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Support what we do at Smithsonian Associates For more than half a century, education has been at the very heart of what we do at Smithsonian Associates. We open the doors of the Smithsonian’s vast knowledge resources to people of all ages. Please help us continue to carry out our educational mission by making a charitable contribution today. Your help is essential because, unlike the museums, Smithsonian Associates is not federally funded and relies entirely on donations and membership support to bridge the gap between program expenses and ticket revenue.

Demonstrate your support today. The returns will exceed your expectations.

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Dear Friends and Members, Smithsonian Associates’ programs capture the imagination—and take you on journeys through time and space from wherever you call home. Learn something new or dig deeper into the subjects that fascinate you—guided by a top-notch array of experts. Join Elaine Ruffolo’s Art-full Fridays streamed live from Italy and explore the country’s rich cultural heritage this summer. Discover the glories of Ravenna, Venice, and Florence, in this popular series (p. 35). Back in the States, Bill Keene examines Frank Lloyd Wright’s singular visions for domestic architecture and the city of the future (pp. 9, 41, and 43). Appreciating food and drink are delightful ways to understand history and culture: Resident sommelier Erik Segelbaum leads delectable adventures through lively at-home tastings of some of the world’s distinctive wines (pp. 3 and 5). The Cooking Up History series, which we’re proud to present in collaboration with the National Museum of American History, offers a menu of programs hosted by chefs and culinary experts that help define the tantalizing mix of American food today (p. 4). Lunch in style with curator Elizabeth Lay and rethink your post-pandemic wardrobe in these fashion-focused noontime programs (p. 37). Or, upgrade your summer reading and lose yourself in programs spotlighting Jane Austen (p. 15), William Faulkner (p. 23), Elizabeth Barrett Browning (p. 25), Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and the Brothers Grimm (p. 28). Who knows where your next Smithsonian Associates adventure will lead? We’re working on a few more right now, just for you.

All programs in this guide are presented on the Zoom platform. Online registration is required.

July 2021 Trending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Studio Arts . . . . . . . . . . .44 Helpful Information . . . . 55 Programs with these icons showcase Smithsonian’s world of knowledge and long-term initiatives

Frederica R. Adelman, Director adelmanf@si.edu Smithsonian Associates (USPS 043-210) Vol. 49, No. 11, July 2021. Published monthly by Smithsonian Associates, Smithsonian Institution, 1100 Jefferson Drive, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20560. Periodicals postage paid at Washington, DC. and at additional mailing offices. Vesna Gjaja, Director of Marketing and Membership; Cecelia Reed, Editor; Robert A. Sacheli, Copywriter; Ric Garcia, Visual Specialist. Copyright 2021 by the Smithsonian Associates. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Smithsonian Associates, P.O. Box 23293, Washington, D.C. 20026-3293. Printed in the U.S.A. on recyclable paper.

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All programs are presented on the Zoom platform; all listed times are Eastern Time. Online registration is required.

An Evening with Jen Psaki, White House Press Secretary THE WHITE HOUSE

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki knows her way around the West Wing. She was the White House deputy press secretary and deputy communications director during the Obama administration, and in 2015 was named White House communications director. The role of press secretary changed dramatically during the previous administration and Psaki is now reinventing this key position and attempting to restore the trust between the White House and the reporters who cover it. In a wide-ranging conversation with author and veteran White House correspondent Ken Walsh, Psaki defines her role as press secretary, describes changes in presidential communication in recent years, and shares her insights into President Joe Biden as a public leader and a private person. Tues., July 27, 7–8 p.m.; CODE 1H0-640; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Black Smoke African Americans and the United States of Barbecue Across America, the pure love and popularity of barbecue cookery has gone through the roof. Prepared in one regional style or another, in the South and beyond, barbecue is one of the nation’s most distinctive culinary arts. But why is it, asks Adrian Miller—admitted ’cuehead and longtime certified barbecue judge—that in today’s barbecue culture African Americans don’t get much love? Drawing on his new book Black Smoke: African Americans and the United States of Barbecue Miller celebrates and tells the stories of Black barbecuers, pitmasters, and restaurateurs who helped develop this American cuisine. Copies of Black Smoke (University of North Carolina Press) are available for purchase.

Adrian Miller

Thurs., July 1, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-402; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Daniel Silva’s The Cellist

MARCO GROB

Master of international intrigue Daniel Silva’s latest novel, The Cellist, explores one of the West’s preeminent threats: the corrupting influence of dirty money wielded by a revanchist and reckless Russia. The fatal poisoning of a Russian billionaire sends Gabriel Allon, art restorer and spy, across Europe and into the orbit of a musical virtuoso who may hold the key to the truth about a friend’s death. Along the way, he uncovers a plot that threatens the stability of the global order. In a conversation with Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jon Meacham, Silva discusses his career as a best-selling author of 24 novels; the inspiration behind his thrilling storylines; and his writing process. A signed copy of The Cellist (HarperCollins) is included in the ticket price. Wed., July 14, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-423; all tickets $50

Daniel Silva

What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1 hour 15 min.–2 hours, including Q&A

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Grape Explorations Chardonnay and Pinot Noir in Context Chardonnay and Pinot Noir are among the most well-loved yet most misunderstood grapes on the planet. Their ability to express terroir or sense of place leads to a multitude of styles across the globe. With top sommelier Erik Segelbaum as your guide, explore wines from three benchmark appellations for Chardonnay and Pinot Noir, respectively. Learn about the varietal signatures of each grape and how their flavor profiles change from the old world to the new. The cost includes a curated personal tasting kit with enough wine for one person to sample the full lineup. Additional participants must register individually to receive their own. Fri., July 16, 6 p.m.; CODE 1L0-400; Members $65; Nonmembers $75 Wine-tasting kit information: Kits are available during two scheduled pick-up times the day before the program and the day of the program, 12–4 p.m., at The Eastern wine bar in the Capitol Hill neighborhood (360 7th St., SE; Metro: Eastern Market, Orange, Silver and Blue Lines). Pick-ups are contactless, with all appropriate health, safety, and social distancing precautions. Due to state and federal laws, wine kits may not be shipped.

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Plat du Jour: French Classics for Today’s Home Chef Plat du jour, French for dish of the day, is announced on chalkboards in front of France’s restaurants and bistros. Based on regional specialties, it is prepared with only the freshest local ingredients. Cooking teacher, author and journalist Susan Herrmann Loomis highlights this iconic part of la formule (set menu). Focusing on making classics approachable without sacrificing authenticity, she shares what’s needed to make a delicious plat du jour. Susan Herrmann Loomis Virtually enter her Parisian kitchen as Loomis prepares a simple dish or two using recipes from her book Plat du Jour: French Dinners Made Easy. You’ll be inspired to prepare your own— delighting all who share your table. Plat du Jour (Countryman Press) is available for purchase.

FRANCIS HAMMOND

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Tues., Sept. 28, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-158; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Support what we do at Smithsonian Associates For more than half a century, education has been at the very heart of what we do at Smithsonian Associates. We open the doors of the Smithsonian’s vast knowledge resources to people of all ages. Please help us continue to carry out our educational mission by making a charitable contribution today. Your help is essential because, unlike the museums, Smithsonian Associates is not federally funded and relies entirely on donations and membership support to bridge the gap between program expenses and ticket revenue.

Demonstrate your support today. The returns will exceed your expectations.

SmithsonianAssociates.org/levels

JULY 2021 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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Programs that share fresh insights into American culture past and present through the lens of food.

Lena Richard’s New Orleans Cook Book

If you’re a baseball fan, you probably have some favorite ballpark foods ranging from nachos to tacos, but have you thought about the food heritages they draw on? Explore the tangible connections between Rendering of entrance to exhibition baseball and Latino culinary traditions, food fusions, and experiences that reflect broader themes and trends in American history—the focus of the American History Museum’s new exhibition ¡Pleibol! In the Barrios and the Big Leagues / En los barrios y las grandes ligas. This influence is easily seen in the food at stadiums across the country, from the Miami Mex hot dogs and Cubano sandwiches served at Tropicana Field in Florida to the Tex-Mex cuisine served at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx. In celebration of the exhibition’s opening, Dayanny de la Cruz, executive chef at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami, prepares a meal that represents Latinos’ culinary cultures and heritage of baseball-loving families. Dayanny de la Cruz

Mon., July 26, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-413; all tickets $20

A Groundbreaking Story of Innovation and Resilience Lena Richard, a Black chef and enDee Lavigne trepreneur in New Orleans, built a dynamic culinary career in the segregated South, defying harmful stereotypes of Black women that hindered their participation in the creation and development of American food culture and its economy. She owned and operated catering businesses, eateries, a fine-dining restaurant, a cooking school, and an international frozen-food business. Her 1940 New Orleans Cook Book is the first Creole cookbook written by a Black author in a time when racial stereotypes permeated the food industry. Guest chef and New Orleanian Dee Lavigne prepares a classic Creole dish and recounts Richard’s story, which is currently featured in the case “The Only One in the Room: Women Achievers in Business and the Cost of Success,” in the American History Museum’s exhibition American Enterprise. This program is hosted in collaboration with the Southern Food and Beverage Museum where Lavigne is the director of culinary programming. Thurs., Aug. 5, 6:45 p.m.: CODE 1L0-415; all tickets $20

Stir-Frying to the Sky’s Edge Chinese Americans and the Power of Stir-Frying In Stir-Frying to the Sky’s Edge, culinary historian and award-winning cookbook author Grace Young writes of how the ancient technique of stir-frying played an important role in the culinary lives of Chinese migrants. In the United States, many families used their culinary skills to open businesses, including chop suey parlors, where that bland, made-up dish gained popularity. Young—known as “the stir-fry guru” and “wok therapist”— demonstrates her stir-fry expertise and shares Grace Young tips on wok mastery for home cooks as she prepares a savory stir-fry of garlicky cabbage and bacon—a dish improvised in the 1940s by immigrant Lin Ong who used two common American ingredients to feed her nine children. She recounts her own San Francisco family’s unlikely wok story and her work to document COVID’s impact on Manhattan’s Chinatown and to support the AAPI community nationwide. Thurs., Sept. 30, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-414; all tickets $20

3-program package; Mon., July 26, Thurs., Aug. 5, Thurs., Sept. 30; 6:45 p.m.; CODE COOKING21; all tickets $50

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CHRISTINE HAN

MATTHEW NOEL

Latino Culinary Traditions and Américas’ Game

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY

Pleibol and Eat Well!

CHANELLE HARRIS

Presented in Collaboration with the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History


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A TOP SOMMELIER'S GUIDE TO WINE

Grapes, Geography, and Global Wine Tastings Spend three fascinating Friday evenings expanding your knowledge of the world of wine as you sip along with sommelier Erik Segelbaum in a series of delectable adventures. Each immersive program includes a curated personal tasting kit to enhance the experience.

AUG 13 Unlocking Portugal’s Wine Secrets Portugal is a fascinating country with an even more amazing wine culture that represent every style imaginable. The wide range of options and flavor profiles, along with a plethora of indigenous native grapes, put Portuguese wine at the forefront of every wine pro’s mind.

SEPT 17 Discovering South America South America boasts some of the world’s best vineyard locations. Explore wines made on both sides of the Andes and how this massive mountain range is repsonsible for a diverse stylistic influence on the coastal west in Chile and the inland east in Argentina. You might even discover a new favorite among vintages produced in wine regions you never knew existed, such as Uruguay and Bolivia.

OCT 15 Loving the Loire The Loire Valley is the heart of France, famous for its natural beauty, magnificent châteaux and exceptional wine. The region is rich in history and culture: Renaissance writer Rabelais was born here and Joan of Arc led French troops to victory in the Hundred Years War in the Loire. As a testament to all the region contributes to French and global culture, the Loire Valley was added to the UNESCO World Heritage list in 2000. 3 sessions; Fri., Aug. 13, Sept. 17, and Oct. 15, 6–8 p.m.; CODE 3WINE2021; Members $175; Nonmembers $200

Individual programs: Fri., Aug. 13; CODE 1L0-420; Fri., Sept. 17, CODE 1L0-421; Fri., Oct. 15; 6–8 p.m.; CODE 1L0-422; Members $65 Nonmembers $75 Wine-tasting kit information: The cost includes a curated personal tasting kit with enough wine for one person to sample the full lineup of wines. Additional participants must register individually to receive their own tasting kit. Kits are available during two scheduled pick-up times the day before the program and the day of the program, 12–4 p.m. at The Eastern wine bar in the Capitol Hill neighborhood (360 7th Street SE; Metro: Eastern Market, Orange, Silver, Blue lines). Pick-ups are contactless, with all appropriate health, safety, and social distancing precautions. Due to state and federal laws, wine kits may not be shipped.

Be sure to stay engaged with us. Visit Smithsonian Associates’ website, where a special link on the home page offers the latest information including program status decisions, messages to members and patrons, and our lively weekly Digital Digest.

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All programs are presented on the Zoom platform; all listed times are Eastern Time. Online registration is required.

The Point of Beginning Join the Ohiobased team of photographer Dan Patterson and American SURVEYING IN EARLY AMERICA The Point of Beginning, An Illustrated History historian Clinton DAN PATTERSON CLINTON TERRY Terry as they use historically accurate contemporary photos that restage the work of Virginia’s first surveyor, George Washington, and his team to provide an interpretive look at surveying in the 18th century. The depictions provide insights into surveying as a primary means of building the nation and how the region from the east to the Ohio River Valley was initially divided and documented. See what Washington saw as he learned his trade, and occasionally laid personal claim to great expanses of land. Patterson and Terry’s book, Surveying in Early America: The Point of Beginning, An Illustrated History (The University of Cincinnati Press) is available for purchase. by

and

Thurs., July 8, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1K0-114; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

BLACKPAST.ORG

Surveying in Colonial America

The African American Great Migration Pursuing the American Dream The Great Migration was the mass movement of mostly rural Black Southerners to urban cores across the country between 1916 and 1970. It was one A Black family arrives in Chicago from of the most important the South, ca. 1919 moments in American history and reconfigured the nation’s politics, arts, and culture. As millions of people confronted the challenges of a new labor market, housing segregation, and Northern racism, African American communities redefined themselves as representative of Southern sensibilities and Northern realities. Marcia Chatelain, professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University, examines how the social upheaval changed families as they faced generational differences, gendered expectations, and the possibilities of a better life in cities. She also explores how the movement continues to change our lives today. Mon., July 12, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-612; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

A Gift That Goes Far To Bring You Closer For so many of us scattered across the country, it’s been challenging to find ways to connect with friends and family. But no matter where you live, here’s how to share a wonderful experience with people you care about. Give a Smithsonian Associates Streaming gift certificate, and who knows … you may end up attending a program or two with your best friend next door—or your far-off cousin!

For more information visit: smithsonianassociates.org/gift-certificate

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Tempest in a Teapot: The Boston Tea Party LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The Boston Tea Party was a response to the 1773 Tea Act devised to reduce tea smuggling within the British Empire. It would also help to boost the sales of tea legally imported to the American colonies by a favored company, the East India Company. Boston merchants denounced the act as a threat to free trade and colonial liberty. And in December 1773, when three ships arrived in Boston harbor carrying that cargo, one hundred local men boarded them and tossed the tea overboard. Historian Richard Bell argues that the Tea Party marks the first major protest in America against corporate greed and the effects of globalization. It was also an act of domestic terrorism that helped set the stage for the American Revolution. Tues., July 13, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-613; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Destruction of tea at Boston Harbor, Currier & Ives lithograph, 1846

Sensational! Trailblazing Women Journalists

PC DANI WERNER

In the waning years of the 19th century, women journalists across the United States risked reputation and their own safety to expose the hazardous conditions under which many Americans lived and worked. In various disguises, they stole into sewing factories to report on child labor, fainted in the streets to test public hospital treatment, and posed as lobbyists to reveal corrupt politicians. These “girl stunt reporters” changed laws, helped launch a labor movement, championed women’s rights, and redefined journalism for the modern age. Drawing from her new book, Sensational, Kim Todd looks at the vivid social history of these fearless reporters. Sensational (Harper) is available for purchase.

