers an in-depth overview of four intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites in Asia, incorporating the insights of the latest scholarship and research. Illustrated lectures feature the the Mogao Grottoes of China, often called an “art gallery in the desert,” with 500 artbedecked caves; the Potala Palace, which offers a window into the history of Tibet; Samarkand in Central Asia, which over the centuries attracted diverse historical groups seeking a base from which to conquer the region; and the Taj Mahal, the 17th-century construction of what would become the architectural jewel of the Mughal empire in India. Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of Shah-i-Zinda necropolis in the city of Samarkand., Reclining buddha statue at Mogao Grottos in Gansu history at American University, acts as ca. 14th–19th centuries province, China guide through iconic monuments and cities of Asia. APR 2 The Mogao Grottos APR 23 The Potala Palace MAY 14 Samarkand JUN 4 The Taj Mahal Save $20 on the full series: 4 sessions; Thurs., April 2, April 23, May 14, June 4, 6:15–8:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-033; Members $80; Nonmembers $120

Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet

The Taj Mahal

Individual sessions: Thurs., April 2 (CODE 1J0-033A); April 23 (CODE 1J0-033B); May 14 (CODE 1J0-033C); June 4 (CODE 1J0033D); 6:15–8:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

Smithsonian Associates

Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood Meet all of the friendly people who make our neighborhoods terrific places to live every day. Recycled crafting, interactive songs, literacy, and numeracy elements make this community day the perfect blend of learning and just plain fun. Ages 3 to 6 (Pre-K to Grade 1) Wed., March 4 to Fri., March 6 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Discovery Theater, Ripley Center

St. Paddy’s Day with Pete Moss and the Bog Band Join Pete (aka Mitch Fanning) and his troupe of talented young musicians and dancers as they pick up their fiddles and bodhran drums to celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day. A Music in Our Schools Month program. Ages 5 to 12 (K to Grade 6) Tues., March 17 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Discovery Theater, Ripley Center

Science Tellers: Escape from Earth Two curious kids investigate a meteor shower and find themselves mixed up with a family of visitors from another planet. Audiences get to learn the secrets of the exciting science behind the show’s out-of-this-world special effects. Ages 7 to 11 (Grades 2 to 5) Thurs., March 12 and Fri., March 13 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Discovery Theater, Ripley Center

DiscoveryTheater.org

Once Upon a Moon Let’s go to the moon! Celebrate the spirit of the Apollo landing in this exciting interactive show where performers and puppets spin old and new stories about the moon’s magic, create a “living exhibit” of its phases, and introduce the amazing science that brought us to its surface. Ages 3 to 7 (Pre-K to Grade 2) Thurs., March 19 and Fri., March 20 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Discovery Theater, Ripley Center

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George Washington in Alexandria No other town is as associated with George Washington as Alexandria, and Washington considered it his hometown. He surveyed Alexandria’s streets as a teenager in 1749, and his public memorial service was held there 50 years later. Join author historian Garrett Peck on a charming walk through Old Town’s alleyways, rustic taverns, 18th-century architecture, ice wells, and waterfront. Visit churches, houses, taverns and other sites associated with the first president, If the 2-hour walk works up a thirst, join in an optional happy hour (with cash bar) following the tour.

Interior of Christ Church, Alexandria, Virginia

WALKING TOUR FOUR OPTIONS: Sat., April 4, 3 p.m.–5:30 p.m. (CODE 1NW-A02); Sun., April 5, 2 p.m.–4:30 p.m. (CODE 1NWB02); Fri., April 17, 11 a.m.–1:30 p.m. (CODE 1NW-C02); Sun., April 19, 2 p.m.–4:30 p.m. (CODE 1NW-D02); tours begin at the main entrance of Christ Church (118 N. Washington Street); route covers about 1.5 miles; detailed information on website; Members $35; Nonmembers $50

Unearthing History at Armageddon The ancient mound at Megiddo—also known as Armageddon—is key to unlocking biblical archaeology. From 1925 until 1939, discoveries there by University of Chicago archaeologists, including biblical-era monuments and gold and ivory treasures, transformed our understanding of the ancient world and life under ancient Israelite kings. Classicist and anthropologist Eric Cline—who has dug at Megiddo— draws on archival records to reveal a portrait of a bygone age of archaeology, setting the expedition against the backdrop of the Great Depression and growing troubles and tensions in Palestine during the British Mandate. His book Digging Up Armageddon: The Search for the Lost City of Solomon (Princeton University Press) is available for sale and signing. Mon., April 6, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-504; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Archaeological remains in Tel Megiddo National Park, Northern Israel

SS UNITED STATES CONSERVANCY

A Man and His Ship Building the S.S. United States In the 1940s and 50s, William Francis Gibbs was considered America’s best naval architect. His quest was to build the finest, fastest, most beautiful ocean liner of his time, and he spent 40 years dreaming of that ship. When the S.S. United States was completed in 1952, it was hailed as a technological masterpiece. Gibbs was an American original: He overcame his family’s financial ruin, debilitating shyness, and lack of formal training to become the visionary creator of some of history’s finest ships. Historian Steven Ujifusa tells a tale of ingenuity and enterprise as he examines how Gibbs transformed an industry. The SS United States in the Caribbean, 1966

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Thurs., April 16, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-035; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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GARRETT PECK

The Seneca Quarry and the Castle

RISA RYAN

The Smithsonian Castle’s distinctive red sandstone facade glows warmly against the cool marble that dominates the National Mall. The story of the building and its stones, from Seneca Quarry in Montgomery County, is a remarkable one involving bankruptcies, floods, and a role in a national scandal involving the Grant presidency! Until it was closed in 1901, the quarry was the source of stones used in the Cabin John Bridge and U.S. Capitol walkways and doorways, among other projects. Garrett Peck, author of The Smithsonian Castle and the Seneca Quarry, leads an excursion exploring the quarry’s role in the building of 19th-century Washington. The first stop is the Castle, then travel to the site of the quarry in Poolesville, now within the C&O Canal National Historical Park. Tours of the Seneca Schoolhouse and Montevideo, the Federal-era home once owned by quarry owner John P.C. Peter, provide another glimpse of life during the years that the Seneca Quarry was a thriving part of the local scene.

Remnants of the stone-cutting mill at Seneca Quarry

DAY TOUR Sat., April 18, 9 a.m.– Mall entrance to the Castle 4 p.m.; by bus; CODE 1ND-016; lunch included; detailed information on website; Members $130; Nonmembers $180 Seneca Schoolhouse Museum, Poolesville, Maryland

Between 1792 and 1815 Europe was in turmoil. The French Revolution unleashed a torrent of political, social, cultural, and military changes, which Napoleon extended beyond the country’s frontiers. The ensuing struggle was immense in its scale and intensity and became known as the “Great War.” Never before had European states resorted to such an immense mobilization of civilian and military resources. Britain and France struggled for dominance in Europe, the Americas, Africa, India,

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM

The Napoleonic Wars: A Global Conflict Indonesia, and the Philippines, as well across the Atlantic and Indian oceans. Even the young American republic was eventually swept up in the competition. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze tells the story of the Napoleonic Wars and explains how European affairs did not unfold in isolation from the rest of the globe. His book The Napoleonic Wars: A Global History (Oxford University Press) is available for signing after the program. 9:30 a.m. The Revolution and the War 11 a.m. “The Elephant vs. Whale” 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Toward the New Middle East 3 p.m. The Remaking of an Atlantic World

Political cartoon depicting British Prime Minister William Pitt and Gen. Napoleon Bonaparte slicing up the globe

Napoleon in Egypt, 1868, by Jean-Léon Gérôme

Sat., April 18, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-077; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

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Classical Greece From Agamemnon to Alexander the Great Classical Greece—the cradle of Western philosophy, democracy, and science—was the heir of grand achievements by the earlier Bronze Age Greeks. Following the widespread upheavals of the Trojan War, the Greek city-states gradually introduced social and political innovations to much of the ancient Mediterranean world. The city-state (Greek polis) created public institutions to prepare citizens for better governance by attaining their full potential in body and mind. Among the well-known cities were Thebes, Corinth, Sparta, Argos, Athens, and Miletos, where Greek philosophy originated. The teachings of early philosophers laid the foundations for Western science as their thoughts about traditional religious beliefs brought about significant cultural changes. Lion Gate at Mycenae, Bronze Age Athens provided the most notable standards for education, arts, and architecture that were widely imitated in the Greek world. It created an Aegean commercial empire but overreached and fell into a devastating civil war. Other Greek states then failed to check the rapid rise of Macedonian Greeks who then transformed the democratic ideals. Archaeologist Robert Stieglitz explores the cultural heritage of the Greeks as revealed by historical sources and archaeological discoveries, notably their achievements in education, politics, arts, and architecture in Greece and beyond. 9:30 a.m. The Mycenaean Heritage 11 a.m. The Spirit of the City-State 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) Engraving of Aristotle teaching Alexander the Great, 1866, by Charles LaPlante

1:30 p.m. The Golden Age of Athens 3 p.m. Alexander and the Hellenistic Ideals

Sat., April 18, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-076; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

An Expert’s Hunt for History On the Trail of the World’s Lost Treasures Nathan Raab is one of the world’s most knowledgeable and respected experts and dealers in historical documents and artifacts. His collection includes documents and relics that once belonged to personalities ranging from Abraham Lincoln and Mahatma Gandhi to Teddy Roosevelt and Mark Twain. Raab reveals how he learned to tell the difference between real and forged artifacts, and the many amazing finds that were nearly lost to the ages. Whether discussing the first report of Napoleon’s death or Albert Einstein’s unpublished letter to a curious soldier, Raab has stories to tell. His book The Hunt for History (Simon & Schuster) is available for purchase and signing. Wed., April 22, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-322; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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How the Bible Is Written Faith and Literary Form Almost everyone reads the Bible for its content and a message that resonates, even from a distance of 3,000 years. But how were the biblical books composed and what can be said about its exquisite literary style? Biblical scholar Gary Rendsburg explores how the ancient Israelite literati used every device imaginable—wordplay, alliteration, repetition and variation, dialect representation, and more—to reach and engage their audiences. Rendsburg leads a literary journey back in time, imagining ourselves as listeners to ancient Israel’s poets, prophets, and storytellers. His book How the Bible Is Written (Hendrickson) is available for sale and signing. Thurs., April 23, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-079 Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Inside the Cuban Missile Crisis How an America Sub in the Mediterranean Played Its Part In October 1962, the United States and the Soviet Union faced off over Russia’s decision to place nuclear missiles in Cuba to deter an American invasion. President Kennedy ordered a naval blockade around the island. After several days of tense negotiations, Premier Khrushchev agreed to remove the weapons if the U.S. publicly declared it would not invade Cuba. The Polaris submarine USS Sam Houston played a significant role in the de-escalation efforts. Remembering the story of its strategic mission are Naval historian David Rosenberg and retired Admiral Cecil Haney, former commander of the U.S. Strategic Command. Joining them are two retired officers: Rear Admiral George Ellis who was at the Belgian headquarters of NATO’s Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe, and Captain Al Perry, who was aboard the Sam Houston. There are two optional 1.5-hour-long daytime tours of the Cold War Museum at Washington Navy Yard. Availability is limited.

US NAVY

In Collaboration with the Naval Submarine League

With Optional Tour

USS Sam Houston

Program only: Thurs., April 23, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-311; Members $30; Nonmembers, $45 Program and tour: Sat., April 25, 10 a.m.; CODE 1L0-312; Members $40; Nonmembers $55

Lincoln in Virginia A Wartime Journey

Abraham Lincoln spent 18 of his last 21 days of life not in Washington but in eastern Virginia, headquarters for Ulysses S. Grant’s campaign against Robert E. Lee, whose army was in the process of defending Richmond and Petersburg. It was Lincoln’s longest time away from the Union capital during which he did no official work, and a pivotal period that saw the Civil War wind down to its conclusion. Noah Andre Trudeau, author of Lincoln’s Greatest Journey: Sixteen Days That Changed a Presidency, March 24–April 8, 1865 leads a visit to sites connected to that trip. Lincoln’s experiences there provide vital missing pieces in the narrative of his final days. Highlights include City Point, Lincoln’s base during his visit; Fort Wadsworth, where Lincoln and his son Tad observed troops in combat; and Richmond’s Jefferson Davis mansion, President Abraham Lincoln in his last which Lincoln visited the day after formal portrait sitting, Feb. 5, 1865, Union troops entered the city. by Alexander Gardner Representatives of the National Park Service and the American Civil War Museum provide more perspective on the Jefferson Davis’ home, aka the Confederate White House, in Richmond visit and the war’s final weeks. DAY TOUR Sat., April 25, 7:15 a.m.–7 p.m.; by bus, lunch at local restaurant is included; tour involves walking and standing on uneven terrain; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-017; Members $155; Nonmembers $205

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AMERICAN CIVIL WAR MUSEUM

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

This program is made possible in part by Newport News Shipbuilding—a division of Huntington Ingalls Industries, Northrop Grumman Corp., Systems Planning & Analysis, and USAA.


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NATIONAL PHOTO COLLECTION (ISRAEL)

Tracing Jewish History From Yemen to Yorkshire The known trajectory of Jewish history begins in ancient Israel, continues through 2,000 years of Diaspora, and then reaches the two major events of the 20th century: the Holocaust and the establishment of the State of Israel. Within those 2,000 years of Diaspora are little-known stories of Jewish communities that are well worth our attention, from translating the Bible into Greek in ancient Egypt to a role in the beginnings of Merton College, Oxford, in medieval England. Biblical scholar and historian Gary Rendsburg leads a fascinating virtual tour across time and space to explore several surprising outposts from Yemen to Yorkshire. It is a striking reminder of Judaism’s broad cultural and geographical reach. 9:30 a.m. The Jews of Hellenistic Egypt 11 a.m. The Jews of Arabia 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Jews in German Lands: Roman and Holy Roman Empires 3 p.m. The Jews of Medieval England

Jews in Yemen, 1949

Sat., April 25, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-087; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Relief on the Arch of Titus showing Roman soldiers moving newly enslaved Jews and their belongings, Rome; ca. 70

The Civil War in Perspective Our Evolving Story No event has altered the United States more profoundly—or been analyzed more exhaustively—than the American Civil War. Yet the question remains: Why do Americans keep looking back to the war to seek answers to their present-day concerns? Contemporizing the war began soon after Appomattox as memories faded and Americans sought to use the conflict to find new meaning in a modern society. A “Lost Cause” narrative emerged that shaped a military-centered view that dominated the popular culture as veterans, journalists, and essayists assessed the war’s turning points to explain victory and defeat. Even today, a national debate questions how and why Confederate symbols square with the unfinished business of reconstruction. Such emblems remind us that as we grapple with the politics of race in America, we continue to encounter the Civil War. Historian Stephen D. Engle traces 150 years of an ever-changing narrative of the Civil War and why we still contend with reaching an acceptable version of its legacy.

Jim Crow laws mandated segregation after Reconstruction and remained in effect until 1965

9:30 a.m. The Civil War’s Lost Causes: Beyond Appomattox 11 a.m. The War at 75: Abraham Lincoln and Gone with the Wind 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. The War at 100 Years: Bruce Catton and Shelby Foote Meet Jim Crow 3 p.m. The War That Won’t Go Away: Today’s Search for a Usable Past Sat., April 25, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-080; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

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Civil War reenactments became a growing hobby in the 1960s, a century after the war

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Ancient Sparta

The Panama Canal

A Template for Modern Dictatorships

A Complicated Backstory

Among the ancient city-states, Sparta, the most feared, had evolved over 700 years into a repressive oligarchic society that political scientists say is a model for 20th-century totalitarian dictatorships. Spartans favored consistency over LED creativity and freedom and ELbelieved C N that the whole CisAgreater than any of its parts and that an individual can only find true happiness as a component of something larger. Sparta achieved a level of political and social stability that exceeded all the others’—but at the cost of stifling artistic and intellectual endeavors. Historian and classics scholar John Prevas explores ancient Sparta’s approach to governing, drawing parallels to the modern dictatorships that echo it.

Marble figure of a Spartan, ca. 480 B.C. ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM OF SPARTA

Mon., April 27, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-310; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

STUDIO ART

Building the Panama Canal was either a bold diplomatic stroke or a crude display of arrogance by America. For President Teddy Roosevelt, it was the centerpiece of America’s growing global power. Years later, as a controversial symbol of this country’s might, the Canal unleashed one of the most contentious foreign-policy debates in history over ceding the Canal to Panama in 1978. Historian Ralph Nurnberger, who served on the staff of the Senate Committee that oversaw the Panama Canal treaties, examines the sweep of the Canal saga, and how the sharp debate over the Canal treaties in the 1970s contributed, among other issues, to the current polarization of parties in Congress. Wed., April 29, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-490; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Political cartoon in the 1903 New York Herald depicting Theodore Roosevelt and the Panama Canal

A Century of Co-ops in the District In 1920, 10 rental apartment buildings in Washington, D.C., converted to cooperative ownership. Today with nearly 15,000 cooperative units, the District is second only to New York City in their concentration. Co-ops are distinctive features of some of the city’s most historic neighborhoods, from Kalorama to Cathedral Heights, Foggy Bottom to Southwest Waterfront. They also represent a wide range of architectural styles and periods. The Italian Renaissance– inspired Altamont in Kalorama Triangle, with its reception-area fireplace ornamented by carved scrolls, was built in 1916 and converted into a cooperative in 1949. Harbour Square, built in 1966, is one of several waterfront-neighborhood projects that reflect the midcentury aesthetic of architect Cloethiel Woodward Smith. The Altamont, in the Adams Morgan neighborLuigi Moretti’s Watergate East offers hood another perspective on modernism. Visit these and other fabled cooperatives during a day guided by Barry Moss, former president of the D.C. Cooperative Housing Coalition. During resident-led tours of private apartments in several of the cooperatives, Moss and hosts provide

background on the history, architectural importance, and notable former residents of the communities. DAY TOUR Sat., May 2, 9 a.m.– 5 p.m.; by bus; not all sites ADAcompliant; box lunch and light reception included; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-018; Members $145; Nonmembers $195

Aerial view of The Watergate

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A Year of Delightful Destinations Overnight Tours in 2020 Our study tours are designed for people who want more than just a getaway: They offer one-of-a-kind experiences combined with opportunities to gain new insights into the topics that fascinate you. Whether you’re a fan of history, art, music, science, nature, or architecture—or simply love exploring new places— these expert-led excursions offer a year’s worth of tempting travels. Several of our most popular tours return to the schedule, offering you another chance to join us on these adventures—before they sell out again! Note: Tour dates and content are subject to change.

Hiking in the Shenandoahs May 3–4 (see p. 41) Celebrate the beauty of Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park as you hike its trails,in spring. Take in the panoramas from Skyland, your lodge nestled along Skyline Drive. Leader: Keith Tomlinson

The Road to Nashville March 22–26 Music City USA is a cultural melting pot, and this journey south offers a blend of attractions from outstanding country music performances to a major museum exhibition of Turner paintings.

OUT D L SO

The Bronx in Bloom May 17–18 (see p. 35) Spring is the perfect time to discover the beauty and the history of New York City’s northernmost borough, from the stunning gardens of Wave Hill along the Hudson to Edgar Allan Poe’s cottage.

Leader: Richard Selden

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The Best of Brooklyn April 19–20 Brooklyn offers plenty of delights for lovers of art, music, nature, and food. An arts journalist and former Brooklynite introduces you to several of its top attractions.

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Leader: Richard Selden

Leader: Richard Selden

A Mountain Rail Extravaganza June 5–7 (see p. 24) Stunning spring vistas, vintage locomotives, and West Virginia history are on the itinerary for a weekend spent riding the Cass Scenic Railroad and other mountain routes.

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Leader: Joe Nevin

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


Spring in the Brandywine River Valley

Theodore Roosevelt’s North Dakota

June 14–15 (see p. 53)

Sept. 19–23; on sale April 1

The beautiful Brandywine region is the ideal destination for lovers of art, grand houses and gardens, American history— and used books.

Fly west and experience the wild beauty of the Dakota Territory that shaped young Theodore Roosevelt’s course as a conser-vationist and naturalist.

Leader: Hayden Mathews

Leader: Melanie Choukas-Bradley

An Artful Weekend in New York August 15–16; on sale April 1 Here’s a perfect getaway for art aficionados: Take in a trio of contemporary museums, enjoy an evening on your own, and stay at a grand Jazz Age hotel. Leader: Ursula Rehn Wolfman

A Carolina Fourth Baseball, Barbeque, and Fireworks

Gold-Rush California

July 1–5 (see p. 37)

Oct. 10–15; on sale April 1

Summer baseball in North Carolina reflects the game at its most authentic. Head to Bull Durham country with the authors of Fodor’s Baseball Vacations to experience games in historic stadiums, meet coaches and players, and savor some great barbecue.

In the late 1840s, the dream of riches drew hundreds of thousands to California—and shaped the history of the state and the American West. A 7-day tour immerses you in the places where the adventure unfolded.

