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franklin county t


Franklin County Guide

Education...................4 Business.. .................. 11 Recreation.............. 16 Arts & Entertainment.. ... 22 Shopping & Dining...................... 25 County MAp.. .......... 30

P.O. 158, Rocky Mount, VA 24151 540.483.9542 • franklincounty.org

ABOUT THIS PUBLICATION Publisher: Mark Vosskamp Editor: Andie Gibson Graphic designer: Matt Brown Contributing writers: Amy Hanek, Lindsey Wagnon Contributing photographers: Josh Ashton, Micah Gaudio, Andie Gibson, Jerry Hale, Ted Pratt, Ray Reynolds, James Roney, Sebastiano Stia, Mark Taylor The 2010 Franklin County Guide was produced by Laker Media, a division of Times-World LLC. While every possible effort has been made to verify all facts and figures herein, Laker Media and Times-World LLC take no responsibility for omissions or inaccuracies. Content may not be reproduced without written consent from Times-World LLC. All rights reserved. Copyright 2010, Times-World LLC. For more information: 13420 Booker T. Washington Hwy., Moneta, VA 24121. Phone: 540-721-4675. 2

F RANKLIN C OUNTY, V i r g i n i a

Discover what you’ve been missing T

hose of us lucky enough to call Franklin County, Virginia, home recognize it as an exceptional place to live, work, study and play. If you’re just hearing about our little slice of heaven in the picturesque mountains of Southwest Virginia, you won’t be disappointed. Among the pages of this guide, you’ll read more about the county’s outstanding people, places and opportunities, including:

• A school system that ranks as one of the best in the state as well as exceptional institutes of higher education

• Scenic mountains, abundant parks and miles of hiking and biking trails

• Two beautiful lakes perfect for fishing, boating, water sports and other family fun

• A business-friendly community with progressive workforce development and training programs

• Cutting-edge healthcare facilities

• An affordable, diverse and expanding residential housing market

• A small-town feel with easy access to several metropolitan areas

• An extraordinary musical heritage with plentiful opportunities for participation in the arts Did we miss anything? Probably, because there’s so much happening here it’s hard to keep track of it all. In Franklin County, we’re proud of our heritage and excited about the future. We invite you to come for a visit and discover what you’ve been missing! Rick Huff Franklin County Administrator Janie Hopkins Executive Director Franklin County Chamber of Commerce


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education in franklin county

Where learning is a way of life I

n any area, the quality of a school system is a major consideration, a high priority for families choosing a place to live. In Franklin County, community members enthusiastically agree its quality of education is one of its biggest draws. Franklin County Public Schools District Superintendent Dr. Charles Lackey said the school system works according to its motto: Every Child, Every Chance, Every Day. “We take education seriously,” said Lackey. “We plan aggressively, implement with conviction, and specifically care about students and their future. Our parents have a high expectation for their children’s education and they support rigorous standards and requirements for good citizenship and support teachers when issues arise.” In truth, the schools in Franklin County – elementary through adult education – exceed the standards. Franklin County schools are ranked among the best in Virginia by all academic standards,

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educational assessments, efficiency studies and innovative advancements. Lackey said the county’s educational success begins with excellent leadership. “Our future will be specifically determined by a healthy, trusting and supportive relationship between the School Board and Board of Supervisors, as well as the administrators,” he said. “This will yield the type of school system that 95 percent of our constituents indicate they expect. Our students, our parents and our business community have indicated they expect a 21st Century education and they are willing to do what it takes to support and reach that goal.” One of the 21st Century enhancements Lackey noted is the Center for Energy Efficient Design (CEED) expected to open for the fall 2010 semester at the Gereau Center for Applied Technology and Career Exploration. “This innovative and creative classroom design will be a working lab for our students and community that will teach and motivate

students to learn about existing and new technologies about energy, which is so important in our nation’s future. The CEED project will strive to obtain a platinum LEED certification which may be the first in the state of Virginia and will serve as a beacon for creative innovation throughout the Southeast,” he said. There are 12 elementary schools, one middle school and one high school in the Franklin County district. In addition, the Franklin County school system offers the Gereau Center, an innovative learning center for middle and high school students. The district is fully accredited and highly rated among the 1,860 schools in the state, reflecting outstanding student achievements in the areas of English, history/social sciences, math and science. In 2010, several of the county’s elementary schools received the Governor’s Award for Educational Excellence. In addition, three schools received the Board of Education’s Excellence Award.


Careers on the cutting edge significant educational asset to the Franklin County school system is an innovative, hands-on career exploration facility, the Gereau Center for Applied Technology and Career Exploration. Named for retired district superintendent and education champion Leonard Gereau, the facility includes eight modules designed to give middle and high school students a taste of career opportunities in various fields. Principal Kevin Bezy said the Gereau Center was established to meet the needs of the community. “In the 1990s, it was perceived that high school graduates did not have a clear idea of their career goals. The center was set up to address career exploration for students before they went to high school. This allows

students to make more informed course selection decisions in high school,” said Bezy. “We also teach applied technology so students will have the skills for the academic work in high school and on the job. We back up the traditional academic classes by providing opportunities for the students to take the knowledge learned in class and use it to solve real problems with hands-on, engaging activities.” Bezy said every county eighth grader rotates through the modules, which include Arts, Aviation/Aerospace, and Environmental Science/Natural Resources. “We are examining our curriculum to include more STEM [Science, Technology, Engineering, Math] education,” he said. “STEM represents the areas where future jobs will be. The Center for Energy Efficient Design [CEED] is being constructed as part of

the Gereau Center. This building will produce more energy than it uses. It will have solar and wind energy producing applications. The building itself will be a teaching tool for environmental and energy studies for 8th graders and high school students. We are planning to have an impact on future generations of home owners and builders.”

Sebastiano Stia

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ranklin County residents don’t have to travel far for a college education. Among the many opportunities offered at the Franklin Center in downtown Rocky Mount are classes through Patrick Henry Community College and Virginia Western Community College. Kay Pagans, site supervisor for the PHCC satellite campus at the Franklin Center, said the college offers remedial classes in math, Spanish and English as well as Microsoft Office and art history. The college, which has its main campus in Martinsville, also offers business and industry training tailored to specific needs in Franklin County. Examples include classes in e-mail etiquette and basic computer training. Mike Greer, Administrative officer for VWCC’s Franklin Center campus, said he has been extremely pleased with the way community members have embraced the opportunities now found in their own backyard. Greer said the campus offers 12-20 classes each semester ranging from physical education electives to teacher

re-certification to fresh-water fishing, which includes field trips for students to nearby Philpott Lake. Greer said Roanoke-based VWCC has even more plans for the Franklin Center. “This is just a starting point,” he said. “We hope to continue to grow the classes we offer.” Pagans said she also has been happy with the PHCC’s growth at the Franklin Center. Plans are in the works to add a Licensed Practical Nurse program and agribusiness classes. Pagans said PHCC’s goal is to reach all types of students in the community and will continue to grow in a variety of directions. “We are here to serve all the citizens of Franklin County,” she said.

Kim Dillon

e d u c at i o n

Two colleges. One big idea.

 Virginia Congressman Tom Perriello speaks at the Franklin Center in Rocky Mount.


institutions like Patrick Henry and Virginia Western community colleges, as well as Ferrum College and Averett University. Businesses utilize 31,000 square feet of meeting rooms and technological equipment for specially designed training programs at the center. The Department of Rehabilitation Services assists with programs to help injured employees return to work. Among other services offered by Goodwill of the Valleys is a special program for on-the-job training for older workers. Hodges said the Franklin Center has been so successful that an additional grant from the Virginia Tobacco Indemnification and Community Revitalization Commission has been secured to complete an additional

4,700 square feet on the lower level. The project will provide additional classrooms, computer labs and career counseling space and should be completed in time for the 2010 fall semester. For more information, contact the Franklin Center at 540-483-0179 or visit thefranklincenter.org.

