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EARLY REGISTRATION Donors at levels of $300 or higher can register beginning Tues FEB

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and

Wed FEB

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THREE DAYS before registration opens to the general public. Starting at 9 a.m. This is just one—of many—great reasons to upgrade your level of support today. See page 56 for more details.

Contact Donor Services at 202-633-3030


Dear Friends and Members, The new year brings many exciting new and ongoing initiatives throughout the Smithsonian, and all year long, Smithsonian Associates programming will enhance these overarching themes. In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Earth Day this spring, the Smithsonian is hosting the 2020 Earth Optimism Summit (April 23–25) to promote planetary well-being through actions and success stories that preserve and protect natural and cultural resources. In advance of the summit, Associates has invited a senior NOAA scientist to discuss how climate change has accelerated extremes in weather, and how countries and communities are addressing these challenges (p. 31). We also will hear from two Smithsonian scientists who examine some of nature’s intricate symbiotic connections and their ecological importance (p. 30).

January 2020 Trending . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33 Studio Art . . . . . . . . . . . .43 Member Benefits . . . . . .56 Helpful Information . . . .58

We continue to honor the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative, Because of Her Story, by focusing on the lives and accomplishments of lost aviatrix Amelia Earhart (p. 7) and the late poet and author, Toni Morrison (p. 19). We’ll be hitting it out of the park with a special 5-day study tour that embraces baseball at its most authentic in North Carolina (p. 5) as a warm-up to the National Postal Museum’s summer blockbuster exhibition, Baseball: America’s Homerun. We ‘ll be doing much celebrating of our own, as 2020 marks Smithsonian Associates’ 55th year presenting programs that illuminate and support Smithsonian’s objectives to educate, entertain, and inspire. Here’s to an optimistic Happy New Year from all of us to all of you!

Frederica R. Adelman, Director adelmanf@si.edu

Upper left: Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative’s first published book (womenshistory.si.edu); Above: Stephen Strasburg and the Nationals won the World Series in 2019.

Programs with this icon put a spotlight on the Smithsonian facebook.com/smithsonianassociates twitter.com/smithsonianTSA

Smithsonian Associates (USPS 043-210) Vol. 48, No. 5, January 2020. Published monthly by Smithsonian Associates, Smithsonian Institution, 1100 Jefferson Drive, S.W., Washington, D.C. 20560. Periodicals postage paid at Washington, DC. and at additional mailing offices. Vesna Gjaja, Director of Marketing and Membership; Cecelia Reed, Editor; Robert A. Sacheli, Copywriter; Ric Garcia, Visual Specialist. ©2020 by the Smithsonian Associates. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Smithsonian Associates, P.O. Box 23293, Washington, D.C. 20026-3293. Printed in the U.S.A. on recyclable paper.

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How To Watch the Oscars

Sapporo-Style Ramen

Long before Academy Awards night rolls around on February 9, you’ve probably assembled your own slate of favorites in the Oscar race. There’s nothing more enjoyable than comparing your picks, talking about the nominated films and performers—and of course, those you felt really should have gotten a nod—with other movie fans. Washington City Paper film critic Noah Gittell is back for an evening that focuses on all things Oscar, from its history through all of this year’s story lines and gossip. You’ll be the most knowledgeable guest at your Oscar party! Sip something festive and cast your vote in several major categories, with the most accurate predictions eligible for prizes after the awards are presented.

A Regional Rage

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While ramen has been one of the most common foods in Japan for decades, it has surged in popularity in the U.S. only recently. Japanese foodies take their ramen very seriously: There are approximately 32 distinct regional variations in the country, and just a few of those can be found stateside. Sapporo is one of Japan’s most competitive ramen markets. Its distinctive ramen characteristics include a rich, Chintan stock; thick curly, chewy, and flavorful aged noodles; and wok preparation. The team behind D.C.’s popular Bantam Sopporo ramen King, Daikaya, and Haikan restaurants, including partner chef Katsuya Fukushima and partner Daisuke Utagawa, discuss Sapporo ramen’s basics, demonstrate how they prepare its components, and suggest how best to enjoy it. Then, sit down to lunch at the Haikan restaurant in Shaw.

REY LOPEZ

With Lunch

Thurs., Feb. 6, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-024; all tickets $30

Sat., March 7, 10 a.m.–12 p.m.; Haikan, 805 V Street N.W. (U Street/ African-American Civil War/Cardozo Metro, Green/Yellow line); Members $85; Nonmembers $100

Restaurateur Danny Meyer Bringing Manhattan Style to DC Dining

Thurs., Feb. 20, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-309; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

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Bagel and Lox: An Edible Icon DANIEL KRIEGER

Danny Meyer’s restaurants, including Gramercy Tavern, The Modern, and Shake Shack, are fixtures on the Manhattan dining scene. This winter, the founder and CEO of Union Square Hospitality Group (USHG) opens Maialino Mare, with roof top bar Anchovy Social, at the Thompson Hotel in Washington’s Navy Yard neighborhood. Maialino Mare is Danny Meyer USHG’s first seafood-focused restaurant and only full-service location beyond Manhattan. Meyer—an industry leader known for setting standards in areas such as hiring practices and corporate responsibility—received the 2017 Julia Child Award from the National Museum of American History. He discusses his career, plans for Maialino Mare, and equitable pay’s future in the restaurant industry.

What’s better than fresh-cured smoked salmon piled atop a toasted bagel schmeared with cream cheese? Historian Ted Merwin bites into the cultural history of this beloved breakfast sandwich, revealing why it’s a Jewish tradition, and what makes some bagels superior to others. (Is it really the New York City water?) Local purveyors Andrew Dana and Daniela Moreira of Call Your Mother Jewish Deli explain the basics of their bagel-making process, and Nina Damato of Blue Circle Foods delves into their process for making lox. Stay for a bite of Call Your Mother bagels and Blue Circle Foods lox.

With Tasting

Sun., March 29, 11 a.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-103; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Meet Best-Selling Authors MEMBERS-ONLY PROGRAM

Author Erik Larson on Churchill’s Darkest Year

New overnight tour

Philadelphia Flower Show Getaway A Preview of Spring Sweep away winter with an overnight escape to the horticultural paradise that’s the famed Philadelphia Flower Show. The 2020 edition, with a “Riviera Holiday” theme, is sure to provide plenty of color and Gallic extravagance. Arrive Sunday in Philadelphia for an afternoon that offers an overview of the city (literally) from the spectacular One Liberty Observation Deck, and a special private illustrated program providing a history and overview of the Philadelphia Flower Show. On Monday, take in the blooms before the show opens to the public, then spend a full day exploring the delights of the world’s largest annual floral exhibition. Enjoy an indulgent Mediterraneaninspired Blooming Brunch, then step into the Designer’s Studio and Gardener’s Studio, which feature top flower designers in competitions and lively how-to gardening demos; explore the many plants, flowers, and gifts at the Marketplace; sample complimentary wine and spirits tastings in the Grand Hall; and celebrate the beauty of container-grown plants in the PHS Hamilton Horticourt. Before heading home, pick up dinner at the Reading Terminal Market, housed in a National Historic Landmark building. Overnight accommodations are in the elegant and historic Kimpton Hotel Monaco. OVERNIGHT TOUR Sun., March 1, 10 a.m.–Mon., March 2, 8 p.m.; by bus; detailed information on website; purchase of trip insurance recommended; CODE 1NN-PFS; Members $585; Nonmembers $780; single room-supplement $90

On Winston Churchill’s first day as prime minister, Adolf Hitler invaded Holland and Belgium and began a yearlong bombing campaign, killing 45,000 Britons. It was up to Churchill to unite his country and persuade President Franklin Roosevelt that Britain was a worthy ally, in the fight to the end. Drawing on his newest book, The Splendid and the Vile, Erik Larson—author of bestseller Devil in the White City—creates a vivid portrait of London and Churchill during the Blitz. He explains how, in the face of unrelenting horror, Churchill’s eloquence, courage, and perseverance bound a country together. Mon., March 16, 6:45 p.m.; Lisner Auditorium, George Washington University; CODE 1L0-307; all tickets $40; a copy of The Splendid and the Vile (Crown) included in ticket price

Life Lessons with Judith Viorst From Under 9 to Nearing 90 For generations of readers, Judith Viorst’s Alexander and the Terrible Horrible No Good Very Bad Day is a benchmark book. Parents and children alike identify with the 1972 tale about a young boy whose day goes from bad to worse, and, for all its humor, examined some of the real difficulties of growing up. Her decade-focused poetry books observe adulting with as much fun and insights. Viorst shares her wry wisdom on aging, growth, and change; guilt and control; love, marriage, and parenting; and definitions of happiness later in life. Nearing 90 and Other Comedies of Late Life (Simon & Schuster) is available for sale and signing. Mon., March 16; 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-499; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Forensic Anthropologist Kathy Reichs A Novel Approach to Crime Fiction Forensic anthropologist Kathy Reichs is known for crimefiction novels featuring forensic anthropologist Temperance (Bones) Brennan. She also produced the TV series “Bones,” inspired by the character. In the latest novel, A Conspiracy of Bones, Brennan must discover the identity of a faceless corpse, its connection to a decade-old missing child case, and why the dead man had her cell phone number. Reichs discusses the challenges of translating real-life drama into fiction, and a career that includes an expert witness role in the Casey Anthony trial and as investigator at Ground Zero. A Conspiracy of Bones (Scribner) is available for signing after the program. Wed., March 18, 6:45 p.m.; Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art; CODE 1L0305; Members $40, Nonmembers $50 (includes price of book)

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A New Year of Delightful Destinations Overnight Tours for 2020 Our study tours are designed for people who want more than just a getaway: They offer one-of-a-kind experiences combined with opportunities to gain new insights into the topics that fascinate you. Whether you’re a fan of history, art, music, science, nature, or architecture—or simply love exploring new places— these expert-led excursions offer a year’s worth of tempting travels. Several of our most popular tours return to the schedule, offering you another chance to join us on these adventures—before they sell out again! Note: Tour dates and content are subject to change.

The Best of Brooklyn April 19–20 (see p. 28) Brooklyn offers plenty of delights for lovers of art, music, nature, and food. An arts journalist and former Brooklynite introduces you to several of its top attractions. Leader: Richard Selden

Hiking in the Shenandoahs

Philadelphia Flower Show Getaway

May 3–4 (see p. 32) Celebrate the beauty of Virginia’s Shenandoah National Park as you hike its trails, in spring. Take in the panoramas from Skyland, your lodge nestled along Skyline Drive.

March 1–2 (see p. 3) The spectacular displays at the nation’s top floral event are even more beautiful without the crowds. A private viewing before opening hours is just one of the special features of this visit to the 2020 edition of the show, themed Riviera Holiday.

Leader: Keith Tomlinson

The Bronx in Bloom May 17–18; on sale Feb. 1 Spring is the perfect time to discover the beauty and the history of New York City’s northernmost borough, from the stunning gardens of Wave Hill along the Hudson to Edgar Allan Poe’s cottage. Leader: Richard Selden

Exploring Frank Lloyd Wright The Road to Nashville Music City USA is a cultural melting pot, and this journey south offers a blend of attractions from outstanding country music performances to a major museum exhibition of Turner paintings.

Appreciate Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterwork anew during a late spring visit to the house. See other significant Wright modernist architecture at Kentuck Knob and the cluster of houses at Polymath Park designed by the architect and one of his apprentices.

Leader: Richard Selden

Leader: Bill Keene

March 22–26 (see p. 25)

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May 31–June 1; on sale Feb. 1


A Mountain Rail Extravaganza

Theodore Roosevelt’s North Dakota

June 5–7; on sale Feb. 1

Sept. 19–23; on sale April 1

Stunning spring vistas, vintage locomotives, and West Virginia history are on the itinerary for a weekend spent riding the Cass Scenic Railroad and other mountain routes.

Fly west and experience the wild beauty of the Dakota Territory that shaped young Theodore Roosevelt’s course as a conservationist and naturalist.

Leader: Joe Nevin

Leader: Melanie Choukas-Bradley

A Berkshires Summer Sampler July 26–30; on sale Feb. 1 The scenic and historic Berkshire hills of western Massachusetts are alive with music, art, and theatre. A 5-day tour offers a splendid sampling of cultural attractions in the region. Leader: Richard Selden

Gold-Rush California

Spring in the Brandywine River Valley

Oct. 10–15; on sale April 1

The beautiful Brandywine region is the ideal destination for lovers of art, grand houses and gardens, American history— and used books.

In the late 1840s, the dream of riches drew hundreds of thousands to California—and shaped the history of the state and the American West. A 7-day tour immerses you in the places where the adventure unfolded.

Leader: Hayden Mathews

Leader: Garrett Peck

June 14–15; on sale March 1

An Artful Weekend in New York August 15–16; on sale April 1 Here’s a perfect getaway for art aficionados: Take in a trio of museum exhibitions, enjoy an evening on your own, and stay at a grand Jazz Age hotel. Leader: Ursula Rehn Wolfman

Baseball in North Carolina

Autumn in Hyde Park

July 1–5; on sale Feb. 1

Fall 2020

Summer baseball in North Carolina reflects the game at its most authentic. Head to Bull Durham country with the authors of Fodor’s Baseball Vacations to experience games in historic stadiums, meet coaches and players, and savor some great barbecue.

Follow the Hudson to FDR’s family home and presidential library, Eleanor Roosevelt’s Val-Kill Cottage, the opulent Vanderbilt Mansion, and the Culinary Institute of America. Leader: Bill Keene

Leaders: Peggy Engel and Bruce Adams

Wonders by Wright Buffalo and Beyond August 28–31; on sale April 1 In the early 20th century, Frank Lloyd Wright and his contemporaries turned Buffalo into a showcase for some of the most dazzling and innovative public and private architecture. A 4-day tour surveys this rich heritage. Leader: Bill Keene

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The Making of England: From the Viking Wars to King Cnut A thousand years ago, Danish king Cnut the Great penned his Letter to the English People, casting him as an upholder of English law and tradition. His declaration followed a series of Viking attacks on Britain that began with a small-scale raid in 787 A.D., accelerated six years later with the destruction of the holy island of Lindisfarne, and extended into two centuries of wars that concluded with Cnut, a Danish warlord, reinventing himself as a Christian Anglo-Saxon king. Britain had been a patchwork of Anglo-Saxon and 14th-century medieval illumination from the Chronica Majora depicting Kings Edmund Ironside (left) and Cnut (right) Celtic kingdoms at the onset of the Viking wars. By their conclusion, much of Britain was consolidated into a single one, England. Historian Richard Abels explores the role of the Viking wars in its creation. JAN 8 From Raids to Conquest (787–874) JAN 15 The Reign of Alfred the Great (871–899) JAN 22 Establishing the Kingdom of England (899–978) JAN 29 The Second Viking War and the Danish Conquest (978–1020) 4 sessions; Wed., Jan. 8–29, 12–2 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-478; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Fact vs. Fiction People love the Middle Ages. But do they really know them? The period still lives with us today, reflected in re-enactment groups and Renaissance faires, Late 13th-century French manuscript hit television shows illustration depicting the three classes such as “Game of of the times—cleric, knight, and workman Thrones,” and bestselling games like Chivalry. But popular culture presents a skewed version of the era that is often based on outdated preconceptions of this millennium. Medievalist Paul B. Sturtevant, editor-in-chief of The Public Medievalist, reveals a medieval world that holds surprises for amateurs and history buffs alike. Learn what and who really is “medieval,” and hear stories of people who didn’t just break the medieval mold, but demonstrate that the mold may not be what you always thought. Thurs., Jan. 16, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-021; Members $20; Nonmembers $30; Students with valid ID $15

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The Day Prohibition Began Thirteen Awful Years of the Noble Experiment America’s “noble experiment” of Prohibition began on January 16, 1920, after a century of agitation by the temperance movement to create a dry, sober nation. What started as a measure to prevent soldiers from drinking quickly became a constitutional amendment to ban the manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcohol. As bootleggers catered to the thirst for booze, organized crime dramatically undermined the noble experiment. The experiment ended with the repeal of the 21st Amendment in 1933. Celebrate the centennial of Prohibition with author and historian Garrett Peck during a cocktail-driven journey through history. Sample Prohibition-era cocktails (legally).

With Cocktail Tasting

Thurs., Jan. 16, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; participants must be 21 or older with ID; CODE 1L0-297; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Liquor is poured into a sewer following a raid during the height of Prohibition

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

Medieval History

BRITISH LIBRARY

England in 878


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Amelia Earhart

The Birth of the OSS

Part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative

Before the CIA there was the OSS—the Office of Strategic Services. Authorized by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941, he installed charismatic lawyer William “Wild Bill” Donovan as head of the nation’s first peacetime intelligence organization. The agency’s unlikeliest of recruits—among them, historian Arthur Schlesinger Jr., film director John Ford, and Harvard scholar Ralph OUT D L Bunche—worked SO with safecrackers, forgers, parachutists, mountain climbers, and others, carrying out the war’s boldest covert operations. OSS Detachment 101 helped to For example, they liberate Rangoon in 1945 supported French Resistance forces, blew up bridges, ran a guerrilla army in Burma, and helped a group planning to assassinate Hitler. Randy Burkett, a career CIA directorate of operations, traces the colorful history of the OSS. Wed., Jan. 22, 6:45–8:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-473; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY

Wild Bill’s Secret Agents

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On May 21, 1937, aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart set out to become the first woman to fly around the world. She and her navigator, Fred Noonan, had flown more than 22,000 miles when, on July 2, they disappeared Amelia Earhart over the Pacific Ocean, en route to Howland Island. Their disappearance has remained one the 20th century’s greatest unsolved mystery. But is that the only reason Earhart is to be remembered? Disappearance theories aside, when Earhart went missing, the world lost a pioneering woman of intriguing complexity and tremendous courage. National Air and Space Museum Curator Dorothy Cochrane examines Earhart’s accomplishments and shortcomings, and why her legacy still challenges and inspires today. Thurs., Jan. 30, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-296; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

The World of the Crusades Holy War and Jihad When the Byzantine Emperor Alexius called on Pope Urban II to local leaders were able to rally enough support to drive the last send him aid against the Turks, he had no idea that he was setting crusaders from Middle Eastern soil. in motion a movement that we now call the Crusades. What Historian Jennifer Paxton explores the origins of the Crusades, caused tens of thousands of Europeans to travel more than a the complex relations between crusaders and their opponents, and thousand miles to try to reclaim Christian territory and, perhaps their legacy for the modern world. more importantly, 9:30 a.m. Just-War save their souls? Theory and the Origins The Europeans of the Crusades who settled in the 11 a.m. The First Holy Land Crusade brought many 12:15 p.m. Lunch Western-style (participants provide institutions and their own) customs with 1:30 p.m. The Rise of them, but they Jihad also acclimated in 3 p.m. Crusading surprising ways to Attack of the Crusaders on Constantinople, ca. 1330, by Geoffreoy de Villehardouin, Venice Redefined the very different Sat., Feb. 8, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2culture they found there. The Muslim response to the Christian 065; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 challenge was hampered by political infighting, but ultimately,

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1774: The Long Year of Revolution

J’Accuse! The Dreyfus Affair and Its Aftermath On Jan. 5, 1895, a shocking spectacle took place in the courtyard of the Parisian Ecole Militaire as Alfred Dreyfus, a young Jewish officer, was publicly degraded and denounced with cries of “Jew” and “Judas”. Found guilty of treason, he was sentenced to life imprisonment in Devil’s Island penal colony. A 12-year struggle to free Dreyfus included new evidence exposing the actual traitor, and the role of the press, most famously for publishing novelist Emile Zola’s denunciation of Front page of the newspaper L’Aurore with the the French army for this miscarriage letter written by Émile Zola, January 13, 1898 of justice. Historian Ralph Nurnberger examines the Dreyfus affair and its far-reaching ramifications including anti-Semitism’s expansion in Europe and the difficulties minorities face when seeking justice in pluralist societies.