Leaders: Bruce Adams and Peggy Engel

Wonders by Wright

Leader: Garrett Peck

Buffalo and Beyond August 28–31; on sale April 1 In the early 20th century, Frank Lloyd Wright and his contemporaries turned Buffalo into a showcase for some of the most dazzling and innovative public and private architecture. A 4-day tour surveys this rich heritage. Leader: Bill Keene

Autumn in Hyde Park

A Berkshires Summer Sampler

Fall 2020 Follow the Hudson to FDR’s family home and presidential library, Eleanor Roosevelt’s Val-Kill Cottage, the opulent Vanderbilt Mansion, and the Culinary Institute of America.

July 26–30 (see p. 38) The scenic and historic Berkshire hills of western Massachusetts are alive with music, art, and theatre. A 5-day tour offers a splendid sampling of cultural attractions in the region. Leader: Richard Selden

Leader: Bill Keene

Exploring Frank Lloyd Wright Sept. 13–14; on sale June 1 Appreciate Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterwork anew during a late spring visit to the house. See other significant Wright modernist architecture at Kentuck Knob and the cluster of houses at Polymath Park designed by the architect and one of his apprentices. Leader: Bill Keene MARCH 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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Coal and Capitalism

The Rise and Fall of the Berlin Wall For 28 years, the Berlin Wall marked the tense epicenter of the Cold War. The only time U.S. and Soviet tanks faced off directly was at crossing point Checkpoint Charlie, shortly after the Wall went up in 1961. It took a direct appeal from JFK to Nikita Khrushchev to avert A free man is seen through a hole the real threat of nuclear war. in the Berlin Wall The Wall came down suddenly in 1989, but its impact and the questions it raised persist. Historian Hope M. Harrison addresses those questions—and the Berlin Wall’s influence on German memory and identity. Harrison’s book After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present (Cambridge University Press) is available for sale and signing. Mon., May 4, 6:45 p,m,; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-503; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Theodore Roosevelt, J.P. Morgan, and the Strike That Changed Labor History The assassination of business-friendly President McKinley upset financier J.P. Morgan’s plans for Northern Securities, an enterprise that would ensure his dominance of America’s railroad industry. President Theodore Roosevelt had different ideas about big business: Northern Securities was sued for antitrust violations. But In early 1902, a Pennsylvania coal miner strike threw the president and the banker together to avoid a national crisis. Susan Berfield draws on her new book The Hour of Fate, as she discusses this historic episode, and why the lessons of Roosevelt and Morgan’s time still deserve attention today. The Hour of Fate (Bloomsbury Publishing) is available for sale and signing. Thurs., May 7, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-324; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

Exclusive, FREE Member Tours Did you know that Smithsonian Associates offers exclusive complimentary tours for our members? Tours last 1 hour; for members only; free, but require registration: call 202-633-3030

The exhibition John Singer Sargent: Portraits in Charcoal is the first in more than 50 years to feature Sargent’s portrait drawing. The artist’s charcoal portraits have the same delicate balance of detail and simplification that is so compelling about his oil paintings.

Registration is limited to two guests per account, two times a year. Space is limited, available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you are unable to use the tickets you’ve reserved, please contact Customer Service at least 24 hours in advance so that we may offer them to other members. Failure to do so will result in the reservation counting as a used benefit.

Voice of America Studio Tour

Tues., March 10, 12 p.m.; CODE 1E0-216, Voice of America, 330 Independence Ave., SW (Federal Center, Orange/Blue/ Silver lines)

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Wed., March 11, 1 p.m.; CODE 1E0-217; National Portrait Gallery NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the Voice of America Studio, which provides international live news and information programming in more than 40 languages. Its headquarters, the art deco-style Wilber J. Cohen Federal Building, houses New Deal-era American art treasures, including Ben Shahn’s mural The Meaning of Social Security.

LENT BY THE NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, LONDON

John Singer Sargent: Portraits in Charcoal

Sir William Blake Richmond, ca. 1910, by John Singer Sargent

National Geographic Tour two exhibitions on view at the National Geographic Museum: Becoming Jane: The Evolution of Dr. Jane Goodall, and Women: A Century of Change. Both are well-timed to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution that granted women the right to vote. Fri., March 27, 12 p.m.; CODE 1E0-218; National Geographic, 1145 17th St., NW (Farragut North, Red line)

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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The Real Revolution: America, 1775–1783 LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

“The history of our Revolution will be one continued lie from one it: “Great men get praise; little men, nothing.” end to the other,” wrote John Adams in 1790. “The essence of the Richard Bell, associate professor of history at the University of whole will be that Dr. Maryland, explores the tumultuous Franklin’s electrical rod smote years between 1775 and 1785 from the Earth and out sprang the perspective of these “little men” General Washington.” by examining military recruitment, As Adams understood, the the wars on the home front and in real story of the American Indian territory, the struggles of Revolution is far more than people of color, and the experiences the catalog of deeds done by a of loyalists. handful of famous men. 9:30 a.m. Hearts and Minds Declaring independence on a 10:45 a.m. Homes and Hearths piece of parchment on a 12 p.m. Tomahawks and Trade summer’s day in Philadelphia Goods in 1776 would have meant 1 p.m. Lunch (participants nothing had ordinary Hand-painted etching of New York City in flames with citizens and Redprovide their own) Americans—more than coats fighting in 1776; by Franz Habermann, ca. 1778 2 p.m. Race and Rebellion 200,000 men and boys served in the Continental Army over the 8 years of war—not been 3:15 p.m. Fear and Loathing willing to support that cause and fight to make it a reality. As Sat., May 9; 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-510; Joseph Plumb Martin, a private in the Continental Army, later put Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Doodlebugging Through Delaware

NICK MCLEAN

Hop aboard a private charter of an early 20th-century self-propelled railcar called the Doodlebug and take in the spring sights along the historic Wilmington and Western Railroad line. The W&W has been in continuous operation since 1867, stretching at its longest to 20 miles of track along the Red Clay Valley from downtown Wilmington, Delaware to Landenberg, Pennsylvania. Your leader Joe Nevin, a railroad historian, covers the colorful background of the W&W and offers stories of the once-bustling industrial towns along the branch line. The visit includes a tour of the W&W’s steam locomotive and passenger car shop facilities at Marshalltown, as well as a guided walking tour of a vintage amusement park site at Brandywine Springs. The day concludes with a stop Wilmington and Western Doodlebug, Delaware in New Castle to see remnants of the New Castle and Frenchtown Railroad, one of the nation’s first. Lunch is at the Back Burner restaurant in Hockessin, the current end of the line. Doodlebugging offers an ideal way for fans of historic railroads to spend the day. DAY TOUR Sat., May 9, 7 a.m.–7 p.m.; by bus, detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-019; Members $180; Nonmembers $230

Wilmington & Western engine 98 crosses Red Clay Creek near Greenbank Mills & Philips Farm, Delaware

Read more about programs in this guide on our website. Search by code or date. Expanded program descriptions, presenters’ information, and more at smithsonianassociates.org.

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Very Secret, Very Cool: The Mysteries of Area 51 For decades, the aerial surveillance programs of the CIA were shrouded in mystery by both design and necessity. CIA historian Brent Geary tells the story behind the mythology of Area 51, the agency’s secret southern Nevada flight-test site for the development of the U-2 and A-12 reconnaissance craft in the mid-1950s. These test planes flew higher than commercial airliners, and air-traffic controllers—unaware of the testing—began to report seeing unidentifiable objects, as did commercial pilots flying below them. The Air Force’s cover stories led to conspiracy theories about Area 51 and the existence of alien life. Geary explores the mysteries and realities of 1950s American aviation, Cold War-era intelligence, and—inadvertently—popular culture. Wed., May 13, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-501; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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All You Can Eat A Culinary History of America “It’s as American as apple pie” is a common saying, but what actually makes apple pie “American?” In reality, throughout this country’s history, food has been a battleground where culture, ethnicity, race, and identity clash. In fact, in the 1890s, some New Yorkers saw the Italian immigrant dish of spaghetti with tomato sauce as a threat to American values. Hamburgers, too, were considered a disgusting foreign food. Historian Allen Pietrobon explores American food culture since 1850, revealing how immigration, economic forces, politics, religion, gender, foreign policy, and debates over national identity influenced our food choices. Wed., May 13, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE: 1J0-038; Members $25; Nonmembers $35; Students with ID $15

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Their names tell the story of these magnificent flying machines: Galaxy, Globemaster, Starlifter, and others. They are among the largest and most specialized aircraft ever to fly with the United States military. Join pilot and transportation expert Scott Hercik as he goes behind the scenes and onboard these giant aircraft that carry soldiers and their supplies around the world. Begin at Dover Air Force Base, home to the 436 Airlift Wing of the USAF Air Mobility Command and the 512th Airlift Wing of the Air Force Reserve Command. It’s currently the home base to the state-of-the-art C-17 Globemaster III and the newly re-engined C-5M Super Galaxy. Tour the base control tower and explore the maintenance center, which is the only facility for conducting major ISO maintenance of the entire C-5M Super Galaxy fleet. Enjoy a luncheon with some of the talented men and women who keep these magnificent giants in the sky. A Super Stallion helicopter is loaded into a C-5A Galaxy Afterward, explore the Air Mobility Command Museum’s vintage aircraft and the largest military aircraft found in any museum. Enjoy the preserved base-control tower and the museum’s World War II-era display hanger. View prop, turbo-prop, and jet aircraft and climb onboard the massive C-141 Starlifter.

U.S. AIR FORCE

Giants in the Sky: Military Aircraft

DAY TOUR Tues., May 19, 7:30 a.m.–7:30 p.m.; by bus; lunch included; government-issue ID required; participants contacted prior to tour for additional security information; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-020; Members $155; Nonmembers $205

The Women Who Ruled the East End Remarkable Tales of Wartime London Why did the British vote to leave the European Union in 2016, and why did it prove so difficult to “get Brexit done”? Historian Jennifer Paxton traces Britain’s long-ambivalent relationship to Europe, reflected in a reluctance to join what was originally the European Economic Community. The rise of Euro-scepticism among Conservatives led to an internal party struggle that spilled over onto the national political stage. Paxton looks at the consequences of the Brexit deal on the future of the unwritten British constitution—and for the constituent nations of the United Kingdom, as the debate drew in questions about the status of Scotland and the future of the Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland. Wed., May 20, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-089; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

© DAISY WOODARD

Why Brexit?

The BBC’s period drama “Call the Midwife” made a community of nuns and nurses famous. But what about acknowledging the formidable East End mothers whose babies they delivered? Author Kate Thompson and historian Alan Capps delve into the social history of the strong, determined women—the working-class community’s matriarchs—who kept the children fed, birthed the babies when there was no midwife to call, and laid out the dead. They helped shape the neighborhood’s diverse economy, politics, and culture as the war threatened their home. Thompson’s book The Stepney Doorstep Society (Penguin) is available for sale and signing.

Two factory workers take a tea break in London’s East End, 1948

Mon., Sept. 21, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-111; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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GEORGE SCHEPER

The Maya Ancient Splendors, Modern Legacies The Maya, Aztec and Inca are the best-known of ancient American civilizations. But whereas the Aztec and the Inca flourished late in the Pre-Columbian era, on the eve of Spanish contact, the Maya arose as a distinct civilization more than two thousand years ago. During their Classic period, from about 300 to 900 A.D., the Maya had a fully developed writing system, partly hieroglyphic and partly phonetic. And the Maya are still very much with us today, living in Central America, the U.S., and elsewhere. The famous breaking of the Mayan code in the late 20th century revolutionized the study of ancient America and the Maya. Humanities scholar George Scheper shows how interdisciplinary study of the Maya extends beyond traditional archaeological investigation to comprise political and social history, art, comparative religion, and ecology. He offers an anthropological look at modern romantic versions of Mayan culture and their fallacies; considers Maya cultural evolution from a foundation laid down by older Mesoamerican cultures; follows the trajectory of Classic Maya civilization’s network of interconnected city-states, each with its own ruling elites and court culture; and concludes with a look at the Maya in today’s globalized world culture and world economy. 9:30 a.m. Romancing the Maya 11 a.m. Dawn of the Maya and Beyond 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Splendors of the Classic Maya 3 p.m. The Maya in Modern History and Today Painted bas relief in Palenque

Sat., May 30, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-090; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

El Castillo , a Mayan pyramid at Chichen Itza, Mexico

France During World War II Occupation and Resistance NATIONAL ARCHIVES

It took just six weeks in the spring of 1940 for Germany to invade and defeat France. The intuitive reaction of the populace was to flee by the millions toward southern France. But the defeated French government’s response was a one-sided armistice that would result in a psychological legacy that would haunt the nation for decades. An armistice signed by Adolf Hitler and France’s Marshal Philippe Pétain divided the country geographically into two large sectors, one occupied by Germany and one ostensibly designated as “free,” governed by a new regime in the town of Vichy. But there was also a third France, sited in England and led by the indomitable brigadier general, Charles de Gaulle. Historian Ronald C. Rosbottom examines why knowing more about the impact of both occupation and resistance during WWII helps us understand aspects of France’s present political and diplomatic environment. Rosbottom’s book Sudden Courage: French Youth Confront the Germans, 1940–1945 (HarperCollins/ Custom House) is available for sale and signing. 9:30 a.m. How the Occupation Worked 11 a.m. The Occupation’s Evolution 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. The Nature of Resistance 3 p.m. Young Resisters and the Occupation’s Legacy Sat., May 30, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-091; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 Resisters learn about weapons

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Hitler in Paris, 1940

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Fake News How To Spot and Discredit Disinformation How can a society awash in misinformation combat the powerful impact of fake news? It has exploded in the public consciousness since 2016 and remains a threat to democratic elections around the world. Research shows that many people are unable to identify reliable websites and often forward fake news unintentionally, despite social media platforms’ struggle to control the practice. Helen Lee Bouygues, president of the Reboot Foundation, offers some tools to help news consumers better understand the purpose of messages in a news dispatch and to identify rhetorical tools designed to influence our positions. She also examines fake news within the context of broader problems in public discourse. Tues., June 2, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-512; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Beyond Stonewall How DC Shifted the Nature of Pride On June 28, 1970 in New York City—exactly one year after a police raid on the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village sparked the riots that marked the beginning of the modern LGBT+ rights movement—the first Gay Pride parade took place. But parades that followed were criticized for mostly representing the experiences of white gay men. In May 1991 a lesser-known pivotal moment took place in Washington, D.C.: the city’s first Black Pride celebration. Nikki Lane, a professorial lecturer in the Critical Race, Gender, and Culture Studies Collaborative at American University, examines how the District served as the founding place for Black Pride celebrations of community, inclusion, and diversity. Wed., June 3, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-044; General Admission $25

USHMM / COURTESY OF DAVID LAOR

The Tehran Children Rediscovering Iran’s Role in a Holocaust Rescue In Collaboration with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Many Iranians know their country sheltered Polish refugees during World War II. Fewer know many were Jews, including nearly a thousand so-called Tehran Children, who later emigrated to Palestine. In conversation with Abbas Milani, director of Iranian Studies at Stanford University, author Mikhal Dekel, whose father and aunt were Tehran Children, and journalist Arash Azizi explore this little-known wartime rescue and Iran’s critical role in it. Dekel’s book Tehran Children: A Holocaust Refugee Odyssey (W.W. Norton) is available for sale and signing. Thurs., June 4, 7 p.m.; U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, 100 Raoul Wallenberg Pl. SW; (Smithsonian Metro, Blue/Orange/Silver lines); CODE 1A0-106; Members $30, Nonmembers $45; check-in starts at 6 p.m. at the 15th Street entrance. Three Polish Jewish girls in Tehran

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RON COGSWELL

A Mountain Rail Extravaganza The Cass Scenic Railroad and Other West Virginia Excursions 3-Day Tour All aboard for an exciting rail journey through West Virginia’s breathtaking mountain scenery. Led by railroad historian Joe Nevin, this multi-day tour features three rail excursions, including a climb behind the geared steam locomotive of the Cass Scenic Railroad to the top of the second-highest point in the state. Friday’s route descends into the scenic Shenandoah Valley before turning west into the region known as “Virginia’s Switzerland.” After a scenic stop for a

Engine No. 11 at the Water Tower, Cass Scenic Railroad State Park

picnic box lunch, continue west to the town of Durbin, West Virginia, and board the Durbin Rocket for a private chartered trip on the last remaining miles of the track which once connected Durbin with Cass. The leisurely 10-mile round trip along the upper Greenbrier River introduces the rugged Climax locomotive #3, as well as other early 20th-century cars. Saturday is a full day of riding the rails. In Elkins, board the Cheat Mountain Salamander, a vintage passenger train featuring restored cars UT and climbing from the Tygart and early diesel locomotives. After O twisting D L Valley, the train travels S to O the Cheat River side of the 4,000-foot-high mountain and descends to the valley below. Enjoy a 30-minute stop at the isolated High Falls of the Cheat. Lunch is served on board, as the train continues south through the heart of the Cheat Mountain Wilderness, Durbin railway station with excellent opportunities to view the region’s wildlife. Then transfer to the legendary Cass Railroad for a four-hour ride behind historic geared steam locomotives to the top of Bald Knob, traversing grades exceeding nine percent, before reaching Bald Knob overlook where a large platform offers panoramic views into two states and the Allegheny Mountains. Continuing into Cass, the train passes through two switchbacks and follows Leatherbark Creek, passing the Cass shops and mill, to its mouth at the Greenbrier River. Dinner is included at the 1863 Restaurant. On Sunday, tour the The Durbin Rocket, built in 1910 historic lumber town buildings and see remnants of its great mills. View a film capturing an overview of the Cass experience, tour the shop where the railroad’s restored locomotives are maintained, with a chance to meet some of the people who keep them running. Shay logging locomotive

3-DAY TOUR Fri., June 5, 8 a.m.–Sun., June 7, 7:30 p.m., by bus; all meals included; purchase of trip insurance recommended; detailed information on website; CODE 1NN-CAS; Members $695; Nonmembers $895; Single-room supplement $125

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

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The Greek Gods

Global Climate Justice

Myths and Worship

What Does It Mean?

The Greek gods were powerful figures, and ancient myths tell us of their capacities to create and manipulate the entire world. Fascinating stories explain how Zeus demonstrated his dominion over mortals; how the seasons sprang from the abduction of Demeter’s daughter Persephone by Hades; and how Marble relief portraying the goddess Demeter (left) and daughter Persephone Dionysus, the unruly god of wine, led debauched and sometimes deadly celebrations. The ancient Greeks worshipped their gods in festivals and celebrations that permeated all aspects of daily life, and through rituals they hoped would help them gain the gods’ favor and blessings. Classics scholar Katherine Wasdin examines Greek myths in the context of the religious worship of the gods. Mon., March 2, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0028; Members $20; Nonmembers $30; Students with valid ID $15

RESERVED SEATING is available for most programs. Contact Donor Services at 202-633-3030 to learn about the many benefits of donating to Smithsonian Associates.

Part of the Smithsonian Earth Optimism Initiative The question of how to meet the challenges of climate change continues to take on an increasingly larger role in the worldwide debate about our planet’s future. As an array of proposed responses to that challenge come from governments, corporations, and countries, Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò, an assistant professor of political philosophy and ethics at Georgetown University, insists there’s another question to consider: Are our methods to confront climate change just? Táíwò provides an overview of the challenges to developing a fair and effective policy to combat climate change—among them, economic development and land use—and examines possible pathways to achieving global climate justice. Mon., April 27, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0036; Members $20; Nonmembers $30 The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the Smithsonian.

Why We Love Crosswords It’s a Puzzle Solving a challenging puzzle like the New York Times Crossword is less about what you know and more about understanding how to penetrate those tricky clues. The Times Crossword has become the gold standard in the puzzle industry, with hundreds of thousands of people counting themselves as crossword solvers. Many turn to the paper’s crossword puzzle column New York Times graphic for Wordplay Wordplay for daily tips for navigating the word grid. Deb Amlen, Wordplay senior editor, looks at how the crossword evolved, how you can get started or improve your problem-solving skills, and ways to crack the code behind even the trickiest of clues—not a bad skill to have when other kinds of puzzles come into play. Thurs., March 5, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-004; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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Smithsonian Chamber Music Society Masterworks of Five Centuries

HUGH TALMAN/SMITHSONIAN

The season’s second Schubertiade, in March, brings back the multi-faceted Mark Fewer for readings of the monumental C Major Fantasy and, with three SCMS Fellows, the ebullient “Trout” Quintet. Fellows also join Kenneth Slowik, Vera Beths, and Steven Dann for a program that includes the original sextet version of Transfigured Night.