Kim Dillon

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dults in Franklin County have an array of opportunities for new fields of study, independent learning, and skill enhancement. The Franklin Center for Advanced Learning and Enterprise in the heart of Rocky Mount offers an impressive list of programs for non-traditional students. According to Executive Director Kathy Hodges, the Franklin Center has a considerable influence on Franklin County adult education. Through 20 educational and business partners the facility is able to offer a wide assortment of GED courses, technologically specific programs, college courses, online studies, leadership workshops and customized training series. Many classes are offered by area

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e d u c at i o n

The Franklin Center fills a needed niche in the community


e d u c at i o n

Ferrum College O

ne of the prize features of Franklin County, Ferrum College has a subtle, yet influential character, much like the Blue Ridge Mountains that surround it. Founded in 1913, the four-year liberal arts college offers 33 areas of study ranging from business and environmental science to teacher education and criminal justice with an 11-to-1 average student-tofaculty ratio. The school, which is affiliated with the United Methodist Church, offers exceptional career and graduate school preparation in a scenic, natural setting. The more than 1,300 students who attend Ferrum come from 25 states and a dozen countries. Approximately 80 percent live on Ferrum’s 700-acre campus, which includes many of the amenities found at larger universities such as campus-wide wireless Internet. Ferrum’s official mission is to educate students in the disciplines of higher learning and to help them be thoughtful and perceptive, to be articulate and professionally capable, and to be

Public Schools Franklin County Schools 540.483.5138 www.frco.k12.va.us • 12 Elementary Schools 3,329 students • 2 Middle Schools 1,662 students • 1 High School 2,240 students Private Schools Christian Heritage Academy Rocky Mount, 540.483.5855 Approximately 110 students Pre-Kindergarten through 12th www.chaknights.org

Courtesy of Ferrum College

caring and concerned citizens of their community, nation and world. Ferrum also excels in athletics with eight men’s and seven women’s NCAA Division III programs that compete in the USA South Athletic Conference. The

Smith Mountain Lake Christian Academy Wirtz, 540.719.1192 Approximately 35 students Kindergarten through 9th www.smlacademy.com area Colleges Ferrum College Ferrum, 540.365.2121 www.ferrum.edu

school won the National Junior College Athletic Association national football championship four times (1965, 1968, 1974, 1977) and has produced a number of noted professional athletes, including Chris Warren and Billy Wagner.

Roanoke Higher Education Center Roanoke, 540.857.8922 www.education.edu Virginia Western Community College Roanoke, 540.857.8922 www.virginiawestern.edu Workforce Development

Patrick Henry Community College Martinsville, 276.638.8777 www.ph.cc.va.us

The Franklin Center Rocky Mount, 540.483.0179 www.thefranklincenter.org

web.roanoke.edu

- Kevin Bezy, Gereau Center Director

“We aren’t training them in a skill but teaching them Roanoke College what theSalem, career possibilities are in their future.” 540.375.2500

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business in franklin county

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here are many reasons a business would want to relocate to Franklin County. Michael Burnette, acting director for Franklin County’s Department of Commerce and Leisure Services, said he’s seen businesses drawn to the county for its “award-winning educational system [primary and secondary schools as well as institutes of higher learning]; a motivated, skilled and hard-working labor force; an extremely low tax structure; proximity to major markets; and, of course, our unrivaled quality of life.” SleepSafe Beds (see accompanying article), McAirlaids and Empire Foods are just a few of the new companies that recently chose to make Franklin County their new home. Many more have invested in the local economy and enjoyed the region’s varied amenities for decades. McAirlaids is a manufacturer of non-woven composite material

for absorbency uses. In 2006, the German-based company invested $85 million to open its first U.S. facility and headquarters in Rocky Mount. McAirlaids employs more than 160 people. Empire Foods has produced perishable products for 30 years. The company recently expanded its manufacturing facilities to Rocky Mount with a 45,000-square-foot facility. The plant produces primarily bakery items – such as decorative cakes and cookies – for resale in major retail grocers. Empire Foods employs about 100 Franklin County residents. The Willard Companies is based in Moneta near Smith Mountain Lake and serves as an umbrella company for Willard Construction of the Roanoke Valley, Inc., Prudential Waterfront Properties, Westlake Cinema, Smith Mountain Building Supply, two private country clubs (The Waterfront and The Water’s Edge), one public

Ray Reynolds

Franklin County opens its doors to new industry

 The Willard Companies’ Ron Willard II (left) and Ron Willard Sr. are developing a community of energy-efficient homes in Franklin County.

golf course (The Westlake Golf & Country Club) as well as numerous residential subdivisions, including The Boardwalk and The Farm, a community being built using energy efficient guidelines. Ronald L. Willard founded The Willard Companies, which now employs about 250 people, in 1973. Continued on page 12 w w w . F RANKLIN C OUNTY VA . o r g

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leepSafe Beds, LLC began as English Ave Industries, manufacturing wood products and custom furniture. In September 2000, company owners received a furniture request that would change the course – and the name – of the business. The New York State Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities needed a bed that would prevent falls and entrapment for residents in its group homes. Without any experience in the healthcare bed industry, the owners approached the project from a fresh perspective, developing the SleepSafe Bed system. The company changed its name to SleepSafe Beds, LLC and filed for a patent on their inventive bed designs in 2001. Company CEO Joe Hallock said he knows how much of an impact one SleepSafe bed can make on a family. “One of the comments we get the most is, now that they have our bed, their child actually sleeps through the night, something that they have never done before,” Hallock said. “If your child has never slept through the night that generally means their parents have not either.” SleepSafe Beds manufactures its products in Callaway and distributes them nationwide and to Canada. In 2008, one of the company’s beds was featured on the ABC

television show “Extreme Makeover Home Edition.” In 2009, SleepSafe was named to Inc. Magazine’s list of the 5,000 fastest-growing private companies in America.

Courtesy of SleepSafe Beds, LLC

B U S INE S S

Dreaming big in Callaway S

Business, Continued Trinity Packaging is considered the leader in innovation and plastic products in North America. The company, which is headquarterd in Armonk, N.Y., operates a manufacturing facility on Industrial Drive in Rocky Mount. Ronile Incorporated was founded by Abe and Elinor Essig in 1984 as a yarn-spinning company. With the acquirement of Colorstrand Corp. and Bacova Guild, Ltd., Ronile has broadened its horizons, adding the production of space-dyed nylon, polyester, acrylic and other fibers for use in numerous types of commercial rugs, carpets and more. The company is employee-owned by more than 700 associates. Jammin Apparel was founded in Tustin, Calif., in 1983. The owners were musicians and developed the company’s initial clothing design concepts during their band’s jam sessions. By 1989 those ideas had evolved to a full-fledged business designed to help individuals, corporations, teams and special events create unique, American-made custom sportswear. Ply Gem Windows is a leading manufacturer of window and door products for residential construction. The company (formerly MW Windows) distributes to vendors up and down the East Coast. Ply Gem’s production facility in Rocky Mount employs approximately 750 workers. 12

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Southern Heritage Homes has provided custom-built modular homes since 1995. The company employs 14 full-time workers and prides itself on its relationship with 25 subcontractors used in various capacities during the completion of each home. Mod-U-Kraf Homes has been manufacturing modular homes since 1971. With a marketing area that stretches across 10 East Coast states, Mod-U-Kraf is one of the leading modular building manufacturers in the nation. The company’s headquarters is in Rocky Mount. Fleetwood Homes provides factory-crafted homes to people across the country. Among the company’s many service and manufacturing locations is its facility in Rocky Mount. Newbold Corporation provides personal identification and retail technology solutions. The privately held company has been most successful in the healthcare market over the past 10 years. Newbold distributes to more than 80 countries worldwide and has its manufacturing facility in Rocky Mount. The Uttermost Company employs approximately 200 workers at its Rocky Mount facility. The company, founded in 1975, is an international distributor of mirrors, metal wall art, lamps, clocks, lighting fixtures and accent accessories.


to reach full electronic integration. “This is a huge deal for us,� said Jacobsen. “We were recognized for reaching stage six of our conversion to electronic medical records. It puts us in the top 2.5 percent of all hospitals in the United States that participate in this conversion.� One of the newest healthcare facilities, Carilion Urgent Care in Westlake, opened in 2009. Three specialty physicians rotate through

the $4 million facility four mornings a week. Roanoke-based cardiologists see patients on Mondays and Wednesdays. CT scans and x-ray machines are also available. With 21 acres of land surrounding the facility, the clinic was designed for expansion. “We know that the clinic will suit the community’s needs for now,� said Jacobsen. “As the support grows, we can grow with it.�

Andie Gibson

ealth and safety are top priorities in Franklin County. The community receives support in these areas through numerous facilities and extensive staffing. Among the county’s many vital health institutions, The Franklin County Health Department encourages healthy living through its programs promoting wellness and disease and disability prevention. The Carilion Franklin Memorial Hospital, located in Rocky Mount, is a 37-bed acute care facility including labor and delivery, surgical care, an intensive care unit, and an adjoining full-spectrum care clinic. Hospital CEO and Carilion Clinic Vice President Bill Jacobsen said the facility was recently recognized by the Healthcare Information Management and Systems Society of the American Hospital Association as one of only 120 national hospitals

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Quality healthcare options H


B U S INE S S

Find your home, sweet home in Franklin County

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ranklin County’s large size, convenient location and history of continuous development offer newcomers a broad range of living opportunities. Here, residents enjoy rolling mountain views provided by the Blue Ridge Mountains, a mild climate and rural landscape, including two beautiful lakes. The charming and historic town of Rocky Mount and the booming area of Westlake Corner are the main commercial centers. The county’s 692 square miles of land include residential living in town, in the country and around Smith Mountain Lake. Rocky Mount Rocky Mount’s approximately 5,000 citizens are right at home with its small-town feel with accessible services. New residents can find affordable apartments and town homes to buy or rent within a couple of miles of shopping areas. Home buyers can easily locate a home with two, three, four or more bedrooms suited to their taste within town limits. The most popular singlefamily homes in Rocky Mount are ranch style and clustered in friendly, safe neighborhoods. Smith Mountain Lake A main attraction to the area, Smith Mountain Lake is highly desirable

and under continuous planning and development. On and off-water lots are tucked away in private settings or stately neighborhoods enhanced by beautiful lake scenery and rich green landscape. Local real estate spans a wide range of accommodations from condominiums to modest contemporaries to million-dollar mansions. Many of the residential buildings near the lake are used as vacation homes or seasonal rentals. Franklin County Countryside Franklin County also offers private rural settings that allow tranquility lovers to remove themselves from the hustle and bustle of town. Newcomers can settle within a few miles of town and still experience all the benefits of the country. Districts like Callaway, Ferrum and Penhook are even more remote. One of the benefits of Franklin County’s countryside is its low cost of living. Comparatively inexpensive acreage is available in abundance, many properties putting no limit to the style or size of residential construction. Suburban splitlevels, generations-old farmhouses, contemporary cottages, cozy ranches, and magnificent Adirondack-style cabins are just a few of the home designs populating the county’s countryside.

Franklin County offers a landuse program and tax relief for the elderly and disabled. Both programs are administered by the office of the Commissioner of the Revenue, which also enforces a 4 percent county meals tax and a 5 percent transient occupancy tax on properties rented on a less-than30-day basis. Both taxes are payable to the county treasurer and are due by the 20th of each month. The office of the Commissioner of the Revenue is online with the Virginia Department of Taxation. Consequently, state income tax returns filed locally are transmitted to Richmond immediately upon receipt. Contact information

State income taxes, personal property taxes, business licenses or tax relief: 540.483.3083 Land use program: 540.483.3084 Real estate: 540.483.3085 Payment of taxes: 540.483.3078 Real Estate Taxes

The following offices will relocate in June 2010 to the new Franklin County Government Center. For the most current rates, please visit the county’s web site at franklincountyva.org. Office of the Commissioner of the Revenue 1255 Franklin St. Rocky Mount, VA 24151 540.483.3083 Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. Office of the County Treasurer 1255 Franklin St. Rocky Mount, VA 24151 540.483.3078 Open Mon.-Fri., 8:30 a.m.- 5 p.m.

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ranklin County is home to plentiful industry, many businesses maintaining considerable success in this convenient, relaxed location. Thanks to the area’s rural, open geography, farming is and has been the profession of choice among natives and newcomers. Bruce Brown, manager of the Virginia Farm Bureau Franklin County Agency, said, “The area retains a vibrant agricultural economy and heritage. It’s a good place to operate an agricultural enterprise.” Select Sires, which meets the need for artificial insemination of cattle, has operated in Franklin County since 1950 and serves 15 East Coast states as part of the Select Sire Federated Coop. “Franklin County is the second

largest cattle county in Virginia, with over 10,000 diary cows grazing its hillsides,” noted Wayne Dudley, the firm’s general manager. “We’re located exactly where we want to be.” Homestead Creamery of Burnt Chimney is also prospering in the county. The family-owned company offers home delivery of its all-organic and hormone-free dairy products to nearby communities. “Milk and eggs on the doorstep is a real convenience for people with busy two-wage-earner lives,” said Jeff Beckner, general manager for the company, which uses milk from cows raised on its two nearby farms. Franklin County’s fields aren’t only good for plants and livestock. When a steady decline hit the tobacco industry a few years ago and healthy

eating increased in popularity, tobacco farmer Johnny Angell and wife Sharon decided to supplement their business by introducing the unlikely industry of aquaculture to their Penhook farm. In order to harvest shrimp in the right conditions, Angell can only grow a crop between mid-May and September. Harvests are scheduled for Saturdays in September. Janie Hopkins, Executive Director of the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce, predicts a bright future for agriculture in the area. “Well-educated young people are opting to stay here and carry on their families’ agricultural traditions,” she said. “That’s a very encouraging sign.”

B U S INE S S

Agriculture a thriving tradition in Franklin County F

franklin county General County Administrator’s Office:

Franklin County Public Library (Rocky Mount): 540.483.3098

1255 Franklin St., Ste. 112, Rocky Mount, VA 24151 Smith Mountain Lake Chamber of Commerce: 540.721.1203, visitsmithmountainlake.com 540.483.3030, franklincountyva.org Town of Rocky Mount: Rescue/Fire/Police: dial 911 540.483.7660, rockymountva.org Sherriff: (non-emergency) Community Partnership for Revitalization (Rocky Mount): 540.489.3825

Carilion Urgent Care-Westlake: 540.719.1815 Franklin County Health Department:

540.484.0292 Free Clinic of Franklin County, Inc.:

540.489.7500 economic development & tourism

Rocky Mount: 540.483.3000 Westlake sub-station: 540.483.3009 Family Resources Dept.: 540.483.5088

historicrockymount.com

Southern Virginia Child Advocacy Center and CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates): 540.484.5566

Department of Motor Vehicles (Rocky Mount): 866.368.5463 Town of Boones Mill: 540.334.5404

Franklin County Chamber of Commerce:

S.T.E.P. Incorporated: 540.483.5142

2150 Sontag Rd., Rocky Mount, VA 24151 540.483.9293, franklincountyva.org

Education

Utilities

Area Agency on Aging: 800.468.4571

Franklin Co. School Board: 540.483.5138

Electricity, Appalachian Power: 800.956.4237

Helping Hands of Franklin County:

Health Care

Water: Rocky Mount: 540.483.5243 Boones Mill: 540.334.5404 Franklin County: 540.483.6660

540.483.9542, franklincounty.org Department of Aging Services: 540.483.9238

540.483.2387 Piedmont Community Services: 540.483.7220 Voter Registration: 540.483.3025

Carilion Franklin Memorial Hospital:

540.483.5277, carilion.com Carilion Health Systems: 800.422.8482

Department of Commerce & Leisure Services:

1255 Franklin St., Ste. 112, Rocky Mount, VA 24151 540.483.6606, franklincountyva.org Tourism / Parks & Recreation:

Sewer, Town of Rocky Mount: 540.483.5243


recreation in franklin county

Lakes and rivers beckon fishermen W

hen it comes to fishing – recreational or professional – it’s hard to beat Franklin County. And with Smith Mountain Lake, Philpott Lake and an abundance of creeks and rivers running throughout, it’s easy to see why. Philpott Lake, located at the south end of the county, is known for its walleye fishery. In fact, the 3,000-acre body of fresh water is unsurpassed by any other reservoir in Virginia in terms of number of fish. The lake is also stocked with largemouth and smallmouth bass, crappie, catfish and sunfish.