Kim Todd

Thurs., July 15, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-403; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

The Hidden History of Coined Words In an engaging dive into language, author Ralph Keyes explores the etymological underworld of word-coinage and finds that neologisms are as likely to be created by chance as by design. Many new words were coined whimsically. “Knickers,” for example, resulted from a hoax and “Big Bang” from an insult. Casual wisecracking produced “software,” “crowdsource,” and “blog.” Others resulted from happy accidents such as typos, mistranslations, and mishearings. Neologizers (a Thomas Jefferson coinage) include not just scholars Ralph Keyes and writers but cartoonists, columnists, children’s book authors. Word nerds, history buffs, trivia contesters, and anyone who loves the power of language will enjoy this program. Keyes’ book The Hidden History of Coined Words (Oxford University Press) is available for sale. Wed., July 14, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1K0-117; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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England, Custodian of the Jewish Past The Duke of Sussex—no, not Harry, but rather Prince Augustus Frederick, son of King George III— collected Hebrew Bibles. An 18th-century Oxford don traveled to Italy to purchase a lavishly illuminated Hebrew Bible manuscript. John Selden, whom John Milton called “the chief of learned men reputed in this land,” collected manuscripts of the Code of Jewish Law written by Moses Maimonides. Charles Taylor, master of St. John’s College, Cambridge, expended the funds to bring 200,000 Jewish documents found in a Cairo synagogue’s attic storeroom back to Cambridge. Why were these venerable English personages so fascinated by Jewish history? Historian and self-styled Anglophile Gary A. Rendsburg draws on many summers and sabbaticals spent conducting research in English museums and libraries to find the answers to that question. Follow him through the centuries, commencing with the Middle Ages and then crafting the narrative from the Tudors to the Victorians. 9:30 a.m. Setting the Stage: Oxford and Cambridge British Museum

11 a.m. The Bodleian Library, University of Oxford 12:15 p.m. Break 1:15 p.m. The Cairo Geniza: Discovery and Documents 2:45 p.m. The British Library, the British Museum, and the John Rylands Library

Oxford aerial view

Sat., July 17, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; CODE 1M2-141; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

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How Prohibition Shaped the Twenties

The 1920s is both one of the most vibrant and rebellious periods in modern American history as well the most socially conservative. A Constitutional amendment prohibiting the consumption of alcohol threatened to muffle its everloudening, jazz-inflected roar. The intent was to solve some of the Alabamians protesting Prohibition nation’s most pressing social issues, including alcoholism, childhood malnutrition, and domestic violence. Instead Prohibition uncorked an exuberant cultural freedom and a host of new social problems, with heady effects still felt today. Historian Allen Pietrobon examines the role that alcohol played in American life leading up to Prohibition. Why did Prohibition backfire so spectacularly? And how, in its defiance, did American society and culture change so dramatically throughout the 1920s? Tues., July 20, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-100; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Operation Pedestal: The Fleet That Battled to Malta In 1940 Adolph Hitler had two choices when it came to the Mediterranean region: Stay out or commit sufficient forces to expel the British from the Middle East. He committed a major strategic blunder and ordered the Wehrmacht to seize Crete, allowing Malta to remain in Allied hands. The Royal Navy and RAF were able to use the island as a base, sinking many German supply ships. But tables turned as the Luftwaffe’s relentless bombing raids took their toll. Drawing on his new book, Operation Pedestal, historian Max Hastings recounts the story of the ensuing British mission to save troops on Malta—in one of the war’s fiercest battles. Operation Pedestal (Harper) is available for purchase. Tues., July 20, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-410; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Max Hastings

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Frank Lloyd Wright: Affordable Homes for Americans

BILL KEENE

Many of Frank Lloyd Wright’s best-known domestic designs are homes for well-to-do clients. Though not mansions, residences such as Fallingwater in rural Pennsylvania and Chicago’s Frederick C. Robie House were out of reach for average Americans. Early in the 20th century, Wright undertook a quest to design housing more accessible for the typical middle-class family. Drawing on extensive illustrations, historian Bill Keene examines this lesser-known aspect of the architect’s career. By the 1930s, Wright embraced a simplified compact plan for affordable homes, which he christened Usonian. Examples include the Herbert Jacobs house, built in Madison, Wisconsin for $5,500; and the 1940 Pope-Leighey house in Northern Virginia. After World War II, most of Wright’s domestic architecture consisted of Usonians and many still exist today. Wed., July 21, 12–1:30 p.m.; CODE 1NV-076; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

Pope-Leighey House

Herbert Jacobs House

How the Old West Forged the New Woman Between 1840 and 1910, more than half a million men and women traveled deep into the American West. Unlike their Eastern counterparts, women took on responsibilities usually reserved for men and gained authority in public life. They achieved the rights to earn income, purchase property, and especially, vote. Winifred Gallagher draws on her book New Women in the Old West: From Settlers to Suffragists, An Untold American Story to explore little-known women—including Native American, Hispanic, African American, and Asian women—who changed the course of the fight for women’s suffrage and universal equality. New Women in the Old West (Penguin Press) is available for sale.

NINA SUBIN

Part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative

Wed., July 21, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1K0-119; Members $20; Nonmembers $25 Winifred Gallagher

What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1 hour 15 min.–2 hours, including Q&A

Mark FRIDAYS AT NOON on your calendar to savor the liveliest and most interesting conversation you’ll hear all week. Designed exclusively for Smithsonian Associates members, this monthly web podcast series invites you to go behind the scenes into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. Learn more at SmithsonianAssociates.org

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Beyond Stonewall How DC Shifted the Nature of Pride On June 28, 1970 in New York City—exactly one year after a police raid on the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village sparked the riots that marked the beginning of the modern LGBT+ rights movement—the first Gay Pride parade took place. But parades that followed were criticized for mostly representing the experiences of white gay men and to some extent white lesbians. In May 1991 a lesser-known pivotal moment took place in Washington, D.C.: the city’s first Black Pride celebration. Nikki Lane, assistant professor of Black queer studies in the Comparative Women’s Studies Program at Spelman College, examines how the District became the founding place for Black Pride celebrations of community, inclusion, and diversity. Thurs., July 22, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-103; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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Finding the Real Queen Charlotte The enormously popular Netflix series Bridgerton has brought Queen Charlotte into the limelight. It can be easy to oversimplify representations of the Queen, especially with so much attention on court controversies and the impact of King George III’s illness on the royal family. How accurate are the show’s portrayals of this long-reigning queen consort? Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger Princess Charlotte (detail), by Johann explores the many Georg Ziesenis, ca. 1761 ways in which Charlotte made a difference in her subjects’ lives during her 57-year reign and her influence on social life, the arts, and politics during the reign of George III and the Regency. Thurs., July 22, 6:30–8:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-139; Members $30; Nonmembers $35

Driving the Green Book

Alvin Hall

Janée Woods Weber

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Hit the road with award-winning journalist Alvin Hall and social justice trainer Janée Woods Weber as they document their 12-day, 2,021-mile road trip from Detroit to New Orleans inspired by The Negro Motorist Green Book, the historic guide (published 1936–1967) African Americans relied on to travel safely at the height of segregation and the Jim Crow era. Hall and Woods Weber collected personal and powerful Lifting the Veil of Ignorance, monument to Booker T. stories from Black Americans who used the Green Book to Washington, Tuskegee navigate trips, patronize Black-owned businesses, and come University together in the face of institutionalized racism. Join Hall and Woods Weber as they share stories—collected into a living-history podcast, “Driving the Green Book”— about people, their communities, and their fight for equality. Tues., July 27, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-404; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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Napoleon’s Complicated Legacy Few figures in history excite as passionately held and often-conflicting visions as Napoleon. Whether he was the genius and the spirit of revolution incarnate, or the megalomaniac monster and compulsive warmonger, his personality is crucial to understanding the turbulent years that shaped the world at the start of the 19th century. One of the greatest military minds, the scale of Napoleon’s ambitions continues to capture people’s imagination, despite the fact that he was called a double-dealer, egoist, nepotist, and exploiter of human weaknesses. Whether admired as a military leader, or condemned as a dictator, he dominated his age like no other. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze discusses the many facets of Napoleon and his enormous influence on Europe and many parts of the world. Thurs., July 29, 6:30 p.m; CODE 1M2-140; Members $30; Nonmembers $35 The Emperor Napoleon in His Study at the Tuileries (detail) by JacquesLouis David

The Espionage Act of 1917

The Valois Dynasty In public imagination, the Valois dynasty is largely overshadowed by their English rivals, the Tudors. Yet, the two centuries of the Valois reign were crucial in the establishment of France as a major European power. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze explores the dynasty’s rise—and fall. When the first Valois came to power in 1328, much of France was under English rule. By the early 16th century, a powerful King Francis I allied with Ottoman sultan Suleiman the Magnificent, feuded with the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, negotiated with England’s Henry VIII— while cultivating French arts and sciences. The dynasty ended with internal intrigues, the chaos of the Reformation, the Wars of Religion, and the death of the heirless King Henry III, in 1589.

Charles V of France

Tues., Aug. 3, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-146; Members $30; Nonmembers $35

The Perils of Protecting the Nation’s Secrets More than a century after it was enacted in 1917, the Espionage Act plays an increasingly significant role in modern American politics. Prosecutions carried out under the act, once rare, have become regular events as figures like Chelsea Manning, Julian Assange, and Edward Snowden face imprisonment for violating the law. How did a law enacted during the Wilson administration become the primary mechanism for securing the vast national security state today? Political historian Sam Lebovic traces the law’s development through the World Wars, the Cold War, and the War on Terror; how it reveals American democracy’s past struggles to balance security and liberty; and suggests the threats to democracy that national security secrecy poses today. Tues., Aug. 3, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-614; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Be sure to stay engaged with us. Visit Smithsonian Associates’ website, where a special link on the home page offers the latest information including program status decisions, messages to members and patrons, and our lively weekly Digital Digest.

JULY 2021 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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WALKER ART GALLERY, LIVERPOOL

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Even though they lived nearly 500 years ago, the Tudors continue to fascinate us. From the king with six wives to the first two crowned queens of England, the Tudors redefined the monarchy and what it meant to be royal. The family oversaw several changes in religion, instituted a tradition of a professional council, started the Royal Navy and the Royal Postal Service, and ushered England from the Middle Ages into the Renaissance. In just three generations, the Tudors reshaped the monarchy in their image and changed England, Europe, and the world. Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger takes participants behind Tudor England’s carefully contrived image of power and magnificence for a revealing glimpse of the royals, their friends and family, and the social climbers and power-brokers who filled the Tudor court and created the Tudor world. 9:30 a.m. The Unlikely Beginning at Bosworth Field 11 a.m. Henry VIII: An Heir at any Cost 12:15 p.m. Break 1:15 p.m. Religion and Power in Tudor England

NATIONAL MUSEUM OF AMERICAN HISTORY

Portrait of Henry VIII, 1536–1537, by the workshop of Hans Holbein the Younger

2:45 p.m. The Final Tudor and the Tudor Legacy Sat., Aug. 7, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.: CODE 1M2-144; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, by Nicholas Hilliard

Keepers of the Flame

Shakespeare’s London: A Living Stage

Smithsonian Olympic Collections Past, Present, and Future Smithsonian curators started collecting Olympic artifacts in earnest in the 1970s and ’80s, originally with an eye to the most famous and uncontroversial medal winners. But Bill Baker 1980 hockey jersey over the last 20 years, collecting has evolved to document the diversity of athletes and their compelling Olympic appearances. From the Miracle on Ice and Dominique Dawes to recent acquisitions from Tommie Smith, fencer Ibtihaj Mohammad, and the Paralympics and Special Olympics, the collection tells a broad range of stories. Join Kenneth Cohen, Edward and Helen Hintz secretarial scholar and curator at the American History Museum, for a tour of the Smithsonian’s Olympic collections and a look at how Smithsonian curators will approach the Tokyo Games this year and beyond.

When young Will Shakespeare showed up in London some time before 1592, he found himself in a completely unfamiliar scene. London was becoming the largest and most important city in Europe. It was Sir John Falstaff arrested, at the suit of Mrs. full of travelers from Quickly! [Henry IV, pt. 2], engraving by George all over the world—a Cruikshank polyglot of different cultures and languages, its inhabitants crammed together in narrow streets and taverns. The work of writing and performing plays was changing for playwrights and actors with the establishment of permanent playhouses and acting companies. Shakespeare was primed to make his mark. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger explores how London served as a backdrop and inspiration for his plays—and how the humanity he observed was reflected in the unforgettable worlds of his plays.

Tues., Aug. 3, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-416; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Thurs., Aug. 12, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-147; Members $30; Nonmembers $35

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WALKER ART GALLERY, LIVERPOOL

A Day with the Tudors


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GEORGE SCHEPER

The Maya: Ancient Splendors, Modern Legacies The Maya, Aztec, and Inka are the best-known of ancient American civilizations. The Aztec and the Inka flourished late in the pre-Columbian era on the eve of Spanish contact, but the Maya arose as a distinct civilization more than 2,000 years ago. They are still very much with us today, living in their southern Mexican and Central American homelands, as well as in the United States and elsewhere in diaspora. During the Classic period, from about 300 to 900 A.D., the Maya had a fully developed writing system, partly hieroglyphic and partly phonetic. The famous breaking of the Mayan code in the late 20th century revolutionized the study of these peoples and of ancient America generally. Humanities scholar George Scheper examines how interdisciplinary study of the Maya extends beyond traditional archaeological studies to comprise political and social history, art, comparative religion, and ecology. 9:30 a.m. Romancing the Maya 11 a.m. The Dawn of the Maya 12:15 p.m. Break 1:15 p.m. Splendors of the Classic Maya 2:45 The Maya in Modern History and Today Sat., Aug. 14, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; CODE 1M2-120; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

Painted bas relief in Palenque El Castillo, a Mayan pyramid at Chichen Itza, Mexico

The Valley Forge Winter: Remembering the Man Who Made a Difference During the harsh winter of 1777, when the Continental Army was camped at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, Gen. George Washington turned to Baron Friedrich von Steuben for help in turning a ragtag collection of ill-supplied, untrained enlistees into a professional fighting force. Baron Friedrich Wilhelm It was a turning point in the war von Steuben by Charles and historian Richard Bell tells the Willson Peale story through the perspective of von Steuben, a Prussian immigrant who had to overcome antiGerman bigotry and rumors about his sexuality in order to do his job and transform Washington’s army. The life von Steuben chose to live took grit, which he had in abundance: He is remembered as the gay man who saved the American Revolution. Mon., Aug. 16, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-149; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

Los Angeles: Creating the Vision From the last years of the 19th century throughout much of the following one, alluring images of endless sunshine, pristine beaches, and snow-capped mountains filled magazine stories and tourist pamphlets promoting Los Angeles and Southern California. But LA’s civic boosters wanted to be seen as much more. Discover how Los Angeles evolved from a winter vacation destination to become a dynamic center of industry, and the leading port of the western United States—despite the lack of a natural harbor. In a richly illustrated lecture, Bill Keene covers the period from the city’s founding in 1781 to 1930 as he draws on booster literature, magazine articles, and scholarly and informal histories to examine how LA’s vision of itself became a reality. Thurs., Aug. 26; 7:30 p.m.; CODE 1NV079; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

Downtown Los Angeles

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The Rise and Fall of the House of Bourbon

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Thomas Paine: Revolutions of a Founding Father

The House of Bourbon remains one of the most historically important European royal houses. The Bourbons came to prominence in the 16th century when they first became the rulers of Navarre, in Spain, and later of France proper. Historian Alexander Mikaberidze explores their rise to power, starting with the life and career of Henry Portrait of Louis XIV by Hyacinthe Rigaud IV, the first Bourbon king of France and one of the most important French sovereigns. The Bourbon rulers who followed—Louis XIII and the famed Louis XIV, the “Sun King”— turned France into Europe’s leading power. Then, in the 18th century, the Bourbon kings confronted severe political and financial strains. Mikaberidze examines the root causes for revolution that ended the French monarchy in 1792.

When Tom Paine died in June 1809 only a dozen people came to his funeral. The burial service was held in Westchester County near the 250-acre farm gifted to Paine by the people of the state of New York in gratitude for his role in stirring the American Thomas Paine by Laurent Dabos, 1791 Revolution. The site of Paine’s funeral wasn’t hard to find or difficult to travel to, yet not a single political leader attended. Historian Richard Bell examines Paine’s meteoric rise to celebrity status during the American Revolution with the publication of Common Sense (1776), and his equally dramatic fall from grace years later, deemed as too radical and uncompromising for the cautious new country he had helped call into being.

Wed., Sept. 8, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-150; Members $30; Nonmembers $35

Thurs., Sept. 9, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-151; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Fighting Slavery in the Civil War Era The Civil War was the largest slave revolt in world history—and a war for freedom that derailed American history. It would end with the destruction of American slavery and the passage of the 13th Amendment. But it was the result of years of struggle and sacrifice by men and women who devoted their lives to advancing the freedom struggle, from author Harriet Beecher Stowe and Underground Railroad conductor Harriet Tubman to abolitionist, activist, and firebrand John Brown and the thousands of Black men—from the free North, the border states, and the slave-owning South—who fought against slavery while wearing Union blue. Historian Richard Bell explores the antislavery fight, focusing on the people whose courage and personal struggle led to the final victory. 10 a.m. Two Harriets 11:15 a.m. The Black Heart of John Brown 12:15 p.m. Break 1:15 p.m. The Slaves’ War 2:30 p.m. Black and Blue Woodcut image of a male slave on the broadside publication of John Greenleaf Whittier’s antislavery poem, “Our Countrymen in Chains,” 1837

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Sat., Sept. 11, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-152; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

Harriet Beecher Stowe, ca. 1880

NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, LONDON

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The Regency World of Jane Austen: From Parlor to Politics In 1811, when King George III descended into madness and was deemed unfit to rule, his son George, the Prince of Wales, was appointed to act as regent in his place. Thus began the Regency, a time that has been characterized as a mix of high fashion and low morals. Jane Austen’s novels give us a window into life in Regency England, creating a world of country retreats, London townhouses, fashionable finery, and romantic (if sometimes-rocky) courtships. Tudor and Renaissance scholar Carol Ann Lloyd-Stanger looks at Regency England as seen through the eyes of Austen and her novels, providing added insight into the lives of the characters during one of England’s most fascinating eras. Mon., Sept. 13, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-153; Members $30; Nonmembers $35 The Prince Regent, an illustration by George Cruikshank, 1816

American Schism: Healing a Divided Nation The bitter political divisiveness, anger, and irrational thinking that inhibit logical debate today led Enlightenment scholar Seth David Radwell to search American history for root causes of this split. He discovered a startling truth: Two disparate Americas have always coexisted, originating in two distinct Enlightenments that have been fiercely competing since the founding of our country. He discusses the nature of this divided vision and the core issues at the heart of the current national brawl. He also proposes a new dialogue between all thoughtful Americans to begin the process of repair and reconciliation. His new book, American Schism: How the Two Enlightenments Hold the Secret to Healing Our Nation (Greenleaf Book Group), is available for purchase. Mon., Sept. 13, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-417; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Seth David Radwell

The Battle of the Little Bighorn Custer, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, Bloody Nose, Reno: The Battle of the Little Bighorn, fought June 25–26, 1876, is the single most iconic event in what have been called the Plains Indian Wars. “Custer’s Last Stand” is one of the central episodes of the frontier era of American history. It’s one of the handful of stories that are endlessly fascinating—and never give up all their mysteries. Humanities scholar Clay Jenkinson, who has spent his life in Sitting Bull and Custer country and who has walked the Custer Battlefield a dozen times, brings his perspectives on the conflict. His discussion draws on his new book, The Language of Cottonwoods: Essays on the Future of North Dakota. Tues., Sept. 14, 7 p.m.; CODE: 1K0-133; Members $20; Nonmembers $25 The Custer Fight by Charles Marion Russell, 1903