Kolot HaLev (Voices of the Heart) choir

Jewish Music Many Languages, One Heart

Smithsonian Chamber Music Society concerts are held in the intimate Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum

Schubert: Fantasy in C Major, D934; Quintet in A Major, D667, “The Trout” Smithsonian Chamber Players: Mark Fewer, violin; Kenneth Slowik, fortepiano, with SCMS Fellows Sat., March 7; concert at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talk at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; CODE 1P0-684; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Schubert: Quartet in A Minor, D804, “Rosamunde”; Schoenberg: Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Op. 4 Smithsonian Chamber Players: Vera Beths, violin; Steven Dann, viola; Kenneth Slowik, violoncello, with SCMS Fellows TWO OPTIONS: Sat., March 28 (CODE 1P0-685); Sun., March 29 (CODE 1P0-693); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 J.S. Bach: Partita in G Major, BWV 829; Sonata in C Minor, BWV 1017; Haydn: Sonata in E Minor, Hob. XVI: 34; Mozart: Sonata in D Major, K306/300l Smithsonian Chamber Players: Marc Destrubé, violin; Kenneth Slowik, harpsichord and fortepiano TWO OPTIONS: Sat., April 18 (CODE 1P0-686); Sun., April 19 (CODE 1P0-694); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Programs and artists subject to change.

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What is Jewish music? The best answer is a musical response that draws on the cultures and traditions of countries where Jewish people have lived over the centuries. Cantor and choral director Ramón Tasat (left) leads discussions about this history, which segue into live performances by the Kolot HaLev (Voices of the Heart) choir. MAR 8 Les Chansons Juives Portraits of Jewish Music in France Performance: “Maoz Tzur” (to a melody from Georges Bizet’s L’Arlesienne) and a setting of Psalm 29 by Emile Jonas, among other works

APR 26 Jewels in the Crown The Sounds of Jewish England Performance: “Adon Olam” by Samuel de Sola and “Shahar avakeshkha” by Emanuel Aguilar, among other works

JUN 14 Cantata Ebraica Music of the Italian Jews Performance: “I cieli immensi narrano” by Benedetto Marcello and “Va, pensiero” from Giuseppe Verdi’s opera Nabucco, among other works

Save $15 on the full series: 3 sessions; Sun., March 8, April 26, June 14, 4–5:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1P0-711; Members $60; Nonmembers $90 Individual sessions: Sun., March 8 (CODE 1P0-712); April 26 (CODE 1P0-713); June 14 (1P0-714); 4–5:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Bonus Concert (May 17): Discounted tickets to Kolot HaLev’s annual concert, this year dedicated to Jewish music from England, are available to purchasers of full-series tickets. The concert includes premiere of “Eshet Hayil” by English composer Judith Silver; Temple Beth Ami, 14330 Travilah Road, Rockville, MD 20850

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Re-examining Plato’s Republic

Heaven and Hell

Plato’s Republic, a utopian vision of the state, remains one of the most influential documents in the history of democracy and political philosophy. Written in response to the failure of Athenian democracy in the 5th century B.C., it is an imagined dialogue between Socrates and a group of young interlocutors who sought to find justice in the political organization of the state. It is the first preserved literary attempt in the West to set out a philosophically based Plato in The School of guide to forming the ideal Athens by Raphael, ca. 1511 political unit—and was profoundly anti-democratic. Classics scholar Frederick Winter discusses how a reexamination of the Republic provides important insights into our own era of political transformation.

According to the most recent Pew Research Center poll, 72 percent of all Americans believe in a literal heaven as a place of eternal blessing for departed souls, and 58 percent believe in a literal hell and its eternal torments. But these ideas do not appear in the Old Testament or even in the teachings of the historical Jesus. So where did they come from? Bart Ehrman, a leading authority on early Christianity, the New Testament, and the life of Jesus, examines T views of U O the afterlife from the ancient Near East, Greek, and OL D Roman cultures, the S Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the early centuries of the church. He traces the source of the belief in eternal life immediately after death, the ideas of paradise and hell, and illustrates how they became the dominant view of religion in the West. Ehrman’s book Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife (Simon & Schuster) is available for sale and signing.

Mon., March 9, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0474; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Sat., March 14, 9:30 a.m.—4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-070; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Perspectives on the Afterlife

9:30 a.m. Death After Death 11 a.m. Justice in the World Beyond 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Jesus, Paul, and the Book of Revelation 3 p.m. The Birth of Heaven and Hell Bart Ehrman

Windows on the World Reading Literature from Many Cultures Because we live in a globalized world, what better way to learn about a variety of distinctive cultures and their histories than to delve into a good story? Read across time and place to consider how authors offer windows into fully imagined worlds different from our own. Join Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English department at Georgetown University, in spirited lectures and informal discussions about four compelling novels. Participants should read each book prior to class. Sherry and cookies are available for refreshment. MAR 9 The Alchemist (1993) by Paulo Coelho APR 6 In the Time of the Butterflies (1994) by Julia Alvarez MAY 4 The God of Small Things (1997) by Arundhati Roy JUN 8 The Penelopiad (2005) by Margaret Atwood BOOK DISCUSSIONS 4 sessions; Mon., March 9, April 6, May 4, and June 8, 6:45–8:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-486; Members $80; Nonmembers $130 Individual sessions: Mon., March 9 (CODE 1H0-486A); April 6 (CODE 1H0-486B); May 4 (CODE 1H0-486C); June 8 (CODE 1H0-486D); 6:45–8:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

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Classical Sounds of the Cinema Magnificent Movie Music Since the beginning of the talkies, film directors have turned to classical music for their soundtracks. Whether it’s Beethoven, Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Richard Strauss, Mascagni, Puccini, or Bach, opuses of almost every famous composer have added emotional depth to hundreds of films. Twentieth-century giants of the concert hall such as Shostakovich, Bernstein, Copland, Corigliano, Gershwin, Walton, and Prokofiev each composed superb movie music. With fascinating clips, witty commentary, and piano demonstrations, concert pianist and movie fanatic Rachel Franklin delves into the magic of some of the greatest film music ever composed (even when it was unintentional). MAR 15 Mozart Goes to Hollywood MAR 22 The Myth of Beethoven Queen Elizabeth I, ca. 1592, by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

MAR 29 Classical Crossovers APR 5 Lights, Camera, Composer!

Decoding the Royal Wardrobe

Save $20 on the full series: 4 sessions; Sun., March 15–April 5, 2–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-005; Members $80; Nonmembers $120 Individual sessions: Sun., March 15 (CODE 1K0006); Sun., March 22 (CODE 1K0-007); Sun., March 29 (CODE 1K0-008); Sun., April 5 (CODE 1K0-009); Ripley Center; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

From the Tudors to Today

Rachel Franklin

Neighborhoods of Berlin Discovering Hidden Gems Fred Plotkin, a popular Smithsonian speaker on culture, history, and music, shares what he’s found on his walks through the distinctive and colorful neighborhoods of Berlin. Germany’s capital has changed more radically than any city in Europe. Its people jealously conserve all evidence of its glorious and tormented past, reflected in neighborhoods throughout Brandenburg Gate, Berlin Berlin’s sprawling urban spaces and abundant green zones. The city abounds in offbeat museums—some devoted to sugar, erotica, hemp, and pacifism—and boasts the best food hall in Europe. You can take in a performance at the Admiralspalast, the stunning 1928 theater favorited by Hitler that became the first in Germany to stage The Producers.

There’s more to the gowns, crowns, uniforms, and regalia of British royalty than meets the eye. The history of the monarchy—and England—is told in part through their attire. Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger provides a glimpse into the palace closet that reveals 500 years of royal fashion choices. She explores how monarchs used their wardrobes to project power, influence, politics, and personality, from Henry VIII’s athletic, virile image to Queen Victoria’s white wedding gown and black mourning dresses, which helped define her reign. In modern times, uniforms and simpler attire helped royals to better connect with their subjects in wartime, and Queen Elizabeth II’s evolving wardrobe projects today’s monarchy. Wed., March 18, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-073; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Thurs., March 19, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-061C; Members $35; Nonmembers $45

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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The Road to Nashville

PATSY CLINE MUSEUM JOHNNY CASH MUSEUM

Other highlights of this one-of-a-kind week include: • a backstage tour of the Ryman Auditorium, dubbed the “Mother Church of Country Music” • a driving tour of Lower Broadway, home of landmarks including the Ernest Tubb Record Shop and honky-tonk Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge, a country music institution

VISIT KNOXVILLE

Johnny Cash Museum

• a visit to the Johnny Cash Museum, with its comprehensive collection of Man in Black memorabilia

NASHVILLE CONVENTION & VISITORS CORP

The capital of Tennessee—and of country music—Nashville is a 21stcentury boom town, a cultural melting pot that attracts residents from across the nation and around the world. If the new Ken Burns documentary Country Music has sparked your T OU appetite to learn more about the form’s roots and influences, D L O S Selden offers the this tour led by arts journalist Richard perfect way to do it: Several key locations featured in the film are part of the itinerary. The 5-day tour follows the road to Nashville through the twin cities of Bristol, Virginia, and Bristol, Tennessee, home of the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, with a A performance at the Grand Ole Opry House stop at the Patsy Cline Historic House in Winchester, Virginia, on the return trip. In Nashville, explore the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and attend a performance at the Grand Ole Opry with the best seats in the house. The visit coincides with the Tin Pan South Songwriters Festival, which may offer a chance to learn about new talent showcased at Nashville’s legendary small venues. Explore Nashville beyond the music scene with a visit to the Frist Art Museum, hosting a major J.M.W. Turner exhibition from the Tate Britain, Quest for the Sublime. A driving tour of the city’s architectural landmarks includes the Tennessee State Capitol and Downtown Patsy Cline Museum, Winchester Presbyterian Church, both by 19th-century architect William Strickland, and the Parthenon replica in Centennial Park. And it wouldn’t be a trip to Nashville without sampling traditional Southern and contemporary cuisine for which Nashville is famous.

New 5-Day Tour

CHRIS HOLLO / NASHVILLE CONVENTION & VISITORS CORP

TRENDING

• the special exhibition Outlaws & Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ’70s at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum celebrating that decade’s Nashville–Austin musical axis • a group experience at Hatch Show Print, a working letterpress print shop founded in 1879 that has produced iconic Tootsies Orchid Lounge posters for the Grand Old Opry, fairs, circuses, and musical acts, and • a visit to the Tennessee Theatre in Knoxville, the 1928 movie palace that helped launch the career of fiddler Roy Acuff. The group stays two nights in Nashville and one each in Bristol and Roanoke.

Tennessee Theatre, Knoxville

5-DAY TOUR Sun., March 22, 8 a.m.–Thurs., March 26, 6 p.m.; by bus; cost includes bus transportation, lodging, all activities, admissions and fees, gratuities, and meals (4 breakfasts, 3 lunches, 3 dinners); purchase of trip insurance recommended; detailed information on website; CODE 1NN-NAS; Members $1,960; Nonmembers $2,610; Single-room supplement $460

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Writing a Successful Screenplay

MAR 21 (SAT) 9:30 a.m. The Essentials of a Screenplay: Assessing Your Objectives 10 a.m. It’s All About Story 11:30 a.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 12:30 p.m. Character Matters 1:45 p.m. Analyzing Great Screenwriting MAR 22 (SUN) 9:30 a.m. Creating Believable Dialogue 10:45 a.m. Putting It on the Page: Proper Screenplay Formatting 11:45 a.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 12:45 p.m. Lessons from a Master 2 p.m. Marketing Your Screenplay Sat., March 21 and Sun., March 22, 9:30 a.m.– 3 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-494; Members $180; Nonmembers $220

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Celebrating Robert Frost An American Poet More than 50 years after his death, Robert Frost remains one of the most beloved and critically respected poets of all time. The Pulitzer Prize-winning poet who became America’s “national poet” often suggested in his poetry how small encounters between an individual and nature could be construed as metaphors for the human condition. President John F. Kennedy, at whose inauguration Frost delivered a poem, said “He saw poetry as the means of saving power from itself. When power leads man towards arrogance, poetry reminds him of his limitations.” Author Daniel Stashower explores Frost’s life and legacy, and actor Scott Sedar reads selected poems.

With Light Reception

NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY/LONDON

A Hands-on Weekend Workshop You’ve got a brilliant idea for a terrific film. Your next move is to master the steps in turning it into a reality on the screen. Spend a valuable weekend with screenwriter Marc Lapadula, a screenwriting professor at Yale University, as he analyzes the key ingredients of a successful script. Over two days, gain the practical foundation to develop your own cinematic narrative (regardless of genre) and learn how to create delineated, multidimensional, and memorable characters to tell that story. Lapadula covers the necessary screenwriting components of a professional script: plot construction, character development, creating cinematic dialogue, conflict, dramatic pacing, foreshadowing, the element of surprise, text and subtext, plot points, and visual storytelling. He also provides tips on how to market the script when it’s done.

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Robert Frost

Wed., April 1, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-496; Members $40; Nonmembers $50

Start To Tell Your Family Story A Hands-on Workshop Your family is unique in all the world, but how do you best tell its story? Whether you’re starting with boxes (or electronic folders) of photos, diaries, news clippings, and recipes—or whether memories themselves are your main material—documenting a family history can be daunting. Learn how to assemble and present your story as writer, editor, teacher, and writing coach Mathina Calliope provides the tools and guidance you need to move from daunted through motivated and on to accomplished. Bring a pad and pen or fully charged laptop with any digital mementos and no more than one shoebox full of physical memorabilia. 9:30 a.m. Nostalgia and Brainstorming 11 a.m. Genre and Structure 12:15 p.m. Lunch (boxed lunch is provided) 1:15 p.m. Dive Right In 3 p.m. Next Steps Sat., April 4, 9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-485; Members $110; Nonmembers $160

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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A Ganges River Excursion Exploring India from the Sacred River

Emerson String Quartet The Emerson String Quartet stands apart in the history of string quartets with an unparalleled list of achievements over three decades, including more than 30 acclaimed recordings, nine Grammys, three Gramophone Awards, and the Avery Fisher Prize. The quartet (violinists Eugene Drucker and Philip Setzer, violist Lawrence Dutton, and cellist Paul Watkins) concludes its 41st season. Beethoven: String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 95 “Serioso”; Beethoven: String Quartet in B-flat Major, Op. 18 No. 6; Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 5 in B-flat Major, Op. 92 (1951) Sun., April 5, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Building; CODE 1P0-704; Members $50; Nonmembers $60

From the snowmelt of the Himalayas, through the emerald-green valleys of eastern India, and spilling across the fertile delta into the Bay of Bengal, the Ganges is one of the greatest river systems in the world. This astonishing waterway connects the lives of nearly 400 million humans and some of the oldest traditions on earth. Take a virtual cruise with explorer and author Andrew Evans. Stops include the holy city of Varanasi, the rare temples of Kalna, and the historical capital of Murshidabad. Along the way, discover India’s people, from the beauty of Bengali culture to the wonderfully chaotic energy of Kolkata. Sunset on the Ganges river in Varanasi

Tues., April 14, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-506; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Program subject to change.

Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971) was the greatest composer of the 20th century. He began as a student of Rimsky-Korsakov’s and the Russian Romanticists, but in a short time the modern world of sound was his to invent. Opera and classical music expert Saul Lilienstein draws on the finest recordings and DVDs in discussions about many of Stravinsky’s major accomplishments, from his early ground-breaking music for the Ballets Russes in Paris where the production of The Firebird brought him recognition and acclaim; through a period of neoclassical masterworks that included chamber ensembles (Octet for Winds), a ballet (Pulcinella), plus concertos for piano and violin, and culminating with the opera The Rake’s Progress; and concluding with his embrace of farreaching modernism in his later years.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

BIBLIOTHÈQUE NATIONALE DE FRANCE

Igor Stravinsky: The Masterworks

APR 14 An Émigré in Paris APR 21 Master of the Dance APR 28 The Widening Vision MAY 5 Back to the Baroque MAY 12 Ancient Words, Modern Sounds MAY 19 A Summation at Mid-Century 6 sessions; Tues., April 14–May 19, 12–1:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-086; Members $100; Nonmembers $150

Igor Stravinsky with Leonard Bernstein, 1946, by Ben Greenhaus

Igor Stravinsky, 1920, by Pablo Picasso

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Ayn Rand

Celebrating the Songs of Stage and Screen

The Controversy Continues

Join fellow fans of the Great American Songbook in a choral program that celebrates some of the most enduring music of Broadway and Hollywood. If you like classics such as “Over the Rainbow,” “I Got Rhythm,” or “Let’s Do It,” then it’s time to join the Smithsonian Chorus geared for adults who enjoy singing the popular music of many eras—and there’s no experience required. Ernest Johnson, (left) veteran choral director and music educator, leads the ensemble in arrangements of the songs you know and love. They may include favorites by George and Ira Gershwin, Cole Porter, Duke Ellington, Rodgers and Hart, and others selected by the conductor to fit the specific vocal and musical abilities of the group.) The experience is designed for singers of all skill levels. General instruction in vocal techniques in-cludes exercises in healthy breath management for singing and improving your voice’s tone and range. Basic musicreading instruction is covered in rehearsal.

Russian-American writer and philosopher Ayn Rand generated legions of fans—and detractors—through her bestselling books The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. Ayn Rand As the founder of Objectivism, Rand positioned herself as a defender of the individual and who provided a philosophical base for the ideals of the Enlightenment and its greatest political achievement, the United States. Onkar Ghate, a senior fellow at the Ayn Rand Institute, explores some of the passionately embraced—or wholeheartedly rejected—ideas Rand’s philosophy challenges about the nature of the world and of good and evil, and selfishness and altruism.

9 sessions plus performance; Tues., April 14–June 9, 6:45–8:30 p.m.; performance Tues., June 16, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE BPS4; Members $120; Nonmembers $150

From the top: Choral conductor Ernest Johnson gets the singers rockin’; the chorus performs

NORWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

SAFIYA GALLAGHAN

Smithsonian Chorus

STUDIO ART

Wed., April 15, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-502; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Five Giants of Romantic Music Friends in Life, Rivals in Art As Europe emerged from the chaos of the Napoleonic wars, the world of the 19th-century professional musician was changing, setting the stage for prodigiously talented young individuals destined to change the musical landscape. Born within four years of one another (1809–1813), Felix Mendelssohn, Robert Schumann, Frederic Chopin, Franz Liszt, and Richard Wagner were geniuses of Romantic music, and as intriguing for their personal interrelationships as they were for their creations. Friends who were often at odds, they were candid critics of one another’s work yet advocates of their individual musical languages. They entertained, argued, and concertized together—even sketched one another—as they critiqued one another’s music publicly. They were performers, conductors, correspondents, and teachers who had a profound cultural impact on their times, to say nothing of our own. Popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin combines lecture and piano demonstrations to examine the lives and work of these five musical giants. 10 a.m. The Birth of the Romantics 11:15 a.m. Fame, Glamour, and Grit 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Working Careers 2:45 p.m. Early Deaths and Extraordinary Legacies

Franz Liszt, 1858, by Franz Hanfstaeng

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Felix Mendelssohn, 1830, by James Warren Childe

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Fri., April 24, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0012; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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John Eaton Celebrates His Favorite Songwriters Join pianist, vocalist, and humorist extraordinaire John Eaton in his 41st season at the Smithsonian as he pays tribute to three of his favorite great American composers: Hoagy Carmichael, creator of classics such as “Skylark,” “Georgia on My Mind,” and “Stardust,” which remain beyond category; Richard Rodgers, genius writer of melodies famously teamed with two of America’s greatest lyricists; and the enigmatic and wonderful Harold Arlen, composer of “Over the Rainbow,” “Blues in the Night,” and “Come Rain or Come Shine.” Eaton concludes the series with a discussion of the importance of 1964, the year that Bob Dylan and the Beatles emerged. He closes the program with a special concert of his own and your favorites. (As always, he will take requests!) APRIL 29 Jazz, Folk, or Pop: The Paradoxical Genius of Hoagy Carmichael MAY 6 One Composer, Two Lyricists: The Worlds of Richard Rodgers MAY 13 Harold Arlen: The Wonderful Wizard of Song MAY 20 1964: The Year the Music Changed 4 sessions; Wed., April 29–May 20, 10:15–11:45 a.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-081; Members $80; Nonmembers $130

John Eaton at the piano

Neighborhoods of Rome, Vienna, and Madrid Discovering Hidden Gems Rome, Vienna, and Madrid were once the capital cities of vast empires. Each gathered within its confines the best artists, architects, thinkers, scientists, and chefs. All of them created deep roots in these cities, leaving treasures and pleasures often overlooked by visitors who spend their time in world-famous sites such as the Sistine Chapel, the Vienna State Opera, and the Prado. But it’s the off-the-beaten-track corners of these cities where unexpected gems await discovery. Fred Plotkin, a popular Smithsonian Associates speaker on culture, history, and music, has lived in and visited these cities over more than four decades. In a richly illustrated series, he looks at these places through the eyes of a flâneur—a French term for a person who in casual strolls through city streets produce delight in their chance discoveries. He shares what he’s found on his neighborhood walks: churches, theaters,

Palazzo Doria Pamphilij, Rome

Vienna from St. Stephen Cathedral

specialty shops, restaurants, cafes, and unusual museums just a stone’s throw from world-famous landmarks. APR 30 Rome MAY 28 Vienna JUN 18 Madrid 3 sessions; Thurs., April 30, May 28, June 18, 6:45–8:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-084; Members $90; Nonmembers $130

Egyptian Temple of Debod, Madrid

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The Met’s Costume Institute

COURTESY OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, PHOTO © DAVID BAILEY

Surreal, 1980, by David Bailey

© THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

Collecting, Curating, and Creating Across Time Spend a fascinating day among the riches of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collections to discover intriguing perspectives on collecting, curating, and exhibiting fashion. First, a docent-led tour focuses on the representation and meaning of clothing in art from ancient Greece to today. Afterward, visit a pair of major exhibitions at the museum’s fabled Costume Institute. In Pursuit of Fashion: The Sandy Schreier Collection reflects the distinctive outlook of a pioneering collector who amassed a trove of 20th-century French and American couture and ready-to-wear as an appreciation of a form of creative expression. About Time: Fashion and Duration explores fashion from 1870 to today, and how it reflects the spirit of its times as it evolves with it. The exhibit links fashions from across decades and centuries that The Message is the Medium gallery at the Met’s In Pursuit of Fashion: The Sandy Schreier Collection relate to one another through shape, motif, material, pattern, technique, or decoration. Textile curator Elizabeth Lay, a faculty member of the GW Corcoran–Smithsonian Master’s Program in Decorative Arts and Design History, serves as tour guide. En route, she prepares participants for the day, discussing how museums collect, curate, and present costume as she explores how these very different costume exhibitions are represented: In the Pursuit of Fashion’s highly personal private collection vs. the largely “museumized” curation of About Time: Fashion and Duration. On the return trip, she discusses Christian Dior’s groundbreaking 1947 season when the history-making runway show introduced the New Look to the world. Thurs., May 14; 7 a.m.–10 p.m.; by bus; boxed lunch served en route; purchase meal on return trip; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-021; Members $175; Nonmembers $225

Three Reasons To Support Smithsonian Associates 1. You’re inspired by thought-provoking programs

2. You enjoy meeting smart, interesting people 3. You value special behind-the-scenes access Smithsonian Associates receives no federal funding and relies on your generosity. To learn more about levels of support and the range of member benefits, visit our website: SmithsonianAssociates.org/levels or call 202-633-3030 (M-F, 9-5)

Demonstrate your support today. The returns will exceed your expectations.