The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries works to provide the best fishing experience for anglers. Special attention is given to the management and stocking of striped bass at Smith Mountain Lake, a 20,600-acre lake featuring a number of fishing-friendly amenities. The scenic community park, vacation rental homes, boat rentals and fishing guides make Smith Mountain Lake attainable for those interested in casting a line from a watercraft or from the shoreline. “Smith Mountain Lake provides opportunities to a wide variety

of angler interests, from a casual angler looking for a couple of days relaxation on the water to the intense tournament angler,” said Dan Wilson, fisheries biologist for DGIF. Types of fish found in SML range from basic sunfish to smallmouth, largemouth and striped bass, the lake’s most prized catch. “Smith Mountain Lake is one of the best striped bass fisheries in the country and the current black bass population is doing very well as evident by attracting one of the tournaments in the Bassmaster tournament trail,” added Wilson. Continued on page 18

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Outdoor fun awaits for the adventurous W

Tourism/Special Events Manager for the county, said an added benefit is the abundance of birds and other wildlife that can be viewed along the area’s many trails. Smith Mountain Lake, a reservoir that is 40 miles long and features 500 miles of shoreline, offers residents and visitors a wide variety of outdoor activities, including golf, boating, swimming, fishing, wakeboarding, water-skiing, tubing and parasailing. The 37-acre Smith Mountain Lake Community Park has become a favorite destination for families who enjoy the beach, fishing pier, playground, picnic tables and shelter. There are also 1.7 miles of moderate, kid-friendly trails that run along the scenic lake. Along with the natural recreational amenities in Franklin

County are a few man-made ones. In Rocky Mount, a skate park provides youth and adults a place to skate or roller blade. Weir said residents also rave about a disc golf course located in the Sontag area. “At the Franklin County Recreation Park we have a disc course that rivals those [anywhere] in the state,” Weir said. “That’s a best-kept secret.” For more information about Franklin County’s parks, trails and outdoor recreational opportunities, log on to franklincountyva.org.

Mark Taylor

ith its rolling hills, rocky peaks and numerous bodies of water, Franklin County has an ideal geography for all types of outdoor enthusiasts. The county has more than a dozen parks encompassing over 4,000 acres of outdoor recreation space. Several of the parks provide mountain bikers with abundant trails that incorporate open meadows, creeks and rivers, and excellent training-level grades. Waid Recreation Park, located just outside of Rocky Mount, is the county’s prime location for mountain biking offering seven miles of challenging trails that attract serious riders for fun and competition. For those who enjoy hiking, Franklin County’s varied terrain makes it an ideal spot for people of all experience levels. Debra Weir,

Josh Ashton

 Kayaker Scott Martin navigates Franklin County’s Pigg River.  The Smith Mountain Lake Community Park features a beach, playground, fishing pier and hiking trails.

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orn into slavery in 1856, Booker T. Washington spent the first nine years of his life working on a Franklin County plantation. As an adult, Washington was active in promoting educational opportunities for slaves and founded Tuskegee University in Alabama. Washington’s Franklin County birthplace has been transformed into a national monument devoted to his life and legacy. The park (one of 379 that make up the National Park System) is designed to replicate the plantation where Washington spent his early years and includes cabins, livestock and gardens. Not only is it a tribute to history, but its knowledgeable staff and meticulously kept grounds offer guests a hands-on educational experience. The Booker T. Washington National Monument hosts public tours, clubs, a variety of group programs and numerous educational opportunities for both children and adults. Park Ranger Betsy Haynes said the monument highlights the importance of an education. For more information call 540-721-2094 or visit nps.gov/ bowa/index.htm

Andie Gibson

r e c r e at i o n

National park devoted to the life of Booker T. Washington B

 Top: Booker T. Washington National Monument near Hardy includes several small cabins that existed on the 207-acre tobacco farm where Washington spent the first nine years of his life. Bottom: Volunteers work in the park’s gardens.

Recreation, Continued The Blue Ridge Brawl, a stop on the Bassmasters Elite Series, was first held at Smith Mountain Lake in 2007 and has returned every year since. The event, which is televised on ESPN, attracts professional anglers from around the world, putting Smith Mountain Lake on the map in the sport of fishing.

Indoor Pool & Spa Fitness Center - Meeting Room

Rocky Mount

395 Old Franklin Turnpike, Rocky Mount, VA 24151

Rick Ries

(540) 489-5001

 Professional angler Kevin VanDam, winner of the 2009 Blue Ridge Brawl, shows off his catch at the final weigh-in. 18

F RANKLIN C OUNTY, V i r g i n i a

Email: rockymounthie@ehm-inc.com hiexpress.com/rockymountva


E

Water sport enthusiasts benefit from the Cooper Aquatics Center at the Rocky Mount YMCA. The center has two heated pools, a 25-yard, six-lane lap and competition pool, and a fourfoot-deep program pool for lessons, water exercise and family play. Jessica Johnson, Director of Fitness and Programs, said the aquatics center

Sebastiano stia

ncouraging health and fitness in Franklin County is its double dose of community YMCAs. The county’s first full-service YMCA opened in 1998 in Rocky Mount. And, since two fitness complexes are better than one, a second full-service branch at LakeWatch Plantation near Smith Mountain Lake opened in late 2008. Both locations offer comprehensive fitness and wellness centers, basketball courts, men’s and women’s locker rooms, exercise studios, outdoor recreation and a knowledgeable staff. One of the most popular benefits of the SML YMCA is the indoor tennis and racquetball courts. Program Director Melissa Heft said the facility continues to build programs around tennis, including free children’s clinics to encourage health and fitness in youth.

hosts several water exercise classes per week, a competitive rec swim team, the Franklin County High School swim team and lessons in partnership with the Red Cross. “Our mission statement is, ‘We build strong kids, strong families, strong communities,’� said Johnson.

ď ° The Smith Mountain Lake YMCA

T&T Sporting Apparel

TNSports

“We work hard to make you look good!�

Tina & Tim Angle (owners)

W.E. Skelton 4H Educational Conference Center

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to offer on our website, www.skleton4hcenter.org.

Contact Megan Parker, Conferencing Manager

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r e c r e at i o n

YMCAs aim to build a strong community


r e c r e at i o n

May

Visit franklincountyva.org for the most up-to-date event information.

Historic Preservation Tours

540-483-1890 • franklincountyvirginiahistoricalsoc.org

Festival in the Pines (Bluegrass)

540-483-9839 • tripplecreek.com

Smith Mountain Lake Corporate Golf Cup

540-721-1203 • visitsmithmountainlake.com

Tom Maynard Memorial Poker Run

540-721-1203 • visitsmithmountainlake.com

Take Pride in Smith Mountain Lake Clean-Up

540-721-1203 • visitsmithmountainlake.com

Footlights of the Blue Ridge (Bluegrass)

540-489-3825 • historicrockymount.com

June Pigg River Ramble Weekend

540-483-9292 • visitfranklincountyva.com

Franklin County Chamber Business Expo

540-483-9542 • franklincounty.org

Juneteenth Celebration at Booker T. Washington National Monument

540-721-2094 • nps.gov/bowa

Retail Merchants Fun Festival & Auction

540-483-9211

Footlights of the Blue Ridge (Bluegrass)

540-489-3825 • historicrockymount.com

Southwest Virginia Antique Farm Days

540-483-0442 • visitfranklincountyva.com

July Rocky Mount Rotary Independence Festival

540-483-9293 • visitfranklincountyva.com

Smith Mountain Lake Fireworks Celebration

540-721-1203 • visitsmithmountainlake.com

Footlights of the Blue Ridge (Bluegrass)

540-489-3825 • historicrockymount.com

August Footlights of the Blue Ridge (Bluegrass)

540-489-3825 • historicrockymount.com

Warren Street Festival

540-483-5773 • visitfranklincountyva.com

September Smith Mountain Lake Wine Festival

540-721-1203 • visitsmithmountainlake.com

Smith Mtn. Lake Antique & Classic Boat Show

540-721-1203 • visitsmithmountainlake.com

Boones Mill Apple Festival

540-334-1578 • boonesmillapplefestival.com

Footlights of the Blue Ridge (Bluegrass)