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ANDREW SHIVA

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Masada: Searching for Answers in the Desert Situated on top of an isolated rock plateau, Masada, an ancient fortress overlooking the Dead Sea, is one of the most popular tourist attractions in Israel. It is believed that Masada is where the final confrontation of the First Jewish–Roman War (66–73 A.D.) took place. After breaching the fortress, Roman troops discovered that the 960 Jewish Zealots gathered in this last stronghold, had killed themselves, preferring “death to slavery.” This version of what happened at Masada has become one of the most significant and enduring sources of pride among Israelis. But what really happened at Masada? Drawing on findings from recent archaeological digs, historian Ralph Nurnberger explores the myths and realities of this ancient fortress. Tues., Sept. 14, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-621; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Gettysburg: Crossroads of the Civil War The epic battle fought in the farm fields and hills of southern Pennsylvania in early July 1863 remains a pivotal moment—both in the Civil War as well as the broad sweep of American history. After three days of fighting at Gettysburg, more than 7,000 Americans lay dead, and another 43,000 were wounded or missing. Drawing on original documents from that fateful summer, historian Christopher Hamner explores the most destructive battle ever fought in North America, from the beginning of Lee’s invasion in early June through the climactic fighting in central Pennsylvania to the Confederate retreat in July—and the effects of the Union victory on the two bloody years that followed. Mon., Sept. 20, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-619; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Cemetery Ridge at the Bloody Angle

The Korean War: A Forgotten “Forever” War The Korean Peninsula is arguably one of the most perplexing and paradoxical places on the planet: dynamic, modern South Korea vs. desperately poor, unstable North Korea. The two countries have been locked in a military standoff that began with a devastating war in June 1950 and ended, after claiming 5 million casualties, with a temporary armistice in 1953. The military conflict has been frozen in place since; a remnant of the Cold War and largely forgotten in the annals of U.S. history. Academic and policy analyst Balbina Y. Hwang explores Korea’s unique culture and long history, and the global role this tiny corner of Asia will likely play in the 21st century. Tues., Sept. 21, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-115; Members $30; Nonmembers $35 Korean Demilitarized Zone

Mark FRIDAYS AT NOON on your calendar to savor the liveliest and most interesting conversation you’ll hear all week. Designed exclusively for Smithsonian Associates members, this monthly web podcast series invites you to go behind the scenes into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. Learn more at SmithsonianAssociates.org

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Volcanic UNESCO World Heritage Sites There are 1,121 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout the world. Each of them offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. Join Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of history at American University, for in-depth looks at four UNESCO World Heritage sites that have been profoundly affected by nearby volcanoes. Drawing on the material remains of Herculaneum and Pompeii, Jacobs paints a lively portrait of daily urban life in the ancient Roman world. Iceland’s Thingvellir National Park is the historical backdrop for an exploration of the Viking migrations and their strategies for survival on an impoverished and volatile island. A focus on Mount Fuji considers the human influences on this dormant volcano and its role in Japanese history. Virunga National Park, known for a chain of eight volcanoes — two active, six dormant, along the border of Uganda, Rwanda, and Congo—is home to the endangered mountain gorilla and hundreds of other unique plant and animal species. SEPT 23 Herculaneum and Pompeii SEPT 30 Thingvellir National Park OCT 7 Mount Fuji OCT 14 Virunga National Park 4 sessions; Thurs., Sept. 23–Oct. 14, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-113; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

THE NATIONAL GALLERY, LONDON

Individual sessions: Thurs., Sept 23 (CODE 1J0-113A); Thurs., Sept. 30 (CODE 1J0-113B); Thurs., Oct. 7 (CODE 1J0-113C); Thurs., Oct. 14 (CODE 1J0-113D)l 6:45 p.m.; all tickets $25

Clockwise: Pompeii, Mount Fuji, Mount Nyiragongo, Virunga National Park, Thingvellir National Park

The Philosophical Thought of Thomas Aquinas

Lady Bird Johnson, Hidden No More

The thought of Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274) presents one of the most comprehensive philosophical systems in the history of Western civilization. Although a theologian by profession, Aquinas dedicated much of his vast writings to discerning what the human mind can learn independently of faith. Although Aquinas saw philosophy as the handmaiden of theology, he was careful to acknowledge its significance as a system of thought distinct from theology. Aquinas scholar Gregory T. Doolan explores the historical significance of Aquinas’s philosophical thought from his own time to today. He also examines Aquinas’s accounts of causality, of the immortality of the human soul, and of the existence of God as ultimate source of being.

Lady Bird Johnson’s complex and captivating role—as a political partner to her husband, and as a critical advisor and strategist—is revealed in Julia Sweig’s new biography. The story, told in Lady Bird’s own words through the largely unknown audio diaries that she kept as first lady, reveals a formidable storyteller and historian, and a conscious creator of legacy. In conversation with Katrina Vanden Heuvel, publisher of The Nation magazine, Sweig discusses revelations she uncovered about the role Lady Bird played in the LBJ White House. She also shares Lady Bird’s crucial role in environmental policy-making, which went far beyond flowers planted along highways. Lady Bird Johnson: Hiding in Plain Sight (Random House) is available for purchase.

Thurs., Sept. 23, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-157; Members $30; Nonmembers $35 Saint Thomas Aquinas by Carlo Crivelli, 1476

Julia Sweig

Wed., Sept. 22, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-418; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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Travel Writer Colin Thubron on the Amur River The Amur River is the tenth longest river in the world—yet it is almost unknown. It rises in the Mongolian mountains, flows through Siberia to the Pacific, and for 1,100 miles forms the tense border between Russia and China. Acclaimed travel writer Colin Thubron recounts an eye-opening, often-perilous journey from the Amur’s secret headwaters to where it ends, covering almost 3,000 miles. Thubron travels on Mongolian horse, poachers’ sloops, and the Trans-Siberian Express, meeting everyone from Chinese traders to indigenous people. By the time he reaches the river’s desolate end— Colin Thubron where Russia’s 19th-century imperial dream evaporated—a pivotal world has come alive. His book The Amur River: Between Russia and China (HarperCollins) is available for purchase. Wed., Sept. 29, 12–1:30 p.m.; CODE 1L0-419; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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Wine and the White House: A Presidential Toast Early presidents recognized the important function wine played in entertaining at the White House. While some appreciated wine, others considered it merely a ceremonial necessity. Still others banned it from the Executive Mansion; their successors celebrated its return. More recently, all presidents, regardless of whether they enjoyed wine themselves, have used the White House to showcase the fine wines produced in the United States. Fred Ryan Jr., author of Wine and the White House: A History, is joined by Smithsonian Distinguished Scholar Richard Kurin for an informative and entertaining evening perfect for devotees of presidential history, lovers of wine, or both. Wine and the White House: A History (White House Historical Association) is available for sale. Wed., Sept. 29, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1K0-140; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Fred Ryan Jr.

Richard Kurin

The Queen’s Residences

RXUYDC @ ENGLISH-LANGUAGE WIKIPEDIA

Royal Recollections The official residences of Queen Elizabeth II are scattered through the United Kingdom. Beyond iconic landmarks, they are also magnificent living palaces, estates, and castles that serve the daily needs of the monarchy and to entertain guests in state banquets to small receptions. Andrew Lannerd, co-founder of Transcendent Travel, which specializes in distinctive tours of the United Kingdom, explores each of these famed residences, from garden parties at Buckingham Palace, a royal wedding at Windsor Castle, to a private 80th birthday party for the queen. He also uncovers royal letters from a private collection, notable objects, and anecdotes from a lifetime researching the British monarchy. Lannerd is the author of Royal Recollections: Stories of Travel, Royalty and Collecting. Wed., Oct. 6, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1J0-117; Members $20; Nonmembers $25 Sandringham House, Norfolk

What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1 hour 15 min.–2 hours, including Q&A

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The Potomac: A Natural and Cultural History The Potomac River is one of the most storied in North America, with a rich natural and cultural history reflected throughout its nearly 400 miles of waterways that extend from the Appalachian highlands of West Virginia to the Chesapeake Bay. Environmental historian Hayden Mathews brings that heritage to life in a series that focuses on how the Potomac has shaped the lives of the those who settled along its banks throughout history. The Potomac flows through rocks that hold more than a billion years of Earth’s history and encompasses many different ecological areas and diverse species. Mathews’ first program examines the natural, ecological, and geological forces that defined the character of the land we see today, covering continental collisions, glaciations, and species lost and gained. He shifts to cultural history in subsequent programs that highlight some of the most notable aspects of the 15,000 years that humans have inhabited this area. Mathews moves from the lifeways of the Paleoindians and First Nations peoples to the stories of slaves seeking freedom, inventors, smugglers, fishermen, floods, and first ladies, painting a colorful portrait of Mid-Atlantic history.

The Potomac River in Great Falls National Park

Fri., Oct. 8, 15, 22, TIME; CODE 1NV-085; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Looking northwest toward Rosslyn, Virginia

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The Aztecs

Tues., Oct. 5, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-118; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

The Barbarians The ancient Greek and Roman civilizations were incubators of Western culture. However, they did Early iron age tools from the not develop in isolation. The area of modern-day Poland lands to the north of the Greek and Roman peninsulas were inhabited by non-literate communities known through archeological finds of settlements, monuments, and burials. The remnants painted a portrait as compelling as that of contemporaneous literate civilizations. Archaeologist Peter Bogucki surveys the development of these groups’ cultures from the Stone Age through the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west, highlighting their increasingly complex societal structures, technological accomplishments, and distinct cultural practices. He provides compelling glimpses into the silent Europeans who lived during the final millennium B.C. Bogucki’s book The Barbarians: Lost Civilizations (Reaktion Books) is available for purchase. Tues., Nov. 16, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-120; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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Explore the legacies of the Aztecs, Sumerians, Barbarians, and Indus. What did they achieve—and why are they remembered?

When Hernando Cortés and his company of conquistadores landed near present-day Veracruz, Mexico, in April of 1519, he kept hearing of “Motecuhzoma.” This was Motecuhzoma Xocoyotzin, The coronation of Motecuzuma I, king of the Mexica and Tovar Codex emperor of the powerful Aztec empire, which dominated most of central Mexico. Archaeologist Frances F. Berdan examines some of the Aztec civilization’s most interesting aspects, including how they built an empire without the wheel, beasts of burden, and iron tools; and how human sacrifice was used. She also discusses their greatest achievements, including the splendid capital city of Tenochtitlan; the stunning luxury crafts in feathers, precious stones, and gold that astounded Europeans; and the elegant poetry that grappled with personal emotions and great philosophical questions.

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The Sumerians Living in southern Iraq (ancient Sumer), the Sumerians created the world’s earliest civilization between about 3500 and 2000 B.C. They became known 150 years ago, as archaeologists uncovered evidence of their existence. Excavations at sites such as Uruk, Ur, and Nippur established an image of the Sumerians as the inventors of city life, writing, and the wheel. They have even been credited with experiments in democracy. As such, this civilization can easily be understood as the root of our own urban, literate world. Paul Collins, a curator at Oxford University’s Ashmolean Museum, tells the story of how the Sumerians were “ discovered” and how things are not always as they seem. His book The Sumerians (Reaktion Books) is available for purchase. Enthroned Sumerian king of Ur, 2600 B.C.

Tues., Oct. 26, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1J0-119; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

The Indus For centuries no one had been aware of the ancient Indus civilization. Then in 1921, its ruins began to be excavated, revealing a civilization as ancient and extensive as those of Egypt and Mesopotamia. It featured drainage and town planning comparable with those of modern times; a sophisticated naval export trade to Mesopotamia; an absence of weapons and warfare; carnelian jewelry drilled with precision techniques; and a still-undeciphered writing system inscribed mainly on stone seals. It may also have been the origin of the Hindu religion. Historian and science writer Andrew Robinson introduces this “lost” civilization that uniquely combined artistic excellence, technological sophistication, and economic vigor with social egalitarianism, political freedom, and religious moderation. Tues., Dec. 7, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1J0-121; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

The Pashupati seal


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All programs are presented on the Zoom platform; all listed times are Eastern Time. Online registration is required.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

A Salute to Ira and George Gershwin

The Story of America in Seven Books In 1869, as our nation was recovering from the devastations of the Civil War, the critic John William DeForest described the quest for “the Great American Novel,” suggesting how difficult it was to capture the complexity and diversity of the American experience in a single book. Since then, a wide range of authors have taken up this challenge. Joseph Luzzi, a professor of comparative literature at Bard College, examines how seven masterpieces of American literature—Herman Melville's Moby Dick, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Joseph Heller’s Catch-22, Philip Roth’s American Pastoral, Ralph Ellison’s Invisible Man, and Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird—reveal the characters and conflicts of the American spirit. Wed., July 7, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-615; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Ira was known as “The Jeweler,” a songsmith able to embed a seamless mosaic of words within the contour of a melodic line. When his brother George sat at the piano, the tunes flowed from his fingers. From their first hit in 1918, “The Real American Folk Song (Is a Rag),” through immortal blockbusters like “I Got George Gershwin, 1937, by Carl Van Rhythm, and Vechten “Embraceable You” and great Broadway and Hollywood scores, the Gershwin brothers established musical comedy as an American art form. American music specialist and Gershwin scholar Robert Wyatt draws on original cast recordings, film clips, interviews, and other primary materials for a discussion about the lives of the Gershwins and the music that hasn’t lost its rhythm with audiences today. Thurs., July 15, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-145; Members $30; Nonmembers $35

Maps and the Birth of America Charting a New Continent Before photography, film, and television opened the world, printed and hand-colored maps brought home the thrill of undiscovered lands and the possibilities of exploration. Over the centuries, maps of America changed from exotic curiosities and cherished art objects to vital instruments in the growing conflicts on the continent. Neal Asbury and Jean-Pierre Isbouts, co-authors of the new book Mapping America, trace the critical role that maps played in battles including those of the French and Indian War, and examine how British strategy during the Revolutionary War became entirely dependent on hastily engraved (and often flawed) charts of geographical features and enemy dispositions. Mapping America (Apollo Publishers) is available for purchase.

Map of the Pacific Ocean from 1589, Asbury Family Collection

Tues., July 13, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-405; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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How To Watch Movies Like a Film Professor Great film directors all have one thing in common—lofty artistic ambitions. The most challenging directors disguise their bold artistic intentions behind the mask of easily accessible genre forms, often burying something quite profound beneath a story’s glossy surface. The prospect of unraveling a hidden encoded message in the fabric of the film’s narrative is what drives some movie lovers (and film professors) to attempt to decipher what is really going on beneath the scenes playing out before our eyes and ears. Yale University film professor Marc Lapadula screens clips from examples of cinematic mastery, including You Only Live Once, Sullivan’s Travels, On the Waterfront, The Night of the Hunter, and Rebel Without a Cause. Learn how to view films with a critical eye to unlock the story behind the story. Mon. July 19, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-609; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

The Beatles: From Liverpool to Legend

Metaphysics A Philosophical Exploration of Ultimate Questions

A Musical Celebration

PETER DAMIAN

From the moment “She Loves You,” “ I Want To Hold Your Hand,” and “Please Please Me” hit the airwaves in Britain and then America, John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr reshaped the pop music world of the 1960s—and the whole world for the next several decades. Their music was a cultural inheritance of music, speech, and social attitudes that sprang from specific segments of English and Irish life. It also borrowed heavily from the music of American rock ‘n’ rollers like Little Richard, Chuck Berry, and Buddy Holly, who were their early influences. Saul Lilienstein takes a joyful and serious look at their music and its relationship to the tumultuously exciting period of social change that provided a backdrop to their years at the top of the charts. The program is highlighted by musical recordings and film clips. 9:30 a.m. Anglo-Irish Roots: Traditions RISA RYAN

10:30 a.m. American Roots: Rhythm and Blues and Pop 11:50 a.m. Reflecting and Shaping a Generation

Metaphysics is not a relic of ancient wisdom, but a lively intellectual discipline that is still being practiced today. It is the branch of philosophy that focuses Aristoteles by Francesco Hayez, on what is fundamental 1811 or basic to reality. Greek thinkers such as Plato and Aristotle proposed sophisticated theories that underwent transformations as they intersected with Jewish, Muslim, Aristotle’s Metaphysics, and Christian thinking in illuminated page from Book VII, subsequent centuries—and 14th-century manuscript skeptical challenges and surprising incarnations in the modern era. Prepare for a whirlwind tour led by Michael Gorman, a professor of philosophy at The Catholic University of America, of historical and contemporary controversies in search of the nature of the ultimate reality. 9:30 a.m. An Overview of Metaphysics

12:45 p.m. Break

11 a.m. The Problem of Universals

1:45 p.m. The Composition Process

12:15 p.m. Break

2:30 p.m. Lennon and McCartney: A Stylistic Comparison

1:15 p.m. The Problem of Possibility 2:45 p.m. Beyond Metaphysics

4 p.m. Just Music Sat., July 24, 9:30–4:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2143; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

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Saul Lilienstein

Sat., July 24, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; CODE 1K0-111; Members $80; Nonmembers $90


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Designing Camelot The Kennedy White House Restoration and Its Legacy On February 23, 1961, Jacqueline Kennedy launched the most historic and celebrated redecoration of the White House. Her plan was to restore the historical integrity of the executive mansion’s interiors. James Archer Abbott and Elaine Rice Bachmann discuss the 60-year legacy of one of the most influential interior design projects in American history. Drawing on photographs, firstperson reflections, personal and public correspondence, and media accounts they present detailed room-by-room analyses of the restoration and share stories about the people involved and insights into the choices made. Abbott and Bachman’s book Designing Camelot: The Kennedy White House Restoration and Its Legacy (White House Historical Association) is available for sale.