The 16 months from December 1773 to midApril 1775 helped define the course of America as a nation. Colonial historian Mary Beth Norton examines the critical “long year” that encompassed the Boston Tea Party, the first Continental Congress, and two significant early battles in the War of Independence. Norton surveys the developments that led King George III’s loyalists to accept the inevitability of war against the British Empire. Although the Declaration of Independence would not be formally adopted until July 1776, Americans had in effect already declared independence, following their new provincial governments’ decrees rather than colonial officials’. Norton’s book 1774: The Long Year of Revolution (Penguin Random House) is available for sale and signing. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

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RESCHEDULED: Mon., Feb. 10, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-468; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

The Black Death’s Legacy Wealthy Orphans of Renaissance Florence As it swept through Florence from the mid-14th century to the end of the next, the Black Death made no distinction between the city’s poor and rich. Many orphans inherited vast fortunes, and the Florentine state managed these minors’ assets until they reached the age of majority. Inventory record from a cloth merchant's store, Official accounting records and inwith symbols possibly indicating types of cloth, 1388, Florentine State Archives; photo by Daniel ventories from that time offer today’s Lord Smail historians a unique glimpse into upper-class Renaissance Florence life, enumerating property from embroidered garments and garden tools to farm animals and foodstuffs—and even enslaved persons. Historian Laura Morreale uses the inventories to illuminate items found in the homes of wealthy Florentines, shedding light on their world during a time of plague.

“Americans throwing the Cargoes of the Tea Ships into the River, at Boston”, in The History of North America, 1789

Wed., Feb. 12, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-300; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

RESERVED SEATING is available for most programs. Contact Donor Services at 202-633-3030 to learn about the many benefits of donating to Smithsonian Associates.

Tues., Feb. 25, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-027; Members $20; Nonmembers $30; Students with valid ID $15

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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The Wars of the Roses Cousins, Conflicts, and the Crown Can a family conflict change the history of England and Europe? Yes, if it’s the Plantagenet family. King Henry VI’s weakness led to a challenge for power, resulting in a series of battles and power grabs known as the Wars of the Roses. Tudor scholar Carol Ann LloydStanger traces a historic arc that begins with the death of Plantagenet King Edward III in 1327, the power shifts that led the Plantagenets to split into the houses of York and Lancaster, and bloody battles for the throne. The death of Edward IV in 1483 was followed by a disruption of succession that put Henry Tudor on the throne—and established the powerful Tudor Dynasty. 9:30 a.m. King Edward III: My Five Sons 11 a.m. Henry VI and Edward IV: Family Feud 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Red and White Roses: The Women’s Stories 3 p.m. Battlefields to Bedchambers: Power Shifts in the Tudor Ascent Plucking the Red and White Roses in the Old Temple Gardens, ca. 1908, by Henry Payne

Sat., Feb. 29, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-069; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Set high in the Peruvian Andes, Machu Picchu, built by the Inca Empire around 1450, is one of the most spectacular archaeological sites in the world. Designated a Peruvian Historical Sanctuary and UNESCO World Heritage Site, over the centuries Machu Picchu has acquired archaeological and historical importance, mythic and symbolic significance, a continuing diversity of interpretations, and a myriad of contemporary political and cultural issues. In a fascinating daylong seminar, George L. Scheper looks through the lenses of geography, history, and culture to uncover new truths about a people and a place that fascinate us still. Scheper is a senior lecturer in Advanced Academic Programs at Johns Hopkins University and former director of the Odyssey Lifelong Learning Program.

PHOTOS BY GEORGE SCHEPER

The Inca and Machu Picchu

Inca stone work at Sacsayhuaman

9:30 a.m. Andean Contexts 11 a.m. The Empire of the Sun 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Visiting Machu Picchu 3 p.m. Contemporary Issues and Interpretations of Machu Picchu Sat., Feb. 29, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-068; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Machu Picchu with tourists

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The Constitution and the Declaration of Independence A Contrary View Have we gotten the principles of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution all wrong? Kermit Roosevelt, Constitutional law professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s law school and descendant of Theodore Roosevelt, challenges the conventional view that these hallowed documents tell us who we are. Rather than a steady realization of principles established during the nation’s founding, he argues, America’s story is one of repeated failure and reinvention. He explains why our America was not born with the Revolution, why we cannot trace our ideals back to the Founders, and how we have rejected the central ideal of the Declaration—and yet why the Constitution remains an articulation of American ideals. Tues., March 3, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-482; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

LOCATION CHANGES Programs occasionally move to a different location from the one published on tickets. We do our best to inform ticket holders of location changes by mail, phone, and email. You are advised to confirm the location by calling 202-633-3030 (M–F; 9–5) or visiting SmithsonianAssociates.org

Understanding the Celtic World The ancient Celts terrified the Greeks and Romans, but the modernday revival of Celtic music and art charms millions of people around the world. But what makes something “Celtic”? Modern scholarship has transformed our understanding about the people known to the classical world as the Celts. Historian Jennifer Paxton reveals that the traits we associate with them—their language, their art, and their customs—may not come from one ethnic group, but coalesced among peoples in northwestern Europe pushed to the margins by Romans. Interest in the Celts, revived in the 16th century, later influenced Ireland’s independence struggle, and cultural nationalism’s rise in Wales and Scotland. Today, from the “Celtic Tiger” to Celtic Woman, the legacy endures.

NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

Wed., March 4, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-071; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Green Man and May Queen at a bonfire during the Beltane Fire Festival in Edinburgh

The Worlds of Benjamin Franklin Born to a humble family in Boston in 1706, Franklin’s rise to prominence and power, first in Philadelphia and then on the Continent, was nothing short of meteoric. His very public achievements—in business, science, philanthropy, politics, and diplomacy—were remarkable in his day, and even more so by the standards of our own. Yet his many contradictions remain both puzzling and glaring: He was a proud British subject until the moment he was an American revolutionary. He was a loving husband and father, and a notorious flirt. He was a longtime slaveowner who condemned the practice in old age. Historian Richard Bell explores the many faces of the ever-fascinating Franklin. Tues., March 10, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-072; Members $30; Nonmembers $45 Benjamin Franklin, ca. 1785, by Joseph Siffred Duplessis

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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GERMAN NATIONAL MUSEUM, NUREMBERG

Sears Houses of Arlington From 1908 to 1940, Sears Roebuck & Co. sold more than 70,000 of its prefabricated Modern Homes kits, affordable dwellings assembled on site that offered Americans of moderate means the chance to own an up-to-date house. Arlington County, which saw a boom in its growth during the 1920s, boasts a significant collection of these kit houses. After an introductory slide presentation at the Ripley Center, historian Dakota Springston leads a bus tour through historic Virginia neighborhoods in Ad for a Sears house search of these structures. View the exteriors of approximately 50 Sears homes representing some 50 different models that range from the single-story “Sunlight” to the magnificent 10-room “Woodland” model. Springston discusses the rail and trolley lines that provided transportation for Sears products, laborers, and residents; and how these rapidly growing developments at the time these houses were built replaced formerly agrarian communities. Emperor Charlemagne, ca. 1513, by Albrecht Dürer

Charlemagne

Sat., March 14, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; by A Sears house in Arlington bus from the Ripley Center; lunch at nearby restaurant; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-013; Members $125; Nonmembers $175

The Paradoxical Conqueror Charles the Great, king of the Franks (r. 768–814), known to the French as Charlemagne, rose to power after the fall of the Roman Empire. During his reign (r. 768–814) he waged constant brutal warfare, creating an empire comprising France, Germany, northern Italy, and Catalonia. At the same time he was also a great patron of the arts, learning, and religion. The Carolingian Renaissance he supported preserved the classical world’s legacy into the Middle Ages and beyond. Charlemagne embodies the paradoxes of the early Middle Ages, known popularly (and misleadingly) as the Dark Ages. Historian Richard Abels explores the man and the myth of the so-called Father of Europe.

Ireland’s Fight for Freedom To wage their bitter war with the powerful British Empire from 1919 to 1921, Irish nationalists turned to novel tactics to avoid directly confronting Britain’s overwhelming military power. The Irish Republican Army’s strategies included assassinations, hit-and-run raids, and urban guerrilla warfare. Another idea—counterstates or self-governing institutions—robbed the British of their claim as Ireland’s legitimate government. Historian Kevin Matthews discusses how this war set the standard for other independence struggles in the 20th century. He examines how the Irish gained their freedom, but at a price: Ireland’s partition, leaving six northeastern counties under British rule—an ongoing source of conflict. Tues., March 17, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-493; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Thurs., March 12, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-495; Members $30; Nonmembers $45 General Michael Collins inspects a soldier, 1922

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Women in Wartime Stories from Gettysburg Part of the Smithsonian’s American Women’s History Initiative

They came from the neighboring Pennsylvania countryside and states as far away as Wisconsin. Many sought to learn the fate of husbands and family members, and others were drawn to provide solace to strangers. The bravery and life-changing actions of thousands of disparate women amid the horrors of the Civil War’s bloodiest battle are often overlooked by history. Author Chuck Raasch retells some of their compelling stories on the sites on which they unfolded at Gettysburg National Military Park. The tour also includes the Gettysburg Museum and Visitors Center, a screening of the film New Birth of Freedom, and a viewing of Gettysburg National Park Visitor Center the historic Gettysburg Cyclorama, a fully restored version of the epic 19th-century painting, 377 feet in circumference. Raasch is the author of Imperfect Union: A Father’s Search for His Son in the Aftermath of the Battle of Gettysburg. DAY TOUR Sat., March 21, 8:30 a.m.—6 p.m.; by bus; detailed information on website; lunch at nearby restaurant; CODE 1ND-014; Members $155; Nonmembers $205

Leadership in Crisis

European Microstates Survival of the Smallest In an age of nation-states, Europe contains the world’s largest collection of a dozen countries that are literally too small to appear on most maps of the continent. One of them is the last remaining relic of the medieval Holy Roman Empire; another is the first country outside the Iron Curtain to elect a communist government; another uses a language spoken nowhere else in the world; the smallest actually consists of two tiny pieces located 400 miles apart; and the (once powerful) next smallest disappeared from the map for nearly a century. Historian Charles Ingrao delves into these miscrostates’ remarkable resilience, examining the historical forces that shaped them.

Lichtenstein Castle

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The Women’s Memorial depicts Elizabeth Thorn, caretaker of Gettysburg's Evergreen Cemetery who buried 91 soldiers after the Battle of Gettysburg

Tues., March 24, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-030; Members $25; Nonmember $35

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Defining Moments of Modern Presidencies Crises that occur during their time in office can pose a supreme challenge to presidents. Franklin Roosevelt’s initiatives to end the Depression, John F. Kennedy’s management of the Cuban Missile Crisis, George W. Bush’s response to the terrorist attacks of 9/11, and Donald Trump’s handling of impeachment are all examples of such defining crises, according to journalist Ken Walsh. Walsh discusses what we have learned about presidential attributes and skills that matter most in trying times. His book Presidential Leadership in Crisis: Defining Moments of the Modern Presidents from Franklin Roosevelt to Donald Trump (Routledge) is available for sale and signing. Tues., March 31, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center: CODE 1H0498; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Forgotten No More: Rediscovering Remarkable Women NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

Part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative

For centuries, women have been making strides in their professions, but their work has often been overlooked, uncredited, or forgotten by time. Celebrate Women’s History Month by spending a fascinating day with four experts who bring to light remarkable women who lived in the shadows of history far too long. Art historian Barrett Tilney traces the journey of Judith Leyster (1609—1660) who gained remarkable professional success as a woman in a competitive, male-dominated art market. Historian Robyn Muncy spotlights some of the women active in social movements in this country who aimed to diminish inequalities of wealth and power in the early 20th century. Women in blues and jazz have long made significant contributions to music—while not always being taken seriously as artists. Michele L. Simms-Burton, DownBeat magazine reviewer, discusses the challenges many women faced trying to achieve recognition. Biology professor Kay Etheridge Self-Portrait, ca. 1630, by Judith Leyster examines the life and work of Maria Sibylla Merian (1647–1717) an artist and naturalist who revolutionized what would become the field of ecology. 9:30 a.m. Judith Leyster: A Star in Her Time 11 a.m. Pioneers in Progressive Politics 12:15 Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Women in Blues and Jazz: From Footnotes to High Notes 2:45 p.m. Maria Sibylla Merian: A Biologist to the Bone Mary Lou Williams, ca. 1946, by William P. Gottlieb

Sat., March 28, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-032; Members $90; Nonmembers $140; Students with ID $50

Lotus by Janet Fish This 25-color serigraph is exclusively offered

through Smithsonian Associates Art Collectors Program in an edition of 150, signed and numbered by the artist. The print is sold unframed and comes with a certificate of authenticity from Smithsonian Associates. For details call 202-633-8680. Members $950*; Nonmembers $1,200 CODE: ART095.06

*Member pricing applies to Promoter level and above

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A History of the British Royal Family Early Legends to Modern Monarchs Britain boasts one of the eighth-longest monarchies in the world, and certainly the most famous. Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger traces a path through the twists and turns of the royals and rebels who have ruled England for nearly a thousand years. She explores how rulers used personality and politics to establish dynasties and leave a lasting mark on the nation’s history. Learn how family feuds, religious battles, and a changing world shaped the faces and functions of the British monarchy. From King Arthur to William the Conqueror and Richard the Lionheart, from Henry IV to Henry VIII, and from the kings of Early and Medieval England into modern times, Lloyd Stanger summons the monarchs who waged historic wars on battlefields and in bedchambers to secure the crown, the ultimate prize. MAR 26 Legends and Leaders of Early and Medieval England APR 2 Roses, Reformation, and the Renaissance APR 9 Divisions and Unions: Civil War and the Creation of Great Britain Title page of The Boy's King Arthur, 1922, by N.C. Wyeth

APR 16 The Sun Never Sets: Ruling the British Empire APR 23 Monarchy for Modern Times 5 sessions; Thurs., March 26–April 23, 10:30 a.m.– 12:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-074; Members $100; Nonmembers $150

The British royal family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace, 2013

Exploring World Heritage Sites in Asia There are 269 UNESCO World Heritage sites throughout Asia. Each of them offers a fascinating glimpse into the evolution of complex civilizations, empires, and religions. This series offers an in-depth overview of four intriguing UNESCO World Heritage sites in Asia, incorporating the insights of the latest scholarship and research. Illustrated lectures feature the the Mogao Grottoes of China, often called an “art gallery in the desert,” with 500 artbedecked caves; the Potala Palace, which offers a window into the history of Tibet; Samarkand in Central Asia, which over the centuries attracted diverse historical groups seeking a base from which to conquer the region; and the Taj Mahal, the 17th-century construction of what would become the architectural jewel of the Mughal empire in India. Justin M. Jacobs, associate professor of Shah-i-Zinda necropolis in the city of Samarkand., Reclining buddha statue at Mogao Grottos in Gansu ca. 14th–19th centuries province, China history at American University, acts as guide through iconic monuments and cities of Asia. APR 2 The Mogao Grottos APR 23 The Potala Palace MAY 14 Samarkand JUN 4 The Taj Mahal 4 sessions; Thurs., April 2, April 23, May 14, June 4, 6:15–8:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-033; Members $80; Nonmembers $120 Potala Palace in Lhasa, Tibet

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The Taj Mahal

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Smithsonian Chamber Music Society Masterworks of Five Centuries

In Nomine Cantus firmus consorts by William Byrd, Osbert Parsley, Nicholas Strogers, Christopher Tye, Clement Woodcock, Alfonso Ferrabosco, and Henry Purcell Smithsonian Consort of Viols: Kenneth Slowik, Lucine Musaelian, Zoe Weiss, Catherine Slowik, Arnie Tanimoto, viols, with Chelsea Bernstein and Thomas MacCracken TWO OPTIONS: Sat., Jan. 4 (CODE 1P0-681); Sun., Jan. 5 (CODE 1P0689); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Haydn: Sonata in B Minor, Hob. XVI: 32; J.S. Bach: Partita in D Major, BWV 828; Sonata in B Minor, BWV 1014; Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 in D Major, BWV 1050 Smithsonian Chamber Players: Ian Swensen, violin; Kenneth Slowik, harpsichord, with SCMS Fellows TWO OPTIONS: Sat., Feb. 1 (CODE 1P0-682); Sun., Feb. 2 (CODE 1P0690); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Mozart: Sonatas in D Major, K381/123ac; C Major K521; Schubert: Four Polonaises, D599; Grand Duo, D812 Smithsonian Chamber Players: Naoko Takao and Kenneth Slowik, fortepiano four hands Sat., Feb. 15; concert at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talk at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; CODE 1P0-683; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 J.S. Bach: Partita in A Minor, BWV 827; Sonata in E Major, BWV 1016; Haydn: Sonata in D Major, Hob. XVI: 42; Mozart: Sonata in G Major, K379/373a Smithsonian Chamber Players: Elizabeth Blumenstock, violin; Kenneth Slowik, harpsichord and fortepiano Sun., Feb. 23; concert at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talk at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; CODE 1P0-691; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

HUGH TALMAN/SMITHSONIAN

The Smithsonian Consort of Viols returns early in the new year with a program illustrating the diversity of English consort pieces built on the cantus firmus framework of the In Nomine. Three spring concerts follow up the Bach-Haydn-Mozart subseries of last season. In the first, San Francisco Conservatory professor of violin Ian Swensen and Kenneth Slowik offer selections including Bach’s Fifth Brandenburg Concerto, joined by five Smithsonian Chamber Music Society Fellows. The second features Elizabeth Blumenstock, one of the concertmasters of the Bay Area’s inventive Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra; and the third, Axelrod Quartet’s Marc Destrubé. Slowik and Naoko Takao play a four-hands program on two contrasting early-19th-century pianos in February. The season’s second Schubertiade, in March, brings back the multi-faceted Mark Fewer for readings of the monumental C Major Fantasy and, with three SCMS Fellows, the ebullient “Trout” Quintet. Fellows also join Slowik, Vera Beths, and Steven Dann for a program that includes the original sextet version of Transfigured Night. Smithsonian Chamber Music Society concerts are held in the intimate Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum

Schubert: Fantasy in C Major, D934; Quintet in A Major, D667, “The Trout” Smithsonian Chamber Players: Mark Fewer, violin; Kenneth Slowik, fortepiano, with SCMS Fellows TWO OPTIONS: Sat., March 7 (CODE 1P0-684); Sun., March 8 (CODE 1P0-692); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; preconcert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Schubert: Quartet in A Minor, D804, “Rosamunde”; Schoenberg: Verklärte Nacht, Op. 4 Smithsonian Chamber Players: Vera Beths, violin; Steven Dann, viola; Kenneth Slowik, violoncello, with SCMS Fellows TWO OPTIONS: Sat., March 28 (CODE 1P0-685); Sun., March 29 (CODE 1P0-693); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; preconcert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 J.S. Bach: Partita in G Major, BWV 829; Sonata in C Minor, BWV 1017; Haydn: Sonata in E Minor, Hob. XVI: 34; Mozart: Sonata in D Major, K306/300l Smithsonian Chamber Players: Marc Destrubé, violin; Kenneth Slowik, harpsichord and fortepiano TWO OPTIONS: Sat., April 18 (CODE 1P0-686); Sun., April 19 (CODE 1P0-694); concerts at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talks at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; Members $25; Nonmembers $35 Programs and artists subject to change.

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SAFIYA GALLAGHAN

Smithsonian Boomers Chorus Legends of Song Join fellow pop-music lovers in a choral program celebrating the legends

With Performance of song. Do you sing Elvis hits in the shower, croon along with the

NORWOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

Beatles when you’re stuck in traffic, know every word of Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” or Billy Joel’s “Piano Man”, or have a knockout kitchen version of your favorite Motown classic? It’s time to find a bigger stage! Join the Boomers Chorus, a program geared for people ages 55 and above who love to sing—and there’s no experience required. Ernest Johnson, veteran choral conductor and music educator, leads the ensemble in arrangements of the hits you know and love. The final song list may include favorites by Elvis Presley, the Beatles, Temptations, Supremes, Beach Boys, Billy Joel, Carole King, and others, selected and arranged by the conductor to fit the group’s specific vocal and musical abilities. The experience is designed for singers of all skill levels. General instruction in vocal techniques includes exercises in healthy breath management for singing and improving tone and range. Basic music reading instruction included as music is rehearsed. 8 sessions plus performance; Tues., Jan. 14–March 3, 6:45– 8:30 p.m.; free public performance Tues., March 10, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE BPS3; all tickets $100

Choral conductor Ernest Johnson gets the singers rockin’

The chorus performs

This program is made possible through generous funding from Aroha Philanthropies.