540-489-3825 • historicrockymount.com

October Blue Ridge Folklife Festival

540-365-4416 • blueridgeinstitute.org

Blue Ridge Autumn Days Festival

540-483-9293 • franklincountyva.org/parks

Historic Preservation Ghost Tours

540-483-1890 • franklincountyvirginiahistoricalsoc.org

Footlights of the Blue Ridge (Bluegrass)

540-489-3825 • historicrockymount.com

Smith Mountain Lake Charity Home Tour

540-297-8687 • smlcharityhometour.com

November Smith Mountain Lake Fall Chili Festival

540-721-1203 • visitsmithmountainlake.com

Court House Tree Lighting

540-483-9542 • franklincounty.org

Virginia Dare Flotilla for Toys at SML

540-297-7100 • visitsmithmountainlake.com

December

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F RANKLIN C OUNTY, V i r g i n i a

Come Home to Franklin County Christmas

540-483-9542 • franklincounty.org

Rocky Mount Christmas Parade

540-483-9211

Westlake Tree Lighting

540-721-5288 • westlaketownecenter.com


operate,” said Ellmore. “Soon, we’re opening an indoor shooting sports complex that can be used for archery, air rifle and public-safety training.” A new addition Ellmore is particularly proud of is a flag plaza designed to recognize all five branches of the military. It will serve to connect the center with Virginia Tech’s military roots. “It will be a patio area with new flag poles and plaques to honor the military and tie in to the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets. The area will be great for group assemblies and gatherings,” he said. “It’s important to note that anyone who rents our facilities is helping underwrite our educational programs, which helps kids in this region.” For more information about the 4-H Center, call 540-721-2759 or visit skelton4hcenter.org.

Franklin County consists of 692.1 square miles of land and 9.5 square miles of water, making it the seventh largest county in Virginia. Altitude varies from 900 feet above sea level to more than 3,200 feet. The highest point is Cahas Mountain, near the Blue Ridge Parkway. Altitude in the Town of Rocky Mount ranges from 1,200 feet to 1,420. Three-fourths of the county is level to rolling. Source: Office of the County Administrator

Climate Average January high: 46.9° F Average January low: 26.6° F Average July high: 86.2° F Average July low: 64° F Mean Annual Temperature: 55.9° F Average annual rainfall: 44 inches Average annual snowfall: 15.6 inches Average relative humidity: 65% Average growing season: 180 days Average dates for frost-free nights: April 20 – Oct. 16 Sources: Southeast Regional Climate Center, U.S. Department of Agriculture

Highway Travel Distances

Ted Pratt

ne of the true recreational and educational jewels of Franklin County is the W.E. Skelton 4-H Educational Conference Center. A cooperative facility run by Virginia Tech, the center is much more than a summer camp facility for youth. Its 120-acre layout holds well over 20,000 square feet of meeting and classroom space, hotel-style accommodations, pavilions, computer and multi-media labs, a catering service, outdoor amphitheater and sprawling lakeside landscape. Visitors of all ages can participate in year-long programs and events at the 4-H Center. Primarily, the facility provides youth with educational and recreational summer camp sessions, an excellent community asset. In addition, the center is also a prime location for family reunions, business meetings, company retreats, weddings and adult education programs. Executive Director Roger Ellmore said the facility is continually upgrading and improving its facilities. “We’ve begun construction on a 7,200-square-foot welcome center featuring a state-of-the-art board room and administrative offices that will really change the way we

Courtesy of the W.E. Skelton 4-H Educational Conference Center

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r e c r e at i o n

Opportunities abound for adults and kids at 4-H Center by the

City Miles Atlanta, GA....................... 445 Baltimore, MD.................. 272 Charleston, WV................. 225 Charlotte, NC.................... 190 Chicago, IL........................ 700 Columbus, OH.................. 375 Knoxville, TN................... 290 Lexington, KY................... 385 Nashville, TN.................... 465 New York, NY................... 505 Norfolk, VA....................... 225 Pittsburg, PA...................... 365 Raleigh, NC....................... 145 Richmond, VA................... 170 Roanoke, VA........................ 30 Washington, DC................ 220

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arts & entertainment in franklin county

A musical heritage beyond compare n Franklin County, music is as rooted into the local culture as the sprouting farmlands. Not only does it present an abundance of talented musicianship, it also offers a rich legacy. Depending which direction you’re traveling, Franklin County is either the first or last stop on a wondrous, 250-mile musical journey. The trip takes you through the Appalachian Mountains, from the western slopes of the Blue Ridge to the coalfields region, and brings you face to face with the region’s musical legacy – bluegrass, gospel, folk and mountain music. The route that makes up this trek is called the Virginia Heritage Music Trail, aptly nicknamed The Crooked Road, and it leads to archives, memorabilia and exhibits that tell how “roots” music was born and how it has thrived for generations. It also invites the traveler to sit down with local musicians and soak up the ambiance. Your first stop in Franklin County should be the Community and Hospitality Center in downtown Rocky Mount. A kiosk in the center, which also houses the Franklin County Chamber of Commerce, provides more information on The Crooked Road, which winds through 10 counties. Next, you’ll want to head west to the Blue Ridge Institute & Museum on the campus of Ferrum College. For more 22

F RANKLIN C OUNTY, V i r g i n i a

than 30 years, the museum has documented and interpreted the cultural traditions and folkways of the Blue Ridge region. The facility is open year-round Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sundays 1-4 p.m. mid-May through mid-August. Admission is free. If it’s live music you prefer, Franklin County won’t disappoint. On almost any given day you can enjoy the toetapping, thigh-slapping sound of some of the best bluegrass around – from a variety of jamming individuals to bands with scheduled stage performances. For dates, locations, directions and more information, visit blueridgemusic.org and click on “Search.” Franklin County is in Region 4. Schedules may change so it’s best to call ahead to confirm performances.  The Rocky Mount Community and Hospitality Center is the eastern gateway to The Crooked Road.

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ne glance at the extensive musical heritage of Franklin County and it is apparent that talented musicianship is a county staple. The grass-roots character of the area is easily heard in the variety of groups rooted here. One of the most noteworthy accomplishments is the rise of The Clark Brothers, former Rocky Mount residents who won the top spot on Fox’s reality television show “The Next Great American Band” in 2007. Since then, band members and brothers Adam, Ashley and Austin Clark have changed the group’s name to Sons of Sylvia and are taking their sound – a fusion of country, rock, bluegrass and gospel – on the road in 2010 to tour with country superstar Carrie Underwood. The Harwell Grice Band, a group whose members hail from Franklin County, was formed seven years ago at Radford University. The group began

Jerry Hale

Musicians’ stars are on the rise O

 The Johnathan Dillon Band

playing locally at bars, parties, weddings and festivals but has progressed to joining the likes of Larry Keel, Seldom Scene, Tony Rice, Blue Highway and Chatham County Line. The Wright Kids learned to play musical instruments and sing before they could read. Many will remember the talented siblings from the NBC television show “America’s Got Talent,” which they appeared on in 2008. Sage, Baruch, Levi

Wright have added little sister Selah to the group, which performs regularly around the region. Johnathan Dillon is a 15-year-old Wirtz resident making a name for himself around the area. Dillon, a bluegrass prodigy who plays mandolin, fiddle, guitar, bass and banjo, fronts The Johnathan Dillon Band. The group plays around the region, including a regular open jam on Wednesday nights at 504 Wray’s Chapel Road near Rocky Mount. Live music fans in Southwest Virginia have been entertained by the Franklin County-based group Barefoot West since 2007. The rock/reggae artists perform frequently at venues around Rocky Mount, Smith Mountain Lake, Roanoke and beyond. The band, which includes Kyle Forry, Corey Hunley, Ryan Greer, Justin Arnett and Chance Taylor, will release its debut album in 2010.