Reading Faulkner Chronicler of the American South He was an uncompromising modernist, a great chronicler of the American South, and an inspiration— as well as immovable obstacle—for the generations of writers who followed. William Faulkner (1897–1962) stands as one of the greatest, and one of the most problematic figures in American William Faulkner in 1954 literature. Faulkner was Mississippi-born—a white man of his time and place who did not always rise above it. Yet his work also provides a burning account of the intersection of race, region, and remembrance: a probing analysis of a past that we have never yet put behind us. He set almost all his work in what he called an “apocryphal” territory, the imaginary Yoknapatawpha County in northern Mississippi. He carried characters and plot lines over from one book to another, as if the land itself were sprouting a story in which everything and everyone was connected. Michael Gorra, professor of English language and literature at Smith College and author of The Saddest Words; William Faulkner’s Civil War, focuses on three of Faulkner’s greatest novels. (It is suggested you read each book before the class.) JUL 26 The Sound and the Fury (1929) AUG 23 Light in August (1932) SEPT 27 Absalom, Absalom! (1936) 3 sessions; Mon., July 26, Aug. 23; Sept. 27; 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-610; Members $60; Nonmembers $65

GARY BRIDGMAN, SOUTHSIDEARTGALLERY.COM

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Mon., July 26, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1K0-120; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

How To Start Traveling Again Remember when travel was easy? When all you required for an international trip was a passport and a sturdy pair of walking shoes. Those were the days. The pandemic has upended the travel industry and changed the way we explore the world. Now travelers must factor in COVID tests, self-quarantines, and vaccinations, as well as restrictions that can vary from one locale to the next. Here to help aspiring travelers, Andrea Sachs, Washington Post travel writer; Pauline Frommer, editorial director of Frommer’s Guidebooks; and Karin King, deputy assistant secretary of state for overseas citizen services, offer a field guide to topics such as pandemic-era travel trends and vaccination passports. They also discuss COVID-related scams and share resources for staying safe and healthy on that long-overdue trip. Wed., July 28, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-102; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Faulkner’s Underwood Universal Portable typewriter

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OFFICE OF THE CHAIRMAN OF THE JOINT CHIEFS OF STAFF FOR PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Something To Laugh About: TV Comedy, From Milton Berle to David Letterman From television’s earliest days, making people laugh was TV programmers’ central goal. In the late 1940s, radio’s situation comedy and variety show formats were re-created for TV, joined a few years later by late-night comedy talk shows. They dominated the airwaves for seven decades, led by brilliant comedians such as Sid Caesar, Jackie Gleason, Johnny Carson, Carol Burnett, Gilda Radner, and Jerry Seinfeld. Media and communications expert Brian Rose examines the evolution of TV comedy, from the vaudeville shtick of Milton Berle and the slapstick artistry of Lucille Ball to relevant sitcoms like “All in the Family” and “M*A*S*H”, the social satire of “Saturday Night Live,” and the self-reflexive absurdities of David Letterman. Tues., Aug. 3, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1J0-106; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

David Letterman on “The Late Show”

A Change Is Gonna Come How Black Music Powered the Civil Rights Movement NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION/ROWLAND SCHERMAN

From 1940 to 1970, gospel, jazz, blues, and soul music underscored the Civil Rights Movement. Artists, activists, and radio DJs came together to write, perform, and promote music that reflected the ongoing fight for freedom. Legendary artists lent their voices and talents to the movement: Sam Cooke, Aretha Franklin, Billie Holiday, James Brown, Marvin Gaye, and Charles Mingus, among others. Radio personalities including Frankie Crocker of WBLS New York, Tall Paul White of Birmingham’s WENN, and Chicago’s Al Benson at WVON showcased their music. Civil rights and Black music historian Leon Burnette explores how the music that grew out of a seminal era became part of America’s social and cultural heritage. Thurs., Aug. 5, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1J0-107; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Odetta Holmes performing at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, August 28, 1963

Let’s Stay Connected!

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Elizabeth Barrett Browning: A Reinvented Life “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.” With these words, Elizabeth Barrett Browning has come down to us as a romantic recluse controlled by a domineering father and overshadowed by husband Robert Browning. But she defied cultural constraints—a modern figure whose life is a study in self-invention. Born in 1806 when women were denied property, a university education, or the vote, Barrett Browning seized control of her private income, eloped with Browning, and became a feminist icon, political activist, and Britain’s leading female poet. Writer and poet Fiona Sampson explores Barrett Browning’s life. Sampson’s book Two-Way Mirror: The Life of Elizabeth Barrett Browning (W. W. Norton & Company) is available for sale.

Fiona Sampson

HOWARD SCHNAPP

Tues., Aug. 17, 6 p.m.; CODE 1K0-121; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Mastering Crossword Puzzles

Food Fight

Whether you’re a beginner or an expert, you’ll be solving puzzles faster and more accurately after this intensive and fun seminar led by Stanley Newman. He’s the crossword editor for Newsday, winner of the U.S. Open Crossword Championship, and holder of the world record for the fastest completion of the New York Times crossword. A set of Stan’s Monday-toSaturday crosswords of increasing difficulty is available now for downloading. Please complete them prior to the seminar and have them handy on August 21. Peeking at the answers is encouraged Stan Newman if needed.

America’s Changing Diet and Its Consequences

9:30 a.m. Behind the Scenes 11 a.m. Secrets of the Champions 12:15 p.m. Break 1:15 p.m. Tackling the Toughies 2:45 p.m. How Crosswords Are Made

Since the end of WWII, the American diet has changed from one based on a relatively wholesome and nourishing food system to one laden with fats, sugar, and ultra-processed unhealthy foods. Historian Allen Pietrobon highlights the changes in American eating since 1945. He explores events that radically affected American diets, from fast-food outlets proliferating in inner-city neighborhoods following the 1960s race riots to an alliance among the U.S. government, ad agencies, and major food corporations that helped create a nation of overweight people. Pietrobon also discusses the politicization of food today, from the labeling of “healthy” foods as elitist and liberal, to a new generation of healthy-eating advocates pushing back against an ultra-industrialized food system. Wed., Sept. 1, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-111; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Sat., Aug. 21, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; CODE 1K0-141; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

Read more about programs in this guide on our website. Search by code or date. Expanded program descriptions, presenters’ information, and more at SmithsonianAssociates.org.

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Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks: Grandmasters of American Comedy For more than seven decades, Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks made America laugh—either through their remarkable solo careers or their legendary partnership. They were giants of American comedy who conquered every medium they took on: television, films, Broadway, recordings. Media and communications expert Brian Rose takes a look (and gives a listen to) their extraordinary achievements, beginning with their work together on comedian Sid Caesar’s Your Show of Shows and their creation of the 2000 Year Old Man, to their accomplishments as writers, directors, and performers. And no one will ever pull off sporting a cocked, broad-brimmed hat and flowing cape like Brooks, even if they live to be 2000.

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Mel Brooks

Carl Reiner

Thurs., Sept. 2, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1J0-112; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

A Trip to Britain with the Great Composers Live Performance of Works by Haydn and Chopin “It is fearful! It is mad! I am mixed up and confused. London is the most grandiose monster on the face of the earth! …” Those are the words composer Felix Mendelssohn wrote to his family after arriving in London in 1829. He found the capital filled with a star-struck public flocking to hear concerts by the likes of Haydn, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Liszt, and Chopin. Popular speaker and concert pianist Rachel Franklin serves as tour guide to the England these masters discovered. Haydn often performed in She follows our favorite London’s Hanover Square composers as they Rooms hobnob with royalty, dazzle the critics, complain about the weather, and admire the ladies. Rachel Franklin

Wed., Sept. 8, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-132; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

Frank Sinatra: He Set the Standard Frank Sinatra was many things: father, husband patriot, Rat Pack member, controversial celebrity, and acclaimed movie actor. But it is his Frank Sinatra genius as a singer and interpreter of American popular song that has secured his place in history. Possessed of unerring taste and a deeply personal singing style, he came to be known as “The Voice” and remains the standard for generations of singers. Music historian John Edward Hasse draws on film and video clips, rare photographs, and original recordings to provide insight into Sinatra’s career. He also tells anecdotes about Sinatra and items included in the American History Museum’s collection, including bow ties that a young Sinatra threw to screaming bobby-soxers, published sheet music, movie posters, and recordings. Thurs., Sept. 30, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-156; Members $30; Nonmembers $35

Mark FRIDAYS AT NOON on your calendar to savor the liveliest and most interesting conversation you’ll hear all week. Designed exclusively for Smithsonian Associates members, this monthly web podcast series invites you to go behind the scenes into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. Learn more at SmithsonianAssociates.org

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“I’m Ready for My Close-up” Favorite Movies and Their Times Some moments in movies never leave us: the piercing eyes of a private eye, a raft hurtling down the rapids, that little black dress, the close-up of a fading movie star. In a film discussion series featuring film clips and stills, documentary filmmaker and writer Sara Lukinson revisits some of our favorite movies and characters, setting them against the backdrop of their times, the people who dreamed them up, and the America they reflected—or asked us to imagine. SEPT 13 Portraits of a Woman: Katharine Hepburn and Elizabeth Taylor SEPT 27 A Different Kind of Hero: Humphrey Bogart and Paul Newman OCT 4 Simply Irresistible: Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Charade OCT 25 Wicked and Wonderful: Billy Wilder NOV 8 Drama in the Courtroom: Anatomy of a Murder and 12 Angry Men 5 sessions; Mon., Sept. 13, 27, Oct. 4, 25, and Nov. 8, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1K0-134; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

Individual sessions: Mon., Sept. 13 (CODE 1K0-135); Sept. 27 (CODE 1K0-136); Oct. 4 (CODE 1K0-137); Oct. 25 (CODE 1K0-138); Nov. 8 (CODE 1K0-139); 12–1:15 p.m.; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Elizabeth Taylor

Literary Baltimore: Poe, Stein, Mencken, and Fitzgerald Something about Baltimore clearly nurtures the literary impulse, but what is it, exactly? The allure of the famed harbor? Its heritage of Southern ways? The city’s journalistic traditions? Arts journalist and Charm City resident Richard Selden takes a look at the sites and works closely connected with the most famous writers who lived—and, in two cases, died—in Baltimore: Edgar Allan Poe, Gertrude Stein, H. L. Mencken, and F. Scott Fitzgerald. Along the way he shares historic and contemporary images and reads passages from each author’s work. Sat., Sept. 25; 10 a.m.–12 p.m.; CODE 1NV-083; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1 hour 15 min.–2 hours, including Q&A

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The Story of Grimms’ Fairytales In 1812 in Germany, brothers and literary scholars Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm published a collection of 86 folktales, Kinder und Hausmärchen— Grimms’ Fairy Tales in English. A major source of the brothers’ inspiration was the Romantic nationalism sweeping over a still-ununified Germany. They believed a country’s folk tales were a valuable reflection of its culture—and therefore helpful in nation building. Folklorists Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman share the Grimms collection’s history: its connection to the early field of folkloristics; its literary impact on authors such as Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Neil Gaiman; and its use in support of dangerous political ideologies. Insights into how these “simple children’s stories” have profoundly shaped Western culture may stay with you ever after.

JASTROW/RELEASED/MUSEO NAZIONALE ROMANO DI PALAZZO

Wed., Sept. 29, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-123; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Bust of Aristotle by Lysippos 330 BC

Brittany Warman and Sara Cleto

Aristotle on Ethics, Happiness, and the Good Life

Sherlock Holmes Under the Magnifying Glass

The Nicomachean Ethics is one of the most influential works on human happiness ever written. Its author, Aristotle (384–322 B.C.), gives an account of what happiness is and how human actions fit together to make up a happy life. Michael Gorman, professor of philosophy at The Catholic University of America, examines this seminal treatise on practical wisdom and its lasting influence on Western thinking about living one’s best life ethically.

There’s no mystery why the fame of Sherlock Holmes now stretches into a third century or why Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is one of the most popular writers of all time. The era of gaslights and hansom cabs is long past, but Holmes and Watson in a Sidney Paget illustration the redoubtable detective’s popularity is unwavering: “I hear of Sherlock everywhere,” as Holmes’ brother Mycroft once remarked. Writer Daniel Stashower, author of Teller of Tales The Life of Arthur Conan Doyle, turns a magnifying glass on the legendary sleuth and his creator. He is joined by actor Scott Sedar who reads from some of Conan Doyle’s classic works. As Holmes himself remarked, “Come at once if convenient—if inconvenient, come all the same!”

9:30 a.m. Happiness and Action 11 a.m. Virtues and Vices I 12:15 Break 1:15 p.m. Virtues and Vices II 2:45 p.m. Happiness, Contemplation, Friendship, and Politics Sat., Oct. 2, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; CODE 1K0-131; Members $80; Nonmembers $90 A 1566 edition of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics in Greek and Latin

The Game’s Afoot!

Wed., Oct. 6, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-625; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Read more about programs in this guide on our website. Search by code or date. Expanded program descriptions, presenters’ information, and more at SmithsonianAssociates.org.

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All programs are presented on the Zoom platform; all listed times are Eastern Time. Online registration is required.

The Geology of Yellowstone Past, Present, and Future The Yellowstone Caldera, which formed during a massive volcanic eruption 630,000 years ago, is the centerpiece of our nation’s first national park, founded in 1872. The volcanic story of Yellowstone, however, begins approximately 17 million years ago and will certainly continue long into the geologic future. Volcanologist Kirt Kempter explores the geology of Yellowstone, including the rocks and hydrothermal features that make this national park unique in the world. Google Earth aerial views survey the park’s geology from a birds-eye perspective, augmented by illustrative graphics, maps, and field photos. Look out Cooke City, Montana. . . the Yellowstone hotspot is coming your way! INSIDE SCIENCE Sun., July 11, 5 p.m.; CODE 1NV-074; Members $25, Nonmembers $30

Backyard Bird Feeding: Getting Started Adding a bird feeder to your yard is a great way to closely observe wild birds, as well as offset the loss of urban avian habitats. Feeders can be set up in various ways to fit your outdoor space and to attract birds of all kinds. Home birders can also act as citizen scientists by reporting on the variety of species a feeder attracts—which might even include rare out-of-range birds that have lost their way and need sustenance. Matt Felperin, NOVA Parks’ roving naturalist, covers feeder types, seasonal considerations, and food to attract the greatest variety of birds. He also offers a live look at Potomac Overlook Regional Park’s bird feeder as he identifies its visitors and their dining behaviors. Sun., July 18, 5 p.m.; CODE 1NV-075; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

Castle Geyser eruption, upper geyser basin of Yellowstone National Park

Economics + Harry Potter: The Sequel The Harry Potter novels may seem like a strange perspective from which to view economics. In a realm filled with magic, we might expect the economic problems that we muggles face to disappear in a puff of smoke. But even the Boy Who Lived has to come to grips with fiscal reality. Instead of divination class, Harry should have signed up to study the economics of the magical world. Economist Brian O’Roark reappears to offer a sequel to his look at economics in the Potterverse, exploring topics more fully than in the original: Who pays for a magical education? Can you be unemployed in the wizarding world? And which Hogwarts teacher is most likely to be an economist? Wed., July 21, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0-101; all tickets $20

Our Deceptive Universe With Astrophysicist Hakeem Oluseyi For centuries, Isaac Newton’s view was universally accepted: Time and space are constant. Then, Einstein put forth the possibility that we operate in a multiverse—an infinity of universes. Join Hakeem Oluseyi as he examines spacetime, the illusion of mass, the structure of the universe, dark matter, and dark energy. Oluseyi’s new book, A Quantum Life: My Unlikely Journey from the Street to the Stars (Ballantine Books) is available for purchase.

Hakeem Oluseyi

INSIDE SCIENCE Mon., July 12, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1J0-105; all tickets $15

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Rescuing the Planet Protecting Half the Land To Heal the Earth

MICHAEL LIONSTAR

In his new book Rescuing the Planet, author Tony Hiss sets out on a journey to take stock of the “superorganism” that is the Earth: its land, its elements, its plants and animals, its greatest threats—and what we can do to keep it, and ourselves, alive. In conversation with botanist and environmentalist Peter Raven, Hiss discusses why it’s critical to understand the scope and gravity of the problems and makes the case to protect half the land and sea by 2050 in order to manage sufficient habitat to reverse the species extinction crisis and ensure the long-term health of the planet. Rescuing the Planet (Knopf Publishing Group) is available for purchase. INSIDE SCIENCE Wed., July 28, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-411; Members $20; Nonmembers $25 Tony Hiss

Jeffrey Kluger’s Holdout An Astronaut’s Move for Justice When a freak accident on board the International Space Station results in an order to return to Earth, astronaut Walli Beckwith refuses to leave. Something terrible is happening in the Amazon rainforest and she’s determined to do something. Beckwith is the heroine of award-winning science journalist Jeffrey Kluger’s new novel, Holdout, inspired by today’s environmental activism and space programs. The author of Apollo 13 speaks with former NASA astronaut Marsha Ivans about his science writing background and his career reporting on space, which has taken him from the Kennedy Space Center to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center. Jeffrey Kluger Holdout (Penguin Random House) is available for purchase. Wed., Aug. 4, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1L0-412; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

R.B. TOTH ASSOCIATES

Digitization Technology: A New Frame for Art Research Digitized online artwork offers the only way most people can enjoy and research art while museums and galleries are closed because of the pandemic. Advanced imaging can also reveal new information about art objects. Digital technologies draw on a variety of light and energy levels to provide insights into paintings, prints, sketches, and other art works, offering new perspectives on their elements, creation, and history. Michael B. Toth, president of R. B. Toth Associates, discusses some of his work with high-resolution cameras and advanced lighting to X-ray synchrotrons to reveal previously hidden aspects of artworks dating from the Renaissance to today. He also shares surprises he encountered while investigating a Rubens painting. INSIDE SCIENCE Wed., Aug. 25, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1J0108; Members $30; Nonmembers $35

X-ray fluorescence imaging of Nativity oil painting at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

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KIRT KEMPTER

A Geologic Tour of Copper Canyon, Mexico A series of spectacular gorges in northern Mexico, collectively called Copper Canyon, rival Arizona’s Grand Canyon in depth, width, and scenic beauty, and are home to the indigenous Tarahumara, or Rarámuri, people known in part for their endurance running. Tourism has long been centered around the Ferrocarril Chihuahua al Pacifico, an iconic train ride that passes along the rim of Copper Canyon before a circuitous and scenic descent to the Pacific coast. Volcanologist Kirt Kempter focuses on the geologic Copper Canyon origins of Copper Canyon and the Sierra Madre Occidental: massive supervolcano eruptions around 30 million years ago that left behind dozens of giant volcanic craters. He also explores other fascinating geologic topics related to the Copper Canyon region. INSIDE SCIENCE Sun., Aug. 29, 5 p.m.; CODE 1NV-078; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

In Search of the Hummingbird Hummingbirds have captured our imaginations with their unsurpassed jewel-like plumage, acrobatic flight, and ethereal presence. Their fascinating history has frequently intersected with ours through references in ancient religion, folklore, art, literature, and Native people’s oral traditions, serving as messengers between the living and the spirit world. Drawing on his book The Glitter in the Green, nature writer Jon Dunn recalls following them from Alaska to the tip of South America. He marooned on a Chilean island to see the rare Juan Fernandez Firecrown, trekked the Andes searching for a long-unseen hummingbird, and learned of dark superstitions about the species in Mexico City. Join Dunn for a colorful, fascinating discussion about hummingbirds and become one of the many they have already enchanted. Dunn’s book The Glitter in the Green (Basic Books) is available for purchase. Wed., Sept. 1, 12–1:30 p.m.; CODE 1NV-086; Members $25, Nonmembers $30 Jon Dunn

A Geologic Tour of the Northern Rockies Join geologist Kirt Kempter for an exploration of the splendid scenery and geology of the northern Rocky Mountains that straddle the border between the United States and Canada. The geologic processes that formed these mountains represent a plate tectonic collision more than 30 million years in the making and spelled the retreat and demise of the great Western Interior Seaway. Kempter compares and contrasts the rock units at three national parks (Glacier, Banff, and Jasper), and discusses how the Ice Age transformed these mountains into the topography we see today. From the emerald Lake Louise near Banff to the majestic views along Going-to-the-Sun Road at Glacier, a deep geologic history created these spectacular landscapes, now World Heritage Sites. Valley of the Ten Peaks and Moraine Lake, Banff National Park, Canada

Mon., Sept. 20; 7–8:30 p.m.; CODE 1NV-081; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

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The Beasts Before Us

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary

The Untold Story of Mammal Origins

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, located along the Appalachian flyway in eastern Pennsylvania, was founded in 1934 as the world’s first sanctuary for raptors. With 2,500 acres of landed dedicated to conservation, the sanctuary is connected to an important migratory pathway that thousands of birds pass through daily in Cooper's Hawk peak fall migration. Here, data was collected and utilized to help ban the use of DDT in the 1970s and helped save our eagle species. Research continues to this day on several different species of raptors and other important animals that call the mountain their home. Join a Hawk Mountain raptor-care specialist and educator who covers the history of the sanctuary—and offers a chance to view a raptor up close.