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New York Rising: Music from the 1930s In defiant answer to the Crash of 1929, New York City produced a spectacular decade of music. In a lively and engaging day, music expert Saul Lilienstein leads a musical journey that encompasses the emotion-filled sounds of the Great Depression to Gershwin and Copland shaking off the blues; extravaganzas at the Cotton Club in Harlem to the avant-garde of Greenwich Village; the optimistic joy of Swing to Arturo Toscanini in residence at Carnegie Hall and NBC’s fabled Studio 8H in Radio City. It was a golden age at the Metropolitan Opera, and America’s own opera, Porgy and Bess, premiered on Broadway. Everyone had a radio and the airwaves were filled with the sound of music from New York, defining the era for all of America. 9:30 a.m. Escaping the Realities Benny Goodman

12 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

1 p.m. The Sound of Optimism Fri., May 15, 9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-088; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 Cab Calloway, ca. 1933, by Carl Van Vechten

The Bronx in Bloom Gardens, Art, and Local Culture The series of visits to New York City’s outer boroughs led by arts journalist Richard Selden continues with a two-day tour to the northernmost, the Bronx—the perfect destination for a spring getaway. The itinerary includes the glorious urban oasis Wave Hill, whose 28 acres of gardens overlook the Hudson River and the Palisades. At the spectacular New York Botanical Garden, view Cosmic Nature, a series of landscape and building installations by Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama and step into the Enid A. Haupt UT of a Victorian-style glasshouse. Oexample Conservatory, a stunning D L O S tour of lively Arthur Avenue in the Belmont Enjoy a walking section, the center of the Bronx’s Little Italy. See the Edgar Allan Poe Cottage, a charming early-19th-century farmhouse where the writer spent the last years of his life with his ailing wife, Virginia. View of the Hudson River from a pergola at Wave Hill A visit to any of New York’s boroughs calls for eating at favorite local spots: Savor Albanian and Kosovo cuisine at a dinner at Cka Ka Qellu and dig into lunch at the venerable seafood eatery Sammy’s Fish Box. OVERNIGHT TOUR Sun., May 17, 7:30 a.m.–Mon., May 18, 11 p.m.; by bus; 2 lunches and 1 dinner and breakfast included; accommodations are at The Residence Inn New York The Bronx; purchase of trip insurance recommended; detailed information on website; CODE 1NN-BRX; Members $575; Nonmembers $765; Single-room supplement $100 Edgar Allan Poe Cottage

Cka Ka Qellu restaurant

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What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow Co-presented with The Washington Chorus In his acclaimed What Makes It Great? programs, beloved educator and former NPR music commentator Rob Kapilow “gets Rob Kapilow audiences in tune with classical music at a deeper level than they ever thought possible” (Los Angeles Times). In a three-part format, Kapilow explores a great musical masterpiece with the audience. Next, the piece is performed in its entirety, followed by a Q&A with the audience and performers.

Beethoven: String Quartet No. 16 in F Major, Op. 135 Sun., May 17, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Museum; CODE 1P0-707; all tickets $25

Arriving Hungry?

Snacks are available for purchase (cash only) in the Ripley Center concourse outside our offices on Mondays–Thursdays, 6–7:15 p.m.

PETER SCHAAF

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Civility’s Role in Social Justice As civility seems to decline because of increasing political polarization and easy mass communication via social media, should we remain civil in social and political discourse? Does civility hinder progress and the fight for social justice? Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò, assistant professor of political philosophy and ethics at Georgetown University, examines what role civility already plays in the pursuit of social justice, both in past campaigns about social norms, like the “Ms.” form of address and today’s emerging use of preferred personal pronouns. He considers what’s at stake—not only for the general public but even for activists, organizers, and political gadflies—if civility is left by the wayside. Wed., June 10, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-043; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

The 1920s Welcome to the New World The end of the Great War ushered in a decade of economic prosperity and cultural dynamism in the United States. Women, newly given the vote, were finding their voice and testing their strength. Jazz radiated out from New York’s Harlem, where a renaissance in art, music, and literature bloomed. People were dancing faster, driving faster, and living faster. The modern world, with its sleek art deco façade, technological breakthroughs, and societal transformations fueled by the growth in mass communication, had arrived. Stef Woods, a popular speaker on cultural topics, explores the decade’s new directions and what comparisons may be drawn between that era and today as our ’20s begins. Thurs., June 11, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-046; Members $25; Nonmembers $35; Students with ID $15

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A Carolina Fourth: Baseball, Barbeque, and Fireworks Baseball fans, are you ready to take a break from the $20 beers and $125 box seats at Major League ballparks? Here’s the perfect chance to reconnect with baseball at its most genuine and restore your faith and excitement in the game you love—and get an insider’s glimpse of both its history and its future. Join Bruce Adams and Peggy Engel, authors of Fodor’s Baseball Vacations: Great Family Trips to Minor League and Classic Major League Ballparks Across America, on a 5-day tour that brings you into the heart of Bull Durham country in North Carolina, where the revival of minor-league baseball began. Watch the stars of tomorrow play in classic 1930s ballparks, learn how the top players make their way Fireworks at Durham Bulls Athletic Park from college teams to the majors, and spend the Fourth of July cheering the Durham Bulls from their home field, where of course, there’s a fireworks display. You’ll see baseball—and America—from a whole new perspective as you travel through the towns and cities where the game has long been a way of life.

New 5-Day Tour

DURHAM BULLS / DISCOVER DURHAM

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Highlights of the tour include: Edenton Steamers vs. Holly Springs Salamanders

• a tour of the classic 1926 Durham Athletic Park (made famous in Bull Durham), and a game at the Bulls’ current home in a modern stadium that offers views of the city’s downtown

• a meeting with experts from Baseball America magazine • a visit to the USA Baseball National Training Complex in Cary, North Carolina • a visit to the North Carolina Baseball Museum at historic Fleming Stadium (a 1939 WPA

project) in Wilson, a chance to meet officials from the Coastal Plain League and the Wilson Tobs, and an evening game between the Tobs and the Morehead City Marlins

• a session with players, coaches, umpires, and scouts to learn about summer college baseball USA Baseball National Training Comple in Cary

at Edenton’s historic Hicks Field (one of America’s last remaining wooden-bleacher ballparks), an evening game that has the Edenton Steamers host the Outer Bank Daredevils, and

• a meeting with a Durham Bulls executive who offers perspectives on college baseball, and a Triple-AAA International League game hosted by the Durham Bulls on July 4.

North Carolina Baseball Museum

The itinerary also includes walking tours of Edenton, a vibrant colonial port city that once served as the capital of North Carolina, and historic downtown Durham. And no visit to the state would be complete without experiencing Carolina-style dining at local favorites, including Parker’s Barbeque in Wilson. The group stays two nights each in Durham and Edenton. Lighthouse in Edenton

5-DAY TOUR Wed., July 1, 7:30 a.m.–Sun., July 5, 4 p.m.; by bus; cost includes bus transportation, lodging, all activities, admissions and fees, gratuities, and meals (4 breakfasts, 4 lunches, 4 dinners); trip insurance recommended; detailed information on website; CODE 1NN-BAS; Members $1,610; Nonmembers $2,140; single room supplement $350

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A Berkshires Summer Sampler A popular summer retreat for Bostonians and New Yorkers for more than 150 years, the Berkshire hills of western Massachusetts are alive with music, art, and theatre. Arts journalist Richard Selden leads a 5-day tour that offers a splendid sampling of cultural attractions in the region, from historic writers’ homes to outstanding museums to music and theatre performances. Destinations with literary connections include Herman Melville’s evocative Edith Wharton’s The Mount Pittsfield farmhouse, Arrowhead, and Edith Wharton’s elegant Lenox estate, The Mount. Visit the Clark Art Institute in Williamstown, featuring the museum’s first outdoor exhibition, Ground/work, a series of artists’ installations; The Clark Institute of Art in Williamstown MASS MoCA, a collec- The Yellow Barn, Putney, Vermont tion of contemporary galleries in a former industrial complex; and art museums at Williams College and, on the return trip, Yale University. Be part of the audience at two The Night Café, 1888, by Vincent intimate chamber van Gogh, in the Yale University music venues in Art Gallery Vermont, Music Mountain and Yellow Barn, as well as for a performance MASS MoCA in North Adams at the Williamstown Theatre Festival.

5-Day Tour

5-DAY TOUR Sun., July 26, 6:30 a.m.–Thurs., July 30, 9:30 p.m.; by bus; detailed information on website; includes bus transportation, lodging, all activities, admissions and fees, 3 performances, gratuities, and meals (4 breakfasts, 4 lunches, 3 dinners); purchase of trip insurance recommended; CODE 1NN-BER; Members $1,980; Nonmembers $2,640; Single-room supplement $395

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What’s Inside Science? It’s an ongoing series of expert-led programming. It is also a community of like-minded people who have the opportunity to participate in a lively online learning exchange. Visit smithsonianassociates.org/science

Alexander von Humboldt His World of Nature

COURTESY VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS

Part of the Smithsonian Earth Optimism Initiative Prussian naturalist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt was one of the most celebrated intellectuals of the 19th century. His name may have fallen from popular culture, but his legacy lives on. During a short visit to America in 1804, Humboldt’s lively exchanges of ideas about the arts, science, politics, and exploration with President Thomas Jefferson, artist Charles Willson Peale, and others, helped shape America’s cultural identity and relationship with the environment. Illustration of a city showing the effects of climate change

Eleanor Jones Harvey, senior curator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, explores Humboldt’s influence on American art and culture, and connections to the Smithsonian’s collections. Humboldt in his Library, 1856, after Edouard Hildebrandt Come early to view the exhibition Alexander von Humboldt and the United States: Art, Nature, and Culture, organized by Harvey. INSIDE SCIENCE Sun., March 29, 3 p.m.; McEvoy Auditorium, American Art Museum; CODE 1A0-104; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Forensic Science Investigating the Real Profession From popular television shows and true-crime podcasts to real-life cases, forensic science has long captured our interest and imagination. Given the wide representations of the field in entertainment and news—and the potential to mix fact and fiction—it’s often hard to know what forensic professionals actually do. (Are they all intrepid crime-solvers with complicated personal lives?) Victor Weedn, a leading expert on forensic science, traces the development of forensic medicine and toxicology, key figures who helped professionalize the field, and changes made by fingerprint examination, chemistry and DNA instrumentation, and digital databases. Weedn examines current controversies in the field and how it continues to evolve and improve.

Extreme Weather and Climate Adaptation in a Changing World Part of the Smithsonian Earth Optimism Initiative Meeting the challenges of extreme weather events calls for plans and action. Adaptation is higher than ever before on the global agenda. Scientists and policy makers alike are challenged with making choices about disaster risk and reduction as countries, communities, and businesses demand access to authoritative, usable science and risk-assessment information to allow for better-informed immediate and long-term decisions. Roger S. Pulwarty, senior scientist at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, brings his research and perspective to address these issues. What risks can we learn from global weather events? What are the challenges and opportunities for adapting to and successfully managing changing climates going forward? INSIDE SCIENCE Tues., March 31, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-105; Members $30; Nonmembers $45 The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the Smithsonian.

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SMITHSONIAN GARDENS/HAROLD DORWIN

An Immersion in Nature Japanese “Forest Bathing”—Urban Style Shinrin-yoku (translated as “forest bathing”) began in Japan in the 1980s. Rooted in Shinto and Buddhist traditions of reverence for nature, the practice involves a full sensory immersion in the outdoors. Health benefits of quiet time spent in nature are well known. Lately, more and more studies are focused on the health benefits of time spent in natural landscapes within cities. Experience forest bathing as Melanie Choukas-Bradley, a certified nature and forest-therapy guide leads a series of 2-hour walks in the Smithsonian’s Enid A. Haupt Garden for a unique and restorative celebration of the beauty of spring.

The moongate in the Enid A. Haupt Garden

WALKING TOUR TWO OPTIONS: Tues., April 14 (CODE 1NS-A02); Tues., May 5 (CODE 1NS-B02); 8:45 a.m.–10:45 a.m.; meet at the S. Dillon Ripley Center entrance; detailed information on website; Members $45; Nonmembers $60

Composting 101 In April, 1970, an explosion on the Apollo 13 spacecraft headed to the moon threatened the possible loss of the crew. But after six harrowing days, a global rescue mission ensured the astronauts’ safe return. Roger D. Launius, former chief NASA historian and former associate director for collections and cultural affairs of the Air and Space Museum, and William F. Causey, a senior docent at the museum, examine the unique story of the Apollo 13 mission and the significance of Apollo after a half century. Launius’s book Apollo’s Legacy: Perspective on the Moon Landings (Smithsonian Books), and Causey’s book John Houbolt: The Unsung Hero of the Apollo Moon Landings (Purdue University Press), are available for sale and signing. Wed., April 15, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-085; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

Workshop and Garden Tour With Cultivate the City Part of the Smithsonian Earth Optimism Initiative Want to reduce waste, enrich soil sans fertilizer, and save money and the planet? Then try composting. Niraj Ray, founder of Cultivate the City, digs deep into composting; its microbial processes, how to effectively compost at home, and local resources. He explains Cultivate the City’s use of the vermicomposting process in which worms help to breakdown waste, along with other gardening techniques at its rooftop urban farm. Their corps of urban farmers collaborate with other local organizations to plant and cultivate urban spaces. Afterward, Ray answers questions about setting up at-home compost and leads a tour of the rooftop farm. Participants take home a complimentary bag of vermicompost and a Rootpouch fabric H St. Farms’ rooftop gardens showcase urban planter bag. gardening techniques

NIRAJ RAY

Remembering Apollo 13

INSIDE SCIENCE Sun., April 26, 2 p.m.; H St. Farms at W.S. Jenks & Sons, 910 Bladensburg Rd., NE; CODE 1A0-107; Members $30; Nonmembers $45 The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the Smithsonian.

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How Advanced Technology Reveals Hidden Histories For centuries, historic information on paper was erased or damaged by fire and flood, parchment was scrubbed clean and reused, and papyrus torn and repurposed for mummy masks. Artwork was covered by paint and canvas, and names scrawled on walls obscured by wall-paper. Now, thanks to modern digital imaging technology, lost historic and religious information is visible again. And the findings are accessible for online research Michael B. Toth, president of R. B. Toth Associates of Oakton, Virginia, discusses his pioneering work to reveal new historic information using the latest advanced imaging systems by his international teams of researchers. Thurs., May 7, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE: 1J0-037; Ripley Center; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE

Michael Toth using multispectral imaging to uncover hidden information

Hiking in Shenandoah National Park Virginia’s fabled Skyline Drive weaves through the length of Shenandoah National Park, one of the region’s top draws for hikers. In a two-day active getaway designed for outdoor lovers, explore Blue Ridge trails at the height of their spring beauty, and stay overnight at the historic Skylands lodge, which offers magnificent panoramic mountain views. Naturalist Keith Tomlinson leads easy-to-moderate hikes to the park’s Stony Man Summit, Hawksbill Mountain, Limberlost Trail, and Rose River area, providing insights into the area’s history, geology, wildlife, and forest environment. He also offers an evening A hiker’s view of Shenandoah National Park program on the high-peaks geography of Shenandoah National Park—the perfect way to prepare for another day spent on the trails. Pack your hiking gear and get ready to experience the natural splendor of spring. OVERNIGHT TOUR Sun., May 3, 8:30 a.m.–Mon., May 4, 7:30 p.m.; by bus; price includes picnic box lunch on Sunday, dinner and breakfast at the historic Skylands lodge, and lunch at Big Meadows Lodge on Monday; tour requires 6-8 miles of hiking on uneven terrain— participants should be in good physical condition; purchase of trip insurance recommended; more detailed information on website; CODE 1NN-SNP; Members $465; Nonmembers $615; Single-room supplement $85

Dark Hollow Falls in Shenandoah National Park

Advantages to providing your email to customer service include receiving: • A digital version of the member program guide so you can read it anywhere • Important notices regarding your ticket and tour purchases including: • Inclement-weather announcements • Location changes • eAlerts on topics that interest you: subscribe at SmithsonianAssociates.org

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Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary Birdwatching Stories from A Naturalist Part of the Smithsonian’s Earth Optimism Initiative

How can you tell a downy woodpecker from a hairy one? A Cooper’s hawk from a sharp-shinned hawk? Liana Vitali, naturalist and educator at Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, shares tips, facts, and resources for dedicated birders and birding beginners alike. Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, just 12 miles outside Washington, D.C., is the jewel of the Patuxent River. Its 1,700 acres of open water, tidal freshwater marshes, forested wetlands, upland and riparian

forest, creeks, meadows, pine and sand barrens, and fields along the eastern shore of the Patuxent, contain multitudes of welcoming habitats for a true diversity of bird species. As one of the Nationally Important Bird Areas, the Sanctuary is a valuable place to conduct bird-related research projects like mist netting studies for forest songbirds and waterbird surveys for ducks and wetlands raptors. Purchase of your ticket gives you access to a private bird walk on Sat., May 9.

Prothonotary warbler

PHOTOS BY WAYNE BIERBAUM

With Optional Walk

INSIDE SCIENCE Wed., May 6, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-109; Members $35; Nonmembers $45 OPTIONAL PRIVATE BIRD WALK Sat., May 9; Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary, 1361 Wrighton Road, Lothian, MD 20711; transportation not provided; parking available on site

Yellow-throated vireo

The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the Smithsonian.

Galileo

Are Humans Naturally Good or Bad?

Lessons from a Great Scientist Galileo Galilei is one of the heroes of intellectual history whose life inspired plays, poems, and even an opera. For Albert Einstein, Galileo was “the father of modern physics—indeed, of modern science altogether.” Astrophysicist Mario Livio examines Galileo’s achievements in astronomy, mechanics, and the development of the scientific method. He also discusses Galileo’s denunciation as a suspected heretic by the Catholic Church because he theorized the Earth revolved around the Sun. As anti-science attitudes proliferate today, Livio believes that Galileo’s life and work underscore the importance of freedom of thought, which spans time and cultures. Livio’s new book, Galileo and the Science Deniers (Simon & Schuster), is available for sale and signing.

For centuries, philosophers have attempted to answer the question of whether humans are naturally good or evil. Despite the publication of thousands of works on the subject, philosophy has yet to yield a satisfactory answer. Evolutionary biologist Rui Diogo draws from the sciences, anthropology, history, and sociology to see what empirical data reveal about our basic nature. His figures include homicide rates, life expectancies, suicide rates, levels of egalitarianism, frequency of sex, and stress levels globally. You might not leave as a better person, but you may have a better idea of why you—and perhaps all of us—behave as we do.

Thurs., May 14, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-083; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Wed., May 20, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-041; Members $25; Nonmembers $35; Students with ID $15

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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SPECIAL EVENT

Celebrating 50 Years: Smithsonian Magazine and Earth Day Part of the Smithsonian’s Earth Optimism Initiative For 50 years, Smithsonian magazine has brought the Smithsonian Institution’s deep knowledge, curiosity, and wonder into the homes of readers across the nation. The magazine was launched in the spring of 1970—as was the first Earth Day— and, from the start, it has been the trusted go-to source on the natural world and environmental issues. Celebrate Smithsonian magazine’s 50th anniversary by revisiting some of its first articles about how we understand planet Earth and learn about all the progress we’ve made since then. Hear from journalists, photographers, and other experts who brought these stories to life. Stay afterward for a toast to 50 years of Smithsonian magazine and Earth Day and enjoy cupcakes, courtesy of Georgetown Cupcake.