New initiative to assist SW Virginia artists

Blue Ridge Insitute preserves area culture

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F

mong the newest artisan initiatives in Southwest Virginia is Round the Mountain, a group whose aim is to assist local artists through education and marketing and develop the region as a major cultural and heritage tourism destination. Comprised of 200 members from 19 counties, the group has been developing membership and venue space for artists of all kinds. Executive Director Diana Blackburn said she’s also looking forward to completing the Artisan Trails of Southwest Virginia, a network of driving trails that connects visitors to studios, galleries, agri-tourism businesses and creative points of interest throughout the region. “Five trails are now completed and the remaining 10 are in various stages of completion,” she said. Also under construction is Heartwood, a 29,000-squarefoot facility that will showcase craft, culture, music and natural assets of Southwest Virginia. The facility, on eight acres adjacent to Virginia Highlands Community College in Abingdon, is slated to open in the spring of 2011. For more information, visit roundthemountain.org or heartwoodvirginia.org.

rom music to folklore to artifacts, every distinct culture has its treasures. And where there is treasure, there are devoted collectors. The Blue Ridge Institute and Museum, located on the campus of Ferrum College in Ferrum, is a treasure chest of Blue Ridge history. Exhibits range from vintage trucks carting illegal moonshine, to musical instruments, to hand worked quilts, woven baskets and rustic artifacts. Roddy Moore, director of the facility, said the most intriguing part of the history of the Blue Ridge Mountains is the people and their music. “There’s no better way to meet people than through their music. If you go to a bluegrass concert you’ll find the local people friendly, warm and eager to teach you about their community,” said Moore, who has been preserving the culture, art and music of the Blue Ridge for 37 years. The BRI galleries are open year-round Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. They are also open Sundays 1-5 p.m. mid-May through mid-August. Admission is free. For more information, visit blueridgeinstitute.org and thecrookedroad. org/BRInstitute.htm. w w w . F RANKLIN C OUNTY VA . o r g

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arolyn Rogers first observed traditional glass blowing during a demonstration at Colonial Williamsburg while on a school field trip. Rogers, who grew up in Franklin County, had never seen anything like it. Her interest in the enchanting art form was piqued. After high school, Rogers attended The University of the Arts in Philadelphia where she had her first opportunity to work with glass. Rogers said she was immediately hooked. “It turned out that once I picked up a blow pipe, I never wanted to put it down,” she said. Rogers went on to hone her skills at Pilchuck Glass School in Stanwood, Wash., a facility where she said glass blowers from all over the country congregate to learn from the masters. Rogers has now completed her training and returned home to Franklin County to begin an art career. In the summer of 2010 she and her mother, Joan Rogers, will open The Grainery, a studio in downtown Rocky Mount that will feature work from a variety of artists. Carolyn Rogers, who described her pieces as “pop surrealist,” said she’s looking forward to bringing traditional glass blowing to residents of Franklin County. She remembers how she was first inspired in the arts and

Roads: U.S. 220 is a divided four lane north/ south highway that links I-81, 25 miles to the north, with I-85 and I-40, 74 miles to the south. VA 40 bisects the county east/west. Rail: Norfolk-Southern Corporation operates a main line north and south through the county: The line links the Franklin County/Rocky Mount area with the nation’s major population centers and the port of Hampton Roads. Motor freight carriers: More than 30 major f reight carriers are authorized to serve the Franklin County/Rocky Mount area. Commercial air service: Roanoke Regional Airport: 30 miles north of Rocky Mount, 540-362-1999, roanokeairport.com

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hopes to do the same for the children who will visit her studio. “I really want to bring [glass blowing] to the kids here,” she said. “Some kids don’t know what’s out there and I can show them.” The Grainery will be open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 11-7. For more information, e-mail thegrainery@hotmail.com.

Kim Dillon

a r t s & e n t e r ta i n m e n t

Artist’s talent will blow you away

Blue Ridge Regional Airport - Martinsville, 30 miles south of Rocky Mount. 5000-foot runway, 276-957-2291 Telephone: CenturyLink:, 800-366-8201, centurylink.com Print Media: Franklin News-Post: Tri-weekly newspaper 540-483-5113, thefranklinnewspost.com The Roanoke Times: Daily newspaper 800-346-1234, roanoke.com Martinsville Bulletin: Newspaper (Sun.-Fri.) 276-638-8801, martinsvillebulletin.com

Radio: WYTI-AM 1570: Rocky Mount, Traditional country/bluegrass/gospel, 540-483-9955 WZBB-FM 99.9 Super Country: Rocky Mount, 540-489-9999 WSLK-AM 880: Oldies music and SML community news. 540.297.7880, wslk880.com WBLT-AM 1350: Bedford ESPN sports talk, 434-942-1064 In addition, most Roanoke, Lynchburg and Martinsville stations are received throughout Franklin County.

Smith Mountain Eagle: Weekly newspaper 540-719-5100, smithmountaineagle.com

Cable TV: JetBroadband, 877-743-8538

Lynchburg Regional Airport: 55 miles east of Rocky Mount, 434-455-6090, lynchburgva.gov

Laker Weekly: Weekly newspaper 540-721-4675, smithmountainlake.com

Piedmont Triad International Airport: Greensboro, N.C., 70 miles south of Rocky Mount, 336-665-5600, flyfrompti.com Smith Mountain Lake Airport: Moneta, 25 miles east of Rocky Mount. 3,500-foot runway, 540-297-4500

Smith Mountain Laker: Bi-monthly magazine 540-721-4675, smithmountainlake.com

Network TV: ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS & FOX Affiliates from Roanoke and Lynchburg are well received in the county

F RANKLIN C OUNTY, V i r g i n i a

Discover Smith Mountain Lake: Quarterly magazine, 540-772-1868, discoversml.com

Satellite TV: Direct TV, 888-777-2454, www.directtv.com Dish Network, 888-825-2557, dishnetwork.com


shoppingin& dining franklin county

Shopping & Dining

J & J Fashions

Kim Dillon

A family tradition

S

heila Copenhaver remembers when her mother, Jewell Hunt, and aunt, Juanita Plybon, first opened J & J Fashions in Rocky Mount 44 years ago. She was 13. “I would get off the bus and come into the store and fold jeans,” Copenhaver said with a laugh. “I would do anything to just stay in the store.”. Copenhaver’s time spent organizing clothes and jewelry helped her develop a keen eye for design. After earning a degree in business management and marketing from Virginia Western Community College, Copenhaver married and moved with her husband to Germany where she worked in retail and designed for a furrier. Later, while living in Paris, she continued to study design. The education and work experience has paid off for Copenhaver, who took over the reigns of J & J Fashions in 2009. She said her training made it easy to step into the role of business owner, and she continues to offer the same high-quality service the store’s loyal customers have come to expect. While J & J Fashions offers “off the rack” sales at its location in historic downtown Rocky Mount, staff

members also act as personal shoppers. “We shop all the major markets, in Atlanta, New York, Dallas, Las Vegas,” Copenhaver said. “We hand pick everything that we buy and don’t carry anything that department stores carry. All of our sales ladies have been trained and are professional shoppers.” Over the years, J & J Fashions has earned a reputation for service and style that extends well beyond the borders of Franklin County. Copenhaver said the majority of the store’s clientele come in from out of the area. She matches jewelry, purses and shoes with the clothes they sell in the store so that shopping is easy and successful for each customer. Copenhaver said she is happy to be continuing the family tradition at J & J Fashions, and the connection may not end there. Her daughter, Victoria, is a student at Liberty University, majoring in retail and design. J & J Fashions is located at 275 Franklin Street. The store is open Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday 9-5. For more information, call 540-483-9530. w w w . F RANKLIN C OUNTY VA . o r g

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From country cooking to fine dining, you can find it all in Franklin County

W

hether you eat out once in awhile or on a regular basis you won’t have any trouble finding something in Franklin County to satisfy your palate. From an elegant lakeside experience to a home-style meal that’s sure to stick to your ribs, our restaurants offer a little taste of everything. Ippy’s Restaurant first opened under the name “Uncle Toms and Gun Shop” in 1919 on Franklin Road in Roanoke. From the start, the restaurant drew loyal customers and became well-known for its barbecue, spare ribs and onion rings. Originally owned by Thomas “Uncle Tom” Michael Thomas, the restaurant became a popular spot for families to congregate. As Thomas’s family grew, so did the restaurant. When Thomas’s son Ippy took over decades later, the restaurant changed its name and its location, moving to Rocky Mount in Franklin County. For the past 91 years, Ippy’s has definitely kept it in the family. Not only are the owners members of the Thomas family but menu items are named after them as well. “Sheila’s Petite Filet, which is named after my mother, is the best-seller,” said Jo Dee Jeans, one of the owners. With tantalizing dishes such as Tommy’s Choice Ribeye, Mama Jo’s Alfredo and Jean’s own Jo Dee Shore Shrimp, patrons can’t help but feel as though they are dining with Ippy and Uncle Tom themselves. Jeans noted that the owners have been careful to keep some original items on the menu that first made the restaurant popular – spare ribs and hand-battered onion rings. Uncle Tom’s famous barbecue returns regularly as a daily special. But it’s not all about tradition at Ippy’s. In an effort to keep up with the times, the restaurant’s owners recently created a Facebook fan page and have started scheduling live music for the weekends. Rocky Mount’s Edible Vibe Café describes itself as a “local gathering place for worldly people.” Local artwork is displayed and rotated on a monthly basis. Thinking outside Kim Dillon

S H O P P IN G & DININ G

Let’s Eat!