DC Theatre Preview 2020 Hosted in Partnership with theatreWashington

The 2020 season in Washington theatre promises plenty of excitement, surprises, and outstanding performances on local stages large and small. Top local arts writers Tim Treanor (DC Theatre Scene), Chris Klimek (Washington City Paper), and Rosa Cartagena (Washingtonian and DC Metro Theatre Arts) share their picks on the hottest tickets in town, what’s worth the price, and what artists to watch in the new season. With Synetic Theatre’s latest movement-based interpretations of classic stories, a sure-to-be-provocative world premiere at Woolly Mammoth and Arena Stage’s offerings for its 60th season—not to mention Signature’s distinctive take on musicals—there’s always much to choose from among the region’s more than 80 producing theaters.

Arriving Hungry?

Snacks are available for purchase (cash only) in the Ripley Center concourse outside our offices on Mondays–Thursdays, 6–7:15 p.m.

Tues., Jan. 14, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-020; Members $20; Nonmembers $30; Students with valid ID $15

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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ROYAL COLLEGE OF MUSIC

Beethoven: The Musical Milestones His was an amazing life of discovery and challenge, reflected in the music he created— first for the piano, and then in chamber music, symphonic, and choral compositions. Beginning as a student of Haydn’s in 1800, Beethoven was rebellious from the start. Inspired by the French Revolution, he imbued pieces such as the “Eroica” Symphony with its ideals as he stretched Viennese classicism to the limit. As deafness began to encroach, he addressed it directly and defiantly, especially in his stunning Fifth Symphony. He went on to compose the most dramatic music of the age, and even the music he composed when he was totally deaf challenged musicians and audiences with their new dimensions of expressive freedom. In a six-session series, classical music and opera scholar Saul Lilienstein reviews the moments in which Beethoven successively leapt into the future, from the Pathétique and Moonlight sonatas to the Ninth Symphony and the final quartets. Each session is highlighted by DVD and CD recordings of excerpts of Beethoven’s most beloved masterpieces. JAN 21 The Student Flexes His Muscles JAN 28 A Revolution in Sound and Spirit FEB 4 Dealing with Deafness

Ludwig van Beethoven, ca. 1819, after the work by Joseph Karl Stieler

FEB 11 Master of the Variation FEB 18 An Orchestral and Choral Synthesis FEB 25 Reaching for All the Notes 6 sessions; Tues., Jan. 21–Feb. 25, 12–1:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-060; Members $100; Nonmembers $150

Saul Lilienstein

Neighborhoods of Barcelona, Milan, and Berlin Discovering Hidden Gems Barcelona, Milan, and Berlin have been crucibles of culture and experimentation for centuries, instrumental in changing the course of European history. They’ve also long been magnets for talented and unconventional residents, many of whom gravitate to distinctive and colorful neighborhoods overlooked by visitors.

Park Guell, Barcelona

Trendy Milan has always attracted and cultivated genius. The legacy of Leonardo da Vinci is found in many aspects of the city’s landscape, which offers surprises from eco-friendly apartment towers covered in vegetation to Puccini’s barbershop. Berlin has changed more radically than any city in Europe.

Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II, Milan

Fred Plotkin, a popular Smithsonian speaker on culture, history, and music, shares what he’s found on his walks through these cities: churches, theaters, specialty shops, restaurants, cafés and unusual museums just a stone’s throw from world-famous landmarks. When overtourism threatened the special character of several Barcelona neighborhoods, citizens worked to preserve evidence of their culture, which continues to resonate in many places, from restaurants and churches to an ancient cemetery.

Brandenburg Gate, Berlin

Evidence of its tormented past exists beside abundant green zones, offbeat museums, and the best food hall in Europe. JAN 23 Barcelona FEB 27 Milan MAR 19 Berlin 3 sessions; Thurs., Jan. 23, Feb. 27, and March 19, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-061; Members $90; Nonmembers $130 JANUARY 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

Literary London In the Footsteps of its Writers London is a writer’s city where poets, playwrights, and novelists have found welcome. Drawn to its lively intellectual scene, diverse figures including Byron, Oscar Wilde, Charles Dickens, and Virginia Woolf made London the center of the literary world for decades. In neighborhoods from Chelsea to Bloomsbury, these writers and their friends and colleagues nourished—and also critiqued—one another and their work. British social historian Virginia Newmyer and Susan Willen, emeritus professor of English from George Washington University, delve into the literary contributions and distinctive worlds of some of city’s authors and their close friends, exploring the houses and clubs, parks and gardens, art galleries, and favorite restaurants that defined the cultural milieu of their London. 9:30 a.m. Three Urban Romantics: Byron, Shelley, and Keats

Oscar Wilde, ca. 1882, by Napoleon Sarony

11 a.m. Taking the Stage: Wilde and Shaw 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Exploring London with Dickens and Woolf Big Ben and Westminster Bridge at sunset, London

Sat., Jan. 25, 9:30 a.m.–3 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-477; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

50 Authors 50 States

The American Southwest occupies a central place in the country’s literary imagination. It is a region in which multiple cultures meet and sometimes clash, and where evidence of ancient peoples informs the landscape, It has inspired novels offering rich portraits of the region and the people who inhabit it. Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English department at Georgetown University, ends the series with an informal discussion of All the Pretty Horses (1992) by Cormac McCarthy, which tells the story of a 16-year old boy who runs away to Mexico to live as an itinerant cowboy. Read the book prior to class. Sherry and cookies are available for refreshment. BOOK DISCUSSION Mon., Jan. 27, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-465D; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

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Travels with Darley: Exploring Qatar TRAVELS WITH DARLEY

Imagining the Southwest

Emmy-nominated television host, writer, and producer Darley Newman shares insider’s tips on Qatar, which she curated while filming her popular PBS series “Travels with Darley.” Visits to markets, museums, restaurants, and beautiful natural locations yielded surprising finds and insights into the local culture of this Middle Eastern nation. Darley explored topics Darley exploring falconry traditions in the desert of from the tradition of falconry Qatar to adventures in the desert to Qatari cuisine. She met locals who shared stories about Qatar’s history and present-day culture, including female entrepreneurs, soccer enthusiasts, and museum curators. She focused on the cosmopolitan capital, Doha, as well as experiences amid deserts and mangroves. Get a sneak preview of the Qatar episode—and stay for light appetizers. Thurs., Jan. 30, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-023; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Paul In an absorbing day of illustrated lectures, archaeologist Jodi Magness, an expert in early Judaism, examines a variety of aspects of Jewish belief in the late Second Temple period (1st century B.C.–1st century A.D.) in Palestine and the Diaspora. Magness offers an overview of the characteristics of Judaism in the time of Jesus and the apostle Paul, and how Jews of the era interacted with and worshiped the God of Israel; explores the meaning and significance of the Dead Sea scrolls; explains how religious practices in modern India provide insights into how ancient Jews and others interacted with their gods; and surveys the literary and archaeological evidence left by ancient Jewish communities in Asia Minor. 9:30 a.m. What Is Ancient Judaism? 11 a.m. Dead Sea Scrolls 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own)

Thousands gather at the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem

1:30 p.m. Modern India as a Window into Ancient Judaism Jodi Magness stands on the eastern wall of an ancient synagogue at Huqoq, Israel

3 p.m. Ancient Jewish Communities of Asia Minor Sat., Feb. 1, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-063; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

A Clear Distinction: Muslim Cultures and the Islamic Faith

Toni Morrison: A Portrait

For many non-Muslims, it can be difficult to distinguish Islamic religious practices from cultural practices in Muslim-majority countries. Farhana N. Shah of the Muslim Community Center in Silver Spring and a content specialist in Montgomery County Public Schools, examines the differences between the faith of Islam and the cultures found in the Muslim world. She defines some of the most misunderstood Arabic terms (among them, jihad, Sharia, Sunni, and Shia Muslim); examines commonalities between Islam and Abrahamic faiths; investigates myths and misconceptions conveyed by Western media and political agendas; and offers a look at American Muslims today. The program includes an informal Q&A conversation with audience members.

The Woman, Editor, Writer, and Educator

Tues., Feb, 4, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0-299; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

Part of the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative

Spend a day exploring the life and works of Nobel laureate, writer, and educator Toni Morrison with Michele L. Simms-Burton, Toni Morrison founding board member of the Toni Morrison Society. She traces Morrison’s career in a creative arc that spans her formative years at Howard University as a student, actress, and professor; her role as an editor at Random House, and her breakthrough first novel The Bluest Eye in 1970; honors including the National Book Award and the Nobel Prize for literature; and her stature as an acclaimed literary figure. 11 a.m. The Howard Years and Early Writings 12:30 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Editor and Novelist 2:45 p.m. From Princeton to Paris: Creativity Abounds Sun., Feb. 9, 11 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-025; Members $75; Nonmembers $125; Students with valid ID $50

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New Series: Economics +

Economics + Dystopian Literature Dystopian literature envisions a future in which a cataclysmic event has wiped out a portion of the population, and the world is now dominated by a totalitarian system of government. For economist Brian O’Roark, tales of dystopian societies offer a perfect setting for an economic analysis. Works in the genre including The Hunger Games, Divergent, Brave New World and 1984 provide him a lens through which to examine basic economic topics like scarcity, game theory, growth, and trade policy. Dystopian literature, he finds, shares a fundamental failure among leaders to understand economics—perhaps the most dystopian result of all. Tues., Feb. 11, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-026; Gen. Admission $25; Students with valid ID $15

NATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE NETHERLANDS

Louis Armstrong: American Icon

Louis Armstrong in Amsterdam, 1965

Say the name Louis Armstrong and you’re instantly able to conjure the sound of his warm, gravelly voice and his trumpet playing in “What a Wonderful World” or “Hello, Dolly!” Smithsonian curator emeritus of American music and author John Edward Hasse provides a film and video portrait of the legendary Armstrong. Born in poverty in 1901 in New Orleans, in his 20s he revolutionized jazz, with generations of musicians and singers following his lead on how to swing, scat, and solo. His frequent tours abroad earned him the nickname “Ambassador Satch.” Fellow musician Tony Bennett summed up his legacy, noting, “The bottom line [for] any country is ‘What did we contribute to the world?’ We contributed Louis Armstrong.” Thurs., Feb. 13, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-067; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

The Creative Curve Unplugging the Myth of the “Lightbulb Moment” You’re putting off writing that book until divine inspiration strikes. Don’t wait, says technology entrepreneur Allen Gannett. He explains that recent psychological research indicates a predictable science behind success in creative endeavors: “the creative curve”—the point of optimal tension between the novel and the familiar. Drawing on his book The Creative Curve, Gannett shows how patterns shared by innovators—from the Broadway team behind Dear Evan Hansen to the chief operating officer of Netflix—demonstrate that creativity isn’t limited to genius—it’s there for all of us. The Creative Curve: How To Develop the Right Idea at the Right Time (Penguin Random House) is available for sale and signing after the program. Tues., Feb. 18, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-481; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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Religious Crises in the Western World Triumphs and Traumas When the fabric of religion is altered, or a new religion begins to grow, the social, cultural, and political consequences are often significant. Ori Z. Soltes, professor of Jewish civilization at Georgetown University, examines some of the key transitional moments in the religious history of the West such as the rise of Christianity, the Muslim golden age, the crises of the papacy, and the onset of the Protestant Reformation and Catholic CounterReformation, concluding with a look at the diaspora of Jews and Judaism. Explore the triumphs and the layered traumas that Temple Mount, Jerusalem have marked the nearly two millennia

from the era of Roman paganism to the secularized shaping of modernity. 9:30 a.m. The Rise and Crises of Early Christianity 11:15 a.m. The Rise of Islam and the Muslim Golden Age 12:30 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. The Papacy: Struggles and Consequences 3 p.m. A Changing World for Jews? Sat., Feb. 22, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-480; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

PETER SCHAAF

What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow

The Greek Gods: Myths and Worship

In his acclaimed What Makes It Great? programs, beloved educator and former NPR music commentator Rob Kapilow “gets audiences in tune with classical music at a deeper level than they ever thought possible” Rob Kapilow (Los Angeles Times). In a three-part format, Kapilow explores a great musical masterpiece with the audience. Next, the piece is performed in its entirety, followed by a Q&A with the audience and performers.

American Songbook: Songs of Lerner and Loewe (featuring singers from The Washington Chorus) Sun., Feb. 23, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Museum; CODE 1P0-706; all tickets $25

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

Co-presented with The Washington Chorus

The Greek gods were powerful figures, and ancient myths tell us of their capacities to create and manipulate the entire world. Fascinating stories explain how Zeus demonstrated his dominion over mortals; how the seasons sprang from the abduction of Demeter’s daughter Persephone by Hades; and how Dionysus, the unruly god of wine, led debauched and sometimes deadly celebrations. The ancient Greeks worshipped their gods in festivals and celebrations that permeated all aspects of daily life, and through rituals they hoped would help them gain the gods’ favor and blessings. Classics scholar Katherine Wasdin examines Greek myths in the context of the religious worship of the gods.

Beethoven: String Quartet No. 16 in F Major, Op. 135 Sun., May 17, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Museum; CODE 1P0-707; all tickets $25

Marble relief portraying the goddess Demeter (left) and daughter Persephone (right)

Mon., March 2, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-028; Members $20; Nonmembers $30;

Students with valid ID $15

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Coming Together on Abbey Road The Making of the Beatles’ Final Album Was it their greatest album? Maybe. Was it their most musically innovative? Definitely. Released in September 1969, Abbey Road was the last album the Beatles recorded together. It introduced innovative recording techniques and technologies and featured such classic songs as “Come Together,” “Something,” and “Here Comes the Sun”—music as compelling today as it was 50 years ago. Acclaimed Beatles historian Kenneth Womack draws on rare Album cover for Abbey Road clips and videos to show how rules were broken and work-arounds created to achieve the album’s unique sounds. Womack’s book Solid State: The Story of Abbey Road and the End of the Beatles (Cornell University Press) is available for sale and signing. Tues., March 3, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-010; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

Re-examining Plato’s Republic Plato’s Republic, a utopian vision of the state, remains one of the most influential documents in the history of democracy and political philosophy. Written in response to the failure of Athenian democracy in the 5th century B.C., it is an imagined dialogue between Socrates and a group of young interlocutors who sought to find justice in the political organization of the state. It is the first preserved literary attempt in the West to set out a philosophically based guide to forming the ideal political unit—and was proPlato in The School of foundly anti-democratic. Athens by Raphael, ca. 1511 Classics scholar Frederick Winter discusses how a re-examination of the Republic provides important insights into our own era of political transformation. Mon., March 9, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0474; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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Why We Love Crosswords

ELENA XAUSA

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It’s a Puzzle Solving a challenging puzzle like the New York Times Crossword is less about what you know and more about understanding how to penetrate New York Times graphic for Wordplay those tricky clues. The Times Crossword has become the gold standard in the puzzle industry, with hundreds of thousands of people counting themselves as crossword solvers. Many turn to the paper’s crossword puzzle column Wordplay for daily tips for navigating the word grid. Deb Amlen, Wordplay senior editor, looks at how the crossword evolved, how you can get started or improve your problem-solving skills, and ways to crack the code behind even the trickiest of clues—not a bad skill to have when other kinds of puzzles come into play. Thurs., March 5, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-004; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

Heaven and Hell Perspectives on the Afterlife According to the most recent Pew Research Center poll, 72 percent of all Americans believe in a literal heaven as a place of eternal blessing for departed souls, and 58 percent believe in a literal hell and its eternal torments. But these ideas do not appear in the Old Testament or even in the teachings of the historical Jesus. So where did they come from? Bart Ehrman, a leading authority on early Christianity, the New Testament, and the life of Jesus, examines views of the afterlife from the ancient Near East, Greek, and Roman cultures, the Hebrew Bible, the New Testament, and the early centuries of the church. He traces the source of the belief in eternal life immediately after death, the ideas of paradise and hell, and illustrates how they became the dominant view Bart Ehrman of religion in the West. Ehrman’s book Heaven and Hell: A History of the Afterlife (Simon & Schuster) is available for sale and signing. 9:30 a.m. Death After Death 11 a.m. Justice in the World Beyond 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Jesus, Paul, and the Book of Revelation 3 p.m. The Birth of Heaven and Hell Sat., March 14, 9:30 a.m.—4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2070; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 JANUARY 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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Windows on the World Reading Literature from Many Cultures Because we live in a globalized world, what better way to learn about a variety of distinctive cultures and their histories than to delve into a good story? Read across time and place to consider how authors offer windows into fully imagined worlds different from our own. Join Lisbeth Strimple Fuisz, a lecturer in the English department at Georgetown University, in spirited lectures and informal discussions about four compelling novels. Participants should read each book prior to class. Sherry and cookies are available for refreshment. MAR 9 The Alchemist (1993) by Paulo Coelho APR 6 In the Time of the Butterflies (1994) by Julia Alvarez MAY 4 The God of Small Things (1997) by Arundhati Roy JUN 8 The Penelopiad (2005) by Margaret Atwood BOOK DISCUSSIONS 4 sessions; Mon., March 9, April 6, May 4, and June 8, 6:45–8:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-486; Members $80; Nonmembers $130

Classical Sounds of the Cinema Magnificent Movie Music Since the beginning of the talkies, film directors have turned to classical music for their soundtracks. Whether it’s Beethoven, Mozart, Rachmaninoff, Richard Strauss, Mascagni, Puccini, or Bach, opuses of almost every famous composer have added emotional depth to hundreds of films. Twentieth-century giants of the concert hall such as Shostakovich, Bernstein, Copland, Corigliano, Gershwin, Walton, and Prokofiev each composed superb movie music. With fascinating clips, witty commentary, and piano demonstrations, concert pianist and movie fanatic Rachel Franklin delves into the magic of some of the greatest film music ever composed (even when it was unintentional). MAR 15 Mozart Goes to Hollywood MAR 22 The Myth of Beethoven MAR 29 Classical Crossovers APR 5 Lights, Camera, Composer! Save $20 on the full series: 4 sessions; Sun., March 15– April 5, 2–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-005; Members $80; Nonmembers $120

Rachel Franklin

Individual sessions: Sun., March 15 (CODE 1K0-006); Sun., March 22 (CODE 1K0-007); Sun., March 29 (CODE 1K0-008); Sun., April 5 (CODE 1K0-009); Ripley Center; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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NEW! 5-DAY TOUR The capital of Tennessee—and of country music—Nashville is a 21st-century boom town, a cultural melting pot that attracts residents from across the nation and around the world. If the new Ken Burns documentary Country Music has sparked your appetite to learn more about the form’s roots and influences, this tour led by arts journalist Richard Selden offers the perfect way to do it: Several key locations featured in the film are part of the itinerary. The 5-day tour follows the road to Nashville through the twin cities of Bristol, Virginia, and Bristol, A performance at the Grand Ole Opry House Tennessee, home of the Birthplace of Country Music Museum, with a stop at the Patsy Cline Historic House in Winchester, Virginia, on the return trip. In Nashville, explore the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and attend a performance at the Grand Ole Opry with the best seats in the house. The visit coincides with the Tin Pan South Songwriters Festival, which may offer a chance to learn about new talent showcased at Nashville’s legendary small venues. Explore Nashville beyond the music scene with a visit to the Frist Art Museum, hosting a major J.M.W. Turner exhibition from the Tate Britain, Quest for the Sublime. A driving tour of Patsy Cline Museum, Winchester the city’s architectural landmarks includes the Tennessee State Capitol and Downtown Presbyterian Church, both by 19th-century architect William Strickland, and the Parthenon replica in Centennial Park. And it wouldn’t be a trip to Nashville without sampling traditional Southern and contemporary cuisine for which Nashville is famous.