With Light Reception

First issue of Smithsonian magazine

INSIDE SCIENCE Fri., May 29, 7 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-112; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the Smithsonian.

The Language of Butterflies

The signed, numbered print from an edition of 105 is offered exclusively through Smithsonian Associates Art Collectors Program. For details on this vivid work and other available prints, go to ArtCollectorsProgram.org or call 202-633-8680. CODE: ART-116.09 Members $1,500* Nonmembers $1,800 *Member pricing applies to Promoter level and above

A Message of Hope Part of the Smithsonian Earth Optimism Initiative Science journalist Wendy Williams looks at how scientists, gardeners, naturalists and citizen scientists have deciphered butterflies” secrets, uncovering surprising details like the unexpectedly intricate shapes of butterflies’ unique wing scales, the microscopic details of the butterfly proboscis, and even the biological tools that allow monarch butterflies to migrate south each fall. The hope is to protect these insects who are becoming important messengers for climate change. Williams’ new book, Karmer Blue butterfly The Language of Butterflies: How Thieves, Hoarders, Scientists, and Other Obsessives Unlocked the Secrets of the World’s Favorite Insect (Simon & Schuster), is available for sale and signing. INSIDE SCIENCE Wed., June 3, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-110; Members $20; Nonmembers $30 The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the Smithsonian.

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ALBANY PINE BUSH PRESERVE

Sam Gilliam’s Museum Moment


Certificate Program in World Art History Art is all around us. It excites us, enriches our lives, and enlivens our imaginations. But to truly appreciate any work of art, we need to understand the context and culture in which it was produced. That’s why Smithsonian Associates offers an exciting certificate program in World Art History. The wide-ranging offerings are designed to provide a global perspective on art and architecture and draw on the Smithsonian’s world-class collections and the rich resources of other Washington institutions.

You love art. Now become the expert you’ve always wanted to be. The core courses and electives in our program are selected from among Smithsonian Associates’ ongoing courses, seminars, study tours, and studio art classes. Look for “World Art History Certificate” throughout the program guide to see current listings. Complete the program requirements at your own pace. Credits are counted from the day of program registration and are not given retroactively. Register now and receive invitations for special tours and informal gatherings with course leaders and other program participants.

To learn more about the Smithsonian Associates certificate program in World Art History, visit SmithsonianAssociates.org/ArtCertificate

Left column, from the top: Fresco of the Libyan Sibyl, ca. 1511, Sistine Chapel, by Michelangelo; Taj Mahal, completed 1643, Agra, India; The Young Ladies of Avignon, 1907, by Pablo Picasso; Equestrian ceramic figure; ca. 13th–15th centuries; Mali; second column; Lou Ruvo Brain Institute, 2010, by Frank Gehry, Las Vegas; The Calf-Bearer, ca. 570 B.C.; Athens, Greece; Girl with a Pearl Earring, ca. 1665, by Johannes Vermeer; Before the Ballet, ca. 1892, Edgar Degas


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Sicily: Eternal Crossroads of the Mediterranean Sicily’s art and architecture mirror its history as a kaleidoscope of cultures. In this daylong program, art historian Janetta Rebold Benton highlights Sicily’s aesthetic eclecticism and cultural signposts. UT Discover the Greek temples at Agrigento and 4th-century mosaics atO the Villa D L O S and Monreale; Romana del Casale; medieval cathedrals and cloisters in Cefalù dramatic Baroque churches in Modica and Ragusa Ibla; classical and Gothic revival styles at Castello di Donnafugata; and other treasures to be found on this sunsplashed island.

With Sicilian-Themed Lunch

Sicilian coast

10 a.m. Antiquity 11:15 a.m. The Middle Ages 12:15 p.m. Enjoy a Sicilian-themed lunch 1:15 p.m. Renaissance to Baroque Saracen arches and Byzantine mosaics inside the Palatine Chapel of the Royal Palace, Palermo, Sicily

2:30 p.m. Luxury Living, 18th and 19th-century Style Sat., March 7, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-484; Members $110; Nonmembers $160

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Out and About with an Artist The National Gallery of Art In artist-led tours and talks, Smithsonian Associates Studio Arts painting instructor Adrienne Wyman offers a “behind-the-easel” perspective of masterworks exhibited at the National Gallery of Art. The series is perfect for practicing artists, art lovers, and anyone who would like to learn more about art from the viewpoint of a working artist with a wide knowledge of historical painting techniques. If you’ve ever looked at a painting and wondered “How did they do that?” these are the tours for you. Viewings of “must-see” masterpieces focus on placing paintings in historical and social context, sharing background on the artists’ personal lives, and demystifying the techniques and materials used to create the works. APR 25 The Making of Impressionism and Post-Impressionism: Monet, Cassatt, Renoir, Degas MAY 2 The Making of Post-Impressionism: Pissarro, Cézanne, Seurat, Lautrec

Artist and Smithsonian Associates’ painting instructor Adrienne Wyman provides insight

MAY 9 Portrait Painting, Renaissance to Rococo: DaVinci, Rembrandt, Rubens, Vermeer, Boucher MAY 16 Portrait Painting, Neoclassical to Post Impressionism: David, Manet, John Singer Sargent, Vincent Van Gogh 4 sessions; 1.5 hours each; Adrienne Wyman; Sat., April 25–May 16, 2 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0YG; Members $95; Nonmembers $115

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Africa in the African American Artistic Imagination

Mary Turner: A Silent Protest, 1919, by Meta Vaux Warrick Fuller

Early in the 20th century, esteemed Howard University professors Alain Locke and James A. Porter debated the impact of African art on African American artists. Locke called African art the “ancestral legacy” and argued that African American artists should develop a “closer knowledge and proper appreciation” of it. Porter said that African Americans were first and foremost American artists. Kevin Tervala, associate curator of African art at the Baltimore Museum of Art, examines the ways in which African American artists—from 20th-century pioneers to contemporary artists—have engaged with the art of the African continent.

Tues., March 24, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0497; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM

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Subway, 1934, by Lily Furedi

Creativity in Dark Times Artists and Writers of the New Deal During the Great Depression in 1929, creatives of all kinds faced a bleak future. Among the programs President Franklin Roosevelt’s government designed to revive the U.S. economy were the Federal Writers’ Project and the Federal Arts Project. Author David Taylor looks at some of the artists and writers for whom the programs gave a new purpose: recording American life. He also discusses how some stirred controversy, creating works that cut against the grain of public opinion and convention. Taylor’s book Soul of a People: The WPA Writers’ Project Uncovers Depression America (Wiley), now in paperback, is available for sale and signing. Wed., March 25, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-011; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

A Creative Writing Workshop at the Freer Reflective Responses to Art Charles Lang Freer believed that a direct, immediate response to art was the highest form of aesthetic pleasure, noting that “The pure emotion of the observer should be his first sensation, unencumbered by the views of others.” Put Freer’s vision into practice by using thoughtful observation in the galleries to inform your responses to the collection. Led by teaching artist Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s Writing Salon, discover connections within the diverse collection and frame your reactions through descriptive writing and free-verse poetry as you slow down and savor the experience of looking at art. Mary Hall Surface in front of Edward Hopper’s 1939 painting Cape Cod Evening at the National Gallery of Art

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WRITING WORKSHOP Fri., March 27, 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.; Freer Gallery of Art (meet in Gallery 9); CODE 1K0-0YA; Members $30; Nonmembers $40

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

A master of light and color, Johannes Vermeer (1632–1675) creates a timeless world where the smallest actions take on a sense of beauty and meaning beyond their commonplace settings. His paintings are considered some of the finest works in their genre. Vermeer’s artistry rests in his ability to transform a simple daily activity—such as pouring a jug of milk or reading a letter—into a sensitive exploration of human psychology. His masterpieces such as The Girl with a Pearl Earring, The Milkmaid, and The Music Lesson, were meticulously created, often taking six months or more to complete. Gloriously lit, serene, and exquisitely rendered, they continue to speak to us through their ability to touch on some of the most universal ideas in human experience. Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine describes Vermeer’s place within the artistic culture of Holland, with an emphasis on his native city of Delft. She examines more closely some of his favorite themes and their possible meanings. The day ends with a discussion of Vermeer’s legacy following his rediscovery at the end of the 19th century.

MARITSHUIS, NETHERLANDS

RIJKSMUSEUM

Vermeer: In Praise of the Ordinary

9:30 a.m. The Sphynx of Delft 11 a.m. From the Everyday Into the Sublime 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Painting as Philosophy 2:45 p.m. Vermeer’s Legacy Sat., April 4, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-500; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 The Milkmaid, ca. 1660, by Johannes Vermeer

Girl with a Pearl Earring, by Vermeer

World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

Masters and Masterpieces of the 18th and 19th Centuries LOUVRE

Discover the masters and masterpieces of art and architecture during a period of change and contrast. Against a backdrop of political and industrial revolutions, the 18th and 19th centuries brought forth a profusion of styles in Europe and America, from rococo exuberance to classical elegance and Napoleonic splendor, romantic flights of the imagination and spectacular landscape paintings to a bold new realism. Art historian Karen Alexis emphasizes cultural context, major movements, the wealth of styles created, and the diversity of the period’s talents. She focuses on great classically inspired masters including Gainsborough, Jacques-Louis David, and Canova; the romanticism of Delacroix; Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelites; and the expressions of realism seen in the paintings of Copley, Courbet, and Winslow Homer and the sculpture of Rodin. APR 7 Empires, Elegance, and Enlightenment: Rococo Sensuality to Intellectual Sobriety APR 21 The French Revolution to the Salons of Paris: Neoclassicism and Beaux-Arts Classicism

La Grande Baigneues, 1808, by Jean Auguste-Dominique Ingres

APR 28 Flights of the Imagination to the Force of Nature: The Romantic Rebellion and Romantic Landscapes

The Entrance to the Grand Canal, Venice, ca. 1730, by Canaletto

MAY 5 A Romance with Modern Life: A Bold Realism

4 sessions; Tues., April 7–May 5, (no class April 14), 6:45–8:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-492; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

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THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON

Art in an Age of Revolutions, Revivalism, and Reforms


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World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

The Art of India: From the Indus Valley to Independence and the early embrace of a new religious tradition, Islam, in the north. Experience the splendor of the Mughal court at its height and the influence of foreign merchants and mercenaries as the court’s power faded. SESSION 1 Origins of South Asian Culture

Taj Mahal, completed in 1643, Agra, India

SESSION 2 Kingdoms, Caves, and Temples

SESSION 3 Southern Dynasties and Northern Newcomers SESSION 4 The Mughal Court, the British Raj, and the Nationalists TWO OPTIONS: 4 sessions; Wed., April 8–May 6, no class April 29 (CODE 1H0-491); 12–2 p.m.; Tues., May 12–June 2 (CODE: 1H0508); 6:45–8:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

TOM CRANE

The Barnes Foundation Philadelphia The Barnes is often considered the greatest post-impressionist and early-modern art collection in the world, with more than 3,000 masterpieces. Opened in 2012, the Barnes’ downtown Philadelphia location was designed to be a complement to the world-famous Barnes art collection. The museum’s dazzling collections of French modern and post-impressionist paintings include masterpieces by Renoir, Cezanne, Matisse, Picasso, Seurat, Rousseau, Manet, and Degas. Also see Greek, Roman, and Egyptian antiquities, Chinese painting, African sculpture, Southwestern retablos, Native American art, and American decorative arts. Apples and Cakes, 1873–1877, by Paul Cézanne Participants visit the special exhibition Marie Cuttoli: The Modern Thread from Miro to Man Ray, which traces how in 1930s Paris leading modern artists experimented with tapestry design, thanks to the efforts of pioneering entrepreneur Marie Cuttoli who commissioned such artists as Picasso, Braque, Le Corbusier, Man Ray, and Miró to create designs for the historic tapestry workshops in Aubusson. The tour is led by art historian Bonita Billman, who offers a lecture en route to Philadelphia. DAY TOUR Sat., April 11, 8 a.m.–7 p.m.; by bus; detailed information on website; lunch at museum; CODE 1ND-015; Members $175; Nonmembers $225 The Barnes Foundation

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.

THE BARNES COLLECTION

From its origins in the ancient Harappan civilization along the Indus River to the present, the complex culture of South Asia has given rise to some of the world’s most remarkable artistic creations. In this riveting course, Robert DeCaroli, associate professor in the department of history and art history at George Mason University, highlights the artistic traditions and historical changes within the Indian subcontinent. Learn about the emergence of the Vedic tradition, the first large-scale empires in the Gangetic Basin, and the beginnings of the Jain and Buddhist traditions. Explore the creative fervor that followed the arrival of the Kushan kings, including new forms of figural art and rock-cut architecture, and the grand tradition of Hindu art and architecture. Trace the creation of grand temples and spectacular Cave painting of Bodhisattva Padmapani, in Ajanta, ca. 2nd bronze work in the southern century, B.C. portions of the subcontinent,


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Women of the Arts and Crafts Movement With Embroidery Project

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HERMITAGE STATE MUSEUM

TRENDING

The Arts and Crafts movement incited an artistic response to industrialized 19thcentury Britain. The movement romanticized medieval history in search of inspiration and honest handmade crafts. Textile historian Elizabeth Lay discusses the emergence of the Arts and Crafts Movement in England and Scotland. She examines the role of embroidery in the movement and the impact of three important women—May Morris, Phoebe Anna Traquair, and Margaret Macdonald—whose embroidery work stands out as some of the most identifiable of the Arts Needle case by Lauren Kingsland and Crafts period. Following Lay’s presentation, participants create an Arts and Craftsinspired embroidered needle case in a studio project led by fabric artist and quilt-making instructor Lauren Kingsland.

With Studio Project

Roofs in Collioure, 1905, Henri Matisse

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Painters in Provence From Van Gogh to Matisse The South of France, with its brilliant Mediterranean light and varied vistas, has long been a magnet for plein-air painters. This is the world Vincent van Gogh describes as his “high yellow note.” Art historian Bonita Billman looks into the inspiration that places like Avignon, Arles, Aixen-Provence, St. Remy, St. Tropez, and Nice provided for 19th- and early-20th-century painters, including Van Gogh, Cezanne, Signac, and Matisse.

ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO

Fri., April 17, 1–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; all embroidery materials provided; CODE 1K0-0BJ; Members $55; Nonmembers $65

9:30 a.m. The Art History of the South of France 11 a.m. The High Yellow Note: Van Gogh in Arles and St. Remy 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Cezanne in Aix-en-Provence 3 p.m. Post-Impressionists Signac and Matisse in the South

Nighthawks, 1942, by Edward Hopper

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Edward Hopper: American Modernist By the turn of the last century, American urban painters were freeing themselves from the tyranny of the academic tradition. Inspired by Robert Henri and the Ashcan School painters, they rejected idealized subjects, choosing to paint gritty New York City scenes. Edward Hopper (1882–1967) was one of the great American realists of modern art. In paintings such as Automat and the iconic Nighthawks he captured a personal vision of the city that was reflected in many noir films of the 1940s and 1950s: austere, silent, moody, and lonely. Art historian Bonita Billman explores Hopper’s career and enduring relevance. Mon., April 20, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-078; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

MUSEUM OF MODERN ART

Sat., April 18, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-075; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

The Starry Night, 1889, by Vincent van Gogh

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World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Islamic Art and Architecture

The Ninth Street Women

Empires, Spirituality, Luxury, and Trade Islamic art is a term that covers many things, from mosques and religious works to the palaces and luxury arts of the world’s predominantly Islamic cultural regions in the Middle East, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and the great early modern empires of Asia. In a two-part program, art historian Lawrence Butler highlights examples of historic Islamic art and architecture from the 7th century through the earlymodern period that embody its spirituality, luxury, and princely Young Prince, mid-16th cent.; by Muhamthemes, including texts mad Haravi; Afghanistan from the Qur’an, calligraphy and the arts of the book, geometric and floral ornamentation, and mosque design. The illustrated talks also feature masterpieces of Islamic art found in Washington-area museum collections, including the Textile Museum’s rare Spanish silks and Egyptian carpets, and magnificent decorative arts from Istanbul, Persia and India in the collections of the Freer and Sackler, Walters, and Textile Museum collections. MAY 1 (FRI) Introduction to the Arts of Islam

FREER GALLERY OF ART

FREER GALLERY OF ART

SCIENCE

MAY 2 (SAT) Arts Across the Islamic World 9:30 a.m. The Early Islamic Caliphates 11 a.m. The Medieval Mediterranean 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) Bowl, 10th century, Iran

1:30 p.m. Silk Roads: Iran, Central Asia, and the Mongols

3 p.m. The Gunpowder Empires: Safavids, Mughals, and the Ottomans 2 sessions; Fri., May 1, 6:30–8:30 p.m. and Sat., May 2, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-082; Members $120; Nonmembers $185

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Abstract Expressionists Who Made Their Own Mark Part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative The abstract expressionist movement in mid-20th-century New York is often considered the first, truly American style of painting. That was good news for a coterie of men who became its superstars, but it often left highly skilled and talented women artists on the sidelines. Their work tells a story of brilliant, creative artists determined to make their marks. Art critic and adviser Judy Pomeranz takes an in-depth look at five of these gutsy women— Lee Krasner, Elaine de Kooning, Tutti Fruitti, 1966, by Helen Grace Hartigan, Joan Mitchell, and Frankenthaler Helen Frankenthaler—who exhibited in the groundbreaking Ninth Street Art Exhibition of 1951, claiming their place in a new postwar avant garde. Mon., May 11, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-507; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

The Sparkling Mosaics of Ravenna Once a backwater coastal town, after becoming a Byzantine province in the 6th-century, Ravenna’s true cultural identity emerged: the “Constantinople of the West” reflecting the East’s magnificence and wealth. Structures built in Ravenna during this time, including the Basilica of San Vitale and the Basilica of Sant’Apollinare in Classe, still preserve the world’s most significant corpus of Byzantine mosaics— a medium that embodies the glory and mystery of both Byzantine culture and Early Christian iconography. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, surveys the fascinating history Empress Theodora and part of her court, Church of San Vitale, Ravenna that shaped Ravenna’s most recognizable artistic marvels, its glorious mosaics. Fri., May 15, 6:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-039; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

When Michelangelo signed the contract with Pope Julius II in 1508 to paint the Sistine Chapel ceiling, little did he know the turmoil that awaited him. Never before had such a large-scale painting been attempted on a ceiling—and by a sculptor no less. After 4½ years of physical strain, personal conflict with the pope, and an endless search for inspiration, Michelangelo covered nearly 9,000 square feet of ceiling with some of the most beautiful and sublime figures in artistic history. He introduced his epic vision of the Old Testament as expressed through his radical interpretations of traditional subject matter and through his celebration of the male nude form. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines the artistic importance of the ceiling and the human drama behind its creation, as well as the chapel’s history and its exquisite art Inside the Sistine Chapel produced before Michelangelo. 10 a.m. A Tomb for the Warrior Pope 11 a.m. The Artistic History of the Sistine Chapel 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Painting the Ceiling 2:45 p.m. A New Iconography Sat., May 16, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-040; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 Sistine Chapel ceiling detail

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

The House Museum as a Memory Palace Discovering the Lesser-known Treasures of Paris Sometimes, especially in Paris, a museum and its history can be as fascinating as the collection within. Nowhere is this more strongly felt than in house museums— marvelous time capsules of lives lived with, and around, art. Staircase in Gustave Moreau’s house Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine highlights some of the city’s most remarkable house museums that offer a sense of the spirit of a particular age and that of their creators. From the masterworks of Bellini to the works of Rembrandt at the Musee Jacquemart-Andre to the house museums of Gustave Moreau and Auguste Rodin, these collections offer up countless treasures.