In most accounts, the story of mammal evolution starts after the asteroid impact that killed the non-bird dinosaurs, but the recent discovery of new fossils have drastically rewritten this story. Paleontologist Elsa Panciroli goes back 300 million years earlier, when the synapsida— humans’ extraordinary lineage—made the world theirs long before the rise of dinosaurs. New fossil discoveries are introducing new and astonishing creatures, ancient Elsa Panciroli mammals that shrank in size alongside the dinosaurs. This evolutionary innovation unlocked the biological traits that define mammals as we know them today. Panciroli describes the discoveries providing a new understanding of mammal evolution. Beasts Before Us (Bloomsbury Sigma) is available for purchase. INSIDE SCIENCE Tues., Sept. 14, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1J0-122; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Read more about programs in this guide on our website. Search by code or date. SmithsonianAssociates.org.

What’s Inside Science? It’s an ongoing series of expert-led programming. It is also a community of like-minded people who have the opportunity to participate in a lively online learning exchange. Visit smithsonianassociates.org/science

A Virtual Visit

Thurs., Sept. 23, 12–1:30 p.m.; CODE 1NV-082; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

Looking Within Understanding Ourselves Through Human Imaging Human imaging studies allow radiologists a completely different way of looking at people. By removing our superficial distinctions they provide a way to study people Magnetic resonance imaging from a unique perspective. Radiologist Cullen Ruff explores the history of medical imaging, from the discovery of X-rays that revolutionized medicine, to nuclear medicine, computed tomography, ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging. He shows examples of how various imaging studies reveal not only information about patients’ health, but also their lives through the stories their pictures tell. Insights gained through the lens of human imaging reflect a recognition of Abdominal CT scan humanity’s intricacy, complexity, adaptive resilience, and ultimate fragility. His book Looking Within: Understanding Ourselves through Human Imaging (Torchflame Books) is available for purchase. Mon., Sept. 27, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-155; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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Fire and Ice: Volcanoes of the Solar System The volcano is among the most familiar and perhaps most terrifying of all geological phenomena. Earth isn’t the only planet to harbor them: Our own moon, now a dormant piece of rock, had lava flowing across its surface billions of years ago. In fact, volcanic activity has occurred in almost every corner of the solar system, in the most unexpected of locations. Volcanoes help scientists trying to picture the inner Natalie Starkey workings of a planet or moon. The ways in which they erupt and the products they generate can even help scientists ponder the possibility of life elsewhere in the solar system. Geologist and cosmochemist Natalie Starkey explores the tallest, coldest, hottest, and most unusual volcanoes. INSIDE SCIENCE Tues., Sept. 28, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1J0-116; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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In-person Tour

Socially Distanced Rock Creek Park Nature and History Walk

Spend a fall morning exploring the verdant wooded trails of Rock Creek Park with naturalist Melanie Choukas-Bradley. Learn about the botanically diverse native trees of Rock Creek Park’s floodplain forest and upland woods and the history of D.C.’s woodland gem, the oldest urban national park in the country and twice the size of Central Park. See the rock outcrops where an exuberant President Theodore Roosevelt led his famous rock scrambles and get acquainted with the well-maintained trail network that now provides recreation for millions of D.C. residents and visitors annually. The walk begins at Peirce Mill, the historic and recently restored grist mill. See the adjacent fish ladder that opened the spawning route for migrating shad and herring, dubbed the “herring highway.”

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THREE OPTIONS: Tues., Oct. 19 (CODE 1NS-A07); Wed., Oct. 20 (CODE 1NSPeirce Mill in Pierce Park, Washington, D.C. The B07); Thurs., Oct. 21 building is listed on the National Register of (CODE 1NS-C07); all tours Historic Places. are 8:30–11:30 a.m.; Members $55; Nonmembers $75; masks are required; limited to 20 participants; meeting next to the parking lot across from Peirce Mill, 2401 Tilden St., NW; see details and information on website

Art is all around us. It excites us, enriches our lives, and enlivens our imaginations. To truly appreciate any work of art, we need to understand the context and culture in which it was created. That’s why Smithsonian Associates offers a Certificate Program in World Art History. The wide-ranging offerings are designed to provide a global perspective on art and architecture and draw on the Smithsonian’s world-class collections and the rich resources of other Washington institutions. They are selected from among Smithsonian Associates courses, seminars, study tours, and studio art classes. Look for World Art History Certificate throughout the program guide to see current listings. Get started today and complete the certificate requirements at your own pace. Registration is ongoing and year round. Credits are counted from day of registration and are not given retroactively.

SmithsonianAssociates.org/artcertificate

Image: Girl with a Pearl Earring, by Vermeer

You love art. Now go deeper.

What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1 hour 15 min.–2 hours, including Q&A

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

The Color of Light

MUSÉE MARMOTTAN MONET

Impressionism: Degas, Monet, Morisot, and Renoir Impressionism, one of the most popular styles in the history of art, derives its name from an insult aimed at Claude Monet’s 1872 painting, Impression, Sunrise. Leaving behind the dark colors, smooth surfaces, and subjects approved by the official Salon, the impressionists painted with bright colors, let their brushstrokes show, and focused on scenes of everyday life. In fact, the artists’ goal was to capture an impression of what the eye sees in a fleeting glance. Art historian Janetta Rebold Benton presents intimate looks at four luminaries of the impressionist school: Edgar Degas (1834–1917), an impressionist by reputation known for paintings of ballet dancers, he considered himself a realist; Claude Monet (1840–1926), key to the founding of impressionism, his use of the “broken color” technique conveyed the impression of light; Berthe Morisot In the Dining Room by Berthe Morisot, (1841–95), a woman impressionist painter in Paris, she 1886 was admired for her skill in handling color in landscapes and portraits; and Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841–1919), one of the original impressionists, he was praised for his masterful use of saturated color and his sensual compositions.

CHESTER DALE COLLECTION/NGA

All programs are presented on the Zoom platform; all listed times are Eastern Time. Online registration is required.

JUL 7 Degas and Monet 10 a.m. Edgar Degas 11:15 a.m. Claude Monet JUL 14 Morisot and Renoir 10 a.m. Berthe Morisot Impression, Sunrise by Claude Monet, 1872

11:15 a.m. Pierre-Auguste Renoir Wed., July 7 and 14, 10 a.m.–12:15 p.m.; CODE 1H0-606; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

Barnes Close-up

THE BARNES FOUNDATION

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Soutine and de Kooning: Conversations in Art

THE BARNES FOUNDATION

Join Barnes Foundation educator Tom Lo for a lively virtual presentation that explores the current exhibition Soutine and de Kooning: Conversations in Paint. Organized by the Barnes and the Musées d’Orsay et de l’Orangerie, it explores the affinities between the work of Chaïm Soutine (1893–1943) and Willem de Kooning (1904–1997). A group of nearly 45 works by these titans of 20th-century art illustrates how Soutine’s paintings, with their built-up surfaces and energetic brushwork, served the art of de Kooning, shaping his groundbreaking figurative and abstract works in the late 1940s and beyond. The exhibition creates a visual dialogue between the highly individual universes of these two important figures. Thurs., July 8, 10–11:15 a.m.; CODE 1NV-073; Members $25; Nonmembers $30 Soutine and de Kooning: Conversations in Paint, 2021 installation view

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Art-full Fridays | Live from Italy, with Elaine Ruffolo World Art History Certificate electives: Earn ½ credit

Ravenna: Mosaics, Monuments, and History For a brief, dazzling moment, Ravenna was an unlikely refuge for a world falling apart. The city’s history, enshrined in superb Byzantine mosaics, reflects the twilight of the Roman Empire and the beginning of the Middle Ages. Ravenna, filled with magnificent new palaces and churches, was the capital of the western outpost of the fading Roman Empire, then of the occidental provinces of the Byzantine Empire. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo presents a virtual exploration of Ravenna’s early Christian-era structures, recognized by UNESCO for magnificent mosaic art, and what they reveal of artistic and religious relationships at an important period of European cultural history. Fri., July 9, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1H0-607; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Basilica of San Vitale, Ravenna

The Medici in Florence: Political Dynasty, Patrons of the Arts At its height, Renaissance Florence was a center of enormous wealth, power, and influence. A republican city-state funded by trade and banking, its often-violent political scene was dominated by rich mercantile families, the most famous being the Medici. From relatively modest beginnings, the Medici became bankers to the pope and to many rich and powerful European families. But perhaps their most enduring legacy is their patronage of the arts. Artists such as Brunelleschi, Donatello, Fra Angelico, Botticelli, and Michelangelo all thrived under Medici patronage. Renaissance art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the family’s influence on the political, economic, and cultural history of Florence. Fri., July 23, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1H0608; Members $20; Nonmembers $25 Procession of the Youngest King by Benozzo Gozzoli

Venice: 1000 Years of History Venice, the jewel of the Adriatic, started out as little more than a mudbank settled by refugees fleeing enemies of the Roman Empire. But by the 15th century, it was one of Europe’s wealthiest cities. Public patronage of the arts flourished as the Venetian school of painting grew in power and influence. The success of Venice’s artists depended on their ability to evoke and blend with the glorious past. The golden period of the Serenissima Republic is reflected in the art generated for its churches, confraternities, and palaces, including works by Bellini, Tintoretto, and Tiepolo. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo traces the history of this fabled city and the art and architecture created there. Fri., Aug. 6, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1H0-617; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

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Art-full Fridays | Live from Italy, with Elaine Ruffolo World Art History Certificate electives: Earn ½ credit

Florentine Splendor: The Pitti Palace and Boboli Gardens Florence’s imposing Pitti Palace was chosen by Cosimo I de’ Medici and his wife Eleanor of Toledo as the grand ducal residence in 1549 and it soon became the new symbol of the Medicis’ power over Tuscany, as well as a repository for great art. Today the palace is divided into several sections including the Palatine Gallery, Treasury of the Grand Dukes, and the beloved Boboli Gardens. Join art historian Elaine Ruffolo for a virtual visit to the Pitti Palace, where she highlights a selection of painting masterpieces, discusses the extraordinary objets d’art, and leads a stroll through the Boboli Gardens. Fri., Sept. 10, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1H0-627; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Courts of Renaissance Italy: Urbino The great cultural revival that was the Renaissance arose both from the rediscovery of classical antiquity and from the emergence of an entirely new vision of humanity. Powerful Italian courts competed to become centers of literary and artistic patronage, scholarly research, and learning. In Umbria, Federico da Montefeltro was nicknamed “The Light of Italy” for his contributions to the era’s culture. Frederico’s court of Urbino came to reflect the virtues of the Renaissance in art, intellect, justice, governance, and public welfare. Artists including della Francesco, Raphael, and Titian—flourished under patronages in this illustrious court. Art historian Elaine Ruffolo brings to life a Renaissance court in all its glory. Fri., Sept. 24, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1H0-620; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

The View from Here SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM

A Reflective Writing Workshop

The Beach by Hughie Lee-Smith, 1962

Spend a summer morning discovering the joy and power of reflective writing inspired by visual art. Guided by the founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s Writing Salon, Mary Hall Surface, participants have the opportunity to slow down, look closely, question, wonder, and write inspired by Hughie Lee-Smith’s intriguing painting, The Beach. These reflections can become fertile creative ground for memoir, poetry, and more. Designed for the curious and writers of all levels, the workshop invites participants to see with new eyes and strengthen their resilience and hope as they look outwardly at art and inwardly through writing. The workshop has a limited enrollment to maximize interaction among the instructor and students. Tues., July 13, 10–11:30 a.m.; CODE 1K0-116; Members $40; Nonmembers $45

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Art + History: The 3rd of May by Francisco Goya MUSEO DEL PRADO

Great art is timeless, and speaks to us across time, culture and space. Yet great works come from real people living real lives—whether their work was made 5 minutes or 500 years ago. Popular Smithsonian Associates speaker Paul Glenshaw looks at great works of art in their historical context. He delves into the time of the artist, explores the present they inhabited, and what shaped their vision and creations. The 3rd of May by Francisco Goya, is a shockingly brutal scene of a mass execution. Discover how Goya’s collision with the ruthless conquering ambition of Napoleon inspired him to paint this masterpiece. Thurs., July 15, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1K0-118; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Join curator Elizabeth Lay, a regular lecturer on the topics of fashion, textiles, and American furniture, for an image-rich lunchtime lecture series focusing on decorative arts and design topics. Maryhill Museum of Art’s Curator Steven Grafe shares the story of the Théâtre de la Mode, which displayed miniature mannequins and fashions in stage sets designed by prominent artists. It allowed Paris fashion houses to let the world know they were still in business after the end of WWII. No other fashion accessory says style like the Hermès Carré, the luxurious square silk scarf. Art historian and collector Samantha Viksnins explores the history of the square and what sets it apart from other luxury scarves. Mae’s Millinery Shop, reproduced in an exhibit in the National Museum of African American History and Culture, was once Philadelphia’s shop for Faïence by Lucien Lelong, 1946 stunning “showstopper” hats—and a community gathering place. Mae Reeves’ daughter, Donna Limerick, shares memories of her mother and of working in the shop. JUL 19 Théâtre de la Mode: 1945 Haute Couture Endures Through Fashion Dolls AUG 2 The Hermès Carré: The History of Fashion’s Most Iconic Accessory

SHARON FARMER

Decorative Arts Design Series

Donna Limerick wears a replica of her mother Mae Reeves' hat designs SAMANTHA VIKSNINS

Lunchtime with a Curator

MARYHILL MUSEUM OF ART

The 3rd of May 1808 by Francisco de Goya

AUG 16 The “Showstopper” Hats of Mae’s Millinery Shop 3 sessions; Mon., July 19, Aug. 2 and 16, 12–1 p.m.; CODE 1K0-127; Members $45; Nonmembers $55 Individual sessions: Mon., July 19 (CODE 1K0-128); Mon., Aug. 2 (CODE 1K0-129); Mon., Aug. 16 (CODE 1K0-130); 12–1 p.m.; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Silk scarves by Hermès

Mark FRIDAYS AT NOON on your calendar to savor the liveliest and most interesting conversation you’ll hear all week. Designed exclusively for Smithsonian Associates members, this monthly web podcast series invites you to go behind the scenes into the working lives of some of the most intriguing people from all across the Smithsonian and Washington’s worlds of culture, science, and education. Learn more at SmithsonianAssociates.org

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Art + History: Evening Encores

PAUL GLENSHAW

Watson and the Shark by John Singleton Copley, 1778

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

If you haven’t experienced Paul Glenshaw’s daytime series Art + History, in which he examines great works of art in their historical context, now’s your chance. He reprises four of his most popular lectures through July and August. In each, he explores the present the artist inhabited and what shaped their vision and creations, bringing the art and their creators to vivid life. In Watson and the Shark, artist John Singleton Copley re-created a dramatic, life-threatening moment from the experience of a young sailor. What brought this expatriate American painter living in London during the American War of Independence together with Brook Watson, who commissioned the work? The African American soldiers of the Massachusetts 54th in Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial stride confidently toward battle, ready to die for freedom. Almost half the members died, including their white leader, Col. Robert Gould Shaw. What brought them together—and how were they remembered when the memorial was unveiled in 1897? When The Railway was first seen, Edouard Manet had once again presented high-minded Parisians with a truly modern scene of an everyday passing moment. What did this scene represent, only three years after the disastrous Franco-Prussian War of 1870? August Rodin’s The Burghers of Calais, completed in 1889, is a monument to French town leaders who offered themselves in sacrifice to the English King Edward III The Railway, 1873 by Edouard Manet almost 550 years before. Why did they give themselves over to die, and how did Rodin produce such a departure from conventional memorials?

Shaw Memorial by Augustus SaintGaudens

JUL 27 Watson and the Shark by John Singleton Copley AUG 10 The Shaw Memorial by Augustus Saint Gaudens AUG 24 The Railway by Edouard Manet AUG 31 The Burghers of Calais by Auguste Rodin 4 sessions; Tues., July 27, Aug. 10, 24, and 31, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1K0-122; Members $60; Nonmembers $70

Individual sessions: Tues., July 27 (CODE 1K0-123); Tues., Aug. 10 (CODE 1K0-124); Tues., Aug. 24 (CODE 1K0-125); Tues., Aug. 31 (CODE 1K0-126); Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Auguste Rodin’s The Burghers of Calais, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN: “150 WORKS OF ART” (1996) BY VALERIE FLETCHER.