Other highlights of this one-of-a-kind week include: • a backstage tour of the Ryman Auditorium, dubbed the “Mother Church of Country Music” • a driving tour of Lower Broadway, home of landmarks including the Ernest Tubb Record Shop and honky-tonk Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge, a country music institution

VISIT KNOXVILLE

Johnny Cash Museum

• a visit to the Johnny Cash Museum, with its comprehensive collection of Man in Black memorabilia

NASHVILLE CONVENTION & VISITORS CORP

JOHNNY CASH MUSEUM

PATSY CLINE MUSEUM

The Road to Nashville

CHRIS HOLLO / NASHVILLE CONVENTION & VISITORS CORP

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• the special exhibition Outlaws & Armadillos: Country’s Roaring ’70s at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum celebrating that decade’s Nashville–Austin musical axis • a group experience at Hatch Show Print, a working letter- Tootsies Orchid Lounge press print shop founded in 1879 that has produced iconic posters for the Grand Old Opry, fairs, circuses, and musical acts, and • a visit to the Tennessee Theatre in Knoxville, the 1928 movie palace that helped launch the career of fiddler Roy Acuff. The group stays two nights in Nashville and one each in Bristol and Roanoke.

Tennessee Theatre, Knoxville

5-DAY TOUR Sun., March 22, 8 a.m.–Thurs., March 26, 6 p.m.; by bus; cost includes bus transportation, lodging, all activities, admissions and fees, gratuities, and meals (4 breakfasts, 3 lunches, 3 dinners); purchase of trip insurance recommended; detailed information on website; CODE 1NN-NAS; Members $1,960; Nonmembers $2,610; Single-room supplement $460

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Decoding the Royal Wardrobe

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From the Tudors to Today There’s more to the gowns, crowns, uniforms, and regalia of British royalty than meets the eye. The history of the monarchy— and England—is told in part through their attire. Tudor scholar Carol Ann Lloyd Stanger provides a glimpse into the palace closet that reveals 500 years of royal fashion choices. She Queen Elizabeth I (the Ditchley portrait), explores how monarchs ca. 1592, by Marcus Gheeraerts the used their wardrobes to Younger project power, influence, politics, and personality, from Henry VIII’s athletic, virile image to Queen Victoria’s white wedding gown and black mourning dresses, which helped define her reign. In modern times, uniforms and simpler attire helped royals to better connect with their subjects in wartime, and Queen Elizabeth II’s evolving wardrobe projects today’s monarchy. Wed., March 18, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-073; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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Writing a Successful Screenplay A Hands-on Weekend Workshop You’ve got a brilliant idea for a terrific film. Your next move is to master the steps in turning it into a reality on the screen. Spend a valuable weekend with Marc Lapadula, a screenwriting professor at Yale University, as he analyzes the key ingredients of a successful script. Over two days, gain the practical foundation to develop your own cinematic narrative (regardless of genre) and learn how to create delineated, multidimensional, and memorable characters to tell that story. Lapadula covers the necessary screenwriting components of a professional script: plot construction, character development, creating cinematic dialogue, conflict, dramatic pacing, foreshadowing, the element of surprise, text and subtext, plot points, and visual storytelling. He also provides tips on how to market the script when it’s done. MAR 21 (SAT) 9:30 a.m. The Essentials of a Screenplay: Assessing Your Objectives 10 a.m. It’s All About Story 11:30 a.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 12:30 p.m. Character Matters 1:45 p.m. Analyzing Great Screenwriting

50 Authors 50 States

Celebrating Robert Frost An American Poet More than 50 years after his death, Robert Frost remains one of the most beloved and critically respected poets of all time. The Pulitzer Prizewinning poet who became America’s “national poet” often suggested in his poetry how small encounters between an individual and nature could be construed as metaphors for the human condition. President John F. Kennedy, at whose inauguration Frost delivered a poem, said “He saw poetry as the means of saving power from itself. When power leads man towards arrogance, poetry reminds him of his limitations.” Author Daniel Stashower explores Frost’s life and legacy, and actor Scott Sedar reads selected poems.

With Light Reception

MAR 22 (SUN) 9:30 a.m. Creating Believable Dialogue 10:45 a.m. Putting It on the Page: Proper Screenplay Formatting 11:45 a.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 12:45 p.m. Lessons from a Master 2 p.m. Marketing Your Screenplay Sat., March 21 and Sun., March 22, 9:30 a.m.–3 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-494; Members $180; Nonmembers $220

Wed., April 1, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-496; Members $40; Nonmembers $50 Robert Frost

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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Start To Tell Your Family Story Your family is unique in all the world, but how do you best tell its story? Whether you’re starting with boxes (or electronic folders) of photos, diaries, news clippings, and recipes—or whether memories themselves are your main material—documenting a family history can be daunting. Learn how to assemble and present your story as writer, editor, teacher, and writing coach Mathina Calliope provides the tools and guidance you need to move from daunted through motivated and on to accomplished. Bring a pad and pen or fully charged laptop with any digital mementos and no more than one shoebox full of physical memorabilia.

A Hands-on Workshop

9:30 a.m. Nostalgia and Brainstorming 11 a.m. Genre and Structure 12:15 p.m. Lunch (boxed lunch is provided) 1:15 p.m. Dive Right In 3 p.m. Next Steps Sat., April 4, 9:30 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-485; Members $110; Nonmembers $160

Smithsonian Chamber Music Society The Axelrod Quartet: Stradivarius and Amati The Axelrod String Quartet completes this season in May when the Omer Quartet joins the Axelrod players in a gala all-Stradivariusand-Amati reading of Felix Mendelssohn’s Octet in E-flat Major. Haydn: Quartet in C Major, Op. 50, No. 2; Bartók: Quartet No. 6, Sz 114; Mendelssohn: Octet in E-flat Major, Op. 20 with the Omer Quartet: Mason Yu and Erica Tursi, violins; Jinsung Hong, viola; Alexander Cox, violoncello Sat., May 9; concert at 7:30 p.m.; pre-concert talk at 6:30 p.m.; Nicholas and Eugenia Taubman Hall of Music, American History Museum; CODE 1P0-698; Members $27; Nonmembers $35 Program and artists subject to change.

Axelrod Quartet

Omer Quartet

Emerson String Quartet The Emerson String Quartet (violinists Eugene Drucker and Philip Setzer, violist Lawrence Dutton, and cellist Paul Watkins) has maintained its stature as one of the world’s premier chamber music ensembles for more than four decades. It has made more than 30 acclaimed recordings and has been honored with nine Grammys®, three Gramophone Awards, and the Avery Fisher Prize. This is the last concert of the season the Quartet is performing at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. Beethoven: String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 95 “Serioso”; Beethoven: String Quartet in B-flat Major, Op. 18 No. 6; Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 5 in B-flat Major, Op. 92 (1951) Sun., April 5, 6:30 p.m.; Baird Auditorium, Natural History Building; CODE 1P0-704; Members $50; Nonmembers $60 All programs subject to change.

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The Best of Brooklyn An independent city until 1898, Brooklyn is New York City’s most populous borough, with more than two and a half million residents. It’s also arguably the most historic and colorful section of the city and today is hipper than ever, filled with intriguing shops and restaurants and a booming cultural scene. On this two-day visit, arts journalist and former Brooklynite Richard Selden introduces you to several of Brooklyn’s top attractions. The itinerary includes the Brooklyn Museum; a concert performance at Bargemusic, a unique floating chamber-music venue; and a behind-the-scenes look at the cutting-edge Brooklyn Academy of Music, the country’s oldest continually running performing arts institution. The group also visits the 52-acre Brooklyn Botanic Garden, Brooklyn Bridge, Olmsted and Vaux’s Manhattan Bridge, from the Brooklyn side Prospect Park, and other landmarks. Participants stay in a hotel in the heart of Brooklyn, and eat like locals with dinner at a charming Italian restaurant in Carroll Gardens and a visit to an authentic Turkish restaurant for lunch. Brooklyn Botanic Garden

Exclusive Member Tours Did you know that Smithsonian Associates offers exclusive complimentary tours for our members? Tours last 1 hour; for members only; free, but require registration: call 202-633-3030 Registration is limited to two guests per account, two times a year. Space is limited, available on a first-come, first-served basis. If you are unable to use the tickets you’ve reserved, please contact Customer Service at least 24 hours in advance so that we may offer them to other members. Failure to do so will result in the reservation counting as a used benefit. FREER GALLERY OF ART

Hokusai: Mad About Painting Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (17601849) is widely recognized for a Thunder God (detail) by Hokusai single image: Great Wave Off the Coast of Kanagawa. Yet he produced thousands of works throughout his lifetime. The exhibit includes six-panel folding screens, hanging scrolls, paintings and drawings. Tues., Jan. 21, 12:15 p.m.; CODE 1E0-211; Freer Gallery of Art

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HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN

OVERNIGHT TOUR Sun., April 19, 7 a.m.–Mon., April 20, 9:30 p.m.; by bus; detailed information on website; purchase of trip insurance recommended; CODE 1NN-BRO; Members $585; Nonmembers $780; Single room supplement $100

Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection This exhibition of over 50 major historical artworks, including more than 35 seminal works by Duchamp, marks the Hirshhorn’s as one of the largest public holdings of Duchamp The Box in a Valise, 1963 in the nation. It showcases his early 20th-century work, including his archetypal ready-made Hat Rack. Tues., Jan. 14, 2 p.m.; CODE 1E0-209; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Canadian Embassy: Art of Lynn Johnston Learn about the history of the Embassy and its architecture and view the hospitality spaces and collections of artworks on display. The Embassy’s small art gallery that showcases Canadian artists and Canada-themed exhibits is currently exhibiting the work of Pulitzer Prize-nominee Lynn Johnston who chronicled the lives of the middle-class suburbanite Patterson family in her popular comic strip, For Better or for Worse. Wed., Jan. 15, 10 a.m.; CODE 1E0-210; Canadian Embassy, 501 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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What’s Inside Science? It’s an ongoing series of expert-led programming. It is also a community of like-minded people who have the opportunity to participate in a lively online learning exchange. Visit smithsonianassociates.org/science

EVENT HORIZON TELESCOPE COLLABORATION

Black Holes A New Look Astronomers and computer scientists recently made history by accomplishing what was previously thought to be impossible: They captured an image of a black hole’s silhouette. Carrie Fitzgerald, professor of astronomy and director of the Montgomery College Astronomical Observatory, explains the nature of black holes by delving into the major ideas of relativity and the fundamentals of gravity. From spacetime to time dilation, travel through a cosmic journey to the center of a black hole. Learn how scientists test the predictions of general relativity and about the latest research into gravitational waves. Fitzgerald also explores the threshold between science and science fiction with a brief look at hyperspace, wormholes, and warp drive. INSIDE SCIENCE Mon., Jan. 13, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-099; all tickets $30

The first image of a black hole, April, 2019

MOSHE ZUSMAN

The Science of Sleep With WebMD’s John Whyte In Collaboration with WebMD

A good night’s sleep might be a dream for some, but the importance of sleep and how it impacts our overall health is a reality for all. John Whyte, WebMD’s chief medical officer, presents the latest research about sleep, including strategies that help to improve sleep. Can too little sleep—or even too much sleep—be a sign of a serious health condition? How do sleep disorders affect quality of life? How much sleep is best for you, and what might your sleep pattern tell about your overall health? Whyte answers these questions and more and shares a sleep quiz that reveals if you’re getting enough quality sleep. John Whyte

INSIDE SCIENCE Wed., Jan. 29, 6:45 p.m.; Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art; CODE 1A0-100; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

The New Brain Science How Brainwave Research Is Shaping the Future Analyzing brainwaves has been possible for nearly a century, but neuroscientists are now widening their awareness of the wealth of information brainwaves can hold about who we are—and that information’s power. Neuroscientist R. Douglas Fields explores how information drawn from the new brain science may reveal hidden signifiers of mental illness and neurological disorders; brainwaves’ potential role in improving cognitive performance and heath; and their use in controlling devices from prosthetic limbs to fighter drones. He also considers future possibilities opened by brainwave research. His book Electric Brain (BenBella Books) is available for sale and signing. INSIDE SCIENCE Wed., Feb. 5, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1J0-022; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

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A Human Face for an Ancient Skull In February 2016, the first skull of Australopithecus anamensis was discovered in Ethiopia. The pivotal early human ancestor that lived between 4.2 and 3.8 million years ago is widely believed to be the ancestor of Lucy, a partial skeleton found in 1974, then considered to be the most ancient early human, or hominin, ever found. Unlike hominin fossils, which are exceedingly rare and often mere bone fragments, the newfound skull reveals many details about one of our earliest ancestors. John Gurche’s reconstructed face of Learn about the Australopithecus anamensis, based skull’s discovery and on the first skull known for the species, 2019 importance from paleoanthropologist Rick Potts, head of the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program at the Natural History Museum, and paleoartist John Gurche, who reconstructed the face of Australopithecus anamensis. INSIDE SCIENCE Mon., Feb. 10, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1L0301; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

STUDIO ART

You + Me = Symbiosis

JOHN GURCHE

Lucy’s Ancestor

ART

Lichens, Fungi-Farming Ants, and Other Tiny Teams What better way to celebrate Valentine’s Day than by hearing from two Smithsonian scientists about how several species make their intricate symbiotic associations work. According to lichenologist Manuela Dal Forno, lichens have long been considered a symbiosis between a fungus and an alga. But research reveals lichens’ relationships are not so exclusive—and quite complex. The ecologically important lichen harbor remarkably diverse communities of bacteria and other small organisms. MARCELO P. MARCELLI

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Lichenologist Manuela Dal Forno collects a lichen specimen in Brazil

Entomologist Natasha Mehdiabadi studies fungus-farming ants and their fungal farms. Here’s how the successful symbiosis works: The ants feed off the fungus even as they nourish, protect, and disperse their fungal cultivars. It’s true teamwork, naturally. INSIDE SCIENCE Fri., Feb. 14, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-101; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

The Science of CBD Anecdotes and Evidence Of the more than 100 related chemicals found in cannabis plants, cannabidiol (CBD) has become almost as well-known as tetra-hydrocannabinol (THC), seemingly overnight. Now widely available in retail stores and websites, it has emerged as a popular consumer product. But it has been difficult to demonstrate exactly what CBD does. And although promoted as a remedy for a wide variety of conditions, only one CBD product has received FDA approval. Neuroscientist Steven Grant examines what research has—and more importantly, has not—discovered about this elusive chemical’s potential benefits and risks. Thurs., Feb. 20, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-487; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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PLEASE NOTE: You may be photographed or recorded for educational and promotional purposes when you attend a Smithsonian Associates event. We encourage you to share your experience though a photo or post on social media during or after a program—and ask that you tag Smithsonian Associates when you do. If you use your phone, do it with consideration for both fellow audience members and presenters. Please restrict your photography to photos of the presentation and do not take pictures of audience members unless you have explicit permission. Full recording of any program is not permitted. A photo ID may be required at some Smithsonian Associates’ venues.

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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MICHELLE COOMBS

Volcanoes of the Western Aleutians A Cradle of Continents As essential to Earth’s planetary identity as liquid water, continents are found on no other known planet. Yet their origins remain one of science’s great unsolved mysteries. One location has been called a “continental nursery”—the line of active volcanoes in the Western Aleutians. Volcanologist and Natural History Museum curator Liz Cottrell recounts her 2015 journey to the middle of the Bering Sea to explore previously unknown active volcanic features. From World War II foxholes to sulfurous fumaroles, Cottrell shares stories from her Arctic expedition in search of critical samples that promise to bring scientists closer to understanding how Earth became the unique planet we live on. INSIDE SCIENCE Mon., Feb. 24, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-102; Members $20; Nonmembers $30

Extreme Weather

Smithsonian Greenhouses and How They Grow

A section of the orchid collection in a

HALF-DAY TOUR Smithsonian greenhouse INSIDE SCIENCE TWO OPTIONS: Thurs., March 12, 9:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. (CODE 1NH-A01); Thurs., March 19, 12:30–3:30 p.m. (CODE 1NH-B01); by bus; detailed information on website; Members $45; Nonmembers $60

Adaptation in a Changing World SMITHSONIAN GARDENS

The Smithsonian Gardens greenhouse facility, on ten acres in Suitland, Maryland, is the permanent home of Smithsonian Gardens’ Greenhouse Nursery Operations. The greenhouses supply the gardens and horticultural exhibits throughout the Smithsonian Institution. Enjoy a discussion with Smithsonian horticulturist Vickie Dibella en route. During your behind-thescenes tour, learn how the many gardens and interior plant displays are kept looking their best all year round. The 10-acre facility includes growing areas and greenhouses devoted to tropical plants, interior display plants, and nectar plants used for the Butterfly Pavilion at the Natural History Museum. View the thousands of fragrant, colorful plants that make up the Smithsonian Orchid Collection, and get a preview of the blooms and plants that will add their color to the Smithsonian’s spring displays.

NASA

Cottrell collects volcanic samples on the flank of Sugarloaf Peak in Alaska’s Western Aleutians

Meeting the challenges of extreme weather events calls for plans and action. Adaptation is higher Super typhoon Yutu, the than ever before on strongest storm on Earth in 2018 the global agenda. Scientists and policy makers alike are challenged with making choices about disaster risk and reduction as countries, communities, and businesses demand access to authoritative, usable science and risk-assessment information to allow for better-informed immediate and long-term decisions. Roger S. Pulwarty, a senior scientist at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory, brings his research and perspective to address these issues. What risks can we learn from global weather events? What are the challenges and opportunities for adapting to and successfully managing changing climates going forward? INSIDE SCIENCE Tues., March 31, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1A0-105; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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Hiking in Shenandoah National Park Virginia’s fabled Skyline Drive weaves through the length of Shenandoah National Park, one of the region’s top draws for hikers. In a two-day active getaway designed for outdoor lovers, explore Blue Ridge trails at the height of their spring beauty, and stay overnight at the historic Skylands lodge, which offers magnificent panoramic mountain views. Naturalist Keith Tomlinson leads easy-to-moderate hikes to the park’s Stony Man Summit, Hawksbill Mountain, Limberlost Trail, and Rose River area, providing insights into the area’s history, geology, wildlife, and forest environment. He also offers an evening A hiker’s view of Shenandoah National Park program on the high-peaks geography of Shenandoah National Park—the perfect way to prepare for another day spent on the trails. Pack your hiking gear and get ready to experience the natural splendor of spring. OVERNIGHT TOUR Sun., May 3, 8:30 a.m.—Mon., May 4, 7:30 p.m.; by bus; price includes picnic box lunch on Sunday, dinner and breakfast at the historic Skylands lodge, and lunch at Big Meadows Lodge on Monday; tour requires 6-8 miles of hiking on uneven terrain— participants should be in good physical condition; purchase of trip insurance recommended; more detailed information on website; CODE 1NN-SNP; Members $465; Nonmembers $615; Single-room supplement $85

Dark Hollow Falls in Shenandoah National Park

Smithsonian Associates

Once Upon a Moon at Udvar-Hazy Celebrate the spirit of the Apollo landing in this exciting interactive show for young audiences. Performers and puppets spin old and new stories about the moon’s magic, create a “living exhibit” of its phases, and introduce the amazing science that brought us to its surface. Generously underwritten by the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation and presented in partnership with the National Air and Space Museum. No-cost performances Thurs., Jan 16 and Fri., Jan. 17 10:15 and 11:30 a.m., and 1 p.m. Air and Space Museum Udvar-Hazy Center, Chantilly, Virginia

Note: No-cost tickets for this production are offered only for performances at the Air and Space Museum’s Udvar-Hazy Center. Reservations are required.

Here We Go, Team! This Discovery Theater original scores big with a musical play about sharing and taking turns, the importance of personal space, and the awesome power of teamwork. Five-year-old Bobby and Casey are aspiring soccer stars and best friends—but they’ve ended up on separate teams! Through a mishap on the field, they discover that helping people is cool, thanks to another kind of team—their favorite teacher and coach who make it all OK. Wed., Jan. 22 and Thurs., Jan. 23 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Discovery Theater, Ripley Center

See the whole season — and get tickets today— at discoverytheater.org Generous support for Discovery Theater is provided by The Nora Roberts Foundation, Smithsonian Women's Committee, Smithsonian Youth Access Grants Program and Sommer endowment.