Raphael was one of the greatest artistic figures working in the Western classical tradition. In celebration of the 500th anniversary of his death, the National Gallery of Art has assembled 25 prints and drawings in an intimate installation, Raphael and His Circle. The works illustrate how the combination of artistic traditions, wide range, and immediate influence of Raphael’s art shaped the The Prophets Hosea and Jonah, standard of aesthetic excellence ca. 1510, Raphael for later artists, connoisseurs, and scholars. Jonathan Bober, Andrew W. Mellon senior curator of prints and drawings at the National Gallery of Art, presents an overview of the exhibition he curated. Wed., May 27, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-323; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

Mon., May 18, 6:45–8:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-511; Members $30; Nonmembers $45 MARCH 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

Raphael and His Circle

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit MUSEE NATIONAL GUSTAVE MOREAU

DENNIS G. JARVIS

Michelangelo, Pope Julius, and the Sistine Chapel


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RISA RYAN

Exploring Frank Lloyd Wright Fallingwater, Kentuck Knob, and Polymath Park One of America’s most innovative architects, Frank Lloyd Wright experimented with new ways to design homes and integrate them into nature. Fallingwater, Kentuck Knob, and the houses at Polymath Park offer prime examples of this organic architecture. Visit all three locations on an overnight tour to the scenic Laurel Highlands of Pennsylvania led by Bill Keene, a writer and lecturer on architecture, urban history, and city planning who has a special interest in Wright. Wright’s most iconic structure, Fallingwater UT was designed in 1936 as a mountain retreat for O D the Kaufmann family of Pittsburgh. Cantilevered over a waterfall, the dramatic structure is the L SO only remaining major Wright house with its setting, original furnishings, and artworks intact. The house constructed entirely of Tidewater red cypress and native fieldstone on Kentuck Knob appears almost a part of the mountain on which it is built. Designed by Wright in 1953, Kentuck Knob now houses furnishings and art of the current owners, Lord and Fallingwater Lady Palumbo. At historic Polymath Park Resort near Fallingwater, view four houses designed for everyday living in the 1950s: the Balter and Blum houses by Wright’s apprentice Peter Berndston; and the Usonianstyle Duncan House and the Mantyla House, both of which were relocated to Polymath Park. OVERNIGHT TOUR Sun., May 31, 7:15 a.m.–Mon. June 1, 6:30 p.m.; by bus; Kentuck Knob admissions, tours, lodging, meals (two lunches and one breakfast and dinner), and gratuities included; detailed information on website; purchase of overnight trip insurance recommended; not all areas of Fallingwater are accessible for visitors with disabilities; CODE 1NN-FKP; Members $495; Nonmembers $660; Single-room supplement $60 A new date for this tour is being added (Sept. 13–14); tickets go on sale June 1

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

van Eyck

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color. Discover the principles of design— unity, balance, scale, emphasis—that guide the arrangement of art’s visual vocabulary and help explain why some arrangements work better than others. See how clues to a work’s meaning are often comDynamism of a Dog on a Leash, 1912, by municated in the Giacomo Balla language of symbols. Finally, acquire some tips that help take the anxiety out of trying to fully comprehend and appreciate a work of art. ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY

The ability to derive meaning from what we see is an essential skill in a culture saturated with images. Once you understand how to derive meaning from what you see, reading images, particularly art, is not only simpler but infinitely more gratifying. Using outstanding works from the history of art as well as images from popular culture, Art historian Lisa Passaglia Bauman focuses on how art communicates, how to analyze and interpret it, and how you can see it as a cultural product that reveals something about the society that produced it. You’ll learn to think of visual elements as the vocabulary of art that helps determine its content: line, shape, space, texture, and The Annunciation (detail), ca. 1436, by Jan

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

Visual Literacy: The Art of Seeing

9:30 a.m. The Visual Elements of Art 11 a.m. The Principles of Design 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Iconography: Understanding Symbols and Meaning 2:30 p.m. Is There a Correct Way To Appreciate Art? Sat., June 6, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-509; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

The Arts and World War I The awesome power of war to unleash death and destruction has often ironically led to remarkable creative breakthroughs from artists, poets, and composers. The arts of World War I present a portrait of the terrible price paid by humanity, documented in paintings, sculptures, novels, memoirs, and poems produced both during, and immediately after, the struggle. David Gariff, a senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art, explores the responses of artists and writers to the trauma of the Great War, discussing works by artists and writers including Otto Dix, Käthe Kollwitz, Siegfried Sassoon, Wilfred Owen, Ernest Seated Youth, ca. 1917, by W. Lehmbruck Hemingway, Erich Maria Remarque, and Robert Graves, which transcended national boundaries. Mon., June 8, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-513; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Contemporary Art as a Commodity “Art is money! Art is money-sexy! Art is money-sexysocial-climbingfantastic!”

Maurizio Cattelan’s duct-taped banana at Art Basel Miami Beach sold for $120,000 in 2019

—Thomas Hoving, former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art

When a Damien Hirst formaldehyde shark in a private collection, a partially shredded Banksy print at auction, and a banana duct-taped to a wall at Art Basel Miami Beach are worth millions of dollars, what does it say about how we value contemporary art? Scholar Ellen Gorman shows how, since the 1950s, various players, from auction houses and dealers to private banks and hedge funds, have transformed artworks into commodities for sale to the highest bidder. Tues., June 9, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-045; Members $25; Nonmembers $35; Students with valid ID $15

Spring in the Brandywine River Valley The Brandywine River Valley includes some of the loveliest and most historic areas of Delaware and Pennsylvania. Learn about the region’s unique heritage during a two-day visit led by Hayden Mathews, an environmental and cultural history interpreter.

Explore the area’s artistic traditions at the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, housed in a renovated 19th-century mill with a dramatic steel and glass addition overlooking the river. Noted for its works by N.C., Andrew, and Jamie Wyeth, the museum’s galleries offer a cross-section of American art of the 19th and 20th centuries, with an emphasis on regional artists. Purchased in 1906 as a country retreat by Pierre du Pont, Longwood Gardens reflects his vision of a stunning collection of outdoor and indoor garden spaces. A guided tour shows off the gardens’ seasonal beauty. COURTESY OF NEMOURS ESTATE

COURTESY LONGWOOD GARDENS

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

ART

Longwood’s conservatory

Wilmington’s Hagley Museum, a Smithsonian affiliate, tells the history of the area’s famous gunpowder mills, the rise of water-powered industry, and the influential role that the du Pont family played in the region. Step into the Federal-era home of E.I. du Pont and generations of his family. Visit Nemours Mansion and Gardens, the elegant home businessman and philanthropist Alfred I. DuPont built for his wife, Jessie, in 1907.

OVERNIGHT TOUR Sun., June 14, 7:30 a.m.–Mon., June 15, 7 p.m.; by bus; detailed information on website; purchase of trip insurance recommended; CODE 1NN-BVO; Members $480; Nonmembers $640; Single-room supplement $60

Interior of Nemours

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Classes are taught by professional artists and teachers. View detailed class descriptions and supply lists at SmithsonianAssociates.org/studio View portfolios of work by our instructors at SmithsonianAssociates.org/artinstructors

GENERAL

Adult Art Camp 3-Day Workshop

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Composition HERMITAGE MUSEUM

Examine concepts and application of composition. Create collages based on art works and themes discussed, and explore connections between formal elements of visual art and art’s emotional impact.

UTdo the kids get to have OWhy

all the fun? If you’ve been waiting for the chance to be an artist, don’t miss this unique workshop. Produce your own original artwork, explore a variety of media, and have plenty of fun.

3 sessions; 5.5 hours each; Susan Vitall; Sat., April 4– Mon., April 6, 10 a.m.; $80 supply fee covers all required materials; optional supply list and more details on website; participants provide their own lunches; CODE 1K0-0YC; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

Student work

Moroccan Café, 1913, by Matisse

4 sessions; 3 hours each; Shahin Talishkan; Tues., April 28–May 19; 2 p.m.; all supplies included; details on website; CODE 1K0-0ZE; Members $155; Nonmembers $175

Creative Writing Workshop A Reflective Response at the Freer

Learn how to slow down and savor the experience of looking at art as you view the Freer collection and then frame your response through descriptive writing and free verse.

Color Theory Become familiar with the color wheel, color value, chroma, and hue. Use acrylic paints and colored papers to explore color qualities and movement in shaping composition. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Dan Riesmeyer; Mon., April 13–June 8 (no class May 25), 6:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZM; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit Mary Hall Surface in front of Edward Hopper’s 1939 painting Cape Cod Evening at the National Gallery of Art

One 2-hour session; Fri., Mar. 27, 10:30 a.m.; Mary Hall Surface; Freer Gallery of Art; more information on p. 46; details on website; CODE 1K0-0YA; Members $30; Nonmembers $40

Connect with us on Social Media facebook.com/ smithsonianstudioarts

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

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Exploring the Visual Foundations and Traditions of Art Apply the science in Renaissance art. Enhance the visual dynamic in drawings using the Golden Ratio, the Rule of Thirds, three-point perspective, or the Fibonacci spiral. 2 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Sat., May 2 and 9, 10:30 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0AZ; details and supply list on website; Members $65; Nonmembers $85

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Beginning Drawing

Out and About with an Artist: The National Gallery of Art

Develop basic drawing skills while working with a variety of materials and techniques, Explore geometric forms, volume, and perspective in still-lifes, architecture, and figure drawing.

A working artist provides a “behind-the-easel” perspective of masterworks exhibited at the National Gallery of Art. Viewings address historical and social context and technique. 4 sessions; 1.5 hours each; Adrienne Wyman;

Sat., April 25–May 16, 2 p.m.; more information

Artist and Smithsonian Associates’ painting instructor Adrienne Wyman provides insight

on p. 45; details on website; CODE 1K0-0YG; Members $95; Nonmembers $115

DRAWING

Continued Drawing

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Developing Your Sketchbook

Lori VanKirk Schue

TWO OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Josh Highter; Sun., April 19–June 14 (no class May 24), 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0YZ; Sallye Mahan-Cox; Tues., April 14–June 2, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0AS; details and supply lists on website; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Transform your sketchbook as you boost your creativity. Learn basic drawing skills and improve your powers of observation working in public spaces in and near Smithsonian museums.

Refine and expand drawing skills through studio practice in traditional media. Sessions focus on four classic areas: still-life, landscape, portrait, and figure. Students should have completed a beginning drawing course. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Dan Riesmeyer; Wed., April 15–June 3, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0ZG; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

6 sessions; 3 hours each; Lori VanKirk Schue; Tues., April 21–May 26, 1 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZX; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

Portrait Drawing Drawing on the Right Side of Your Brain Build drawing ability and improve visualization and recording of objects on paper through drawing exercises focusing on edges and space, relationships between objects, and light and shadow. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Shahin Talishkhan; Wed., April 15–June 3, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K0-0ZF; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Create a portrait using charcoal or graphite. Explore the universal proportions of the face and learn how to better observe and record a subject’s features. 6 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Eric Westbrook; Mon., April 13-May 18, 7 p.m.; details and supply list on website; model fees included in tuition; CODE 1K0-0AT; Members $200; Nonmembers $230

By Eric Westbrook

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Figure Drawing and Independent Projects

Children’s Book Illustration Workshop

Acquire an understanding of advanced elements of composition, anatomy, and artistic direction as you work from live models.

Transform an author’s vision into vivid illustrations by learning the basics of interpreting a story through pictures. Information on working with publishers and protecting art is also

8 sessions; 3 hours each; MaxKarl Winkler; Fri., April 17–June 12 (no class May 22), 10:15 a.m.; model fees included in tuition; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0AW; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Figure Drawing One-Day Marathon

By Max-Karl Winkler

SCIENCE

Working primarily on your own, with the instructor on hand for demos and advice, move between two model workstations running simultaneously (one for quick poses, one for extended work).

One 7–hour session; Josh Highter; Sun., June 28, 10 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZB; Members $95; Nonmembers $105

By Lori VanKirk Schue

discussed. One 5-hour session includes lunch break (students provide their own); Lori VanKirk Schue; Tues., June 2, 12 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0AF; Members $95; Nonmembers $105

Colored Pencils Weekend Workshop Tap into the wide range of effects possible using colored pencils. Learn layering, blending and buffing strokes to achieve the translucency of watercolors with this dry medium. 2 sessions; 3 hours each; Lori VanKirk Schue; Sat., By Lori VanKirk Schue May 9 and 16, 1 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0AK; details on website; Members $95; Nonmembers $115

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Drawing In Museums Colored Pencils II Workshop

National Gallery of Art, Freer Gallery of Art, and Smithsonian American Art Museum

Enhance you skill working with the medium of colored pencils. More in-depth techniques are discussed and demonstrated. Students may bring a work in progress or begin a new project in class, if desired.

Develop rendering and composition skills, and learn the art of copying, by drawing paintings and classical sculptures displayed in the museums. 6 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Paul Glenshaw; Sat., April 18–May 30 (no class May 23), 1:30 p.m.; details and By student Claire Fuller supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0AN; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

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One 4-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Sat., May 30, 11 a.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0– 0AL; Members $65; Nonmembers $75 By Lori VanKirk Schue

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Oil Pastels Become familiar with the basics of using brightly colored, long-lasting oil pastels through group technique demonstrations and one-on-one instruction.

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Traditional Oil Painting Techniques Lessons from Museum Masterpieces Explore the signature effects of famous artists and draw on their techniques in painting demonstrations and exercises designed to broaden individual skills.

6 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Thurs., April 16–May 21, 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K00AX; Members $185; Nonmembers $215

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Adrienne Wyman; Sat., April 18–June 13 (no class May 23), 10 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZK; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Student in class

PAINTING World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

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Touch Painting

Techniques in Modernist Painting

Release your creativity through your fingertips, using your hands instead of brushes in this adult finger-painting class. Students use acrylic paints to produce artwork.

Class exercises, including stilllife setups and model sessions, teach practical applications of modernism’s concepts and techniques. Develop a visual language through class lectures, demonstrations, and critiques.

By Lori VanKirk Schue

One 2-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Mon., March 2, 2 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0XE; all supplies included; details on website; Members $35; Nonmembers $45

Beginning Oil Painting

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Shahin Talishkhan; Tues., April 14–June 2, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZD; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Painting Is for Everyone

Explore basic painting techniques including colormixing, scumbling, and glazing to gain the technical background needed to get started as a painter.

By Shahin Talishkhan

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Shahin Talishkhan; Thurs., April 16–June 4, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0ZJ; details and supply list on website; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Still life in front of a window at Saint-Raphael, 1919, by Picasso

By Chester Kasnowski

Begin working in the medium of acrylic paints. Learn to mix colors, use brushes, and approach elements of form such as value, texture, line, color, shape, and edges. Explore composition and variation and learn art terminology.

8 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Wed., April 15–June 3; 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0BF; Members $225; Nonmembers $255 MARCH 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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Introduction to Watercolor

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Monoprint Without A Press Create prints using Gelli and other types of plates, plus acrylic paints and other materials. Explore additive and subtractive methods, drawing on the plate, over-printing, and using stamps and other materials to create patterns.

Explore basic watercolor techniques and new approaches to painting through classroom demonstration, discussion, and experimentation. TWO OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Josh Highter; Sun., April 19–June 14 (no class May 24), 1:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0ZA; 7 sessions; 2.75 hours each; Dave Daniels; Mon., April 27–June 15 (no class May 25), 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0ZC; details and supply list on website; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

By David Daniels

2 sessions; 5 hours each; Sharon Robinson; Fri., March 27 and April 3, 10:30 a.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XZ; Members $165; Nonmembers $185

By Sharon Robinson

Exploring Encaustic and Mixed-Media Botanicals in Watercolor

The encaustic medium can be molded, sculpted, and combined with collage materials. Learn how to incorporate drawings or prints on paper and other collage elements into encaustic paintings.

Discover the versatility and fluidity of watercolor during this introduction to drawing and painting flora. Following step-by-step instructions using watercolor, work from reference photos to create your art. 4 sessions; 3 hours each; Lubna Zahid; Thurs., May 28–June 18, 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZS; Members $165; Nonmembers $185

By Lubna Zahid

2 sessions; 5 hours each; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; Mon., April 27 and May 4, 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZW; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

MIXED-MEDIA Paper Easter Eggs Learn a fun and fast way to create Easter eggs to decorate your home for spring. Make the colorful, oneof-a-kind eggs using paper dots, small pins, and an overlapping paper-piecing technique.

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Image Transfers and Photo Alteration Mixed-Media Workshop Use multiple methods for making and using image transfers. Topics include applications, choosing images, materials and techniques, altered photos as standalone artwork, and altered photos with collage. 3 sessions; 5 hours each; Sharon Robinson; Fri., March 6–20, 10:30 a.m.; students provide photos, all other supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XY; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

By Sharon Robinson

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By Marcie Wolf-Hubbard

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

TWO OPTIONS: One 2-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Sat., April 4, 11 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0VN; Sat., April 4, 2 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0VP; supply fee $20; details on website; Members $45; Nonmembers $55 By Lori VanKirk Schue

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Crepe Paper Flower-Making Workshop

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Altered Books Drawing and Painting in Collage and Mixed-Media Learn to upcycle book pages as surfaces for drawing, painting, and collage. Create your own story using gelatin plate prints, textures, photo transfers, drawing, painting, and text redaction. Get illustration ideas during a visit to the U.S. Botanic Garden.

Petal by petal, create a drought- and deerresistant spring tulip bouquet. Using various types and weights of crepe paper, learn the skills needed to create paper flowers. One 2.5-hour session; Karen Cadogan; Sun., April 26, 1 p.m.; $15 supply fee covers all equipment and materials; details on website; CODE 1K0-0AM; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

By Karen Cadogan

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; Wed., April 15–June 3, 1:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZZ; Members $235; Nonmembers $265 By Marcie Wolf-Hubbard

Exploring Abstraction

Collage and Mixed-Media Develop collage, mixedmedia or assemblage projects. Experiment with color, form, design and the use of text, images, texture, and found objects. COURSE OPTION:

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; Wed., April 15–June 3, 6:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZY; Members $235; Nonmembers $265 WORKSHOP OPTION: 2 sessions; 5 hours each; Marcie WolfHubbard; Fri., April 17 and 24; 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0AA; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

Gyotaku The Japanese Art of Printing with Fish

By Sue Fierston

STUDIO ART

This venerable art is accomplished by applying water-based printing inks to a whole fish and pressing it to paper. Create several 12-by-18-inch prints featuring a variety of fish to bring home.

NEW DATE ADDED: One 5-hour session; Sue Fierston; Sun., May 31, 10:30 a.m.; details on website; supply fee $25; CODE 1K0-0BS; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

Develop a more intuitive way of working through drawing, painting, and collage exercises. Use traditional media such as charcoal and pastel, as well as liquid acrylic glazes, in nontraditional ways. 8 sessions; 3.5 hours each; By Delna Dastur Delna Dastur; Thurs., April 16–June 4, 12 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K00ZH; Members $265; Nonmembers $295

Build a Tiny House Working in paper mache, acrylics, and mixed media, create your own unique tiny house. Finish the house’s interior and exterior in acrylic and photo transfers. 2 sessions; 5 hours each; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; Sun., April 26 and May 3, 10:30 a.m.; some shared materials provided, By Marcie Wolf-Hubbard additional supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZV; Members $165; Nonmembers $185

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Painting and Printing

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CALLIGRAPHY

Leaves Two Ways

Introduction to Calligraphy

Transform contour drawings of leaf shapes into transparent watercolor paintings. Use a walking press to make leaf prints using water-based ink. Take home several 8-by-10-inch watercolor paintings and botanical leaf prints.

Student in class

One 5-hour session; Sue Fierston; Sun., May 10, 10:30 a.m.; details on website; supply fee $20; CODE 1K0-0BA; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

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Beginning Sculpture

The Foundational Hand Learning the basic letterforms of the Foundational Hand opens the door to other calligraphic hands such as Italic and Black Letter. Upper and lower case letters are covered as well as basic layout and design. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Sharmila Karamchandani; Wed., April 15–June 10 (no class May 20), 1:30 p.m.; supply list and details on website; CODE 1K0-0AV; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Introduction to Pointed-Pen Calligraphy

Sculpt head and face portraits using the medium of clay following hands-on studio practice and demonstrations.

Add sophistication to your hand-lettering when you learn the basic strokes of the copperplate script alphabet and practice using nibs in an elbow holder. No experience required, just a steady hand.

8 sessions; 3 hours each; George Tkabladze; Mon., April 13–June 8 (no class May 25) 6:30 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K00BG; Members $250; Nonmembers $280

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Sharmila Karamchandani; Mon., April 13–June 8 (no class May 25), 1:30 p.m.; supply list and details on website; CODE 1K0-0ZL; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

By George Tkabladze

Figure Sculpture Exploring Eastern Calligraphy

Learn about clay sculpture techniques, tool use and armatures, and the planes of the human body. Sculpt either a portrait, torso, or full figure using a live model. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; George Tkabladze; Mon., April 13–June 8 (no class May 25) 2 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K0-0BH; Members $250; Nonmembers $280 By George Tkabladze

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Persian and Arabic Script Guided by a graduate of Kabul’s Turquoise Mountain Institute, learn to apply the traditional elements of Persian and Arabic calligraphy, with verses by Rumi and from the Quran providing inspiration. By Sughra Hussainy

6 sessions; 3 hours each; Sughra Hussainy; Sat., May 16–June 27 (no class May 23), 2 p.m.; all supplies included; details on website; CODE 1K0-0AR; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Decorative Lettering

The Inspirational Quilts of Gee’s Bend

The art of stylized lettering personalizes everything from journal pages and invitations to recipe cards. This class introduces students to decorative forms such as altered block letters, botanical borders, and illuminated initials with vines and flourishes.

Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative

4 sessions; 3 hours each; Lubna Zahid; Thurs., May 28–June 18, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZR; Members $165; Nonmembers $185 By Lubna Zahid

FIBER ARTS

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Experiment with hand-printing on fabrics using colorful Akua water-based printmaking ink and natural materials. Practice printmaking techniques on muslin, and later design and hand-print a canvas bag.