Baltimore Neighborhoods: Mount Vernon Arts journalist Richard Selden, longtime Baltimore resident, leads the first of several virtual visits to the city’s most historic and distinctive neighborhoods. Centered on a Washington Monument older, shorter, and more classical in style than the one on the National Mall, Baltimore’s Mount Vernon is home to the Walters Art Museum, George Peabody Library, Maryland Historical Society, Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University, and roughly a dozen 19th-century churches and clubs. The Washington Monument

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View of Mount Vernon from the Washington Monument

Thurs., July 29, 6:30–8:30 p.m.; CODE 1NV-077; Members $25; Nonmembers $30


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GEORGIA MUSEUM OF ART/UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Seductive Paris: American Painters in the City of Light

PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART

Twilight Confidences by Cecilia Beaux, 1888

In the late 19th century, Paris was the only place to be for any self-respecting, aspiring American artist and a generation of painters took full advantage. It was a time when expatriates including Mary Cassatt and Cecilia Beaux were inspired to paint scenes of everyday life and domestic interiors; when Childe Hassam, Theodore Robinson, Robert Henri, and other artists helped to popularize the new impressionist style in this country; and when John Singer Sargent, James Whistler, and others encouraged American collectors to buy impressionist paintings. Art historian Bonita Billman highlights Paris’s ascension as the center of the art world, and the effect it had on American artists who returned home to apply their new ideas to an American canvas. 9:30 a.m. French Teachers and American Students 11 a.m. Summers in the Country: American Painters in Brittany and Normandy 12:15 p.m. Break 1:15 p.m. Domestic Bliss: Painters of Genre Scenes 2:45 p.m. Impressionism in America Sat., July 31, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; CODE 1M2-138; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

In the Luxembourg Gardens by John Singer Sargent, 1879

World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

From colossal Olmec heads to the paintings of Frida Kahlo, Aztec temples to Mexican murals, this survey of Latin American art sweeps through the centuries and locations including ancient Mesoamerica, coastal Peru, and the top of the Andes. Michelle Greet, associate professor and director of the art history program at George Mason University, traces the significant creators, works, influences, and trends that defined and shaped the arts of Latin America from their earliest expressions through the 19th and 20th centuries.

MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, UNIVERSITY OF SÃO PAULO

SOUTHERN METHODIST UNIVERSITY

Exploring the Arts of Latin America

AUG 9 The Arts of Ancient Mesoamerica AUG 10 The Arts of the Andes AUG 11 The Arts of Viceregal Latin America AUG 12 Modern Art in Latin America

Olmec head, Xalapa Museum, Mexico

Central Railway of Brazil, 1924, by Tarsila Do Amaral

4 sessions; Mon., Aug. 9–Thurs., Aug. 12, 12–1:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-616; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1 hour 15 min.–2 hours, including Q&A

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

The Wyeth Dynasty

Michelangelo and The Last Judgement

The Worlds of N.C., Andrew, and Jamie Wyeth For a relatively young nation, America has produced a surprising number of artistic dynasties: the Peale family, the Calders, and spanning the 20th century, the Wyeths of Chadd’s Ford, Pennsylvania. The patriarch Illustration by N.C. Wyeth for the painter, N.C. (Newell Convers) 1911 edition of Robert Louis Wyeth, a founder of the Stevenson's Treasure Island Brandywine School, was the famed illustrator of popular editions of novels including Treasure Island, Kidnapped, and The Black Arrow. N.C.’s youngest son, Andrew, chose to paint the local residents and the rural landscapes around Chadd’s Ford and his summer home in Cushing, Maine. His paintings—including one of the best-known works of American art, Christina’s World—have a melancholic, mysterious, even surreal quality. Andrew’s son Jamie Wyeth, continues the family tradition into the 21st century, forging his own distinctive artistic style. Art historian Bonita Billman highlights the extraordinary body of work the Wyeths have created. Wed., Aug. 11, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-142; Members $30; Nonmembers $35

More than two decades after completing the Sistine Chapel ceiling, a 61-year-old Michelangelo returned to fresco its altar wall with his gigantic work The Last Judgement. Covering nearly 1,600 square feet of wall surface and containing more than 300 figures, the revolutionary painting took five years to complete and scandalized Rome, as many of its saints and angels were originally depicted in the nude. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines the style, iconography, and history of The Last Judgement and the influence that it had on later artists. Fri., Aug. 27, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1J0-109; Members $30; Nonmembers $35

The Last Judgement by Michelangelo, Sistine Chapel altar wall (detail)

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Michelangelo and the Medici Popes

STUARTCAHILL

Michelangelo project drawing for the façade of Sagrestia Nuova (New Sacristy)

After finishing the Sistine Chapel’s ceiling, Michelangelo began working for two of his childhood friends from the Medici household who had gone on to become Popes Leo X and Clement VII, respectively. Both would eventually employ Michelangelo on various projects in Florence. Rocky Ruggiero, a specialist in the Early Renaissance, examines one of the most productive, yet frustrating periods of Michelangelo’s artistic career— fulfilling his commissions from the Medici popes. Michelangelo’s first commissioned work for the Medici popes —and his first attempt at architecture—was the façade of the Medici church of San Lorenzo in Florence, suspended after two years of hard work so he could start work on the New Sacristy funerary chapel. That work was interrupted when Pope Clement VII commissioned him to design and build a new library at the church of San Lorenzo, the Laurentian Library—one of the most radical examples of Renaissance architecture, celebrated as the harbinger of the mannerist style. 10 a.m. A Star is Born: Young Michelangelo and Lorenzo il Magnifico de’ Medici 11:15 a.m. Michelangelo, Leo X, and the Façade of San Lorenzo 12:15 p.m. Break 1:15 p.m. The New Sacristy: A Funerary Chapel for the Medici Dukes 2:45 p.m. Michelangelo, Clement VII, and the Laurentian Library

The Laurentian Library

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Sat., Aug. 28, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; CODE 1J0-110; Members $80; Nonmembers $90


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Jacob Lawrence and the Avant-Garde

An Overlooked Gem in Naples

American artist Jacob Lawrence’s career spanned more than 50 years. Lawrence’s depictions of Black life memorialized some of the most significant events and figures of African Bar and Grill, by Jacob Lawrence, 1941 American history, including the lives of revolutionary heroes Frederick Douglass and Harriet Tubman, the Great Migration of the 1930s, and the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. However, the critical emphasis on narrative in his work has come at the expense of a consideration of the artist’s deep engagement with form. Art historian Jordana Moore Saggese examines Lawrence’s formal innovations, repositioning this work within the avant-garde. She highlights the ways Lawrence pushed against a history of modernism that depends on the centrality of whiteness.

The National Archaeology Museum Live from Rome in Naples is a spectacular showcase of antiquities too often overlooked by tourists who view the city as a launching pad to the Amalfi coast and beyond. This labyrinthine museum houses precious artifacts dating back to pre-historic times, exquisitely carved marbles, playful mosaics, colorful frescoes, and cryptic papyrus scrolls illustrating life in Pompeii and Herculaneum before the Mount Vesuvius eruption in 79 A.D. It also reflects the legacy of the aristocratic Farnese family, which includes famous Farnese Hercules at the marbles from Rome, such as the sculptures from the Baths of Caracalla. National Archaeological Museum, Naples Art historian and tour guide Laura R. Weinstein highlights the museum’s fascinating collections.

Wed., Sept. 8, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1H0-628; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

The National Archaeology Museum MARIE-LAN NGUYEN

HISTORY

Thurs., Sept. 9, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1J0-114; Members $20; Nonmember $25

Call for Volunteers

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Contradictory Urban Visions

To assist with online studio arts and lecture programs KJELL OLSEN / CC LICENSE 2.0

SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM

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In 1932 Frank Lloyd Wright published The Disappearing City, a polemic about the evils of urban centers filled with congestion, noise, and crime. He envisioned a better future centered on the automobile, telephone and radio, Broadacre City project drawing by and mass production. The Frank Lloyd Wright city would disperse into the countryside, spread out, and essentially disappear. In 1935 he created a traveling exhibition featuring a large model of such a city of the future, christened Broadacre City, and continued to develop concepts based on the city as architectural canvas. Many remained only ideas on paper. Others were built, including the Guggenheim Museum and the Marin Government Center. Bill Keene examines the apparent contradictions between Wright’s essentially anti-city views and his work to enhance urban life.

Smithsonian Associates seeks volunteers to work remotely, providing background support for live streamed art courses and lectures. Primary duties: managing the Q&A box, posting chat-box announcements, and deploying introductory slides on Zoom. Hours are flexible. Preference is for studio arts volunteering. Requirements: • Familiarity with how Zoom works • Up-to-date computer • Ability to text message For more information visit: smithsonianassociates.org/ticketing/volunteer/ or contact Jenna Jones at: volunteer@smithsonianassociates.org.

Tues., Sept. 7, 7:30 p.m.; CODE 1NV-080; Members $25; Nonmembers $30 JULY 2021 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Notre Dame: Reconstructing an Icon The devastating fire that engulfed Notre Dame Cathedral in April 2019 destroyed that iconic structure’s timber roof framework and crossing spire. But other crucial elements—notably the 13th-century stone vaults and flying- buttress support system—survived miraculously intact. Restoration is proving to be a long, complicated, and delicate process as all involved, from French officials to architectural historians decide how to rebuild. What accounts for the unique role of Notre Dame in the historical and cultural legacy of Paris and all France? How has the cathedral survived threats to its survival in the past? And what makes all 13th-century Gothic so resilient yet so vulnerable? Art historian Judy Scott Feldman highlights the cathedral’s history and historic restoration. Tues., Sept. 14, 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1H0-626; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

PRADO MUSEUM

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Jazz in Paris

Four Giants of Spanish Painting From the 16th century to the late 20th century, Spaniards have made extraordinary contribuLas Meninas by Diego tions to the history of Western Velazquez, 1656 art. In a lavishly illustrated seminar, art historian Nancy G. Heller focuses on a quartet of Spain’s most significant painters. She unearths their principal works, discusses their critical reception, and demonstrates their influence on later generations of visual artists, both within and beyond the borders of Spain. She also considers the stylistic and philosophical “Spanishness” that may, or may not, link these four very different men. SEPT 20 The Mystical Canvases of El Greco SEPT 21 Diego Velázquez: Court Painter of Spain’s Golden Age

Tues., Sept. 21, 6:45 p.m.; CODE 1K0-142; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

SEPT 22 Francisco Goya: Romantic Realist SEPT 23 Joan Miró: Humor and Horror in Modernist Works

Laocoön by El Greco, ca 1610-1614

4 sessions; Mon., Sept. 20–Thurs., Sept. 23, 12–1:30 p.m.; CODE 1M2-154; Members $80; Nonmembers $90

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NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

El Greco, Velázquez, Goya, and Miró

Perhaps nothing epitomizes the cultural bond of France and the United States better than the joyous reception of jazz in Paris during and following the First World War. Paris—long the cradle of the avant-garde and where racial discriminaPhoto illustration by Paul Glenshaw tion was illegal—provided LOUIS ARMSTRONG-1934; COURTESY OF THE LOUIS ARMSTRONG HOUSE MUSEUM a haven for the great American and French musicians who lived there, including Josephine Baker, Sidney Bechet, Ada “Bricktop” Smith, Django Reinhardt, Stephane Grappelli, and Miles Davis. Duke Ellington played in France more than any other foreign country during his long career. The city inspired American pianist John Lewis to record albums like the mythic Afternoon in Paris there. Educators and documentary filmmakers Darroch Greer and Paul Glenshaw share great moments, characters, and incredible music from this ongoing love affair.

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Read more about programs in this guide on our website. Search by code or date. SmithsonianAssociates.org.


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

COURTESY OF FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT'S MARTIN HOUSE

Live Virtual Tour

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House Frank Lloyd Wright designed the Prairie-style Martin House for Buffalo businessman Darwin D. Martin and his family between 1903 and 1905. It is considered one of the architect’s most significant early commissions. The six historic structures on the 1.5-acre estate have been completely restored after work that began in 1997. Mary Roberts, executive director of the Martin House, leads a live virtual tour through the first floor of the main house, the open-air pergola, and conservatory as she shares the fascinating history of the site. Curator Susana Tejada joins the program for the Q&A session. It’s the perfect introduction to this architectural gem—and might spark your own visit.

Martin House

Tues., Sept. 28; 12–1:15 p.m.; CODE 1NV-084; Members $25; Nonmembers $30

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

The Intersection of Art and Literature Where Words and Images Fuse

JOHN F. KENNEDY PRESIDENTIAL LIBRARY

Self-Portrait, by Vincent Van Gogh, 1889, Musée d'Orsay

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The notion that a picture is worth a thousand words is meant to convey the power of imagery. But what of the power of words—if they are Van Gogh’s personal letters, or Michelangelo’s thoughts on his life and art expressed in his poetry, or Hemingway’s musings on a work of art? Vincent Van Gogh’s own words offer some of the deepest insights into his paintings. Letters written across almost two decades refer not only to specific paintings but also his views on art, life, religion, nature, and his aspirations as an artist. Michelangelo, the painter, sculptor, and architect, was also a poet. Michelangelo's Moses, church Many of Michelangelo’s poems refer to the challenges related to some of San Pietro in Vincoli of his most important creations, others are deeply personal and reveal his thoughts on love, religion, neoplatonism, fame, and devotion and hard work. Ernest Hemingway’s most beloved possession was the painting by the Spanish artist Joan Miró titled The Farm. The painting—its subject and larger political and cultural significance—signified a lifelong personal touchstone for them. Its role in their lives reveals a host of artistic insights into the relationship between word and image, Explore the alchemy that occurs at the intersection of art and literature in this fascinating Sunday afternoon series with David Gariff, senior lecturer at the National Gallery of Art. OCT 3 Van Gogh: Artist and Writer

Joan Miró

Ernest Hemingway

E.J.

NOV 7 The Poetry of Michelangelo DEC 5 Ernest Hemingway, Joan Miró, and The Farm (1921-22) 3 sessions: Sun., Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 5, 3-4:15 p.m.; CODE 1H0-622; Members $55; Nonmembers $70

Individual sessions: Sun., Oct. 3 (CODE 1H0-622A); Nov. 7 (CODE 1H0-622B); Dec. 5 (CODE 1H0-622C); 3-4:15 p.m.; Members $20; Nonmembers $25

Mas Miró, Joan Mirós’ family farmhouse and inspiration for the painting The Farm

Each session earns ½ credit toward the World Art History Certificate

Recommended reading: The Letters of Vincent van Gogh (Mark Roskill, editor), Atheneum; Complete Poems and Selected Letters of Michelangelo, Princeton University Press; Ernest Hemingway, Death in the Afternoon, Scribner

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All programs are presented on the Zoom platform; all listed times are Eastern Time. Online registration is required.

Classes are taught by professional artists and teachers. View detailed class descriptions and supply lists at SmithsonianAssociates.org/studio View portfolios of work by our instructors at SmithsonianAssociates.org/artinstructors

Children’s Book Illustration

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1/2 credit Composition is one of the most important of elements of any artwork. This workshop Examine fundamental concepts of composition and their practical application in studio-art practice, offering participants tools to enrich their own work as well to analyze and appreciate visual art in general. Create several collages based on art works and themes discussed in class.

Moroccan Café by Matisse, 1913

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HERMITAGE MUSEUM

Composition

Fri., Sept 3–24, 10:30 a.m.; Shahin Talishkhan; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V00WE; Members $155; Nonmembers $175

DRAWING Beginning Drawing This course, a valuable introduction for beginners, teaches the basic skills needed as a strong foundation for drawing. Working with a variety of materials and techniques, including charcoal and pencils, students explore the rendering of geometric forms, volume, and perspective, with an emphasis on personal gesture marks.

TWO OPTIONS: Instructor Eric Westbrook: 4 sessions; Wed., Aug.11–Sept. 1 (CODE 1V0-0RP); 7 p.m.; details and supply list on website; Members $160; Nonmembers $180 Instructor Josh Highter: 8 sessions: Mon., July 12–Aug. 30, 6:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RF; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

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Creating illustrations for a children’s manuscript is loads of fun once you get to know the basics. In this workshop, an author and illustrator explains the process of interpreting a story through pictures. Information on working with publishers and legally protecting your art is also discussed. Tues., July 13–July 20, 1:30 p.m.; Lori VanKirk Schue; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RU; Members $95; Nonmembers $115

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By Lori VanKirk Schue

PAINTING

Botanicals in Watercolor In this introduction to drawing and painting flora, discover the versatility and fluidity of the medium while exploring the functional and aesthetic elements of color and design found in plants. Sessions include stepby-step instructions in watercolor, demonstrations, and exercises to develop observational skills. Create art working from reference photos.

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Tues., July 6–Aug. 24, 10:30 a.m.; Lubna Zahid; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0QY; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Botanicals in Watercolor II Build on your botanical painting skills in this next-level class as you create vibrant watercolors inspired by nature. Step-by-step instructions in watercolor are given, along with practical demonstrations and exercises aimed at the development of observational skills. Some basic By Lubna Zahid watercolor experienceis required. Tues., July 6– Aug. 24, 5 p.m.; Lubna Zahid; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0- 0RT; Members $245; Nonmembers $275


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Introduction to Watercolor Beginning students as well as experienced painters explore new materials and techniques in By Josh Highter watercolor painting. Working on still-lifes and landscapes from direct observation or photographs, they explore basic watercolor techniques and learn new approaches to painting through demonstration, discussion, and experimentation. Sun., July 11–Aug. 29, 10:15 a.m.; Josh Highter; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RE; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Sculpting with Color and Light The sun-dappled marble sculptures by Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and others lining a walkway outside Florence’s Uffizi Gallery are inspiration for this workshop. Add a sense of dimension to watercolor portraits as you learn how to capture sunlight and layered shadows.

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By Cindy Briggs

Thurs., Aug. 5 and 12, 6:30 p.m.; Cindy Briggs; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V00RW; Members $95; Nonmembers $115

NEW CLASS

Animal Portraits

Western Landscapes Under the Milky Way

Create a portrait of your favorite animal or pet. Students learn to grasp the essence of an animal then discover how to promote the characteristics of their animal on canvas using primarily acrylic paints. The goal is to produce artwork that best expresses your animal with whimsical or actual characteristics.