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the box, owner John Schopp has included whittlers, fused glass artists, candle artists and potters. Food selections include small plates, traditional tapas, and soul food recipes from around the world. Schopp also runs Center Stage Catering, which has satisfied the appetites of many famous entertainers. Brooks and Dunn, Wynton Marsalis, Joan Baez, Herbie Hancock and Kenny Chesney are just a few who have enjoyed Schopp’s food at Roanoke’s Jefferson Center. The Hub Restaurant, a 75-year-old establishment in downtown Rocky Mount, is a cherished icon in Franklin County. Residents have long loved the quaint and friendly diner-style restaurant, making it one of the most wellknown eateries in the area. Owner Tammy Harrell said she and husband Ricky, along with co-owners Richard and Teresa Harrell, Ricky’s parents, bought the restaurant in October 2009. At The Hub, customers can enjoy menu items such as hamburgers, steak, spaghetti and the popular all-day breakfast. The Franklin County dining scene wouldn’t be the same without its busy Applebee’s restaurant. The Rocky Mount location, which has been serving the area for about 5 years, features a full-service bar and several televisions broadcasting various sporting events. The Franklin County franchise is often involved in giving back to the community, hosting numerous fundraising events throughout the year. Members of the Arrington family, long-time county residents, have established several popular franchises in and around Rocky Mount. The parent company, Arrington Enterprises, was started by L.D. and Ruth Arrington more than 45 years ago. The restaurateurs oversee three Dairy Queen franchises and three BoJangles locations in Franklin County. Located between Rocky Mount and Boones Mill on U.S. 220 is the Fisherman’s Galley II, a spacious restaurant that serves fresh seafood in a relaxed, casual atmosphere. The fast, friendly service makes Fisherman’s Galley a favorite among county residents. Continued on page 27


Let’s Eat,

n Franklin County, residents and visitors are fortunate to have access to two thriving farmers’ markets. The Rocky Mount Farmers’ Market, though open all year with a small number of winter vendors, draws crowds April through October with sales of fresh produce, crafts and quilts. It operates Monday through Saturday from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For an ice cream treat you’ll never forget, visit the Homestead Creamery in Burnt Chimney. The family owned and operated store serves 25 flavors of ice cream plus sundaes and milkshakes – all made with milk processed from the owners’ local dairy farm. Yogurt, butter and flavored milk are also available. The Westlake Golf & Country Club is located in a beautifully restored farmhouse near Westlake Corner. The restaurant serves lunch daily with a variety of soups, salads and sandwiches. Banquet and meeting facilities are also available.

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In existence for 11 years, the locale has transformed into a marketplace, gathering place and live entertainment venue. Local groups use the downtown pavilion as a location for everything from music concerts to fundraising barbecues to awards ceremonies. Near Smith Mountain Lake, adjacent to a major shopping area, the Westlake Farmers’ Market operates May through the second week in

October on Saturday mornings from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Continued

In addition to these noted establishments, Franklin County offers a variety of other fine dining, family style and ethnic dining options. To learn more, check out the grid on the next page.

LOCALLY GROWN IN FRANKLIN COUNTY Showcasing Fine Fashions In Downtown Rocky Mount

The destination ladies drive for miles to shop. The latest in apparel, jewelry & gifts • All-Natural Milk • Fresh Churned Butter • Premium Ice Cream cones, sundaes, shakes

• Tours by Appointment • Fresh Produce • All-Natural Angus Beef • All-Natural Pork • Premium Made-to-Order Ice Cream Cakes • Homemade Jellies HOURS VARY WITH SEASON Please call for up-to-date hours

HOMESTEAD CREAMERY 7254 Booker T. Washington Hwy, Wirtz, VA

540-721-2045

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S H O P P IN G AND DI n IN G

Farmers’ markets thrive in 2 locations


S H O P P IN G & DININ G

In addition to a array of fast-food locations and national restaurant chains such as Applebee’s, Franklin County offers a variety of unique local dining options. Following is a selection of restaurants you’re sure to find enjoyable whether you’re looking for an intimate meal with gourmet cuisine or a casual spot to take the whole family. Bon appetit!

fine dining The Blackwater Cafe 4730 Scruggs Rd., Moneta

540.721.4333 Lunch, Dinner theblackwatercafe.com

Fine dining, casual grille, outdoor deck. Fresh seafood and certified angus beef. Non-smoking. Reservations recommended.

Ippy’s Restaurant 540.489.5600 Lunch, Dinner 1760 N. Main St., Rocky Mount ippysrestaurant.com

Since 1919, Ippy’s has served diners in Rocky Mount with great steaks, seafood, ribs, soup, sandwiches and more.

Jonathan’s Restaurant 50 First Watch Drive, Moneta

540.719.1212 Lunch, Dinner jonathansatsml.com

A variety of cuisine in a cosmpolitan atmosphere. Sandwiches, salads, steaks, burgers, seafood and kid’s menu. Full bar.

The Landing Restaurant 773 Ashmeade Rd., Moneta

540.721.3028 thelandingsml.com

Upscale nouveau cuisine in a lakeside setting. Steaks, salads, seafood and casual bar menu. Reservations recommended.

Lunch, Dinner, Sunday Brunch

deli / coffee / ice cream Daily Grind Coffeehouse 285 S. Main St., Rocky Mount

540.483.2233 dailygrindunwind.com

Breakfast, Lunch, Coffee

Specialty coffees, teas, smoothies and other beverages. Bakery items, sandwiches, wraps, paninis, desserts.

Edible Vibe Cafe 315 Franklin St., Rocky Mount

540.489.7827 centerstagefood.com

Breakfast, Lunch, Coffee

Fresh salads, sandwiches and more in an eclectic downtown setting. Coffee and specialty drinks. Extensive catering.

Snacks, Desserts

Ice cream and other treats made from local milk processed from the owners’ Franklin County dairy farm.

Homestead Creamery 540.721.2045 B.T. Washington Hwy., Burnt Chimney Mango’s Bar & Grill 16430 B.T. Washington Hwy.,

540.721.1632 Lunch, Dinner mangosbarandgrill.com

Moosie’s Restaurant 540.721.5255 Lunch, Dinner 16430 B.T. Washington Hwy., Moneta

Sandwiches, steaks and seafood with a tropical twist Live music most weekends throughout the summer. Large selection of fresh sandwiches, burgers and salads. Located on Smith Mountain Lake. bridgewaterplaza.com

No Bologna & Fish on the Fly 540.721.1414 13850 B.T. Washington Hwy., Westlake

Lunch, Early Dinner Freshly prepared deli sandwiches. Takeout seafood market. Fresh fish, clams, shrimp, lobster and more.

Solid Ground Coffee & Tea 540.721.3737 96 Builder’s Pride Dr., Westlake

Breakfast, Lunch, Coffee

Sandwiches, salads, soups, bagels, pastries and specialty coffee drinks in a comfortable atmosphere. Wi-fi access

mexican

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Cancun Mexican Grill 540.719.2884 Lunch, Dinner 13383 B.T. Washington Hwy. , Westlake

Authentic Mexican food in a casual atmospher. Recenlty remodeled. Dine in or take out.