TWO OPTIONS: One 5-hour session; Sue Fierston; Sun., March 1 (CODE 1K0-0XQ); Sat, June 27 (CODE 1K0-0BE); 10:30 a.m.; details on website; supply fee $25; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Learn the storied history of the Boykin, Alabama, quilting tradition and community of Gee’s Bend, followed by a Gee’s Bendinspired quilting project. One 5-hour session; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., March 21, 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; bring sack lunch and something to share; limited to 14 participants; CODE 1K0-0VX; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

Tapestry Weaving Create a miniature woven tapestry on a small frame loom. Class instruction includes basic tapestry-weaving techniques such as warping the loom, color mixing and hatching.

Fabric Printing Using Natural Materials

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Tea Okropiridze; Mon., April 13–June 8 (no class May 25), 6:30 p.m.; details on website; supply fee $40; CODE 1K0-0AY; Members $225; Nonmembers $255 By Tea Okropiridze

Student’s work

Mandala Wall Hanging Workshop Eastern sacred design meets Western textile techniques as students create a quilted mandala wall hanging based on the kolam design tradition. Please come and enjoy a peaceful, creative experience.

By Lauren Kingsland

ART

2 sessions; 5 hours each; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., March 7 and 14, 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VW; Members $110; Nonmembers $130

Three Women of the Arts and Crafts Movement The Arts and Crafts Movement incited an artistic response to industrialization in Britain. Hear how three woman—May By Lauren Kingsland Morris, Phoebe Anna Traquair, and Margaret Macdonald—raised the craft of embroidery to fine-art status, and then take part in a hands-on embroidery project. One 3-hour session; Fri., April 17, 1 p.m.; Elizabeth Lay and Lauren Kingsland; all supplies included; CODE 1K0-0BJ; Members $55; Nonmembers $65 (see website and p. 49 for more information) MARCH 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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Knitting in Living Color Workshop

Quilting for Beginners

Explore color techniques used in knitting. After demonstrations of duplicate stitch, intarsia, mosaic, and Fair Isle color work, try the various techniques, look at knitted samples, and discuss color work strategies. Basic knitting skills are required.

A Small Handmade Quilt

One 6-hour session; Ann Richards; Sat., April 18, 10:15 a.m.; supply list and details on website; CODE 1K0-0BK; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

2 sessions; 4 hours each; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., May 9 and 16, 12 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0AC; Members $85; Nonmembers $105

Learn the basics of quilt-making by creating several small quilts while learning the same piecing, appliqúe, quilting, and finishing techniques used in larger quilts.

Laundry to Legacy Repurposing Treasured Garments into Memory Quilts Transform T-shirts and other garments into memory quilts—gifts that also preserve memories. Learn how to work with stretchy fabrics, color ideas, quilting options, and finishing techniques. Using paper, practice creating a quilt from blocks in a variety of sizes. One 5-hour session, includes lunch break (participants provide their own); Lauren Kingsland; Sat., April 25, 10:30 By Lauren Kingsland a.m.; supply list and details on website: CODE 1K0-0AB; Members $55; Nonmembers $65

Indigo and Shibori Workshop Japan and India have long used brilliant blue indigo dye to apply dramatic patterns to fabric. Working with this timeless natural color, create unique silk scarves using the classic Japanese shibori resist-dyeing technique. TWO OPTIONS: One 5-hour session; Trisha Gupta; Fri., May 1, 10 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0ZT); Fri., May 8, 10 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0ZU); By Trisha Gupta all supplies included; details on website; Members $95; Nonmembers $105

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Back-to-Basics Boot Camp for Knitters Refresh—or advance— knitting skills and your knowledge of fundamentals: casting on, basic knit and purl stitches, increasing, decreasing, and binding off. Review knitting equipment, and practice taking gauge. One 7-hour session, includes lunch break (participants provide their own); Ann Richards; Fri., May 15, 10 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0BL; Members $85; Nonmembers $95

Nuno-Felted Scarf Workshop Create a one-ofa-kind Nunofelted scarf and explore how to use this versatile material for making accessories, jewelry, wall hangings, and other projects. One 6.5-hour session, includes lunch break (participants provide their own); Renate MaileMoskowitz; Sun., May 31, 10:15 a.m.; $30 supply fee covers the cost of a hand-dyed silk and wool kit and all shared supplies; CODE 1K0-0BN; Members $125; Nonmembers $135

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Knitted Botanicals If you want to learn how to add colorful flowers to your next knitted garment or art project, this workshop is for you. Students who have completed a beginner’s class or have intermediatelevel skill are welcome.

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OTHER MEDIA

A Bird-Helper’s Basket Part of the Smithsonian Earth Optimism Initiative

One 3-hour session, includes lunch break (participants pro-vide their own); Ann Richards; Sat., June 13, 10 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0BM; Members $85; Nonmembers $95

Silk Painting Weekend Workshop After an overview of the history and art of silk painting in the instructor’s home studio (in Lanham, MD), learn the basics, including stretching, diluting, resisting, spotting, salting, wet-on-wet, fabric setting, and vocabulary. Create painted pieces to take home.

At nesting time, nature’s weavers love to use bits and pieces of fluff and string to add to their nests. Learn how to create a simple basket for the birds in your garden. TWO OPTIONS: One 3-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Fri., March 6, 11 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0VK; Sat., March 7, 1 By Lori VanKirk Schue p.m.; CODE 1K0-0VR; supply fee $35; supply list and details on website; Members $65; Nonmembers $75 The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the Smithsonian.

Relief Printing Linocut and Woodblock Design and produce relief prints from techniques of design and transfer through cutting and printing the block.

2 sessions; 6 hours each; Diane Tuckman; Sat., June 6 and Sun., June 7, 10 a.m.; 6806 Trexler Road, Lanham, MD; all supplies provided; studio accessed by stairs; more information and details on website; CODE 1K0-0BP; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

By Diane Tuckman

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Max-Karl Winkler; Tues., April 14–June 2, 6:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0BB; Members $225; Nonmembers $255 By Max-Karl Winkler

Necktie Quilts Repurposed finery Celebrate Father’s Day by giving a new life to the silks found in men’s neckties. Learn how ties can be used in both traditional pieced quilt patterns and in contemporary art quilts. Deconstruct and stabilize vintage ties for machineor hand-piecing.

Sogetsu Ikebana Modern Japanese Flower Arranging Create beautiful basic and free-style arrangements with flowers, branches, greens, and other materials.

By Lauren Kingsland

One 4-hour session; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., June 6, 10:30 a.m.; supply list and details on website; CODE 1K0-0AD; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

6 sessions; 2 hours each; Jane Redmon; Wed., April 15–May 20, 6:30 p.m.; flowers, branches, greens, and other basic materials are included in tuition, details and additional supplies on website; CODE 1K0-0ZQ; Members $200; Nonmembers $230

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TRENDING

HISTORY

CULTURE

SCIENCE

STUDIO ART

ART

Native Orchids

Hammered Hoop Earrings

Part of the Smithsonian Earth Optimism Initiative Spend an afternoon with an orchid-care expert learning about orchids native to the northeast United States, where to find them in nature, and how to grow them. Re-pot a native orchid into a container to take home. End the day with light refreshments and a question-and-answer session.

Come ready to pound some metal. Hammer thick wires into sheets that are then accentuated with oxidization and patinas. Leave with oneof-a-kind jewelry pieces. One 3.5-hour session; Mïa Vollkommer; Fri., April 24, 10:30 a.m.; supply fee $20; By Mïa Vollkommer additional supply list online; hand tools available to share; CODE 1K0-0AH; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

Orchid planted outside

One 2-hour session; Barbara Schmidt; Sun., April 19, 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0YF; Members $75; Nonmembers $85 The views, findings, conclusions or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the Smithsonian.

Fashion unique jewelry with findings made from wire in a variety of gauges and sheet metal. Safe use of tools and materials is discussed.

Mosaics: Broken-Dish Portraiture Use the picassiette technique to resurrect a chipped or damaged family heirloom into an animal or human mosaic portrait. Instruction covers transferring designs, nipping, cutting, tool use, good design methods, and grouting. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Bonnie Fitzgerald; Tues., April 14–June 2, 1 p.m.; $70 supply fee; details and supplemental supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZN; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Fabulous Findings and Dramatic Dangles

By Bonnie Fitzgerald

Contemporary Mosaics From the Bottom Up

One 7-hour session, includes a lunch break (students provide their own); Mïa Vollkommer; Sun., April 26, 10:30 a.m.; $45 wire and sheet metal kit fee ($60 for kit plus By Mïa Vollkommer shop shears); additional supply list online; CODE 1K0-0AE; Members $125; Nonmembers $135

Introduction to Beading After basic instruction in bead stringing, wire-working, and pearl knotting, create necklaces, earrings, and single-strand necklaces or bracelets.

Find inspiration in both the ancient art of mosaics and the form’s international movement. Create a mixedmedia abstract mosaic and learn new mosaic fabrication techniques. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Bonnie Fitzgerald; Tues., April 14–June 2, 6:30 p.m.; $85 By Bonnie Fitzgerald supply fee; details and supplemental supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0ZP; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

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COURSE OPTION: 3 sessions, 3 hours each; Mïa Vollkommer; Tues., Wed., and Thurs., April 21, 22 and 23, 6:30 p.m.; $25 sterling silver findings kit fee; details and additional supply list online; CODE 1K0-0AG; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

By Mïa Vollkommer

INTENSIVE WORKSHOP: One 7-hour session; Mïa Vollkommer; Sat., April 25, 10 a.m.; $25 sterling silver findings kit fee; details and additional supply list online; CODE 1K0-0AJ; Members $150; Nonmembers $160

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


HISTORY

CULTURE

Introduction to Afghan Manuscript Illumination

SCIENCE

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TRENDING

PHOTOGRAPHY: Beginner Introduction to Photography

Practice gold-leaf manuscript illumination in the Afghan tradition. Create geometric, vegetal, and floral motifs and naturebased designs used as ornamentation for calligraphy, manuscripts, and more. 6 sessions; 3 hours each; Sughra Hussainy; Sat., May 16–June 27 (no class May 23), 10 a.m.; details and By Sughra Hussainy additional supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0AQ; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

Mother’s Day Floral Arrangement Workshop Create a beautiful and unique floral gift for Mom while learning the fundamentals of floral design from Smithsonian horticulturalists. Make a large bouquet for Mom—or bring her along and make one together! Enjoy complimentary rosé wine and light nibbles. One 1.5-hour session; Sarah Tietbohl and Sarah Dickert; Sat., May 9, 3 p.m.; all materials provided; CODE 1K0-0BQ; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

STUDIO ART

ART

Class sessions emphasize the basics: camera functions, exposure, metering, working with natural and artificial light, and composition. Develop technical skill through assignments and offsite photo shoots. TWO OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Andargé Asfaw; Tues., April 14–June 2, 6:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0BR); Wed., April 15–June 3, By Andargé Asfaw 10:15 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0YN;); camera with manual controls and tripod required; details on website; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

Introduction to Black-and-White Film Photography and the Darkroom Get a grounding in the basics of using a 35mm camera and photo darkroom techniques. Sessions feature lecture-demonstrations, class assignments, critiques, and practical darkroom work. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Paul Matthai; Mon., April 13–June 8 (no class May 25), 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0YD; all developing chemicals are provided; details on website; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Introduction to Lightroom Weekend Workshops

Wondering if class is canceled due to inclement weather? If customer service has your contact information, you will receive an email and phone call. 202-633-3030

You can also call the inclement weather hotline: 202-633-8690

Adobe Lightroom is useful for organizing and editing image files. Learn to use it for importing, exporting, deleting, and grouping files; sorting files; attaching keywords; and improving tone, color, and detail. TWO OPTIONS: 2

sessions; 4 hours each; Eliot Cohen; Sat., March 21 and Sun., March 22 (CODE 1K0-0WK); Sat., May 30 and Sun., May 31 (CODE 1K0-0YL); 9:30 a.m.; (limited to 10); bring laptop with Lightroom 6 or Lightroom Classic (not CC); more details on website; Members $225; Nonmembers $245 MARCH 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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TRENDING

HISTORY

CULTURE

SCIENCE

ART

STUDIO ART

Understanding Your Digital Mirrorless or SLR Camera

PHOTOGRAPHY: Experienced

Moving Beyond Auto Mode

Introduction to Photography II

This workshop covers ISO, shutter speed, aperture, depth of field, RAW vs. JPEG files, and White Balance. Learn various shooting modes and get hands-on experience in a practice session on the Mall.

Expand your understanding of photography fundamentals such as lighting, composition, shooting techniques, and gear, and photoediting software. A photo excursion reinforces in-class instruction.

FOUR OPTIONS: One 7-hour session; Eliot Cohen; Sun., March 15 (CODE 1K0-0WJ); Sun., April 19 (CODE 1K0-0YH); Sun., May 17 (CODE 1K0-0YJ); Sun., June 14 (CODE 1K0-0YK); 9:30 a.m.; details on website; Members $210; Nonmembers $220

Open Darkroom Plus Elevate darkroom skills through small-group lectures, individual instruction, and independent work. Learn about toning, fiber-based printing, dodging and burning, and assessment of print quality.

By Eliot Cohen

Introduction to iPhone Photography Create great images by reviewing photography basics such as composition and exposure, and exploring the best apps, accessories, and editing and image management tools. One 4-hour session; Peggy Feerick; Sun., March 15, 10 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0XX; details on website; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

By Peggy Feerick

See videos, class photos, and meet students on Facebook and Instagram smithsonian studio arts

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By Andargé Asfaw

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Andargé Asfaw; Tues., April 14–June 2, 10:15 a.m.; camera with manual controls and tripod required; details on website; CODE 1K0-0YM; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

FOUR OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Paul Matthai; Thurs., April 16–June 4, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0YE; Joe Yablonsky; Wed., April 15–June 3, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0AU; Sat., April 18–June 13 (no class May 23), 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0YU; Sat., April 18–June 13 (no class May 23), 1:30 p.m.; CODE 1K00YV; all developing chemicals are provided; details on website; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Introduction to Studio Portraiture Produce a portfolio of student and model portraits in this class that focuses on basics such as posing a subject; using highlight and shadow; high key and low key lighting; using a flash meter; and understanding strobe lighting. By Andargé Asfaw

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Andargé Asfaw; Mon., April 13–June 8 (no class May 25), 6:30 p.m.; model fees included in tuition; details on website; CODE 1K0-0YP; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


TRENDING

HISTORY

CULTURE

SCIENCE

ART

STUDIO ART

Photographic Creativity, Design, and Composition

Exhibiting and Selling Your Photographs

Achieving a balance of visual tension in an image creates well-made visual relationships. Gain a better understanding of compositional elements and their application in lectures and assignments focusing on extended shutter speeds, light graffiti, bokeh templates, and macro photography.

Get your photos seen and sold. Learn about strategies such as juried exhibitions, photo contests, showing in alternative spaces, art festivals, galleries, and websites. Sessions also address photographic portfolios, copy-righting, email marketing, By Joe Yablonsky postcards, pricing, printing photos, and matting and framing.

5 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Mon., May 4–June 8 (no class May 25); CODE 1K0-0YX; 6:30 p.m.; details on website; Members $185; Nonmembers $215 By Joe Yablonsky

Mastering Exposure Develop a greater understanding of exposure modes, exposure compensations, filter exposure factors, bracketing, metering modes, histograms, zone system, dynamic range, eliminating camera shake, tripods, and some flash concepts. Hone skills through assignments and in-class reviews.

One 3-hour session; Joe Yablonsky; Mon., Thurs., June 4; 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0YS; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

5 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Thurs., Apr. 30–May 28, 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K00YW; Members $185; Nonmembers $215 By Joe Yablonsky

On-Location Photography Sharpen your way of thinking about shooting outdoors. Sessions include lectures on depth of field, exposure adjustments, using a tripod, composition, and natural lighting conditions. Develop shooting strategies on field trips and in critique sessions. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Sun., April 19–June 14 (no class May 24), 1:30 p.m.; camera with manual controls required; details on website; CODE 1K0-0YT; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Custom Digital Printing and Mat Cutting Printing digital photos and custom cutting mat board windows is explained in sessions that describe online printing labs, paper choices, aspect ratios, mat board choices, and cutter tools. Final assembly of printed photos is done in class. TWO OPTIONS: 2 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Mon., March 5 and 12 (CODE 1K0-0WZ); Tues., June 9 and 16 (CODE 1K0-0YY); 6:30 p.m.; details on website; Members $100; Nonmembers $120

By Joe Yablonsky

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RISA RYAN

Smithsonian Associates Membership Benefits Smithsonian Associates opens the Smithsonian’s rich and varied resources to our members. When you join Smithsonian Associates you become a part of the largest museum-based cultural and educational program in the world. As an insider, you have unparalleled access to the Smithsonian's world of knowledge—and enjoy a full array of exclusive benefits. Smithsonian Associates, unlike the museums, is not federally funded and relies instead on individual contributions to help bridge the gap between program expenses and ticket revenues. There are many membership options across the Smithsonian Institution, but Smithsonian Associates membership is the ONLY program that directly supports Associates’ programming and outreach efforts, and the only way to access ticket discounts and exclusive benefits at our programs. Effective January 2019

INTRODUCTORY Memberships

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Promoter–$100

Champion–$80

Associate–$50

When you become a member you’ll be among the first to know about the outstanding programs we

valuable discounts, including savings up to 35% off Smithsonian Associates program tickets, and

Members-only ticket priority before programs go on sale to the public (some exclusions apply)

Eligibility to purchase one ticket per program at the discounted member price (savings up to 35%)

Subscription to the monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide

Access to members-only programs, including the popular annual Breakfast at the Zoo

Access to two complimentary tours of exhibitions throughout the year

Access to free Associates events as available (notification sent via email)

10% discount at SmithsonianStore.com (with a special code) and select Smithsonian museum restaurants

Eligibility to purchase up to four tickets per program at the discounted member price

Priority consideration for waitlisted programs, including study tours (some exclusions apply)

Recognition on the Smithsonian Associates website

bring you every month—which add up to more than 750 opportunities for discovery, enrichment, and learning you’ll find nowhere else. Membership has its benefits: Members receive a range of access to tickets before they go on sale to the general public.

Eligibility to purchase up to six tickets per program at the discounted member price

Smithsonian magazine delivered to your home

Member discounts on Art Collectors Program fine-arts prints

20% discount at SmithsonianStore.com during special Member Days sales


Benefactor–$5,000 and up

Partner–$2,500

Sponsor–$1,000

Patron–$600

Contributor–$300

Advocate–$175

CIRCLE of SUPPORT

ALL OF THE BENEFITS of the Introductory Membership Levels, plus:

Advance digital copy of the monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide

Two complimentary tickets to one exclusive after-hours Mingle at the Museum event

VIP access, activities, and seating at Breakfast at the Zoo

Advance ticket purchasing by phone for high-demand programs, including Smithsonian Summer Camp

Invitation for two to a Smithsonian Insider event during the year

No handling fees on phone purchases

Recognition in the Smithsonian Associates program guide annual donor list and the annual donor plaque at our headquarters on the National Mall

Advance ticket purchasing to select headliner events

Complimentary invitation for two to an exclusive Meeting the Masters reception

Eligibility to participate in special travel programs sponsored by Smithsonian Journeys

Complimentary tickets for two to a lecture or performance (value equal to $30 per ticket or less)

Copy of the Smithsonian’s annual report

Complimentary VIP tickets for two and a parking pass for Breakfast at the Zoo

Reserved seating at most Smithsonian Associates programs

Invitations to backstage meet-and-greets at select Smithsonian Associates programs

Advance ticket purchasing for embassy programs and receptions

Dedicated concierge phone line for inquiries and tickets

Invitation for two to the prestigious Annual Smithsonian Weekend

An exclusive behind-the-scenes tour with a docent

Recognition in the Smithsonian’s annual report

As a member of Smithsonian Associates Circle of Support, you’ll play a vital and valued role in our work. Your contributions to Smithsonian Associates provide the support that enables all of our programs to continue and grow. There’s no better time to consider enhancing the level of your support. Depending on the level you choose, you’ll enjoy enhanced benefits such as early registration for Smithsonian Summer Camp and special programs, reserved seating at sold-out events, and invitations to exclusive receptions with speakers.