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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You love art. Now go deeper. Art is all around us. It excites us, enriches our lives, and enlivens our imaginations. To truly appreciate any work of art, we need to understand the context and culture in which it was created. That’s why Smithsonian Associates offers an Certificate Program in World Art History. The wide-ranging offerings are designed to provide a global perspective on art and architecture and draw on the Smithsonian’s world-class collections and the rich resources of other Washington institutions. They are selected from among Smithsonian Associates courses, seminars, study tours, and studio art classes. Look for “World Art History Certificate” throughout the program guide to see current listings. Get started today and complete the certificate requirements at your own pace. Registration is ongoing and year round. Credits are counted from day of registration and are not given retroactively. Girl with a Pearl Earring, by Vermeer

SmithsonianAssociates.org/artcertificate

World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Introduction to Western Art

Marcel Duchamp

From the Great Pyramids to the Pantheon

Enfant Terrible and Innovative Genius

ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM OF HERAKLION

The key to understanding the inspiration for monuments found in our modern world is through an overview of ancient material culture. Art historian Renee Gondek leads an insightful survey of the paintings, sculptures, and architecture produced in ancient Egypt and the Greek and Roman worlds. Journey down the Nile during the third and second millennia B.C. and discover the ritual complexes of the pharaohs, such as the Great Bronze head of a colossus statue and ruins of an Pyramids at Giza. Study the ancient Greek temple at Agrigento, Sicily archaeological remains of the earliest Greeks including the palace of Knossos on Crete (reportedly the home of mythical King Minos) to treasures found in Mycenaen graves. Examine the development of Greek art from koroi and korai figures to the famous Euphronios krater (an artifact restored to Italy after decades in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art). Learn about imperial monuments like the Ara Pacis, Column of Trajan, Pantheon, and Arch of Constantine, and ancient frescoes that adorned the spacious dwellings of the Roman elite. JAN 6 Ancient Egypt JAN 13 The Aegean Bronze Age JAN 27 Archaic to Hellenistic Greece FEB 3 The Roman World

Minoan fresco at Knossos, 1600-1450 B.C.

4 sessions; Mon., Jan. 6–Feb. 3; no class Jan. 20, 12–2 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-475; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Regarded as one of the most important, innovative, and influential, artists of the 20th century, Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968) created paintings, sculptures, and objects that go well beyond conventional labels. His revolutionary work anticipated artistic movements as diverse as pop and conceptual art and kinetic sculpture. Duchamp’s deliberate Duchamp as ”Rrose Sélavy", one of his alter egos, 1921, outrageousness caused photo by Man Ray controversy, from the urinal-as-sculpture Fountain to Nude Descending A Staircase No. 2, a cause célèbre at New York’s 1913 Armory Show. Art historian Nancy G. Heller traces Duchamp’s life and art, focusing on the importance of a selection of his key works. Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection is currently on view at the Hirshhorn Museum. Thurs., Jan. 9, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-058; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

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World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

The popular style of 19th-century French painting known as impressionism—filled with color, light, and scintillating brushwork—was an act of extreme rebellion when it appeared in the 1870s. For artists to depict fleeting sensations of rain, a sunrise, or a human gesture was shocking to other artists, art lovers, and critics who had been taught that fine art should focus on timeless and unchanging subject matter. The work of these modern masters—notably Monet, Renoir, Degas, Cassatt, and Morisot—led in turn to the radical art of the post-impressionists. During the 1880s and ’90s Seurat, Cézanne, Gauguin, and Van Gogh used vivid colors and form to depict subjects from the real world, but in ways were not always fully realistic. In an illustrated two-part program, art historian Nancy G. Heller explores the sources, masterpieces, and later influences of these rebels, including their impact on early 20th-century art. JAN 10 (FRI) 6:30 p.m. Edouard Manet and the Transition to Impressionism 7:30 p.m. Monet the Master JAN 11 (SAT) 9:30 a.m. Beautiful Women in Lovely Settings: The art of Renoir

Waterlilies, 1906, by Claude Monet

11 a.m. Ballerinas and Bathers: Edgar Degas’ dancers 12 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. Post-Impressionism I: Structuring Color, Space, and Form: Seurat and Cézanne

Self-Portrait, 1889, by Paul Gauguin

3 p.m. Post-Impressionism II: Expressing Emotions Through Stylization: Gauguin and Van Gogh 2 sessions; Fri., Jan. 10, 6:30–8:30 p.m., and Sat., Jan. 11, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-059; Members $120; Nonmembers $185

World Art History Certificate Program elective: Earn ½ credit

Crafting the Buddha’s Image

SARNATH MUSEUM

The image of Buddha is one of the world’s most recognized religious symbols, but its origins are shrouded in mystery. For 500 years after his death in 483 B.C., his followers avoided creating any image of him. Where did the famous likeness come from and why did it take so long to be created? Rob DeCaroli, professor of art history at George Mason University explains how likenesses and effigies held a special cultural importance in India. The connection they often forged between artistic images and their viewers presented potential challenges to depicting the Buddha. DeCaroli illuminates the historical events that led to the acceptance of the Buddha’s image. Wed., Jan. 15, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-476; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

5th c. Buddha statue, Sarnath, India

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.

OHARA MUSEUM OF ART

Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Painting in France


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

America in the booming post-Civil War decades was a place of contradictions and dichotomies. Great economic growth defined the period, which was ruled by robber barons, magnates who gained tremendous wealth in railways and communications, and in industries like iron, oil, coal, and steel. The nouveaux riches used their wealth to build opulent homes and vacation “cottages,” buy expensive clothes and art, and take up recreational activities as never before, from polo to pampering pets. A portrait painted by John Singer Sargent became an important status symbol.

CLIVEDEN HOUSE, ENGLAND

The Gilded Age Social critic Thorstein Veblen coined the term “conspicuous consumption” to represent this spending, and Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner dubbed the era the Gilded Age, when serious societal ills were hidden by a gilt façade. Some of America’s monied class, though, also used their wealth to improve the country’s big cities with libraries, museums, theatres, and parks. That philanthropy is also a part of the Gilded Age’s complex story. Art historian Bonita Billman explores the dramatic distance between the lives of the upper crust and those on the other end of the social and economic scales in the years between 1870 and 1910. 9:30 a.m. How the Other Half Lives 11 a.m. Gilded Gotham 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) Portrait of Mrs. Waldorf Astor (née Nancy Langhorne), 1908, by John Singer Sargent

The Breakers, a Vanderbilt mansion in Newport, Rhode Island

1:30 p.m. Cottages and Country Houses 3 p.m. Idle Hours

Sat., Jan. 25, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-062; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

The Golden Age of Spanish Art PRADO, MADRID

Spanish art’s golden age—as exemplified in works by artists from El Greco to Velázquez—reflects a complex set of forces that combined humanist philosophies from 15th century Italy with medieval ideas reinforced by the Catholic church and the Counter-Reformation. From the mid-16th to mid-17th centuries, Spanish Habsburgs and other aristocrats became some of the most avid and discerning art lovers in Europe. They brought to Spain and supported the work of numerous artists from Northern Europe and Italy, resulting in cultural exchanges that were instrumental in the flourishing of new approaches to art, in genres from portraiture to still-life painting, among Spain’s leading painters. Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine provides an overview of the era and the enduring achievements of Spanish artists—from El Greco and Murillo to Velázquez—who found their inspiration in it. 10 a.m. The Dawn of the Golden Age 11:15 a.m. Versions of Spirituality 12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Velázquez: Painter, Courtier, Philosopher 2:30 p.m. Symbolic Images: From Still Life to Allegory Las Meninas, 1656, by Diego Velazquez

Fri., Feb. 7, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-479; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Ancient Egypt Through Its Art, Architecture, and Archaeology the pyramids. Contrasting the discord and anxiety of the Middle Period with the wealth and stability of the 18th Dynasty, she illustrates how distinctive art and architecture sprang from each era. Finally, Williamson traces how the monotheism embraced by Akhenaten and his wife Nefertiti upended millennia of religious beliefs and inspired some of the most visually arresting art works in history. 9:30 a.m. Understanding Egyptian Art: The Origins of an Artistic Tradition 11 a.m. Wonder and Majesty: The Art of the 4th Dynasty

WALTERS ART GALLERY

The secret to understanding the daily life and culture of ancient Egypt under its great rulers and pharaohs is right before our eyes—in its art and architecture. Using evidence from the most recent archaeological discoveries, Egyptologist Jacquelyn Williamson surveys the social and historical realities of this civilization from its early pyramids through the art created under King Akhenaten, whose rejection of religious traditions birthed new artistic conventions. Williamson examines the religious influences that provide the driving force behind the origins of all Egyptian art and architecture. She looks at the triumphs of the artists and architects of the 4th Dynasty, ˆwho captured the period’s kings and elite in elegant statuary and memorialized them though the engineering marvels of

12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) Egyptian Goddess Maat, 664332 B.C.

1:30 p.m. The Elegance of Discord and the Beauty of Empire 3 p.m. The Art of Heresy: Akhenaten and Nefertiti

Sat., Feb. 8, 9:30 a.m.–4:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1M2-066; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

The Great Sphinx monument (1397–1388, B.C.) and a pyramid at Giza

World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

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of history and national identity. FEB 19 The French Revolution: Contrasting Visions of David and Goya FEB 26 Reformation and CounterReformation: Artists Take Up the Cause

PRADO, MADRID

Artists such as Picasso, David, and Goya came to grips with the political upheavals of their day with heroic and searing images that elicit our admiration or moral outrage. Calls during the Protestant Reformation to strip churches of biblical-themed art forced artists to seek new patrons outside the Church and new subjects to paint. Following World War I, European artists recorded visions of war and loss, and also hope for a better future, in new forms of art. Art historian Judy Scott Feldman examines the complex interplay between artistic expression and social and political content. She looks at historical turning points and art works that can both inspire patriotic sentiment and, as in the recent cases of toppled onfederate statues, provoke political debate The Third of May 1808 (Execution of the Defenders of about the meaning Madrid), 1814, by Francisco Goya

ROYAL MUSEUMS OF FINE ARTS OF BELGIUM

Seeing History Through Artists’ Eyes

MAR 4 Art in the Wake of World War I: Reacting to a World in Chaos

The Death of Marat, 1793, by Jacques-Louis David

MAR 11 The American Revolution and Civil War: Controversies About the Stories We Tell

4 sessions; Wed., Feb. 19–March 11, 6:45–8:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-489; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Baltimore Museums BALTIMORE MUSEUM OF ART

A Study in Contrasts

The BMA’s Cone Wing rotunda, featuring Henri Matisse's Blue Nude and Reclining Nude I (Aurore), 1907

The Baltimore Museum of Art and the American Visionary Art Museum represent two distinctive and divergent aspects of the city’s cultural scene. Spend a fascinating day visiting both with art historian Ursula Wolfman. Begin with a guided tour at the 104year-old Baltimore Museum of Art, whose collections encompass 19th-century, modern, and contemporary art including the world’s largest collection of works by Henri Matisse, 500 of which are in the BMA’s internationally renowned Cone Collection. Opened in 1995, the American Visionary Art Museum on the Inner Harbor showcases works of self-taught artists whose unique voices set them apart from other makers of contemporary art. A guided tour of highlights of the collection and free time to explore what the museum calls their “Wonderland” campus: three floors of exhibition space in the main building, two outdoor sculpture plazas, and the Jim Rouse Visionary Center. The museum’s collection provides examples of how artists working beyond mainstream traditions have defined highly personal expressions of creativity.

American Visionary Art Museum

DAY TOUR Fri., Feb. 21, 8:30 a.m.– 6 p.m. by bus; lunch included at BMA’s Gertrude’s restaurant; detailed information on website; CODE 1ND-012; Members $180; Nonmembers $230

Creativity Is a Keystroke Away An Image-Software Workshop for Artists Think of it as an e-paint brush. In this 2-day workshop, artists learn how to create imaginative visual images using an easy-to understand digital editing tool that helps them take finished work to another level. Artist Chester Kasnowski guides students in the use of the new app, the GNU Image Manipulation Program app (GIMP2). With the free, crossplatform image-editing software, create new images; digitally amplify colors and adjust color tones; change image size; manipulate shadows and midtones; create circular-shaped images, or enlarge image areas; and even generate black-and-white images from color originals. Kasnowski also addresses how to turn digital results into art prints using available online print companies. 2 sessions; Sat., Feb. 22 and 29, 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-0XF; Members $65; Nonmembers $85

Artwork by Chester Kasnowski

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NATIONAL GALLERY OF DENMARK

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Until his death at 85 in 1954, Henri Matisse’s life was a journey—both personal and artistic. His output ranges from early works inspired by classical French painting to those in post-impressionist and modernist styles, and he bridged genres from prints and paintings to sculpture and paper cut-outs. Matisse traveled the world to explore the light and colors in places beyond his native France—from Tangier to Tahiti—and his discoveries are reflected in the whimsical patterns and bold palettes of his art. Art historian Joseph Cassar offers an in-depth look at this revolutionary giant of 20th-century art whose mastery of color and line is displayed in a body of work spanning more than a halfcentury, and working to the end on one more project, designing a chapel for Dominican nuns in St. Paul de Vence.

Portrait of Madame Matisse (The Green Line), 1905, by Henri Matisse

9:30 a.m. The Early Years and the Fauve Period 11 a.m. Matisse’s Journeys 12:30 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:30 p.m. A Variety of Expressions 2:45 p.m. The Cut-outs and the Chapel of the Rosary Sat., Feb. 22, 9:30 a.m.—4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-483; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

Still Life with The Dance, 1909, by Henri Matisse

Indian Art and Calligraphy An Immersive Exploration Experience how the interplay of art, language, and music shaped the culture, religions, and history of India and the South Asian subcontinent. Join artist and museum docent Sushmita Mazumdar in the Freer|Sackler Galleries and in the classroom for detailed looks at artworks and objects and the opportunity to try your hand at calligraphy inspired by them.

FREER GALLERY OF ART

HERMITAGE MUSEUM, ST. PETERSBURG

Henri Matisse: Master of Color and Line

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MAR 1 The Vasanta Vilasa: View the 15th-century scroll with its verses in Devnagari script MAR 8 The Tibetan Shrine Room: View Tibetan Buddhist art and practice writing Bengali script MAR 15 A Quatrefoil Box: Write the Taj Mahal’s name in the Persian and Devnagari scripts MAR 22 The Bodhisattva White Avalokiteshvara: View the elegant 14thcentury sculpture; write the god’s Sanskrit name in the Devnagari script

Vasanta Vilasa, a poem on spring (detail), 1451, Guajarat, India Bodhisattva White Avalokiteshvara, 14th century, Nepal

FEB 23 The Seated Ganesha: Sketch a 12th-century stone sculpture of the Hindu god Ganesha

MAR 29 The Child Saint Sambandar: Examine a 12th-century bronze sculpture of the child saint Sambandar; explore the written Tamil language in calligraphy

6 sessions; 3 hours each; Sun., Feb. 23–March 29, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XM; Members $195; Nonmembers $225

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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©BOB ROSS INC./USED WITH PERMISSION

Celebrating Bob Ross’s Joy of Painting Between its original public television run

With Hands-On Painting Class (1983–1994) and its current streaming

rebroadcasts, artist Bob Ross’s “Joy of Painting” program is the most-watched TV art show in history—and continues to open the world of painting to countless amateurs. The Smithsonian’s American History Museum recently added two of Ross’s paintings along with “Joy of Painting”-related materials to its collection. Eric Jentsch, curator of entertainment and sports at the museum, and Sarah Strohl of Bob Ross, Inc., discuss Ross’s continued legacy and resurgent popularity as a mild and tempered voice in today’s fraught media landscape. Learn Ross’s signature wet-on-wet technique in a painting class led by a certified Ross instructor.

Bob Ross teaching The Joy of Painting

TWO OPTIONS: Session 1 (painting workshop, program): Sun., March 1, 10 a.m.–2 p.m.; 1-hour lunch break (participants provide their own); CODE 1L0-303; Session 2 (program, painting workshop): 1–4 p.m.; CODE 1L0-304; no experience necessary; all supplies included; Ripley Center; Members $50; Nonmembers $70

LOCATION CHANGES Programs occasionally move to a different location from the one published on tickets. We do our best to inform ticket holders of location changes by mail, phone, and email. You are advised to confirm the location by calling 202-633-3030 (M–F; 9–5) or visiting SmithsonianAssociates.org

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

Sicily: Eternal Crossroads of the Mediterranean Sicily’s art and architecture mirror its history as a kaleidoscope of cultures. In this daylong program, art historian Janetta Rebold Benton highlights Sicily’s aesthetic eclecticism and cultural signposts. Discover the Greek temples at Agrigento and 4th-century mosaics at the Villa Romana del Casale; medieval cathedrals and cloisters in Cefalù and Monreale; dramatic Baroque churches in Modica and Ragusa Ibla; classical and Gothic revival styles at Castello di Donnafugata; and other treasures to be found on this sunsplashed island.

With Sicilian-Themed Lunch

10 a.m. Antiquity 11:15 a.m. The Middle Ages

Sicilian coast

12:15 p.m. Enjoy a Sicilian-themed lunch 1:15 p.m. Renaissance to Baroque 2:30 p.m. Luxury Living, 18th and 19th-century Style Saracen arches and Byzantine mosaics inside the Palatine Chapel of the Royal Palace, Palermo, Sicily

Sat., March 7, 10 a.m.–3:30 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-484; Members $110; Nonmembers $160

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Out and About with an Artist The National Gallery of Art In artist-led tours and talks, Smithsonian Associates Studio Arts painting instructor Adrienne Wyman offers a “behind-the-easel” perspective of masterworks exhibited at the National Gallery of Art. The series is perfect for practicing artists, art lovers, and anyone who would like to learn more about art from the viewpoint of a working artist with a wide knowledge of historical painting techniques. If you’ve ever looked at a painting and wondered “How did they do that?” these are the tours for you. Viewings of “must-see” masterpieces focus on placing paintings in historical and social context, sharing background on the artists’ personal lives, and demystifying the techniques and materials used to create the works. MAR 9 Renaissance through Baroque: Italian and Dutch Art MAR 16 Rococo through Neoclassical: 18th- and Early 19th-Century French and Spanish Art MAR 23 British and American Art: Turner, Gilbert Stuart, and John Singer Sargent

Smithsonian Associates painting instructor Adrienne Wyman gives insight into Rubens’ painting style

STUDIO ART

MAR 30 Impressionism through PostImpressionism: Monet, Van Gogh, Cezanne, Degas

TWO OPTIONS: 4 sessions; 1.5 hours each; Mon., March 9–30, 10:30 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0XU); Mon., March 9–30, 1:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0XV); Members $95; Nonmembers $115

Africa in the African American Artistic Imagination Early in the 20th century, esteemed Howard University professors Alain Locke and James A. Porter debated the impact of African art on African American artists. Mary Turner: A Silent Locke called African Protest, 1919, by Meta art the “ancestral Vaux Warrick Fuller legacy” and argued that African American artists should develop a “closer knowledge and proper appreciation” of it. Porter said that African Americans were first and foremost American artists. Kevin Tervala, associate curator of African art at the Baltimore Museum of Art, examines the ways in which African American artists— from 20th-century pioneers to contemporary artists—have engaged with the art of the African continent. Tues., March 24, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-497; Members $30; Nonmembers $45

SMITHSONIAN AMERICAN ART MUSEUM

Creativity in Dark Times Artists and Writers of the New Deal During the Great Depression in 1929, creatives of all kinds faced a bleak future. Among the programs President Franklin Roosevelt’s government designed to revive the U.S. economy were the Federal Writers’ Project and the Federal Arts Project. Author David Taylor looks at some of the artists and writers for whom the programs gave a new purpose: recording American life. He also discusses how some stirred controversy, creating works that cut against the grain of public opinion and convention. Taylor’s book Soul of a People: The WPA Writers’ Project Uncovers Depression America (Wiley), now in paperback, is available for sale and signing. Subway, 1934, by Lily Furedi

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Wed., March 25, 6:45 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1K0-011; Members $25; Nonmembers $35

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


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A Creative Writing Workshop at the Freer Reflective Responses to Art Charles Lang Freer believed that a direct, immediate response to art was the highest form of aesthetic pleasure, noting that “The pure emotion of the observer should be his first sensation, unencumbered by the views of others.” Put Freer’s vision into practice by using thoughtful observation in the galleries to inform your responses to the collection. Led by teaching artist Mary Hall Surface, founding instructor of the National Gallery of Art’s Writing Salon, discover connections within the diverse collection and frame your reactions through descriptive writing and free-verse poetry as you slow down and savor the experience of looking at art. Mary Hall Surface in front of Edward Hopper’s 1939 painting Cape Cod Evening at the National Gallery of Art