El Rodeo 540.483.0288 Lunch, Dinner 35 Meadow View Ave., Rocky Mount

Authentic Mexican cuisine. Lunch specials. Dine in or carry out. Satellite TV for sporting events.

El Torito Del Lago 540.721.3821 Lunch, Dinner 50 First Watch Drive, Westlake

Fresh salsa and chips, burritos, fajitas, tacos and other original Mexican dishes. Mariachi band once a month.

Los Tres Amigos 540.489.7940 Lunch, Dinner 430 Tanyard Rd., Rocky Mount

Traditional Mexican food in a friendly atmosphere. Tacos, burritos, fajitas, enchiladas and more.

Mexico Viejo 540.719.1000 Lunch, Dinner 400 Crazy Horse Dr., Moneta

Mexican grill and cantina at Crazy Horse Marina on Smith Mountain Lake. Steak, chicken, seafood. Dine in or take out.

F RANKLIN C OUNTY, V i r g i n i a


S H O P P IN G AND DININ G

asian China City 540.484.6967 Lunch, Dinner 675 N. Main St., Rocky Mount able.

A buffet restaurant serving traditional Chinese favorites. Appetizers, lunch specials, combo plates. Take out avail-

Chopsticks Chinese & Sushi 540.721.8839 Lunch, Dinner 16440 B.T. Washington Hwy., Moneta

A large selection of Chinese cuisine and sushi in a family atmosphere with views of Smith Mountain Lake.

Min’s China City 540.721.2646 Lunch, Dinner 400 Scruggs Rd., Moneta

Choose from an extensive menu or from the lunch or dinner buffets. Dine in or take out.

Panda Garden 540.489.7111 948 Tanyard Rd., Rocky Mount

Traditional Chinese food in a friendly atmosphere.

Lunch, Dinner

italian Frank’s Pizza 540.483.7464 Lunch, Dinner 390 Tanyard Road, Rocky Mount

Pizza, subs and Italian specialties.

Hema’s 540.483.2713 Lunch, Dinner 115 Franklin St., Rocky Mount

Family-style Italian restaurant featuring pizza, calzones and other Italian specialties. Across from the train depot.

Joe’s Pizza & Italian Restaurant 540.721.2234 130 Scruggs Rd., Moneta

Lunch, Dinner, Sunday Buffet

Pizza, stromboli, calzone, subs and salads. Buffet or menu. New location at Westlake Corner features Tuscan decor.

La Trattoria Italian Restaurant 540.576.3004 11960 Old Franklin Tpke., Union Hall

Lunch, Dinner, Sunday Buffet

Traditioanl Italian fare in a casual atmosphere. Located off Rt. 40 on the south side of Smith Mountain Lake.

Pizza King 540.483.0360 Lunch, Dinner 925 N. Main St., Rocky Mount

A variety of pizzas served in a casual setting. Burgers, sandwiches and salads also available. Delivery offered.

Pizza Pub 540.721.1234 Lunch, Dinner 16430 B.T. Washington Hwy., Moneta

Pizza, subs an appetizers on Smith Mountain Lake. Dine indoors or on the lakeside patio. bridgewaterplaza.com

family dining Fisherman’s Galley II 540.483.3474 Lunch, Dinner 17890 Virgil H. Goode Hwy., Rocky Mount

Fresh seafood in a casual atmosphere. Spacious areas perfect for intimate dining or large groups.

Franklin Restaurant 540.483.5601 20221 Virgil H. Goode Hwy., Rocky Mount

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Southern-style home-cooked meals in a family-oriented atmosphere. Across from Plateau Plaza on Rt. 220.

Hub Restaurant 540.483.9303 245 N. Main St., Rocky Mount

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Breakfast served all day. Lunch and dinner items include sandwiches, BBQ, burgers, salads, steak and shrimp.

Old Oak Cafe 540.719.3388 400 Scruggs Rd., Suite 900, Westlake

Breakfast, Lunch

Lunch items include sandwiches, burgers, salad bar. Breakfast served all day. Casual, kid-friendly atmosphere.

Our Kitchen 540.365.7800 9238 Franklin St., Ferrum

Full-Service Catering

Southern-style home-cooked meals catered for parties, weddings, meetings and more. Breakfast, lunch and dinner.

77 Restaurant 540.365.7197 4477 Timberline Rd., Ferrum

Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner

Southern-style cooking in a casual atmosphere. Bluegrass music on select evenings. Call for details.

Westlake Golf & Country Club 540.721.4215 360 Chestnut Creek Dr., Hardy golfthewestlake.com

Lunch, Fri. Dinner Buffet

Soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers and more in a friendly setting. Lunch daily 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Extensive Friday buffet. w w w . F RANKLIN C OUNTY VA . o r g

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in franklin county history

10,000 B.C. mid 1700s A.D.: Native Americans live on the land that will become Franklin County. 1740s: Pioneers traveled the Carolina Road to settle in what would become Franklin County. The first known white settler to build a permanent home was Robert Hill circa 1743. 1773: Iron manufacturing begins in area marking arrival of major industry 1786: Franklin County is formed from parts of Bedford and Henry counties and is named for Benjamin Franklin. 1780s-1851: Washington Iron Works thrives as a major industry.

1816: Jubal Anderson Early born in Red Valley section of county; became Confederate general. 1856: Booker Taliaferro Washington born near Hales Ford; later founded Tuskegee Institute and became an advisor to Presidents 1880: Steel rails open up a new world. Franklin and Pittsylvania Railroad begin serving Rocky Mount. A turntable in Rocky Mount sent the engine back to Gretna. 1889-1982: Roanoke and Southern Railway Company begins southerly route from Roanoke to Winston- Salem, N.C. It was leased by N&W Railroad Company. Norfolk & Western Rail Road reorganizes as N&W Railway; begins regular operations on the Shenandoah Line from Roanoke to Winston –Salem, consolidating in 1982 with Southern Railway to form Norfolk Southern Corporation.

1951: 2,880-acre Philpott Lake is filled, realizing its full potential in 1953 when the dam project went on line. 1966: 30,600-acre Smith Mountain lake is filled, giving the county its nickname of “Land between the Lakes” 1986: Franklin County celebrates its bicentennial. 1997: National-model Gereau Center for Applied Technology and Career Exploration opens, named for former county public schools superintendent Leonard Gereau. 2007: Franklin County enters global economy with the opening of Germanbased McAirlaid’s Vliesstoffe in the Commerce Center.

franklin county map

Bernard’s Landing Resort and Conference Center . 540.721.8870 Blue Ridge Institute and Farm Museum ................. 540.365.4416 Blue Ridge Parkway .............................................. 828.298.0398 Booker T. Washington National Monument .......... 540.721.2094 Community Partnership for Revitalization . .......... 540.483.3825 Fairy Stone State Park ........................................... 540.930.2424 Ferrum College....................................................... 540.365.2121 Franklin County Administration ........................... 540.483.3030 The Franklin Center .............................................. 540.483.0179 Franklin County Chamber of Commerce ............... 540.483.9542 Franklin County Historical Society ........................ 540.483.1890 Franklin County Economic Development .............. 540.483.3030 Franklin County Public Schools . ........................... 540.483.5138 Franklin County Tourism/Parks and Recreation ..... 540.483.9293 Franklin County Retail Merchants ........................ 540.483.9211 Philpott Lake Recreation Areas ............................. 540.629.2703 Phoebe Needles Conference Center ........................ 540.483.1518 Rocky Mount Community & Hospitality Center (Depot) ..................................... 540.483.0948 Smith Mountain Lake 4-H Conference Center ....... 540.721.2759 Smith Mountain Lake State Park ........................... 540.297.6066 Smith Mountain Lake Visitor Center & Chamber of Commerce .......................................... 540.721.1203 Town of Boones Mill .............................................. 540.334.5404 Town of Rocky Mount ........................................... 540.483.7660 Rocky Mount Farmers’ Market . ....... (Space Rental)540.483.9211 (Special Events & Parks) 540.483.0907


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2010 Franklin County Chamber Guide  
2010 Franklin County Chamber Guide  

A guide to Franklin County Virginia. With a focus on educational, business, recreational and shopping opportunites. And much more.

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