Recognition as a sponsor of a selected Smithsonian Associates program

Complimentary VIP tickets for six and two parking passes for Breakfast at the Zoo

Priority seating at all Smithsonian Associates programs

Additional 20% discount on member prices for Art Collectors Program fine-arts prints

Visit smithsonianassociates.org/levels or call 202-633-3030 69


PROGRAMS BY FORMAT (New listings in red) All-Day Programs Forgotten No More.......................................................Sat, March 28 ............8 The Napoleonic Wars...................................................Sat, April 18 ...............11 Classical Greece ...........................................................Sat, April 18 ..............12 Tracing Jewish History ...............................................Sat, April 25..............14 The Civil War in Perspective .....................................Sat, April 25..............14 The Real Revolution .....................................................Sat, May 9.................19 France During World War II .......................................Sat, May 30 ..............22 The Maya.........................................................................Sat, May 30 ..............22 Heaven and Hell............................................................Sat, March 14...........27 Writing a Screenplay ..................................................Sat, March 21 ..........30 Tell Your Family Story..................................................Sat, April 4 ...............30 Five Giants of Romantic Music ..............................Fri, April 24...............32 New York Rising ............................................................Fri, May 15................35 Sicily .................................................................................Sat, March 7.............45 Vermeer ..........................................................................Sat, April 4................47 Painters in Provence....................................................Sat, April 18..............49 Michelangelo, Pope Julius, and the Sistine Chapel ..........................................................Sat, May 16 ...............51 Visual Literacy: The Art of Seeing ..........................Sat, June 6 ...............52

Courses History of the British Royal Family .........................Thurs, March 26 ........7 World Heritage Sites: Asia .........................................Thurs, April 2 .............9 Windows on the World ................................................Mon, March 9...........27 Classical Sounds of the Cinema ..............................Sun, March 15..........28 Neighborhoods of Berlin.............................................Thurs, March 19 ......28 Igor Stravinsky ..............................................................Tues, April 14............31 Smithsonian Chorus ..................................................Tues, April 14 ...........32 John Eaton......................................................................Wed, April 29 ...........33 Neighborhoods of Rome, Vienna, and Madrid .....Thurs, April 30 ........33 Out and About with an Artist....................................Sat, April 25 .............45 Masters and Masterpieces ........................................Tues, April 7 .............47 The Art of India .............................................................Wed, April 8..............48 The Art of India .............................................................Tues, May 12 ............48 Islamic Art and Architecture.....................................Fri, May 1 ..................50

Lectures TRENDING Sapporo-Style Ramen..........................................Sat, March 7 ......................2 Judith Viorst ...........................................................Mon, March 16 ..................2 Erik Larson ............................................................Mon, March 16 ..................2 Kathy Reichs...........................................................Wed, March 18...................2 Wine Regions with Sommelier Erik Segelbaum: ........................................... North Italy .........................................................Fri, March 27 .....................3 North Italy .........................................................Sat, March 28....................3 Central/South Italy .........................................Fri, April 24 ........................3 Central/South Italy .........................................Sat, April 25.......................3 Burgundy ...........................................................Fri, May 1 ............................3 Burgundy ...........................................................Sat, May 2 ..........................3 Bagel and Lox .........................................................Sun, March 29...................4 Sustainable Eating ................................................Thurs, April 16...................4 Traveling Smarter..................................................Thurs, May 21 ....................4 Artisan Bread Making ..........................................Thurs, May 28 ...................4 HISTORY The Constitution and the Declaration of Independence..................................................Tues, March 3 ...................5 Understanding the Celtic World........................Wed, March 4 ....................5 The Worlds of Benjamin Franklin......................Tues, March 10..................5

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Charlemagne ..........................................................Thurs, March 12................6 Ireland’s Fight for Freedom ................................Tues, March 17..................6 European Microstates ..........................................Tues, March 24..................7 Democracy Today ..................................................Thurs, March 26 ...............7 Leadership in Crisis ..............................................Tues, March 31..................8 Unearthing History at Armageddon ................Mon, April 6 .....................10 A Man and His Ship ..............................................Thurs, April 16.................10 An Expert's Hunt for History..............................Wed, April 22 ...................12 How the Bible is Written .....................................Thurs, April 23.................12 Inside the Cuban Missile Crisis.........................Thurs, April 23 ................13 Ancient Sparta .......................................................Mon, April 27 ...................15 The Panama Canal................................................Wed, April 29 ...................15 The Berlin Wall .......................................................Mon, May 4 ......................18 Coal and Capitalism .............................................Thurs, May 7 ....................18 All You Can Eat ......................................................Wed, May 13 ....................20 Very Secret, Very Cool: Area 51.........................Wed, May 13 ....................20 Why Brexit? .............................................................Wed, May 20 ....................21 The Women Who Ruled the East End..............Mon, Sept 21 ....................21 Fake News: How To Spot ....................................Tues, June 2 ....................23 Beyond Stonewall..................................................Wed, June 3.....................23 The Tehran Children .............................................Thurs, June 4 ..................23 CULTURE The Greek Gods: Myths and Worship ..............Mon, March 2 ..................25 Why We Love Crosswords...................................Thurs, March 5 ...............25 Global Climate Justice.........................................Mon, Apr 27 .....................25 Re-examining Plato’s Republic..........................Mon, March 9 ..................27 Decoding the Royal Wardrobe ...........................Wed, March 18 ................28 Celebrating Robert Frost ....................................Wed, April 1 .....................30 A Ganges River Excursion...................................Tues, April 14 ...................31 Ayn Rand..................................................................Wed, April 15 ...................32 Civility’s Role in Social Justice .........................Wed, June 10...................36 The 1920s: Welcome to the New World .........Thurs, June 11.................36 SCIENCE Alexander von Humboldt ....................................Sun, March 29 ................39 Extreme Weather ..................................................Tues, March 31................39 Forensic Science...................................................Wed, April 8 .....................39 Remembering Apollo 13 ......................................Wed, April 15 ...................40 Composting 101 .....................................................Sun, April 26....................40 Technology Reveals Hidden Histories.............Thurs, May 7 ....................41 Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary ............................Wed, May 6 ......................42 Galileo.......................................................................Thurs, May 14 ..................42 Are Humans Naturally Good or Bad?..............Wed, May 20 ....................42 50 Years: Smithsonian Magazine and Earth Day.............................................................Fri, May 29 .......................43 The Language of Butterflies..............................Wed, June 3 .....................43 ART Africa in the African American Artistic Imagination......................................................Tues, March 24 ................46 Creativity in Dark Times .....................................Wed, March 25.................46 Creative Writing at Freer ....................................Fri, March 27....................46 Women of the Arts and Crafts Movement ....Fri, April 17........................49 Edward Hopper: American Modernist.............Mon, April 20 ...................49 The Ninth Street Women ....................................Mon, May 11......................50 The Sparkling Mosaics of Ravenna ................Fri, May 15 ........................50 The House Museum ............................................Mon, May 1 ........................51 Raphael and His Circle ........................................Wed, May 27......................51 The Arts and World War I ...................................Mon, June 8......................53 Contemporary Art as a Commodity ................Tues, June 9 .....................53


PROGRAMS BY FORMAT (New listings in red) Performances Smithsonian Chamber Music Society (SCMS) Masterworks of Five Centuries .....................Sat, March 7 ....................26 Jewish Music ..........................................................Sun, March 8...................26 Emerson String Quartet......................................Sun, April 5.......................31 What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow .......Sun, May 17 .....................36

Studio Art Drawing, Painting, Fiber Arts, Other Media, Photography ..............54-67

Member Tours Voice of America Studio Tour ............................Tues, March 10................18 John Singer Sargent.............................................Wed, March 11 .................18 National Geographic.............................................Fri, March 27 ...................18

Study Tours Women in Wartime ...............................................Sat, March 21.....................6 Sears Houses of Arlington .................................Sun, March 29 ...................8 George Washington in Alexandria....................Sat, April 4........................10 George Washington in Alexandria....................Sun, April 5.......................10

George Washington in Alexandria....................Fri, April 17 .......................10 George Washington in Alexandria....................Sun, April 19.....................10 The Seneca Quarry and the Castle .................Sat, April 18.......................11 Lincoln in Virginia .................................................Sat, April 25 .....................13 A Century of Co-ops in the District ................Sat, May 2.........................15 Doodlebugging Through Delaware...................Sat, May 9.........................19 Giants in the Sky: Military Aircraft ..................Tues, May 19 ....................21 A Mountain Rail Extravaganza ..........................Fri, June 5 ........................24 The Road to Nashville..........................................Sun, March 22.................29 The Met’s Costume Institute .............................Thurs, May 14..................34 The Bronx in Bloom ..............................................Sun, May 17......................35 A Carolina Fourth..................................................Wed, July 1 .......................37 A Berkshires Summer Sampler.........................Sun, July 26.....................38 An Immersion in Nature......................................Tues, April 14...................40 An Immersion in Nature......................................Tues, May 5 .....................40 Hiking: Shenandoah National Park ..................Sun, May 3........................41 The Barnes Foundation Philadelphia ..............Sat, April 11 ......................48 Exploring Frank Lloyd Wright ............................Sun, May 31 .....................52 Spring in the Brandywine River Valley ...........Sun, June 14 ....................53

PROGRAMS BY DATE MARCH Mon, March 2

The Greek Gods: Myths and Worship ....................25

Tues, March 24 European Microstates................................................29

Tues, March 3

The Constitution and the Declaration of ..................

Africa in the African American ...................................

Independence .............................................................5 Wed, March 4

Artistic Imagination................................................46

Understanding the Celtic World................................5

Wed, March 25

Thurs, March 5

Why We Love Crosswords ...........................................5

Thurs, March 26 Democracy Today ..........................................................7

Sat, March 7

Sapporo-Style Ramen ..................................................2 Masterworks of Five Centuries ...............................26

Creativity in Dark Times ...........................................46 History of the British Royal Family ..........................7

Fri, March 27

National Geographic (Member Tour) .....................18

Sicily ...............................................................................45

Creative Writing at Freer ..........................................46

Sun, March 8

Jewish Music................................................................26

Wine Regions with Sommelier Erik Segelbaum .....................................

Mon, March 9

Re-examining Plato’s Republic................................27

Fri, March 27

Windows on the World ...............................................27

Sat, March 28 North Italy ......................................................................3

Tues, March 10 Wed, March 11

The Worlds of Benjamin Franklin..............................5

Sat, March 28

Voice of America Studio Tour (Member Tour) .....18

Sun, March 29

John Singer Sargent (Member Tour) .....................18

North Italy ......................................................................3

Forgotten No More .......................................................8 Bagel and Lox .................................................................4 Sears Houses of Arlington..........................................8

Thurs, March 12 Charlemagne ..................................................................6

Alexander von Humboldt ..........................................39

Sat, March 14

Heaven and Hell ..........................................................27

Sun, March 15

Classical Sounds of the Cinema.............................28

Mon, March 16

Erik Larson ....................................................................2

April

Judith Viorst ...................................................................2

Wed, April 1

Tues, March 31

Leadership in Crisis ......................................................8 Extreme Weather ........................................................39 Celebrating Robert Frost..........................................30

Tues, March 17

Ireland’s Fight for Freedom ........................................6

Thurs, April 2

World Heritage Sites: Asia ..........................................9

Wed, March 18

Kathy Reichs...................................................................2

Sat, April 4

George Washington in Alexandria...........................10

Decoding the Royal Wardrobe.................................28

Tell Your Family Story................................................30

Thurs, March 19 Neighborhoods of Berlin ...........................................28

Vermeer ........................................................................47

Sat, March 21

Women in Wartime........................................................6 Writing a Screenplay ................................................30

Sun, March 22

Sun, April 5

George Washington in Alexandria...........................10 Emerson String Quartet ............................................31

The Road to Nashville................................................29

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PROGRAMS BY DATE

Mon, April 6

Unearthing History at Armageddon.......................10

Tues, April 7

Masters and Masterpieces .......................................47

Wed, May 6

Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary.......................................42

Wed, April 8

Forensic Science.........................................................39

Thurs, May 7

Coal and Capitalism....................................................18 Technology Reveals Hidden Histories .......................41

Sat, April 11

The Barnes Foundation Philadelphia.....................48

Sat, May 9

The Real Revolution ....................................................19

Tues, April 14

A Ganges River Excursion .........................................31 Smithsonian Chorus .................................................32

Mon, May 11 Tues, May 12

The Ninth Street Women ..........................................50 The Art of India ................................................................48

An Immersion in Nature............................................40

Wed, May 13

"Very Secret, Very Cool: Area 51"...........................20 All You Can Eat.................................................................20

Thurs, May 14

The Met’s Costume Institute ...................................34 Galileo..................................................................................42

The Art of India ...........................................................48

Igor Stravinsky .............................................................31

Wed, April 15

Ayn Rand .......................................................................32 Remembering Apollo 13............................................40

Thurs, April 16

Sustainable Eating ........................................................4 A Man and His Ship ....................................................10

Fri, April 17

George Washington in Alexandria...........................10 Women of the Arts and Crafts Movement...........49

Sat, April 18

The Seneca Quarry and the Castle .........................11 The Napoleonic Wars ..................................................11 Classical Greece ..........................................................12 Painters in Provence..................................................49

Sun, April 19

George Washington in Alexandria...........................10

Mon, April 20

Edward Hopper: American Modernist ...................49

Wed, April 22

An Expert's Hunt for History ....................................12

Thurs, April 23

How the Bible is Written............................................12

Fri, April 24

Five Giants of Romantic Music ............................32

Inside the Cuban Missile Crisis ...............................13 Wine Regions with Sommelier Erik Segelbaum Fri, April 24

Central/South Italy .......................................................3

Sat, April 25

Central/South Italy .......................................................3

Sat, April 25

Doodlebugging Through Delaware..........................19

Lincoln in Virginia........................................................13

Fri, May 15

New York Rising ..........................................................35 The Sparkling Mosaics of Ravenna ......................50

Sat, May 16

Michelangelo, Pope Julius, and

Sun, May 17

the Sistine Chapel .................................................51 The Bronx in Bloom ........................................................35

Mon, May 18

The House Museum ...................................................51

Tues, May 19

Giants in the Sky: Military Aircraft ........................21

What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow..............36

Wed, May 20

Why Brexit? ...................................................................21 Are Humans Naturally Good or Bad? ....................42

Thurs, May 21

Traveling Smarter..........................................................4

Wed, May 27

Raphael and His Circle...............................................51

Thurs, May 28

Artisan Bread Making...................................................4

Fri, May 29

50 Years: Smithsonian Magazine and Earth Day...................................................................43

Sat, May 30

France During World War II ......................................22

Sun, May 31

The Maya.......................................................................22 Exploring Frank Lloyd Wright ......................................52

Tracing Jewish History ..............................................14 The Civil War in Perspective ....................................14

June

Out and About with an Artist ..................................45

Tues, June 2

Fake News: How To Spot .........................................23

Sun, April 26

Composting 101...........................................................40

Wed, June 3

Beyond Stonewall .......................................................23

Mon, April 27

Ancient Sparta .............................................................15 Global Climate Justice ..............................................25

Thurs, June 4

The Tehran Children...................................................23

The Panama Canal ......................................................15

Fri, June 5 Sat, June 6 Mon, June 8 Tues, June 9

A Mountain Rail Extravaganza.................................24 Visual Literacy: The Art of Seeing ........................52 The Arts and World War I .........................................53 Contemporary Art as a Commodity ......................53

Wed, June 10 Thurs, June 11 Sun, June 14

Civility’s Role in Social Justice ..............................36 The 1920s: Welcome to the New World ...............36 Spring in the Brandywine River Valley..................53

Wed, April 29

John Eaton....................................................................33 Thurs, April 30

Neighborhoods of Rome, Vienna, and Madrid ....33

May Fri, May 1

Islamic Art and Architecture ...................................50

Sat, May 2

A Century of Co-ops in the District .......................15

Wine Regions with Sommelier Erik Segelbaum Fri, May 1

Burgundy .........................................................................3

Sat, May 2 Sun, May 3 Mon, May 4 Tues, May 5

Burgundy .........................................................................3 Hiking: Shenandoah National Park.............................41 The Berlin Wall ..................................................................18 An Immersion in Nature............................................40

72

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

The Language of Butterflies ....................................43

July Wed, July 1 Sun, July 26

A Carolina Fourth........................................................37 A Berkshires Summer Sampler...............................38

September Mon, Sept 21

The Women Who Ruled the East End ....................21


MEMBERSHIP Depending on your level of support, you will receive special benefits, including significant savings on most Smithsonian Associates program tickets; a monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide; discounts at museum shops and restaurants; notices about behind-the-scenes tours and special receptions with world-class speakers; and much more! Visit SmithsonianAssociates.org/join or call 202-633-3030 for more information. Join today!

TICKETS

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Online.......................SmithsonianAssociates.org Email ........................Customerservice@SmithsonianAssociates.org Phone..........................202-633-3030 Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–5 p.m.; Fax 202-786-2536

202-633-3030 SmithsonianAssociates.org/levels

Mail .............................Smithsonian Associates, P.O. Box 23293, Washington, D.C. 20026-3293 In person ...................Mon.– Fri., 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr., S.W., Suite 3077, Washington, D.C. 20560 Fees............................There is a $3 nonrefundable per ticket processing fee on all tickets, except for Members-Only free events, Summer Camps, Smithsonian Sleepovers, and Discovery Theater. Please note that programs with multiple sessions have discounted processing fees applied to each individual session and charged as one fee. There is an additional $3 nonrefundable per order handling fee on phone orders.

REFUNDS are only issued when a program is canceled or if it sells out before we receive your order.

CREDIT TO YOUR SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES ACCOUNT Credit for cancellations or exchanges are only available for programs that cost more than $40. If in compliance with the specific guidelines below, credit is issued to your Smithsonian Associates account, not your credit card. Credits are non-transferable. Programs and Studio Arts Classes If a program or studio arts class is more than $40, and you wish to cancel your tickets or exchange them for another program, please contact Customer Service in writing (email, mail, or fax) at least two weeks before the program date to request a credit. (See contact information above.) Please note that there is a $10 cancellation fee, as well as a cost adjustment when there is a price difference between the programs. Courses To receive credit to your Smithsonian Associates account for a course, (excluding studio arts classes), please contact Customer Service in writing (email, mail, or fax) at least two weeks before the first session. Credit will also be issued within two weekdays after the first session, provided that Customer Service is contacted in writing

CHANGES IN PUBLISHED SCHEDULES Smithsonian Associates reserves the right to cancel, substitute speakers and session topics within a course, and reschedule or relocate any program, if needed. Occasionally, a time, date, or location of a program must change after it has been published or tickets have been mailed. Participants are notified by phone, email, or mail. Be sure to check our website SmithsonianAssociates.org for latest updates, or call 202-633-3030 during business hours for information.

(email, mail, or fax) within that period. Credit will be prorated to reflect the cost of the first session. No credit will be given after the first session. Overnight Study Tours To receive credit to your Smithsonian Associates account for an overnight tour, please contact Customer Service in writing (email, mail, or fax) at least 45 days before the tour date. At that point, there is a $10 cancellation fee. If your request is received between 44 and 15 days before the tour, cancellation fee is $100. No credit will be issued for cancellations received fewer than 15 days before the tour date. The cost of some components of tickets— such as entrance fees, theater tickets, food programs and meals, and some forms of transportation, may not be credited.

the educational and promotional purposes of Smithsonian Institution and Smithsonian Associates. Filming and/or photographing by participants at Smithsonian Associates programs is not permitted. VISITORS WITH DISABILITIES Smithsonian Associates seeks to make activities accessible to people with disabilities. Patrons with disabilities are encouraged to call before registering for programs to inquire about the accessibility of the presentations and locations. For information or to request accessibility assistance, please call 202-633-3030 (VOICE) or send an email to customerservice@SmithsonianAssociates.org

We also reserve the right to refuse to register any individual or to require any participant to withdraw from an activity if the Smithsonian Interpreters for programs are provided free of charge. Smithsonian representative deems such action to be in the best interests of the Associates will make arrangements if requests are made at least two health, safety, or welfare of the group or the participant. weeks in advance of the program. TICKETS AT THE DOOR Tickets are available (on a first-come, MOVING? Please write us with your new information and allow 6 weeks first-served basis) at the door for some Smithsonian Associates for the change to take effect. programs. Call 202-633-3030 to be sure that the program is not already sold out. No discounts applicable to tickets sold at the door. HAVE QUESTIONS? Call Customer Service at 202-633-3030 M–F, GROUP DISCOUNTS Group discounts (for 10 or more) are available for some programs. Please call 202-633-3030 for details. PHOTOGRAPHING AND RECORDING PROGRAMS Participants at Smithsonian Associates programs may be photographed or filmed for

9–5, or stop by our office at 1100 Jefferson Drive, S.W., Suite 3077, (west of the Smithsonian Castle), between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays. (Metro: Blue/Orange/Silver line, Smithsonian–Mall exit)


PERIODICALS POSTAGE Paid at WASHINGTON, D.C. and additional mailing offices

Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C. 20560-0701

Postmaster: please deliver Feb. 28–March 2, 2020

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CUSTOMER NUMBER

On the cover: The Moongate Garden is located in the Enid A. Haupt Garden, adjacent to the Castle.

SMITHSONIAN SUMMER CAMP June 22– August 21, 2020 Weeklong camps for children entering grades K–9 2-week immersive camps forgrades 4–9 Youth Teaching Assistant Boot Camp Visit our website to plan your camper's 2020 Smithsonian Summer Camp Adventure with our Camp Planning Tool.

SmithsonianAssociates.org/camp

Profile for Smithsonian Associates

Smithsonian Associates March 2020 program guide  

Smithsonian Associates monthly program guide. Smithsonian Associates is the largest museum-based education program in the world, offering mo...

Smithsonian Associates March 2020 program guide  

Smithsonian Associates monthly program guide. Smithsonian Associates is the largest museum-based education program in the world, offering mo...