WRITING WORKSHOP Fri., March 27, 10:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m.; Freer Gallery of Art (meet in Gallery 9); CODE 1K0-0YA; Members $30; Nonmembers $40

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn 1 credit

MARITSHUIS, NETHERLANDS

Vermeer: In Praise of the Ordinary RIJKSMUSEUM

A master of light and color, Johannes Vermeer (1632–1675) creates a timeless world where the smallest actions take on a sense of beauty and meaning beyond their commonplace settings. His paintings are considered some of the finest works in their genre. Vermeer’s artistry rests in his ability to transform a simple daily activity—such as pouring a jug of milk or reading a letter—into a sensitive exploration of human psychology. His masterpieces such as The Girl with a Pearl Earring, The Milkmaid, and The Music Lesson, were meticulously created, often taking six months or more to complete. Gloriously lit, serene, and exquisitely rendered, they continue to speak to us through their ability to touch on some of the most universal ideas in human experience. Art historian Aneta Georgievska-Shine describes Vermeer’s place within the artistic culture of Holland, with an emphasis on his native city of Delft. She examines more closely some of his favorite themes and their possible meanings. The day ends with a discussion of Vermeer’s legacy following his rediscovery at the end of the 19th century. 9:30 a.m. The Sphynx of Delft 11 a.m. From the Everyday Into the Sublime

The Milkmaid, ca. 1660, by Johannes Vermeer

12:15 p.m. Lunch (participants provide their own) 1:15 p.m. Painting as Philosophy 2:45 p.m. Vermeer’s Legacy Sat., April 4, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-500; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 Girl with a Pearl Earring, by Johannes Vermeer

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World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

Masters and Masterpieces of the 18th and 19th Centuries Discover the masters and masterpieces of art and architecture during a period of change and contrast. Against a backdrop of political and industrial revolutions, the 18th and 19th centuries brought forth a profusion of styles in Europe and America, from rococo exuberance to classical elegance and Napoleonic splendor, romantic flights of the imagination and spectacular landscape paintings to a bold new realism. Art historian Karen Alexis emphasizes cultural context, major movements, the wealth of styles created, and the diversity of the period’s talents. She focuses on great classically inspired masters including Gainsborough, Jacques-Louis David, and Canova; the romanticism of Delacroix; Rossetti and the Pre-Raphaelites; and the expressions of realism seen in the paintings of Copley, Courbet, and Winslow Homer and the sculpture of Rodin. APR 7 Empires, Elegance, and Enlightenment: Rococo Sensuality to Intellectual Sobriety APR 21 The French Revolution to the Salons of Paris: Neoclassicism and Beaux-Arts Classicism APR 28 Flights of the Imagination to the Force of Nature: The Romantic Rebellion and Romantic Landscapes La Grande Baigneues, 1808, by Jean AugusteDominique Ingres

MAY 5 A Romance with Modern Life: A Bold Realism

The Entrance to the Grand Canal, Venice, ca. 1730, by Canaletto

4 sessions; Tues., April 7–May 5, (no class April 14), 6:15–8:15 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-492; Members $90; Nonmembers $140

World Art History Certificate core course: Earn 1 credit

The Art of India: From the Indus Valley to Independence From its origins in the ancient Harappan civilization along the Indus River to the present, the complex culture of South Asia has given rise to some of the world’s most remarkable artistic creations. In this riveting course, Robert DeCaroli, associate professor in the department of history and art history at George Mason University, highlights the artistic traditions and historical changes within the Indian subcontinent. Learn about the emergence of the Vedic tradition, the first large-scale empires in the Gangetic Basin, and Cave painting of Bodhisattva Padmapani, in Ajanta, ca. 2nd the beginnings of the Jain and century, B.C. Buddhist traditions. Explore the creative fervor that followed the arrival of the Kushan kings, including new forms of figural art and rock-cut architecture, and the grand tradition of Hindu art and architecture. Trace the creation of grand temples and spectacular bronze work in the southern portions of the subcontinent, and the early embrace of a

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new religious tradition, Islam, in the north. Experience the splendor of the Mughal court at its height and the influence of foreign merchants and mercenaries as the court’s power faded. APR 8 Origins of South Asian Culture APR 15 Kingdoms, Caves, and Temples APR 22 Southern Dynasties and Northern Newcomers APR 29 The Mughal Court, the British Raj, and the Nationalists 4 sessions; Wed., April 8–29, 12–2 p.m.; Ripley Center; CODE 1H0-491; Members $90; Nonmembers $140 Taj Mahal, completed in 1643, Agra, India

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.

THE MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON

LOUVRE

Art in an Age of Revolutions, Revivalism, and Reforms


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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

GENERAL

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Introduction to Drawing and Painting Work from still life, architectural interiors, and landscape to become familiar with the fundamentals of drawing and oil painting.

By Max-Karl Winkler

SCIENCE

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Max-Karl Winkler; Fri., Jan. 24–March 13, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UQ; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Exploring the Visual Foundations and Traditions of Art Apply the science in Renaissance art. Enhance the visual dynamic in drawings using the Golden Ratio, the Rule of Thirds, three-point perspective, or the Fibonacci spiral. 2 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Thurs., March 5 and 12, 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0WA; Members $65; Nonmembers $85

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Color Theory Become familiar with the color wheel, color value, chroma, and hue. Use acrylic paints and colored papers to explore color qualities and movement in shaping composition. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Dan Riesmeyer; Mon., Jan. 27–March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UW; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Out and About with an Artist: The National Gallery of Art A working artist provides a “behind-the-easel” perspective of masterworks exhibited at the National Gallery of Art. Viewings address historical and social context and technique. TWO OPTIONS: 4 sessions; 1.5 hours each; Adrienne Wyman; Mon., March 9– 30, 10:30 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0XU); Mon., March 9–30, 1:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0XV); details on website; Members $95; Nonmembers $115 (more information on p. 40)

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Composition HERMITAGE MUSEUM

Examine concepts and application of composition. Create collages based on art works and themes discussed, and explore connections between formal elements of visual art and art’s emotional impact. Moroccan Café, 1913, by Matisse

4 sessions; 3 hours each; Shahin Talishkan; Thurs., Feb. 20–March 12, 2 p.m.; all supplies included; details on website; CODE 1K0-0UM; Members $155; Nonmembers $175

Creative Writing Workshop A Reflective Response at the Freer

Learn how to slow down and savor the experience of looking at art as you view the Freer collection and then frame your response through descriptive writing and free verse. One 2-hour session; Fri., Mar. 27, 10:30 a.m.; Mary Hall Surface; Freer Gallery of Art; see p. 41 and website for more details; CODE 1K0-0YA; Members $30; Nonmembers $40

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STUDIO ART

Adult Art Camp

Oil Pastels

3-Day Workshop

Become familiar with the basics of using brightly colored, long-lasting oil pastels through group technique demonstrations and one-onone instruction.

Why do the kids get to have all the fun? If you’ve been waiting for the chance to be an artist, don’t miss this unique workshop. Produce your own original artwork, explore a variety of media, and have plenty of fun. Student work

3 sessions; 5.5 hours each; Sat., April 4—Mon., April 6, 10 a.m.; Susan Vitall; $80 supply fee covers all required materials; optional supply list and more details on website; participants provide their own lunches; CODE 1K0-0YC; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

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Colored Pencils II Workshop

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Josh Highter; Sun., Jan. 26–March 22 (no class Feb. 16), 1:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; model fees included in tuition; CODE 1K0-0UB; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Enhance you skill working with the medium of colored pencils. More in-depth techniques are discussed and demonstrated. Students may bring a work in progress or begin a new project in class, if desired.

By Lori VanKirk Schue

Drawing on the Right Side of Your Brain Build drawing ability and improve visualization and recording of objects on paper through drawing exercises focusing on edges and space, relationships between objects, and light and shadow. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Shahin Talishkhan; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K0–0UH; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

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Figure Drawing and Independent Projects Acquire an understanding of advanced elements of composition, anatomy, and artistic direction as you work from live models.

DRAWING

One 4-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Mon., Jan. 27, 11 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0– 0VY; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

8 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UX; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

Beginning Drawing Develop basic drawing skills while working with a variety of materials and techniques, Explore geometric forms, volume, and perspective in still-lifes, architecture, and figure drawing. THREE OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Sallye MahanCox; Tues., Jan. 21–March 10, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0UG; Josh Highter; Sun., Jan. 26– March 22 (no class Feb. 16), 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0UA; Eric Westbrook; Mon., Jan. 27– March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 7:00 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K00UD; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


HISTORY

CULTURE

Continued Drawing Refine and expand drawing skills through studio practice in traditional media. Sessions focus on four classic areas: still-life, landscape, portrait, and figure. Students should have completed a beginning drawing course.

SCIENCE

PAINTING

Beginning Oil Painting Explore basic painting techniques including color-mixing, scumbling, and glazing to gain the technical background needed to get started as a painter.

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Dan Riesmeyer; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 6:30 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K00UK; Members $235; Nonmembers $265 By Shahin Talishkhan

Manuscript Illumination in the Medieval Tradition Explore the rich history of manuscript illumination. Use fine-tip markers or colored pencils to produce your own tiny masterpiece in the spirit of the medieval scribes who often depicted animal, plants, and insects to convey deeper meanings.

STUDIO ART

ART

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8 sessions; 3 hours each; Shahin Talishkhan; Thurs., Jan. 23–March 12, 6:30 pm.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UN; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Techniques in Modernist Painting

One 3-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Mon., Feb. 10, 11 a.m.; details on website; supply fee $10; CODE 1K00VZ; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Class exercises, including stilllife setups and model sessions, teach practical applications of modernism’s concepts and techniques. Develop a visual language through class lectures, demonstrations, and critiques. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Shahin Still life in front of a window at Talishkhan; Weds., Jan. 22– Saint-Raphael, 1919, by Picasso March 11, 1:30 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UJ; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Drawing In Museums

World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

National Gallery of Art, Freer Gallery of Art, and Smithsonian American Art Museum

Traditional Oil Painting Techniques Lessons from Museum Masterpieces Explore the signature effects of famous artists and draw on their techniques in painting demonstrations and exercises designed to broaden individual skills.

Develop rendering and composition skills, and learn the art of copying, by drawing paintings and classical sculptures displayed in the museums.

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Adrienne Wyman; Sat., Jan. 25–March 21 (no class Feb. 15), 10 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K00UT; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

6 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Paul Glenshaw; Sat., Jan. 25–March 7 (no class Feb. 15), 1:30 p.m.; By student Claire Fuller details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0WF; Members $195; Nonmembers $225 Student in class

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World Art History Certificate elective: Earn ½ credit

Introduction to Watercolor

Learn To Paint From the Impressionists Somehow, the impressionists captured natural light on canvas. Students view their paintings at the National Gallery of Art, then develop their skills as they create impressionist-inspired works.. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Adrienne Wyman; Sat., Jan. 25–March 21 (no class Feb. 15); 2 p.m.; details and Student in class supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UU; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Explore basic watercolor techniques and new approaches to painting through classroom demonstration, discussion, and experimentation.

By David Daniels

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Dave Daniels; Mon., Jan. 27– March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 10:15 a.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K00UC; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Beautiful Landscapes in Watercolor and Ink

Painting Is for Everyone Begin working in the medium of acrylic paints. Learn to mix colors, use brushes, and approach elements of form such as value, texture, line, color, shape, and edges. Explore composition and variation and learn art terminology.

STUDIO ART

ART

Create landscapes rich in atmosphere by developing skills in painting complex foliage and layers of depth, texture, and light. 6 sessions; 3 hours each; Lubna Zahid; Tues., Jan. 21–Feb. 25, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UE; Members $195; Nonmembers $225 By Chester Kasnowski By Lubna Zahid

8 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Tues., Jan. 21– March 10; 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K00UF; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

Creativity Is a Keystroke Away Image-Software Workshop for Artists

Neuroscience and Art A Creative Connection In this painting class, learn about new findings on how our visual system informs and interprets the visible world for us.

Rework a finished drawing, painting, watercolor or photograph–or create a new artwork–using a laptop and the free image-editing software, the GNU Image Manipulation Program app (GIMP2).

INSIDE SCIENCE

By Chester Kasnowski

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2 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Thurs., Jan. 30 and Feb. 6, 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UP; Members $75; Nonmembers $95

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

By Chester Kasnowski

2 sessions; 2 hours each; Chester Kasnowski; Sat., Feb. 22 and 29; CODE 1K0-0XF; 10:30 a.m.; bring laptop computer installed with GIMP2, and digital files of finished art work or photo-graphs; details on website; Members $65; Nonmembers $85 (see p. 37 for more program information)

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


HISTORY

CULTURE

Watercolor Magic Tricks and Tips Experiment with watercolor paints to achieve surprising results. Use salt, plastic wrap, rice paper, sand, ice, and even liquid soap to create unusual textures in your artwork.

SCIENCE

MIXED-MEDIA Collage and Mixed-Media Develop collage, mixed-media or assemblage projects. Experiment with color, form, design and the use of text, images, texture, and found objects.

TWO OPTIONS:

By Lori VanKirk Schue

One 2-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Fri., Feb. 7, 11 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0VL); 2 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0VM); supply list and details on website; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

STUDIO ART

ART

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TWO COURSE OPTIONS:

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; Tues., Jan. 21–March 10, 1:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0VD); Tues., Jan. 21–March 10, 6:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0VE); details and supply list on website; Members $235; Nonmembers $265 INTENSIVE COLLAGE and MIXED-MEDIA WORKSHOP OPTION:

Touch Painting

2 sessions; 5 hours each; Marcie Wolf-Hubbard; Sat., Feb. 22 and Sun., Feb. 23, 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VC; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

Release your creativity through your fingertips, using your hands instead of brushes in this adult finger-painting class. Students use acrylic paints to produce artwork.

Exploring Encaustic and Mixed-Media Workshop

2-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Mon., March 2, 11 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0XD); 2 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0XE); all supplies included; details on website; Members $35; Nonmembers $45

The encaustic medium can be molded, sculpted, and combined with collage materials. Learn how to incorporate drawings or prints on paper and other collage elements into encaustic paintings.

Celebrating Bob Ross’s Joy of Painting

One 6-hour session; Marcie WolfHubbard; Sun., March 8, 10:30 By Marcie Wolf-Hubbard a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VB; Members $125; Nonmembers: $135

TWO OPTIONS: One

By Lori VanKirk Schue

With Hands-on Painting Class

©BOB ROSS INC./USED WITH PERMISSION

Artist Bob Ross’s “Joy of Painting” program is the mostwatched TV art show in history—and introduced painting to countless amateurs. Learn about the artist—and try his signature wet-on-wet technique in a painting class led by a certified Ross instructor. TWO OPTIONS:

Session 1 (painting workshop, program): Sun., March 1, 10 a.m.–2 p.m.; 1-hour lunch break (participants provide their own); CODE 1L0-303; Session 2 (program, painting work-shop): 1–4 p.m.; CODE 1L0-304; no experience necessary; all supplies included; Members $50; Nonmembers $70 (see p. 39 for more program information)

Mixed-Media in the Style of Romare Bearden Romare Bearden (1911– 1988) is best known for his bold mixed-media collages. Create Beardeninspired mixed-media By Sandra Gobar compositions using various fabrics, papers, cutouts, stencils and photographs, as well as paint and drawing materials. 3 sessions; 5 hours each; Sandra Gobar; Sun., Jan. 26–Feb. 9, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XG; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

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STUDIO ART

ART

Off-the-Wall Assemblage

Handmade Cards from the Heart

Enshrine personal mementos in a wooden box that can stand alone or be wall mounted. Explore a range of materials for collage and embellishment, including papers, paint, metal fixtures, charms, wire, beads, and other objects.

In celebration of all kinds of occasions of the heart, offer your special someone a handmade card. Learn card construction, sentiments, masking, and statement embellishments. Create cards in the session and leave By Karen Cadogan with a basic starter kit to make a dozen masterpieces at home.

By Sharon Robinson

4 sessions; 4 hours each; Sharon Robinson; Sat., Feb. 29–March 21, 10 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XH; Members $185; Nonmembers $205

One 3-hour session; Karen Cadogan; Sun., Feb. 2, 1 p.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XL; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Animal Portraits

Gyotaku

Create a portrait of your favorite animal or pet. Learn how to capture the subject’s essence and express it on canvas using acrylic paints. Collage and other techniques are discussed as useful additions. Bring a reference photo to class.

The Japanese Art of Printing with Fish

SOLD

By Lori VanKirk Schue

One 4-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Mon., Feb. 24, 11 a.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0UV; Members $85; Nonmembers $95

This venerable art is accomplished by applying water-based printing inks to a whole fish and pressing it to paper. Create several 12-by-18-inch prints featuring a variety of fish to bring home.

By Sue Fierston

OUT

One 5-hour session; Sue Fierston; Sat., Jan. 25, 10:30 a.m.; details on website; supply fee $25; CODE 1K0-0XP; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

Fabric Printing Using Natural Materials By Sushmita Mazumdar

Handmade Storybooks Mixed-Media Workshop Explore the many creative ways to use paper while building and binding several books. Use standard bookmaking papers and thread as well as unusual materials such as manila folders and matchboxes. Fill the new books in an afternoon of creative writing and art-making. One 6-hour session; Sushmita Mazumdar; Sat., Feb. 8, 10 a.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; Studio Pause, 4108 4th St. N., Arlington, Virginia (Ballston Metro); onsite parking; CODE 1K00XK; Members $85; Nonmembers $95

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Experiment with hand-printing on fabrics using colorful Akua water-based printmaking ink and natural materials. Practice printmaking techniques on muslin, and later design and hand-print a canvas bag. One 5-hour session; Sue Fierston; Sun, March 1; 10:30 a.m.; details on website; supply fee $25; CODE 1K0-0XQ; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Student’s work

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


HISTORY

CULTURE

Paper Frenzy

STUDIO ART

ART

Monoprint Without A Press

Use a variety of art and printmaking materials to create a supply of accented papers for collage and other art projects. 2 sessions; 5 hours each; Sharon Robinson; Fri., Feb. 14 and 21, 10:30 a.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XJ; Members $125; Nonmembers $145 By Sharon Robinson

Paper Easter Eggs Learn a fun and fast way to create Easter eggs to decorate your home for spring. Make the colorful, one-of-akind eggs using paper dots, small pins, and an overlapping paper-piecing technique.