The American West has some of the most beautiful landscapes in the world—especially breathtaking beneath those expansive dark skies. Using watercolor, learn how to mix the colors that capture the night sky’s subtle tints; work with masking fluid to create highlights and stars; and re-create the texture of the region’s red rock landscapes.

Thurs., July 8 and July 15, 1:30 p.m.; Lori VanKirk Schue; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RV; Members $75; Nonmembers $95

Wed., Sept. 22–29, 6:30 p.m.; Natalia Wilkins-Tyler; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TV; Members $85; Nonmembers $105

Quick-Sketch Watercolors Discover how to quickly capture a variety of subjects with loose lines and painterly colors using the instructor’s quick-sketch watercolors method. This gowith-the-flow technique is perfect for studies, travel journals, and ?nished ?ne art. Have fun as you capture the essence of any subject with free-?owing luminescent watercolors.

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By Natalia Wilkins-Tyler

Painting is for Everyone Working in the versatile and flexible medium of acrylic paints, learn to mix colors, use brushes, and approach elements of form such as value, texture, line, color, shape, and edges. Explore composition and variation, learn art terminology, and a bit of art history as well. Wed., July 28–Sept. 1, 2 p.m.; Chester Kasnowski; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RY; Members $175; Nonmembers $205

Wed., Aug. 4 and Aug. 11, 6:30 p.m.; Cindy Briggs; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RX; Members $95; Nonmembers $115 By Chester Kasnowski By Cindy Briggs

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MIXED-MEDIA

Newsprint Collage

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Wed., July 7–Aug. 11, 6:30 p.m.; Marcie Wolf Hubbard; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RB; Members $215; Nonmembers $245

Making art can be a wonderful way to escape from everyday life. It can also be a useful tool in understanding current events. Work with newspapers, magazines, and mixed-media techniques to create a visual representation of the news By Kate Lewis through collage—and a uniquely personal artwork. The London-based instructor discusses her work and that of other artists working in newspaper collage. Thurs., July 8–July 22, 10:30 a.m.; Kate Lewis; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RD; Members $165; Nonmembers $185

Collage Fundamentals

White-Line Woodblock Printing

In this beginner-level introduction to collage, learn about tools, adhesives, and appropriate bases for supporting a collage. Discover how to use common materials to make different papers, and how to use image transfers and apply 3D embellishments. Use magazines, printed materials, found papers, and By Sharon Robinson other materials as the basis for using shape, color, and texture in compositions developed in class exercises.

White-line woodcuts are multicolor images printed from a single block of wood. Create your own by cutting a nature print or simple line drawing into a single wood block with a knife or gouge, creating the “white lines” when printed. Color the area between the lines with watercolor or gouache.

Collage and MixedMedia: Animals and Nature With an emphasis on imagery from the natural world, learn to sketch animals and objects found in nature, then combine your drawings with painting and By Marcie Wolf Hubbard additional elements and textures to create whimsical or serious mixed-media art.

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Mon., July 12–Aug. 16, 6:30 p.m.; Sharon Robinson; supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RG; Members $215; Nonmembers $245

Collage and Mixed-Media Intensive Collage is a highly versatile and accessible art technique that results in the playful combination of different and sometimes unlikely materials. Get an introduction to the materials, tools, and technologies used in collage and assemblage. Find inspiration in artists who worked in collage including Joseph Cornell, Romare Bearden, and Gertrude Green. Then, develop your own collage, mixed-media, or assemblage projects. Fri., July 16–July 30, 1:30 p.m.; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RJ; Members $165; Nonmembers $185 By Marcie Wolf-Hubbard

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Sat., July 17, 10 a.m.; Sue Fierston; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RK; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

By Sue Fierston

Painting and Collage Combine painting techniques with collage to produce pieces with texture and depth. Work on watercolor paper and canvas; learn how use papers, acrylics, inks, and other materials; and experiment with collaging into painted surfaces as well as painting on collaged surfaces. Some previous experience with acrylic painting is required.

By Sharon Robinson

Sat., July 17—Aug. 14, 1:30 p.m.; Sharon Robinson; details for ordering supply kit from instructor on website; CODE 1V0-0RL; Members $185; Nonmembers $215


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Artful Mind, Tranquil Mind

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Gyotaku: The Japanese Art of Printing with Fish

Centering practices artists use to prepare for making art can be helpful in everyday life. Through guided instruction designed to enhance your own art making , explore mark-making with lines, swirls and puddles; and, using paper, experiment with folding and tearing. Mon., July 19–Aug. 23, 12 p.m.; Sushmita Mazumdar; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RZ; Members $85; Nonmembers $115

SCIENCE

Delightful and detailed prints on paper can be made by applying water-based printing inks to a whole fish and pressing it to paper. Create several 12-by-18-inch gyotaku. By Sue Fierston Learn how to paint realistic fish eyes and cut masks to create realistic compositions. Sat., Sept. 11, 10 a.m.; Sue Fierston; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SZ; Members $75; Nonmembers $85 By Sushmita Mazumdar

Book Arts: Standards and Creative Variations

Relief Printing Linocut and Woodblock The most sculptural of all printmaking techniques, woodblock printing and linocut printing are ideal for creating bold, textured images. This class introduces relief printing techniques including design and transfer through cutting and printing the block. Students By Max-Karl Winkler design and produce their own editions, using nontoxic materials and employing both one and two-color techniques. Mon., July 19–Aug. 23, 6 p.m.; Max-Karl Winkler; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SA; Members $185; Nonmembers $215

Learn the rules of bookmaking…then get creative and break them! Each week, make different kinds of books, including an accordion book, Japanese stab bound journal, By Sushmita Mazumdar and a travel journal with sewn in pages. Once you know the basics, use a variety of techniques to personalize your handmade books to tell your own story. Mon., Sept.13–Sept. 27, 12 p.m.; Sushmita Mazumdar; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TA; Members $125; Nonmembers $145

Where’s My Muse? Build a Tiny House

Flexing Your Creative Muscle

It takes a village! In this workshop, students construct their own tiny houses, which they personalize working in papermache, acrylics, and mixed media. Explore a range of materials in fabricating your own house. Finish the house’s interior and exterior in acrylic, photo transfers, and a variety of techniques to make it your own.

Plumb the depths of creative inspiration, drawing on class discussion, visual aids, and exercises to engage the senses in the act of design. Students use writing, drawing, painting, collage, and other techniques to make pieces of art that are personal creative expressions.

Fri., Sept.10–Sept. 24, 1:30 p.m.; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SY; Members $165; Nonmembers $185

Mon., Sept. 13–27, 6:30 p.m.; Sharon Robinson; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TN; Members $100; Nonmembers $120

By Sharon Robinson

By Marcie Wolf-Hubbard

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FIBER ARTS

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Freestyle Embroidery on Kimono Silk Explore a liberating style of abstract embroidery using improvisational stitches on found fabric, specifically scraps of vintage kimono silk. Take the entire project from beginning to end and learn how to finish the embroidery in the hoop for easy hanging.

By Heather Kerley

Wed. July 7–July 28, 10:30 a.m; Heather Kerley; details on supply kit available for purchase from instructor on website; CODE 1V00RC; Members $95; Nonmembers $105

STUDIO ARTS Back-to-Basics Boot Camp for Knitters

Do your knitting skills stop with scarves? Are you feeling rusty and ready to refresh and advance your skills? This class reviews introductory skills and fundamentals: casting on; knit and purl; binding off; increasing and decreasing; basic finishing skills; and taking gauge. Knitting equipment is also examined. Sat., July 17 and Sun., July 18, 1 p.m.; Ann Richards; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TD; Members $90; Nonmembers $110

Palestinian Embroidery 101 Tapestry Weaving

The Tatreez Sampler

Learn basic tapestry weaving techniques and design. Then, create a miniature woven tapestry on a small frame loom. Techniques covered include warping the loom; color mixing and hatching; creating stripes and irregular shapes; and shading and contour.

Learn about Palestinian embroidery’s fascinating history and how its heritage has been preserved by generations of women. Then, learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch to create a tatreez sampler, using a standardsize sheet of Aida cloth.

Tues., July 6–Aug. 10, 6:30 p.m.; Tea Okropiridze; loom required; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SB; Members $185; Nonmembers $215

By Tea Okropiridze

Today’s Quilts by Hand Hand stitching is a great stress reducer, and handwork projects are ideal take-alongs to fit into your day. Learn the basics of hand-stitched quilt-making by creating an 18-by-24-inch piece as a doll quilt or a wall hanging. The piecing, applique, quilting, and finishing techniques are similar to those used in larger quilts. Wed. July 7–28, 1:30 p.m.; Lauren Kingsland; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SC; Members $105; Nonmembers $125

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THREE OPTIONS: Fri., July 23, 2 p.m. Motif Focus: Road of Stars, Yaffa By Wafa Ghnaim Region (CODE 1V0-0TG); Fri., Aug. 20, 2 p.m. Motif Focus: Flowers, Ramallah Region (CODE 1V00TH); Fri., Sept. 17, 2 p.m. Motif Focus: Carnations, Bersheba Region (CODE 1V0-0TJ); Wafa Ghnaim; details and supply list on website; Members $55; Nonmembers $65

Natural Dye Workshop: A Beginners Studio Explore the wide range of colors that nature can yield. In this three-part class, learn how to establish a dye studio at home, dive into various by An-Phuong Ly dyestuffs and colors, and walk through the process of dyeing fiber with natural materials. A few surface design techniques, such as tying, clamping, and resist, are also discussed. Sun. Aug.1–Aug.15, 12:30 p.m.; An-Phuong Ly; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TF; Members $95; Nonmembers $115


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When Good Patterns Go Bad Avoiding and Fixing Knitting Mistakes

Vines, leaves, and vegetables provide the basis for creating wonderful, evocative prints on fabric. Using colorful Akua waterbased printmaking ink, celebrate summer by spending a day Student’s work experimenting with hand-printing on fabrics using seasonal natural materials. Participants first practice their printmaking techniques on muslin, and later use a cotton or cotton-blend solid light-colored shirt.

knitting project.

Sat., Aug. 28, 10 a.m.; Sue Fierston; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0RQ; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

Fri., Aug. 27, 1:30 p.m.; Ann Richards; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TE; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

Nothing can be more frustrating than realizing there’s something wrong with your knitting, and not knowing how to fix it. Learn how to avoid errors, from dropped stitches to difficult pattern instructions to twisted stitches and more, and what to do when you’re stuck on a

Flash Quilt Stories

Mindful Stitching Center yourself though the calm flow of the rhythmic motion of hand stitching. Create a therapeutic textile panel using a hand needle and materials you have at home, which can include vintage family textiles such as table napkins to invoke warm personal memories. Sessions provide basic instruction and emphasize improvisation and following the inspiration of the moment. Lauren Kingsland; Sat., Aug. 7–Aug. 28, 11:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SD; Members $105; Nonmembers $125

Inspired by the 6-Word Memoir project, learn to capture quick images of personal stories in quilted wall-hangings. Fusing allows students to appliqué shapes quickly, while embroidered By Lauren Kingsland details emphasize essential ideas. Found objects like jewelry or trinkets may also be included. Sat., Sept.11, 1:30 p.m.; Lauren Kingsland; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TB; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

By Lauren Kingsland

Introduction to Bobbin Lace Handmade bobbin lace has been around since the 16th century. Though it might look complicated, all bobbin lace is made with two moves, with four bobbins at a time. Learn the basics of bobbin lacemaking, from winding the bobbins to making four small lace projects, in this introductory class. Wed., Aug.11–Sept.1, 10:30 a.m.; Karen Thompson; details and supply list on website; class size limited to 7; CODE 1V0-0SE; Members $185; Nonmembers $205

NEW CLASS

Freestyle Embroidery Basics In this workshop, beginners are introduced to surface freestyle hand embroidery. In this style, the stitches are applied By Heather Kerley freely, disregarding the weave or structure of the ground cloth. Students learn how to select and prepare fabric using a simple design, ready their hoop, and begin stitching. Sat., Sept. 11, 12:30 p.m.; Heather Kerley; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TK; Members $55; Nonmembers $65

By Karen Thompson

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Local Color: Foraging for Natural Dyestuff Natural dyes are all around us: fields of wildflowers; tree-and flower-lined city streets; our own kitchen composts. Discover sources of natural in-season dyestuff in the by An-Phuong Ly Mid-Atlantic area, how to extract dye from them, and how to effectively prepare fabric and dye samples. Sun., Sept. 12, 12:30 p.m.; An-Phuong Ly; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TM; Members $50; Nonmembers $60

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Introduction to Calligraphy The Foundational Hand The Foundational Hand’s basic strokes provide a solid foundation for learning other hands such as Italic and Black Letter. Sessions cover drawing guidelines, determining heights, and letter spacing; Roman minuscules (lower case) and majuscules (upper case); and basic layout and design. Student work Sat., July 10–Aug. 28, 2 p.m.; Sharmila Karamchandani; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SH; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Edge Finishing Techniques in Quilt making

Introduction to Afghan Manuscript Illumination

A quilt’s finished edge often make a difference in the piece’s overall impact. Learn how to use self-binding or applied bindings, facings, and overstitching to apply the edge. This can be done working by hand, with a machine, or using both techniques.

Circular Weaving Circular weaving is a fun technique for new weavers as well as experienced fiber artists. Learn how to warp and weave on several sizes of circle looms as you explore plain weave as well as By Tea Okropiridze twinning, soumak, ray knots, and loops. Create wall hangings, coasters, mats, cushions, embellishments for accessories, or home dÈcor using a variety of yarn and roving techniques. Fri., Sept. 17 and 24, 12 p.m.; Tea Okropiridze; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TR; Members $85; Nonmembers $105

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The beautiful decorations of religious and secular manuscripts are centuriesold Islamic traditions. Learn elements of gold-leaf manuscript illumination in the Afghan tradition. Create geometric, vegetable, and floral motifs and naturebased designs, and apply illuminations using gold leaf and gum Arabic.

By Sughra Hussainy

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by Lauren Kingsland

Sat., Sept.18–25, 1:30 p.m.; Lauren Kingsland; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TS; Members $65; Nonmembers $85

STUDIO ARTS

Sun., July 11–Aug.15, 9 a.m.; Sughra Hussainy; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SG; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

SCULPTURE

Sculptural Relief This class introduces students to the principles of relief sculpture, which is a bridge between two-dimensional and three-dimensional art forms. Students explore different styles and methods of relief, addressing perspective and depth as they build works from clay or plasticine up and out of a flat surface.

Tues., July 6–Aug.10, 10:30 a.m.; George Tkabladze; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V00SF; Members $205; Nonmembers $235


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

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The Art of Floral Design

Washington’s Marvelous Mosaics

Gain a full understanding of what floral design entails in this class that covers many practical areas including sourcing (with a focus on sustainability), making the most of seasonal flowers, creating centerpieces, wiring techniques, bouquet-making, and By Arrin Sutliff photographing your work. Thurs., July 8–Aug. 12, 12 p.m., Arrin Sutliff; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SJ; Members $135; Nonmembers $165

Like the myriad of small pieces of colored stone, tile, and glass that make up a mosaic, the Washington, D.C., area contains a surprising number of works that together provide a picture of the styles and techniques that mark an art form that’s been practiced since ancient times. Take a virtual tour of a wide variety of local mosaic treasures at notable public sites, contemporary spaces, and federal and private buildings. Tues., Aug 24., 7 p.m.; Bonnie Fitzgerald; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SM; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

The Ancient Art of Henna Tattoos Henna tattoos reflect an ancient and beautiful practice of body art. Explore the form’s history as you learn to apply simple traditional Indian henna designs. Participants also receive instruction in making henna paste from scratch, rolling a cone applicator, the science behind getting a perfect stain, and how to create their own stunning designs from traditional motifs. Sun., July 11, 1 p.m.; Sharmila Karamchandani; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SK; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

Statue of Liberty (detail) depicted in a mosaic at the Basilica of the Shrine of the Immaculate Conception

Orchids Gone Native In their native environments, most common orchids grow above the soil attached to trees or rocks. Discover the unique attributes of orchids that allow them to grow this way. The afternoon concludes with a step-by-step guide to free your orchid from the confines of its pot and mount it on a piece of bark. Sat., Aug. 28, 2 p.m.; Barb Schmidt; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SN; Members $30; Nonmembers $40

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Mosaic and Found Object Assemblage: Fun Faces What happens when traditional and non-traditional materials are brought together to create an offbeat, amusing portrait? Find out in this class that By Bonnie Fitzgerald combines mosaic and assemblage along with instruction in design and composition techniques. Work with a mix of unconventional items including recycled materials, natural found objects, dish shards in pique assiette style, and more. Tues., July 20–Aug. 3, 6:30 p.m.; Bonnie Fitzgerald; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0SL; Members $135; Nonmembers $155

Bead Weaving: On and Off the Loom Bead weaving offers an endless possibility of stitches, designs, and color combinations. Learn two bead weaving methods—with and without a loom—as well as two different stitch patterns with a myriad of design possibilities. The class focuses on how to start and finish wearable pieces, create patterns, and choose bead colors and finishes. Sun., Sept. 12–26, 12 p.m.; Mïa Vollkommer; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0TL; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

By Mïa Vollkommer

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The Joy of Photography

Growing Show Orchids Your orchids are thriving and blooming. If you’re wondering what’s next in your orchid adventure, this more advanced orchid class is for you. Learn about the conditions necessary to raise vigorous, healthy orchids for shows and competitions and get tips on transporting and preparing your competitionready orchids. Sun., Sept. 12, 2 p.m.; Barb Schmidt; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TT; Members $30; Nonmembers $40

STUDIO ARTS

In this class designed for beginners who want to learn how to use their digital or mirrorless camera as a creative tool, students gain skill in technical aspects of photography so that they can concentrate on composing beautiful images. Topics include aperture, shutter speed, ISO, the exposure triangle, focal length, metering, white balance, and composition. Weekly assignments are critiqued by the instructor in class. Digital or mirrorless camera required. Tues., July 6–July 27, 6:30 p.m.; Marty Kaplan; details on website; CODE 1V0-0SP; Members $165; Nonmembers $185

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Understanding Your Digital Mirrorless or SLR Camera Get the most out of your digital mirrorless or SLR camera by taking part in this workshop, which provides a solid introduction to these cameras’ features and potential. Topics By Eliot Cohen include shutter speed, aperture controls, depth of field, raw vs. jpeg files, white balance and auto focus modes. Several photos can be uploaded before the second session, which features critiques over Zoom. WEEKEND WORKSHOP: Sat., Aug. 7 and 14; 9:30 a.m.; Eliot Cohen; details on website; class size limited to 7; CODE 1V0-0RNMembers $255; Nonmembers $275 3-SESSION WORKSHOP: Wed., July 14–28, 1:30 p.m.; Eliot Cohen; details on website; class size limited to 7; CODE 1V0-0RH; Members $255; Nonmembers $275

Introduction to Lightroom Adobe lightroom is the most useful (and user friendly) software for organizing and editing images, usable for both RAW and JPEG image files. This two-sessionworkshop offers users an overview of the program, with a focus on working with the essential Library and Develop modules for organizing and editing your files. By Eliot Cohen

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Sat., July 17 and Sun., July 18; Eliot Cohen; 9:30 a.m.; details on website; class size limited to 6; CODE 1V0-0RM; Members $275; Nonmembers $295

SmithsonianAssociates.org

Introduction to Photography Whether you want to work in digital or film, this class offers a solid foundation for new photographers ready to learn the basics. Topics include camera functions, exposure, metering, working with natural and artificial light, and composition. Critiques of assignments enhance your technical skills.