By Lori VanKirk Schue

SCIENCE

Create prints using Gelli and other types of plates, plus acrylic paints and other materials. Explore additive and subtractive methods, drawing on the plate, overprinting, and using stamps and other materials to create patterns. 2 sessions; 5 hours each; Sharon Robinson; Fri., March By Sharon Robinson 27 and April 3, 10:30 a.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XZ; Members $165; Nonmembers $185

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SCULPTURE Beginning Sculpture

TWO OPTIONS: One 2-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Sat., April 4, 11 a.m.; CODE 1K00VN; Sat., April 4, 2 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0VP; supply fee $20; details on website; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

Sculpt head and face portraits using the medium of clay following hands-on studio practice and demonstrations. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; George Tkabladze; Fri., Jan. 24– March 13, 6:30 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K0-0US; Members $250; Nonmembers $280

Image Transfers and Photo Alteration Mixed-Media Workshop Use multiple methods for making and using image transfers. Topics include applications, choosing images, materials and techniques, altered photos as standalone artwork, and altered photos with collage. 3 sessions; 5 hours each; By Sharon Robinson Sharon Robinson; Fri., March 6-20, 10:30 a.m.; students provide photos, all other supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XY; Members $195; Nonmembers $215

By George Tkabladze

Figure Sculpture Learn about clay sculpture techniques, tool use and armatures, and the planes of the human body. Sculpt either a portrait, torso, or full figure using a live model. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; George Tkabladze; Fri., Jan. 24–March 13, 2 p.m.; details and supply lists on website; CODE 1K0-0UR; Members $250; Nonmembers $280 By George Tkabladze

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CULTURE

CALLIGRAPHY

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Introduction to Calligraphy The Foundational Hand Learning the basic letterforms of the Foundational Hand opens the door to other calligraphic hands such as Italic and Black Letter. Upper and lower case letters are covered as well as basic layout and design. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Marta Legeckis; Thurs., Jan. By Marta Legeckis 23–March 12, 10:15 a.m.; all calligraphy supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K0-0UL; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

Introduction to Pointed-Pen Calligraphy Add sophistication to your hand-lettering when you learn the basic strokes of the copperplate script alphabet and practice using nibs in an elbow holder. No experience required, just a steady hand. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Sharmila Karamchandani; Mon., Jan. 27–March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 2 p.m.; all supplies provided; details on website; CODE 1K00XA; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

The Art of Chinese Calligraphy Using Chinese brush and ink, learn to write basic Chinese characters, short phrases, and poems. The traditional signature seal and its history are also discussed. 6 sessions; 2.5 hours each; John Wang; Sat., Jan. 25–March 7 (no class Feb. 15), 2 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0UY; Members $185; Nonmembers $215

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SCIENCE

ART

STUDIO ART Indian Art and Calligraphy

FREER GALLERY OF ART

HISTORY

An Immersive Exploration This series combines detailed looks at Indian and South Asian objects and artworks in the Freer and Vasanta Vilasa (a poem on Spring) (detail), Sackler collections 1451, Guajarat, India with the opportunity to try your hand at calligraphy inspired by them. 6 sessions; 3 hours each; Sushmita Mazumdar; Sun., Feb. 23–March 29, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XM; Members $195; Nonmembers $225 (see full program details on p. 38)

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FIBER ARTS

Knitting for Beginners Learn the fundamentals of knitting, including casting on, basic knit and purl stitches, increasing, decreasing, and binding off. Practice basic skills and start an optional knitting project. 6 sessions; 2 hours each; Ann Richards; Mon., Jan. 27–March 9 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K00WD; Members $125; Nonmembers $145

Knitting Circle In this collaborative class, expand knitting skills through investigative techniques, demonstrations, hands-on projects, and research. Bring a project or an idea for one to the first session. 6 sessions; 2 hours each; Ann Richards; Sun., Jan. 26–March 8 (no class Feb. 16), 2:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WC; Members $125; Nonmembers $145

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


TRENDING

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SCIENCE

ART

Palestinian Waste-Canvas Technique

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Quilting for Beginners A Small Handmade Quilt Learn the basics of quilt-making by creating several small quilts while learning the same piecing, appliqĂşe, quilting, and finishing techniques used in larger quilts. 2 sessions; 4 hours each; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., Jan. 25 and Feb. 1, 12 p.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VV; Members $85; Nonmembers $105

STUDIO ART

For centuries, Palestinian women have created a traditional long-sleeved dress called a thobe, which is first embroidered onto fabric using waste canvas. Learn the technique by By Wafa Ghnaim transferring a pattern onto an 8 x 10 organic cotton drawstring pouch to take home. One 3-hour session; Wafa Ghnaim; Sun., Feb. 2, 12 p.m.; details on website; all supplies included; CODE 1K0-0VS; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

Palestinian Embroidery 101 Birds of Palestine on Aida Cloth

Mandala Wall Hanging Workshop Eastern sacred design meets Western textile techniques as students create a quilted mandala wall hanging based on the kolam design tradition. Please come and enjoy a peaceful, creative experience. 2 sessions; 5 hours each; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., March 7 and 14, 10:30 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VW; Members $110; Nonmembers $130

Recalling the long tradition of Palestinian women working together on embroidery projects, learn the basic Palestinian cross-stitch to create a traditional bird motif on aida cloth. Take home an embroidered hoop-mounted design. One 3-hour session; Wafa Ghnaim; Sat., Feb. 29, 12 p.m.; details on website; all supplies included; CODE 1K00VT; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

By Wafa Ghnaim

By Lauren Kingsland

Hand Embroidery for Today Tapestry Weaving

Learn basic hand embroidery stitches to create modern designs on contemporary fabrics. Explore threads and tools to enhance knits, felted wools, and ready-made garments.

Create a miniature woven tapestry on a small frame loom. Class instruction includes basic tapestry-weaving techniques such as warping the loom, color mixing and hatching. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Tea Okropiridze; Mon., Jan. 27–March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; details on website; supply fee $40; CODE 1K0-0VF; Members $215; Nonmembers $245

By Lauren Kingsland

One 4-hour session; Lauren Kingsland; Sat., Feb. 8, 10 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0XN; Members $55; Nonmembers $65

By Tea Okropiridze

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English Precious-Metal Embroidery

SCIENCE

ART

Introduction to Indian Textile Printing Explore the traditions and history of Indian Rajastani textiles, dyeing with natural pigments, and sari woodblocks as you create pieces of textile and printed art.

A Taste of Tudor Explore the techniques of traditional English precious-metal embroidery handed down from the Tudors. Materials used include some By Deborah Merrick-Wilson imported from the goldsmith house that is the purveyor to Queen Elizabeth II. Two 7-hour sessions; Sat., April 4 and 18, 9:30 a.m.; Deborah Merrick-Wilson; lunch breaks included (participants provide their own); details on website; supply fee $125; CODE 1K0-0YB; Members $165; Nonmembers $185

8 sessions, 2.5 hours each; Trisha Gupta; Sat., Jan. 25–March 21 (no class Feb. 15), By Trisha Gupta 10:15 a.m.; supply fee $65; details on website; CODE 1K0-0XS; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

The Inspirational Quilts of Gee’s Bend

Grapevine Basket

Learn the storied history of the Boykin, Alabama, quilting tradition and community of Gee’s Bend, followed by a Gee’s Bend-inspired quilting project.

In this introduction to basket weaving, create a melon-shaped basket with grapevine handle and rim. Use a combination of natural weaving materials and learn ribbing techniques.

One 5-hour session; Sat., March 21, 10:30 a.m.; Lauren Kingsland; details and supply list on website; bring sack lunch and something to share; limited to 14 participants; CODE 1K0-0VX; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

STUDIO ART

One 3-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Sat., Feb. 22; supply fee $35; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VU; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

By Lori VanKirk Schue

OTHER MEDIA Heart Basket Use basic weaving techniques including planning and measuring, as you produce a beautiful heart-shaped basket from a complex woven pattern that is deceptively easy to create.

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Relief Printing Linocut and Woodblock Design and produce relief prints from techniques of design and transfer through cutting and printing the block. 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Max-Karl Winkler; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 10:15 a.m.; details and supply list on website; CODE 1K0-0VG; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

TWO OPTIONS: One 3-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Fri., Jan. 31, 11 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0VJ); Sat., Feb. 1, 1 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0VQ); supply fee $35; details and supply list on website; Members $65; Nonmembers $75 By Lori VanKirk Schue

By Max-Karl Winkler

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Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


HISTORY

CULTURE

Exterior Mosaics in Unglazed Porcelain

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STUDIO ART

ART

PHOTOGRAPHY: Beginner

Retro Meets Modern Work with unglazed porcelains to mimic traditional mosaics with a contemporary flair. Create and grout a onesquare-foot piece for exterior display. TWO OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Bonnie Fitzgerald; Tues., Jan. 28–March 17, 1 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0UZ); Tues., Jan. 28– March 17, 6:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0VA); $80 supply fee; details and supply list on website; Members $245; Nonmembers $275

The Joy of Photography An Exploratory Course Learn how to use a digital SLR camera as a creative tool in sessions that cover aperture, shutter speed, metering, exposure, ISO, composition, special effects, and flash photography.

By Bonnie Fitzgerald

Valentine’s Day Bouquets A Floral Workshop with Sarah von Pollaro Celebrate Valentine’s Day and learn the fundamentals of floral design from an instructor who demystifies the art. Create a one-of-a-kind arrangement to gift to a loved one (or keep for yourself) and enjoy champagne, strawberries, and chocolates.

Introduction to Photography Class sessions emphasize the basics: camera functions, exposure, metering, working with natural and artificial light, and composition. Develop technical skill through assignments and offsite photo shoots.

One 1.5-hour session; By Sarah von Pollaro Sarah von Pollaro; Tues., Feb. 11, 6:30 p.m.; all supplies included; CODE 1L0-302; Members $70; Nonmembers $90

A Bird-Helper’s Basket At nesting time, nature’s weavers love to use bits and pieces of fluff and string to add to their nests. Learn how to create a simple basket for the birds in your garden.

By Lori VanKirk Schue

TWO OPTIONS: 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Marty By Marty Kaplan Kaplan; Tues., Jan. 21– March 10, 6:30 p.m. (CODE 1K0-0WQ); Sun., Jan. 26–March 22 (no class Feb. 16), 10:15 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0WP); details on website; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

TWO OPTIONS: One 3-hour session; Lori VanKirk Schue; Fri., March 6, 11 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0VK; Sat., March 7, 1 p.m.; CODE 1K00VR; supply fee $35; supply list and details on website; Members $65; Nonmembers $75

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Andargé Asfaw; Tues., Jan. 21– March 10, 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K00XB; details on website; camera By Andargé Asfaw with manual controls and tripod required; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

Introduction to Black-and-White Film Photography and the Darkroom Get a grounding in the basics of using a 35mm camera and photo darkroom techniques. Sessions feature lecture-demonstrations, class assignments, critiques, and practical darkroom work. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Tues., Jan. 21–March 10, 6:30 p.m.; all developing chemicals are provided; CODE 1K0-0WT; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

JANUARY 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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TRENDING

HISTORY

CULTURE

Introduction to Lightroom

SCIENCE

ART

STUDIO ART

PHOTOGRAPHY: Experienced

Weekend Workshops Adobe Lightroom is useful for organizing and editing image files. Learn to use it for importing, exporting, deleting, and grouping files; sorting files; attaching keywords; and improving tone, color, and detail. TWO OPTIONS: 2 sessions; 4 hours each; Eliot Cohen; 2 sessions; 4 hours each; Eliot Cohen; Sat., Jan. 25 and Sun., Jan. 26, 9:30 a.m. (CODE 1K0-0WH); Sat., March 21 and Sun., March 22 (CODE 1K0-0WK); limited to 10; bring laptop with Lightroom 6 or Lightroom Classic (not CC); more details on website; Members $225; Nonmembers $245

Understanding Your Digital Mirrorless or SLR Camera

By Andargé Asfaw

Expand your understanding of photography fundamentals such as lighting, composition, shooting techniques, and gear, and photoediting software. A photo excursion reinforces in-class instruction.

8 sessions; 2.5 hours each; Andargé Asfaw; Wed., Jan. 22–March 11, 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0XC; camera with manual controls and tripod required; details and supply list on website; Members $225; Nonmembers $255

On-Location Photography Sharpen your way of thinking about shooting outdoors. Sessions include lectures on depth of field, exposure adjustments, using a tripod, composition, and natural lighting conditions. Develop shooting strategies on field trips and in critique sessions.

Moving Beyond Auto Mode This workshop covers ISO, shutter speed, aperture, depth of field, RAW vs. JPEG files, and White Balance. Learn various shooting modes and get hands-on experience in a practice session on the Mall. THREE OPTIONS: One 7-hour session each; Eliot Cohen; Sun., By Eliot Cohen Jan. 12 (CODE 1K0-0WG); Sun., Feb. 9 (CODE 1K0-0WL); Sun., March 15 (CODE 1K0-0WJ); 9:30 a.m.; details on website; Members $210; Nonmembers $220

Introduction to iPhone Photography Create great images by reviewing photography basics such as composition and exposure, and exploring the best apps, accessories, and editing and image management tools. TWO OPTIONS: One 4-hour session; Peggy Feerick; Sat., March 14 (CODE 1K0-0XW); Sun., March 15 (CODE 1K0-0XX); 10 a.m.; details on website; Members $75; Nonmembers $85

By Peggy Feerick

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Introduction to Photography II

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Sun., Jan. 26–March 22 (no class Feb. 16), 1:30 p.m.; field trips Metro accessible; camera with manual controls required; details on website; CODE 1K00WS; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Photographic Creativity, Design, and Composition Achieving a balance of visual tension in an By Joe Yablonsky image creates wellmade visual relationships. Gain a better understanding of compositional elements and their application in lectures and assignments focusing on extended shutter speeds, light graffiti, bokeh templates, and macro photography. 5 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Wed., Feb. 5–March 4, 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WX; Members $185; Nonmembers $215

Published ticket prices are subject to change, depending on availability.


TRENDING

HISTORY

CULTURE

SCIENCE

ART

Continued Black-and-White Film Photography and the Darkroom Refine black-and-white printing skills and 35mm-camera operation in sessions including lectures, demonstrations, darkroom work, and critiques. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Paul Matthai; Mon., Jan. 27–March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; all developing chemicals included; CODE 1K00WM; Members $235; Nonmembers $265 By Paul Matthai

STUDIO ART Mastering Exposure

Develop a greater understanding of exposure modes, exposure compensations, filter exposure factors, bracketing, meterBy Joe Yablonsky ing modes, histograms, zone system, dynamic range, eliminating camera shake, tripods, and some flash concepts. Hone skills through assignments and in-class reviews. 5 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Thurs., Jan. 23–Feb. 20, 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WY; Members $185; Nonmembers $215

Open Darkroom Plus Elevate darkroom skills through smallgroup lectures, individual instruction, and independent work. Learn about toning, fiber-based printing, dodging and burning, and assessment of print quality.

Exhibiting and Selling Your Photographs

THREE OPTIONS:

8 sessions; 3 hours each; Paul Matthai; Thurs., Jan. 23–March 12, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0WN; Joe Yablonsky; Sat., Jan. 25–March 21 (no class Feb. 15), 10:15 a.m.; CODE 1K0-0WU; Sat., Jan. 25– March 21 (no class Feb. 15), 1:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0WV; all developing chemicals are provided; details on website; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Introduction to Studio Portraiture Produce a portfolio of student and model portraits in this class that focuses on basics such as posing a subject; using highlight and shadow; high key and low key lighting; using a flash meter; and understanding strobe lighting. 8 sessions; 3 hours each; Marty Kaplan; Mon., Jan. 27–March 23 (no class Feb. 17), 6:30 p.m.; model By Marty Kaplan fees included in tuition; camera with manual controls required; details on website; CODE 1K00WR; Members $235; Nonmembers $265

Get your photos seen and sold. Learn about strategies such as juried exhibitions, photo contests, showing in alternative spaces, art festivals, galleries, and websites. Sessions also address photographic portfolios, copyrighting, email marketing, postcards, pricing, printing photos, and matting and framing.

By Joe Yablonsky

One 3-hour session; Joe Yablonsky; Mon., Feb. 10, 6:30 p.m.; details on website; CODE 1K0-0WW; Members $45; Nonmembers $55

Custom Digital Printing and Mat Cutting Printing digital photos and custom cutting mat board windows is explained in sessions that describe online printing labs, paper choices, aspect ratios, mat board choices, and cutter tools. Final assembly of printed photos is done in class. 2 sessions; 3 hours each; Joe Yablonsky; Mon., March 5 and 12, 6:30 p.m.; CODE 1K0-0WZ; Members $100; Nonmembers $120

JANUARY 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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RISA RYAN

Smithsonian Associates Membership Benefits Smithsonian Associates opens the Smithsonian’s rich and varied resources to our members. When you join Smithsonian Associates you become a part of the largest museum-based cultural and educational program in the world. As an insider, you have unparalleled access to the Smithsonian's world of knowledge—and enjoy a full array of exclusive benefits. Smithsonian Associates, unlike the museums, is not federally funded and relies instead on individual contributions to help bridge the gap between program expenses and ticket revenues. There are many membership options across the Smithsonian Institution, but Smithsonian Associates membership is the ONLY program that directly supports Associates’ programming and outreach efforts, and the only way to access ticket discounts and exclusive benefits at our programs. Effective January 2019

INTRODUCTORY Memberships

56

Promoter–$100

Champion–$80

Associate–$50

When you become a member you’ll be among the first to know about the outstanding programs we

valuable discounts, including savings up to 35% off Smithsonian Associates program tickets, and

Members-only ticket priority before programs go on sale to the public (some exclusions apply)

Eligibility to purchase one ticket per program at the discounted member price (savings up to 35%)

Subscription to the monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide

Access to members-only programs, including the popular annual Breakfast at the Zoo

Access to two complimentary tours of exhibitions throughout the year

Access to free Associates events as available (notification sent via email)

10% discount at SmithsonianStore.com (with a special code) and select Smithsonian museum restaurants

Eligibility to purchase up to four tickets per program at the discounted member price

Priority consideration for waitlisted programs, including study tours (some exclusions apply)

Recognition on the Smithsonian Associates website

bring you every month—which add up to more than 750 opportunities for discovery, enrichment, and learning you’ll find nowhere else. Membership has its benefits: Members receive a range of access to tickets before they go on sale to the general public.

Eligibility to purchase up to six tickets per program at the discounted member price

Smithsonian magazine delivered to your home

Member discounts on Art Collectors Program fine-arts prints

20% discount at SmithsonianStore.com during special Member Days sales


Benefactor–$5,000 and up

Partner–$2,500

Sponsor–$1,000

Patron–$600

Contributor–$300

Advocate–$175

CIRCLE of SUPPORT

ALL OF THE BENEFITS of the Introductory Membership Levels, plus:

Advance digital copy of the monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide

Two complimentary tickets to one exclusive after-hours Mingle at the Museum event

VIP access, activities, and seating at Breakfast at the Zoo

Advance ticket purchasing by phone for high-demand programs, including Smithsonian Summer Camp

Invitation for two to a Smithsonian Insider event during the year

No handling fees on phone purchases

Recognition in the Smithsonian Associates program guide annual donor list and the annual donor plaque at our headquarters on the National Mall

Advance ticket purchasing to select headliner events

Complimentary invitation for two to an exclusive Meeting the Masters reception

Eligibility to participate in special travel programs sponsored by Smithsonian Journeys

Complimentary tickets for two to a lecture or performance (value equal to $30 per ticket or less)

Copy of the Smithsonian’s annual report

Complimentary VIP tickets for two and a parking pass for Breakfast at the Zoo

Reserved seating at most Smithsonian Associates programs

Invitations to backstage meet-and-greets at select Smithsonian Associates programs

Advance ticket purchasing for embassy programs and receptions

Dedicated concierge phone line for inquiries and tickets

Invitation for two to the prestigious Annual Smithsonian Weekend

An exclusive behind-the-scenes tour with a docent

Recognition in the Smithsonian’s annual report

As a member of Smithsonian Associates Circle of Support, you’ll play a vital and valued role in our work. Your contributions to Smithsonian Associates provide the support that enables all of our programs to continue and grow. There’s no better time to consider enhancing the level of your support. Depending on the level you choose, you’ll enjoy enhanced benefits such as early registration for Smithsonian Summer Camp and special programs, reserved seating at sold-out events, and invitations to exclusive receptions with speakers.

Recognition as a sponsor of a selected Smithsonian Associates program

Complimentary VIP tickets for six and two parking passes for Breakfast at the Zoo

Priority seating at all Smithsonian Associates programs

Additional 20% discount on member prices for Art Collectors Program fine-arts prints

Visit smithsonianassociates.org/levels or call 202-633-3030 57


HELPFUL INFORMATION

1 Baird Auditorium Natural History Museum 10th and Constitution Ave., NW Metro: Federal Triangle (Blue/Orange/Silver) 2 Warner Bros. Theater American History Museum 14th and Constitution Ave., NW Metro: Smithsonian station, Mall exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 3 Lisner Auditorium George Washington University 21st and H St., NW Metro: Foggy Bottom/GWU (Blue/Orange/Silver) 4 Meyer Auditorium Freer Gallery of Art 12th and Independence Ave., SW Metro: Smithsonian station, Independence Ave. exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 5 Nan Tucker McEvoy Auditorium Smithsonian American Art Museum 8th and G Sts., NW Metro: Gallery Place-Chinatown (Red, Yellow/Green) 6 Rasmuson Theater American Indian Museum 4th and Independence Ave., SW Metro: L‘Enfant Plaza (Blue/Orange/Silver or Green/Yellow); Maryland Ave./Smithsonian Museums Exit

58

7 Renwick Gallery, Grand Salon 1661 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Metro: Farragut North (Red) or Farragut West (Blue/Orange/Silver) 8 Ring Auditorium Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden 7th and Independence Ave., SW Metro: Smithsonian station, Mall exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 9 Ripley Center 1100 Jefferson Drive, SW Metro: Smithsonian station, Mall exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 10 Smithsonian Castle 1000 Jefferson Drive, SW Metro: Smithsonian–Mall exit (Blue/Orange/Silver) 11 STUDY TOURS BUS PICKUPS Location for most local tours: Holiday Inn Capitol, 550 C St., SW (corner of 6th & C); Metro: L’Enfant Plaza–7th & Maryland Ave. exit (Yellow/Green/ Blue/Orange/Silver)

12 U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation Auditorium 701 Pennsylvania Ave., NW Metro: Archives-Navy Memorial (Green/Yellow) 13 Voice of America Auditorium Wilbur J. Cohen Building 330 Independence Ave., SW (enter on C St.); Metro: Federal Center SW (Blue/Orange/Silver) 14 University of the District of Columbia Theater of the Arts (Not shown on map.) 4200 Connecticut Ave., N.W. Metro: Van Ness/UDC (Red line) METRO The Mall entrance of the Smithsonian station closes at 10 p.m. The other entrance, at Independence Ave. and 12th St., SW, closes at midnight and at 3 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays), as do the Gallery Place and Federal Triangle stations, To be sure not to miss the last train to your destination, call Metro at 202-637-7000 for schedules.