By Andargé Asfaw

Wed., July 14–Aug.18, 10:30 a.m.; Andargé Asfaw; details on website; CODE 1V0-0ST; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

The Flash Class Understanding how to use the camera’s flash is key for photographers who want to advance to the next level. This class, designed for digital photographers familiar with aperture, By Marty Kaplan shutter speed, ISO and metering in manual mode, offers to do just that. Learn how to take the battery-operated flash off the camera to create a three-dimensional look to your photographs. Tues., Aug. 3–Aug. 24, 6:30 p.m.; Marty Kaplan; details on website; CODE 1V0-0SV; Members $165; Nonmembers $185


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Photo 101

Apertures, Shutter Speeds, and Exposure Modes Take command of your photographic vision as you learn the basics of your camera’s exposure functions. Learn to control the properties of your images through the understanding of apertures, shutter speeds, depth of field, shutter motion effects, equivalent exposures, and exposure modes. Mon., Sept. 20, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Yablonsky; details on website; CODE 1V0-0TU; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

Black & White Analog Photography–Film Developing and Printing Dust off your film cameras, developing tanks, and that old enlarger— for some old-school photography. This class features 35mm and “toy” film cameras; film developing theory and chemicals; evaluating negatives; negative storage and scanning basics; condenser vs. diffuser enlargers; color head usage; printing paper and darkroom options; print storage and scanning basics; and plenty more. Tues., Sept. 14–28, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Yablonsky; details on website; CODE 1V0-0TQ; Members $125; Nonmembers $145

Photo 101

Night Photography and Tripods You don’t necessarily need great light to make a great photo. Understand the essentials of night photography and tripods as you learn to manage longer exposure times, exposure modes, and compensation; choose the right tripod; work with remote shutterrelease triggers; use the self-timer; and more. Mon., Sept. 13, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Yablonsky; details on website; CODE 1V0-0TP; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

Introduction to iPhone Photography Put away your point-and-shoot camera and pull out your iPhone to create great images. Learn to make the most of your phone’s camera, starting with photography basics such as essential compositional skills and exposure, then moving on to an exploration of some of the best apps, camera accessories, and low-cost tools for editing and image management. Sat., Sept. 25 and Sun., Sept. 26, 10 a.m.; Peggy Feerick; details and supply list on website; CODE 1V0-0TW; Members $75; Nonmembers $95 By Peggy Feerick

PHOTOGRAPHY: Experienced

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Photographic Creativity, Design, and Composition Achieving a balance of visual tension in an image is fundamental in photography. Gain a better understanding of compositional elements and their applications through online lectures and assignments focusing on extended shutter speeds, light graffiti, bokeh templates, and macro photography. Wed. July 7–Aug.4, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Yablonsky; details on website; CODE 1V0-0SQ; Members $185; Nonmembers $215 By Joe Yablonsky

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Mastering Exposure Develop a greater understanding of the complex relationship among aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. Topics covered in depth include exposure modes, exposure compensation, filter exposure factors, bracketing, metering modes, histograms, the zone system, dynamic range, eliminating camera shake, tripods, and flash concepts. Skills are honed through assignments and in-class review. Thurs., July 8-Aug. 5, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Yablonsky; details on website; CODE 1V0-0SR; Members $185; Nonmembers $215 By Joe Yablonsky

Lightroom Tune-up In this interactive class, students who have had a structured introduction to Lightroom and are familiar with the Library and Develop modules learn to leverage all of the Library functions to improve organization, sorting, and retrieval of files; ensure editing practice has a logical workflow; more fully understand the possibilities for various sliders and tools; and to achieve finer effects with brushes and gradients.

Build Your Photographic Portfolio Go beyond taking random photographs and develop a cohesive body of work that is uniquely yours. Evaluate your best photos and identify the attributes that define your own photographic vision. Targeted homework assignments help you increase your collection of portfolio-quality work. Portfolio books, print sizes, order of presentation, photography websites, and presentation methods are also discussed. Thurs., Aug. 12–26, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Yablonsky; details on website; CODE 1V0-0SX; Members $125; Nonmembers $145

Mon., Aug. 2–16, 7 p.m.; Eliot Cohen; details on website; class size limited to 7; CODE 1V0-0SU; Members $275; Nonmembers $295

Architecture and Public Art Photography Learn how to take great photographs of architecture and public art. Class discussions include techniques and camera settings for cityscapes, individual buildings, architectural details, contemporary public art, monuments and memorials, and cemetery statuary. Explore favorite locations to fulfill homework assignments. The final class features reviews of students’ work. Wed., Aug. 11–Aug. 25, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Yablonsky; details on website; CODE 1V00SW; Members $125; Nonmembers $145

The Photo Essay A photo essay is a set or series of photographs that are intended to tell a story or evoke a series of emotions. Discover how the essay can help develop a more cohesive body of work. Homework assignments are designed to encourage students to explore their own personal interests. The last class features a review of images. Wed., Sept. 1 and Sept. 22, 6:30 p.m.; Joe Yablonsky; details on website; CODE 1V0-0TC; Members $90; Nonmembers $110

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PROGRAMS HELPFUL INFORMATION BY DATE All programs are presented on the Zoom platform; all listed times are Eastern Time. Online registration is required.

Program Planner

(New listings in red)

Courses and Lectures—Multi-Session Wed., July 7 and July 14 The Color of Light...............................................................................34 Mon., July 26; Aug. 23; and Sept. 27 Reading Faulkner ................................................................................23 Mon., July 19; Aug. 2; Aug. 16 Lunchtime with a Curator ...........................................................37 Tues., July 27; Aug. 10; Aug. 24; Aug. 31 Art + History: Evening Encores.......................................................38 Mon., Aug. 9–Thurs., Aug. 12 Exploring the Arts of Latin America .............................................39

Mon., Sept. 13; Sept. 27; Oct. 4; Oct. 25; and Nov. 8 “I’m Ready for My Close-up” ...........................................................27 Mon., Sept. 20–Thurs., Sept. 23 Four Giants of Spanish Painting ....................................................42 Thurs., Sept 23; Sept. 30; Oct. 7; and Oct. 14 Volcanic UNESCO World Heritage Sites ..................................17

Sun., Oct. 3; Nov. 7; and Dec. 5; The Intersection of Art and Literature ....................................44 Tues., Oct. 19; Wed., Oct. 20; and Thurs., Oct. 21 Rock Creek Park Nature and History Walk ...........................33

Fri., Aug. 13; Sept. 17; and Oct. 15 Grapes, Geography, and Global Wine Tastings........................5

Lectures and Seminars—Single Session Thurs., July 1

Black Smoke ...................................................................2

Wed., July 7

The Story of America in Seven Books ...................21

Thurs., July 8

Surveying in Colonial America ..................................6

Fri., July 9

Ravenna.........................................................................35

Sun, July 11

The Geology of Yellowstone.....................................29

Mon., July 12

The African American Great Migration ...................6 Our Deceptive Universe ............................................29

Fri., July 23

Tues., July 13

Tempest in a Teapot .....................................................7

Sat., July 24

Tues., July 20

Wed., July 21

Soutine and de Kooning ............................................34

Wed., July 14

Economics + Harry Potter: The Sequel .................29 Thurs., July 22

Thurs., July 15

Mon., July 26

Grape Explorations .......................................................3

Sat., July 17

England, Custodian of the Jewish Past ..................8

Sun, July 18

Backyard Bird Feeding: Getting Started...............29

Mon. July 19

How To Watch Movies Like a Film Professor.......22

The Beatles...................................................................22

Cooking Up History: Pleibol and Eat Well!..............4 Designing Camelot .....................................................23

Tues., July 27

An Evening with Jen Psaki..........................................2 Driving the Green Book .............................................10

Wed., July 28

Art + History: The 3rd of May ..................................37 Fri., July 16

The Medici in Florence ..............................................35

Metaphysics .................................................................22

Sensational! ....................................................................7 A Salute to Ira and George Gershwin ....................21

Beyond Stonewall ........................................................10 Finding the Real Queen Charlotte ..........................10

Daniel Silva’s The Cellist .............................................2 The Hidden History of Coined Words ......................7

Frank Lloyd Wright: Affordable Homes ...................9 How the Old West Forged the New Woman...........9

Maps and the Birth of America ...............................21 A Reflective Writing Workshop ...............................36

How Prohibition Shaped the Twenties ....................8 Operation Pedestal.......................................................8

Traveling Again............................................................23 Rescuing the Planet...................................................30

Thurs., July 29

Napoleon’s Complicated Legacy ..............................11 Baltimore Neighborhoods: Mount Vernon............38

Sat., July 31

Seductive Paris ...........................................................39

What time does the program end? Unless noted, Smithsonian Associates programs run 1 hour 15 min.–2 hours, including Q&A

JULY 2021 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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HELPFUL INFORMATION All programs are presented on the Zoom platform; all listed times are Eastern Time. Online registration is required.

Program Planner Tues., Aug. 3

(New listings in red)

The Espionage Act of 1917 ........................................11

Tues., Sept. 14

The Battle of the Little Bighorn...................................15

The Valois Dynasty ......................................................11

Masada ................................................................................16

Keepers of the Flame .................................................12

The Beasts Before Us ....................................................32

A History of TV Comedy ...........................................24

Notre Dame .......................................................................42

Wed., Aug. 4

Jeffrey Kluger’s Holdout ..........................................30

Thurs., Aug. 5

Cooking Up History: Lena Richard............................4 Black Music and the Civil Rights Movement.......24

Fri., Sept. 17

Sommelier's Guide to Wine: Discovering South America ........................................5

Mon., Sept. 20

Gettysburg ....................................................................16 A Geologic Tour of the Northern Rockies ................31

Fri., Aug. 6

Venice: 1000 Years of History .................................35

Sat., Aug. 7

A Day with the Tudors................................................12

Wed., Aug. 11

The Wyeth Dynasty ....................................................40

Thurs., Aug. 12

Shakespeare’s London................................................12

Wed., Sept. 22

Sommelier's Guide to Wine:

Thurs., Sept. 23 Thomas Aquinas ..........................................................17

Fri., Aug. 13

Tues., Sept. 21

The Korean War............................................................16 Jazz in Paris ......................................................................42

Unlocking Portugal’s Wine Secrets ..........................5

Lady Bird Johnson.......................................................17

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary ...........................................32

Sat., Aug. 14

The Maya .......................................................................13

Fri., Sept. 24

Urbino ............................................................................36

Mon., Aug. 16

The Valley Forge Winter ............................................13

Sat., Sept. 25

Literary Baltimore .......................................................27

Tues., Aug. 17

Elizabeth Barrett Browning ......................................25

Mon., Sept. 27

Looking Within .............................................................32

Sat., Aug. 21

Mastering Crossword Puzzles .................................25

Tues., Sept. 28

Plat du Jour ....................................................................3

Wed., Aug. 25

Digitization Technology.............................................30

Thurs., Aug. 26

Los Angeles: Creating the Vision ............................13

Fire and Ice........................................................................33 Frank Lloyd Wright’s Martin House ...........................43 Wed., Sept. 29

Amur River ....................................................................18

Fri., Aug. 27

Michelangelo and The Last Judgement ...............40

Sat., Aug. 28

Michelangelo and the Medici Popes......................40

Wine and the White House .......................................18

Sun, Aug. 29

A Geologic Tour of Copper Canyon, Mexico.........31

The Story of Grimms’ Fairytales.............................28

Wed., Sept. 1

Food Fight.....................................................................25

Thurs., Sept. 30 Cooking Up History: Stir-Frying................................4

In Search of the Hummingbird ....................................31

Frank Sinatra ...............................................................26

Thurs., Sept. 2

Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks .....................................26

Sat., Oct. 2

Aristotle .........................................................................28

Tues., Sept. 7

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Urban Visions ......................41

Wed., Oct. 6

The Queen’s Residences............................................18

Wed., Sept. 8

The House of Bourbon ...............................................14

Sherlock Holmes..............................................................28

A Trip to Britain with the Great Composers...........26 Jacob Lawrence ...........................................................41

Fri., Oct. 8

The Potomac.................................................................19

Tues., Oct. 5

Lost Civilizations: The Aztecs .................................20

Thurs., Sept. 9

Thomas Paine ...............................................................14 An Overlooked Gem in Naples .................................41

Fri., Oct. 15

Sommelier's Guide to Wine: Loving the Loire .......5

Tues., Oct. 26

Lost Civilizations: The Sumerians ..........................20

Fri., Sept. 10

Florentine Splendor....................................................36

Tues., Nov. 16

Lost Civilizations: The Barbarians..........................20

Sat., Sept. 11

Fighting Slavery in the Civil War Era .....................14

Tues., Dec. 7

Lost Civilizations: The Indus....................................20

Mon., Sept. 13

Jane Austen’s Regency World ..................................15 American Schism: Healing a Divided Nation ..........15

Studio Arts Painting, Drawing, Mixed Media, Fiber Arts, Sculpture, Calligraphy, Other Media, Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44-54

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NOTICE TO OUR PATRONS: Until all Smithsonian museums and units can safely return to in-person events, all Smithsonian Associates in-person events are suspended. While our staff is working remotely, our main phone line 202-633-3030 is available from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday. To address your concerns, we are providing the most current information on ticket purchasing and policies, membership and audience services, and communicating with our staff. Although we are unable to provide the usual full level of service now, we’ll do our best to meet the needs of members, ticket-buyers, and donors. We hope to safely resume some previous activities once the Smithsonian-wide phased reopening plan allows us to do so.

SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES POLICIES AND PROCEDURES MEMBERSHIP Depending on your level of support, you will receive special benefits, including significant savings on most Smithsonian Associates program tickets and a monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide, and much more! Visit SmithsonianAssociates.org/join for more information. Join today!

TICKETS Online.......................SmithsonianAssociates.org

CONTACT US Email ........................CustomerService@SmithsonianAssociates.org Mail .............................Smithsonian Associates, P.O. Box 23293, Washington, D.C. 20026-3293

REFUNDS are only issued when a program is canceled or if it sells out before we receive your order. CREDIT TO YOUR SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES ACCOUNT Credit for cancellations or exchanges are only available for ticket orders that cost more than $40. If in compliance with the specific guidelines below, credit is issued to your Smithsonian Associates account, not your credit card. Credits are non-transferable. Important note: Cancelling your program in the Zoom personal link that you received will not entitle you to a Smithsonian Associates credit or refund, unless the cancellation took place at least two weeks prior to the program and you notified Customer Service via email about the cancellation. All Smithsonian Streaming programs, study tours, and Studio Arts classes If you wish to cancel or exchange tickets for any ticket order costing more than $40, please contact Customer Service via email at least two weeks before the program date to request a credit. Please note that there is a $10 cancellation fee, as well as a cost adjustment when there is a price difference if you are applying your credit to another program.

Courses To receive credit to your Smithsonian Associates account for a course, (excluding Studio Arts classes), please contact Customer Service via email at least two weeks before the first session. Credit will also be issued within two weekdays after the first session, provided that Customer Service is contacted within that period. Credit will be prorated to reflect the cost of the first session. No credit will be given after the first session.

CHANGES IN PUBLISHED SCHEDULES Smithsonian Associates reserves the right to cancel, substitute speakers and session topics within a course, and reschedule any program, if needed. Occasionally, a time or date of a program must change after it has been announced or tickets have been reserved. Participants are

notified by email. Check our website SmithsonianAssociates.org for latest updates. MOVING? If you are receiving our print publications, please email or write us with your new information and allow 6 weeks for the change of address to take effect.


PERIODICALS POSTAGE Paid at WASHINGTON, D.C. and additional mailing offices

Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C. 20560-0701

MEMBER NUMBER

On the cover: U.S. Olympic gymnastics leotard worn by Dominique Dawes at the 1996 Summer Games. Photo: National Museum of American History

Viewing Smithsonian Associates Streaming programs on Zoom If you have not yet downloaded Zoom go to www.zoom.us/download and download the latest version of the Zoom desktop application. Because Internet speeds vary, try to use a hardwired internet connection (ethernet cord) to your computer. Limit the number of devices and close other applications in use while viewing, and avoid any high bandwidth activities. Click the Zoom link sent to you via email (“Click Here to Join”). It will automatically open a web page asking you to launch the Zoom application. Click “Open Zoom Meetings.” Once the meeting is open in Zoom, maximize the window by clicking “Enter Full Screen” in the top right corner. Also, make sure your speakers are on.

And Enjoy! All Smithsonian Associates Streaming programs are closed captioned.

Profile for Smithsonian Associates

Smithsonian Associates July 2021 program guide  

Smithsonian Associates monthly program guide. Smithsonian Associates is the largest museum-based education program in the world, offering mo...

Smithsonian Associates July 2021 program guide  

Smithsonian Associates monthly program guide. Smithsonian Associates is the largest museum-based education program in the world, offering mo...

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