PARKING Nearby Colonial Parking garages are shown on the map. Some offer $6 parking for our events on weekday evenings after 5:30 p.m. and all day on Saturday and Sunday. Inquire before parking and have your event ticket with you. Parking lot hours vary. Very limited metered parking is available around the Mall ($2 per hour).

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030


PROGRAMS BY FORMAT (New listings in red) All-Day Programs The World of the Crusades ........................................Sat, Feb 8 ....................7 The Inca and Machu Picchu......................................Sat, Feb 29 .................9 The Wars of the Roses................................................Sat, Feb 29 .................9 Forgotten No More.......................................................Sat, March 28...........13 Literary London.............................................................Sat, Jan 25 ................18 Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Paul.................Sat, Feb 1...................19 Toni Morrison.................................................................Sun, Feb 9.................19 Religious Crises in the Western World ...................Sat, Feb 22 ...............22 Heaven and Hell............................................................Sat, March 14...........23 Writing a Screenplay ..................................................Sat, March 21...........26 Tell Your Family Story .................................................Sat, April 4................27 The Gilded Age..............................................................Sat, Jan 25 ...............35 The Golden Age of Spanish Art................................Fri, Feb 7...................35 Ancient Egypt: Its Art and Architecture ................Sat, Feb 8 .................36 Henri Matisse ................................................................Sat, Feb 22 ...............38 Sicily .................................................................................Sat, March 7 ............39 Vermeer ..........................................................................Sat, April 4 ................41

Courses The Making of England ...............................................Wed, Jan 8 ..................6 History of the British Royal Family .........................Thurs, March 26 ......14 World Heritage Sites: Asia .........................................Thurs, April 2............14 Smithsonian Boomers Chorus..................................Tues, Jan 14 ..............16 Beethoven: The Musical Milestones .......................Tues, Jan 21 ..............17 Neighborhoods: Barcelona, Milan, and Berlin ......Thurs, Jan 23............17 Imagining the Southwest ...........................................Mon, Jan 27 ..............18 Windows on the World ................................................Mon, March 9...........24 Classical Sounds of the Cinema ..............................Sun, March 15 ..........24 Intro to Western Art.....................................................Mon, Jan 6................33 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist ...................Fri, Jan 10 .................34 Seeing History Through Artists’ Eyes.....................Wed, Feb 19..............36 Indian Art and Calligraphy.........................................Sun, Feb 23 ..............38 Out and About with an Artist....................................Mon, March 9 ..........40 Masters and Masterpieces ........................................Tues, April 7 .............42 The Art of India .............................................................Wed, April 8..............42

Lectures TRENDING How To Watch the Oscars..........................................Thurs, Feb 6 ...............2 Danny Meyer ..................................................................Thurs, Feb 20.............2 Sapporo-Style Ramen .................................................Sat, March 7...............2 Bagel and Lox.................................................................Sun, March 29 ...........2 Judith Viorst...................................................................Mon, March 16...........3 Erik Larson ...................................................................Mon, March 16...........3 Kathy Reichs ..................................................................Wed, March 18 ...........3 HISTORY Medieval History: Fact vs. Fiction ...........................Thurs, Jan 16..............6 The Day Prohibition Began ........................................Thurs, Jan 16..............6 Wild Bill’s Secret Agents ............................................Wed, Jan 22 ................7 Amelia Earhart: Legend and Legacy .......................Thurs, Jan 30 .............7 The Dreyfus Affair ........................................................Mon, Feb 10 ................8 1774: The Long Year of Revolution ..........................Wed, Feb 12 ................8 The Black Death’s Legacy ..........................................Tues, Feb 25 ...............8 The Constitution and the Declaration of Independence.........................................................Tues, March 3 ..........10 Understanding the Celtic World...............................Wed, March 4 ...........10 The Worlds of Benjamin Franklin.............................Tues, March 10.........10 Charlemagne .................................................................Thurs, March 12........11 Ireland’s Fight for Freedom .......................................Tues, March 17..........11

European Microstates .................................................Tues, March 24 ........12 Leadership in Crisis .....................................................Tues, March 31.........12 CULTURE DC Theatre Preview 2020..................................Tue, Jan 14 ........................16 Travels with Darley ..............................................Thurs, Jan 30....................18 Muslim Cultures and Islamic Faith .................Tues, Feb 4 ........................19 Economics + Dystopian Literature ..................Tues, Feb 11 .......................21 Louis Armstrong...................................................Thurs, Feb 13 ....................21 The Creative Curve..............................................Tues, Feb 18 ......................21 The Greek Gods: Myths and Worship.............Mon, March 2 ...................22 Coming Together on Abbey Road ...................Tues, March 3 ..................23 Why We Love Crosswords..................................Thurs, March 5 ................23 Re-examining Plato’s Republic ........................Mon, March 9 ...................23 Decoding the Royal Wardrobe..........................Wed, March 18 .................26 Celebrating Robert Frost...................................Wed, April 1.......................26 SCIENCE Black Holes: A New Look ...................................Mon, Jan 13 ......................29 The Science of Sleep ..........................................Wed, Jan 29......................29 The New Brain Science ......................................Wed, Feb 5 ........................29 Lucy’s Ancestor ....................................................Mon, Feb 10 ......................30 You + Me = Symbiosis .........................................Fri, Feb 14 .........................30 The Science of CBD ............................................Thurs, Feb 20...................30 Volcanoes of the Western Aleutians ..............Mon, Feb 24 ......................31 Extreme Weather..................................................Tues, March 31 .................31 ART Marcel Duchamp...................................................Thurs, Jan 9.....................33 Crafting the Buddha’s Image ............................Wed, Jan 15 ......................34 Creativity Is a Keystroke Away .........................Sat, Feb 22 .......................37 Celebrating Bob Ross’s Joy of Painting.........Sun, March 1 ....................39 Africa in the African American Artistic Imagination .....................................................Tues, March 24................40 Creativity in Dark Times.....................................Wed, March 25 ................40 Creative Writing at Freer....................................Fri, March 27 ....................41

Performances Smithsonian Chamber Music Society (SCMS) Masterworks of Five Centuries....................Sat, Jan 4, Sun, Jan 5 .....15 What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow ......Sun, Feb 23 .......................22 Emerson String Quartet ....................................Sun, April 5 ........................27 Smithsonian Chamber Music Society (SCMS) Axelrod String Quartet ..................................Sat, May 9..........................27

Studio Art Drawing, Painting, Fiber Arts, Other Media, Photography ..............43-55

Study Tours The Philadelphia Flower Show .........................Sun, March 1.......................3 Sears Houses of Arlington.................................Sat, March 14 ....................11 Women in Wartime...............................................Sat, March 21....................12 The Road to Nashville .........................................Sun, March 22..................25 Exclusive Member Tours Marcel Duchamp at Hirshhorn..................Tues, Jan 14......................28 Canadian Embassy ......................................Wed, Jan 15 ......................28 Hokusai ...........................................................Tues, Jan 21......................28 The Best of Brooklyn...........................................Sun, April 19 .....................28 Smithsonian Greenhouses.................................Thurs, March 12 ...............31 Smithsonian Greenhouses.................................Thurs, March 19...............31 Hiking: Shenandoah National Park..................Sun, May 3........................32 Baltimore Museums.............................................Fri, Feb 21 .........................37

JANUARY 2020 SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES

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PROGRAMS BY DATE JANUARY Sat, Jan 4 Sun, Jan 5 Mon, Jan 6 Wed, Jan 8 Thurs, Jan 9 Fri, Jan 10 Mon, Jan 13 Tues, Jan 14

Wed, Jan 15 Thurs, Jan 16 Tues, Jan 21 Wed, Jan 22 Thurs, Jan 23 Sat, Jan 25 Mon, Jan 27 Wed, Jan 29 Thurs, Jan 30

SCMS Masterworks Sat concert series.................15 SCMS Masterworks Sun concert series................15 Intro to Western Art ...................................................33 The Making of England................................................6 Marcel Duchamp.........................................................33 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist ..................34 Black Holes: A New Look ..........................................29 DC Theatre Preview 2020 .........................................16 Smithsonian Boomers Chorus .................................16 Marcel Duchamp at Hirshhorn (Member Tour) ..28 Canadian Embassy (Member Tour)........................28 Crafting the Buddha’s Image...................................34 Medieval History: Fact vs. Fiction ............................6 The Day Prohibition Began.........................................6 Beethoven: The Musical Milestones .......................17 Hokusai (Member Tour).............................................28 Wild Bill’s Secret Agents .............................................7 Neighborhoods: Barcelona, Milan, and Berlin ......17 Literary London............................................................18 The Gilded Age ............................................................35 Imagining the Southwest ..........................................18 The Science of Sleep .................................................29 Amelia Earhart: Legend and Legacy.........................7 Travels with Darley......................................................18

FEBRUARY Sat, Feb 1 Tues, Feb 4 Wed, Feb 5 Thurs, Feb 6 Fri, Feb 7 Sat, Feb 8 Sun, Feb 9 Mon, Feb 10 Tues, Feb 11 Wed, Feb 12 Thurs, Feb 13 Fri, Feb 14 Tues, Feb 18 Wed, Feb 19 Thurs, Feb 20 Fri, Feb 21 Sat, Feb 22

Sun, Feb 23 Mon, Feb 24 Tues, Feb 25 Sat, Feb 29

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Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Paul ................19 Muslim Cultures and Islamic Faith.........................19 The New Brain Science .............................................29 How To Watch the Oscars...........................................2 The Golden Age of Spanish Art ..............................35 The World of the Crusades .........................................7 Ancient Egypt: Its Art and Architecture...............36 Toni Morrison................................................................19 The Dreyfus Affair.........................................................8 Lucy’s Ancestor...........................................................30 Economics + Dystopian Literature ..........................21 1774: The Long Year of Revolution ...........................8 Louis Armstrong ..........................................................21 You + Me = Symbiosis ................................................30 The Creative Curve .....................................................21 Seeing History Through Artists’ Eyes ...................36 Danny Meyer...................................................................2 The Science of CBD ...................................................30 Baltimore Museums ...................................................37 Religious Crises in the Western World..................22 Creativity Is a Keystroke Away ................................37 Henri Matisse...............................................................38 What Makes It Great? with Rob Kapilow ..............22 Indian Art And Calligraphy.......................................38 Volcanoes of the Western Aleutians ......................31 The Black Death’s Legacy ...........................................8 The Wars of the Roses ................................................9 The Inca and Machu Picchu.......................................9

SmithsonianAssociates.org 202-633-3030

MARCH Sun, March 1 Mon, March 2 Tues, March 3

Wed, March 4 Thurs, March 5 Sat, March 7 Mon, March 9

Tues, March 10 Thurs, March 12 Sat, March 14 Sun, March 15 Mon, March 16 Tues, March 17 Wed, March 18 Thurs, March 19 Sat, March 21 Sun, March 22 Tues, March 24

Wed, March 25 Thurs, March 26 Fri, March 27 Sat, March 28 Sun, March 29 Tues, March 31

The Philadelphia Flower Show...................................3 Celebrating Bob Ross’s Joy of Painting ...............39 The Greek Gods: Myths and Worship ....................22 The Constitution and the Declaration of Independence ...........................................................10 Coming Together on Abbey Road ..........................23 Understanding the Celtic World..............................10 Why We Love Crosswords.........................................23 Sapporo-Style Ramen ..................................................2 Sicily...............................................................................39 Re-examining Plato’s Republic................................23 Windows on the World ...............................................24 Out and About with an Artist ......................................40 The Worlds of Benjamin Franklin ............................10 Charlemagne .................................................................11 Smithsonian Greenhouses ........................................31 Sears Houses of Arlington.........................................11 Heaven and Hell ..........................................................23 Classical Sounds of the Cinema .............................24 Erik Larson ....................................................................3 Judith Viorst ...................................................................3 Ireland’s Fight for Freedom .......................................11 Kathy Reichs...................................................................3 Decoding the Royal Wardrobe.................................26 Smithsonian Greenhouses ........................................31 Women in Wartime ......................................................12 Writing a Successful Screenplay ...........................26 The Road to Nashville................................................25 European Microstates ................................................12 Africa in the African American Artistic Imagination................................................40 Creativity in Dark Times ...........................................40 History of the British Royal Family ........................14 Creative Writing at Freer...........................................41 Forgotten No More......................................................13 Bagel and Lox .................................................................2 Leadership in Crisis ....................................................12 Extreme Weather .........................................................31

April Wed, April 1 Thurs, April 2 Sat, April 4 Sun, April 5 Tues, April 7 Wed, April 8 Sun, April 19

Celebrating Robert Frost..........................................26 World Heritage Sites: Asia ........................................14 Tell Your Family Story ................................................27 Vermeer .........................................................................41 Emerson String Quartet ................................................27 Masters and Masterpieces.......................................42 The Art of India ...........................................................42 The Best of Brooklyn .................................................28

May Sun, May 3 Sat, May 9

Hiking: Shenandoah National Park ............................32 SCMS Axelrod Quartet Sat concert series...........27


MEMBERSHIP Depending on your level of support, you will receive special benefits, including significant savings on most Smithsonian Associates program tickets; a monthly Smithsonian Associates program guide; discounts at museum shops and restaurants; notices about behind-the-scenes tours and special receptions with world-class speakers; and much more! Visit SmithsonianAssociates.org/join or call 202-633-3030 for more information. Join today!

TICKETS

DONATE NOW!

Online.......................SmithsonianAssociates.org Email ........................Customerservice@SmithsonianAssociates.org Phone..........................202-633-3030 Mon.–Fri., 9 a.m.–5 p.m.; Fax 202-786-2536

202-633-3030 SmithsonianAssociates.org/levels

Mail .............................Smithsonian Associates, P.O. Box 23293, Washington, D.C. 20026-3293 In person ...................Mon.– Fri., 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr., S.W., Suite 3077, Washington, D.C. 20560 Fees............................There is a $3 nonrefundable per ticket processing fee on all tickets, except for Members-Only free events, Summer Camps, Smithsonian Sleepovers, and Discovery Theater. Please note that programs with multiple sessions have discounted processing fees applied to each individual session and charged as one fee. There is an additional $3 nonrefundable per order handling fee on phone orders.

REFUNDS are only issued when a program is canceled or if it sells out before we receive your order.

CREDIT TO YOUR SMITHSONIAN ASSOCIATES ACCOUNT Credit for cancellations or exchanges are only available for programs that cost more than $40. If in compliance with the specific guidelines below, credit is issued to your Smithsonian Associates account, not your credit card. Credits are non-transferable. Programs and Studio Arts Classes If a program or studio arts class is more than $40, and you wish to cancel your tickets or exchange them for another program, please contact Customer Service in writing (email, mail, or fax) at least two weeks before the program date to request a credit. (See contact information above.) Please note that there is a $10 cancellation fee, as well as a cost adjustment when there is a price difference between the programs. Courses To receive credit to your Smithsonian Associates account for a course, (excluding studio arts classes), please contact Customer Service in writing (email, mail, or fax) at least two weeks before the first session. Credit will also be issued within two weekdays after the first session, provided that Customer Service is contacted in writing

CHANGES IN PUBLISHED SCHEDULES Smithsonian Associates reserves the right to cancel, substitute speakers and session topics within a course, and reschedule or relocate any program, if needed. Occasionally, a time, date, or location of a program must change after it has been published or tickets have been mailed. Participants are notified by phone, email, or mail. Be sure to check our website SmithsonianAssociates.org for latest updates, or call 202-633-3030 during business hours for information.

(email, mail, or fax) within that period. Credit will be prorated to reflect the cost of the first session. No credit will be given after the first session. Overnight Study Tours To receive credit to your Smithsonian Associates account for an overnight tour, please contact Customer Service in writing (email, mail, or fax) at least 45 days before the tour date. At that point, there is a $10 cancellation fee. If your request is received between 44 and 15 days before the tour, cancellation fee is $100. No credit will be issued for cancellations received fewer than 15 days before the tour date. The cost of some components of tickets— such as entrance fees, theater tickets, food programs and meals, and some forms of transportation, may not be credited.

the educational and promotional purposes of Smithsonian Institution and Smithsonian Associates. Filming and/or photographing by participants at Smithsonian Associates programs is not permitted. VISITORS WITH DISABILITIES Smithsonian Associates seeks to make activities accessible to people with disabilities. Patrons with disabilities are encouraged to call before registering for programs to inquire about the accessibility of the presentations and locations. For information or to request accessibility assistance, please call 202-633-3030 (VOICE) or send an email to customerservice@SmithsonianAssociates.org

We also reserve the right to refuse to register any individual or to require any participant to withdraw from an activity if the Smithsonian Interpreters for programs are provided free of charge. Smithsonian representative deems such action to be in the best interests of the Associates will make arrangements if requests are made at least two health, safety, or welfare of the group or the participant. weeks in advance of the program. TICKETS AT THE DOOR Tickets are available (on a first-come, MOVING? Please write us with your new information and allow 6 weeks first-served basis) at the door for some Smithsonian Associates for the change to take effect. programs. Call 202-633-3030 to be sure that the program is not already sold out. No discounts applicable to tickets sold at the door. HAVE QUESTIONS? Call Customer Service at 202-633-3030 M–F, GROUP DISCOUNTS Group discounts (for 10 or more) are available for some programs. Please call 202-633-3030 for details. PHOTOGRAPHING AND RECORDING PROGRAMS Participants at Smithsonian Associates programs may be photographed or filmed for

9–5, or stop by our office at 1100 Jefferson Drive, S.W., Suite 3077, (west of the Smithsonian Castle), between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays. (Metro: Blue/Orange/Silver line, Smithsonian–Mall exit)


PERIODICALS POSTAGE Paid at WASHINGTON, D.C. and additional mailing offices

Smithsonian Institution Washington, D.C. 20560-0701

Postmaster: please deliver Dec. 27–30, 2019

SOURCE CODE

CUSTOMER NUMBER

SMITHSONIAN SUMMER CAMP June 22– August 21, 2020 Weeklong camps for children entering grades K–9 2-week immersive camps forgrades 4–9 Youth Teaching Assistant Boot Camp Visit our website to pre-register your camper and save time on registration day! You can also plan out your camper's 2020 Smithsonian Summer Camp Adventure with our Camp Planning Tool.

Mark your calendars! Registration: starting 9 a.m. Tues FEB

11

Wed FEB

12

]

Current members of Smithsonian Associates at the $300 level or higher

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Current members of Smithsonian Associates at the $50, $80, $100, and $175 levels

Fri FEB

General Public

Thurs FEB

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SmithsonianAssociates.org/camp

Profile for Smithsonian Associates

Smithsonian Associates January 2020 program guide  

Smithsonian Associates monthly program guide. Smithsonian Associates is the largest museum-based education program in the world, offering mo...

Smithsonian Associates January 2020 program guide  

Smithsonian Associates monthly program guide. Smithsonian Associates is the largest museum-based education program in the world, offering mo...

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