Old Whitgiftian News 2017-18

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WHITGIFTIAN ASSOCIATION

Old Whitgiftian News 2017-2018 “Quod et hunc in annum vivat et plures”


W HITG IFTIAN A SSOCIATION 2017-18

President:: Dr Richard Bateman Senior Vice-President and President for 2017-18: Lord David Freud Committee Chairman: Jonathan Bunn Deputy Chairman: Pip Burley Hon Treasurer: Andrew Gayler Elected Members: Richard Blundell, Dr Sam Barke, David Stranack, Stuart Woodrow, Peter Ellis, Nick Somers, Yeboah Mensa-Dikka

Editor of OW Newsletter: Richard Blundell Editor of OW News: Nigel Platts Design & Production: Pip Burley

THE WHITGIFTIAN ASSOCIATION

Iconic Images” by Valerieria Duca H A L I N G P A R K , S O U T H C R O Y D O N , C R 2 Left: 6 Y “Two T (Courtesy: T E L : + 4 4 ( 0 ) 2 0 8 6 3 3 9 9 2 6 e - m a i l : o f f i c e @ w h i t g i f t i a n a s s o c i a t i o n . c oChristine . u k Burley)


From the Editor

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‘The Celebration of Whitgift Life’, 2017 attended by HRH The Duke of York - Honorary OW meets President, Dr Richard Bateman Photography by Danny Fitzpatrick (1987-93), DFphotography.co.uk

HIS is the twelfth edition of Old Whitgiftian News and it takes us through the Whitgiftian Association and School year from March/April 2017 to the first quarter of 2018. OWs with an interest in regular information on the School’s progress should also look at the magazine Whitgift Life, which is accessible on the School website (www.whitgift.co.uk). We have said farewell to Christopher Barnett and welcomed his successor Chris Ramsey. As I said last year, the final year of the Barnett headmastership was no period of hibernation: it was another year of remarkable achievement – the culmination of an extraordinary period. Chris Ramsey has taken over a thriving school, which has achievements of an astonishingly high level in every field of activity. Music and drama have never been of a higher standard, in 2017 the School was again the leading boys’ school in the country in the International Baccalaureate and, throughout the new Headmaster’s first two terms, sporting success has been outstanding with national titles in cricket, rugby, hockey, tetrathlon and table tennis and numerous individuals reaching international recognition. Again, and despite enormous competition and high fees, entrance exams attracted record numbers. There is much justified goodwill for the School among alumni and an increasing interest in offering tangible support to the provision of bursaries – this edition of WA News records several reunions and dinners and familiar events missing from this year - Sportsman’s lunch which had to be cancelled when Dulwich dropped out of the scheduled fixture because of a cup commitment (by the way, for those who are interested, of all senior school rugby teams that played Dulwich only the 3rd XV and the Under 14 D XV lost, there was one draw and all the others won!), and Drinks in the City - are on the agenda for 2018. I leave comment on Dr Christopher Barnett’s last WA Dinner to D omin ic Edwar ds (1988-96), not only an OW but also a member of the School staff and a Housemaster: “When you are a retiring Headmaster, you end up giving a lot of speeches; the overriding theme of Dr Barnett was undeniably his unquenchable passion for everything that is Whitgift. When addressing the WA at the annual dinner last May at The Royal College of Surgeons, he defied expectations by speaking not about the school’s many successes, but with regret about all the things he had not managed to achieve during his 26-year tenure as the leader of our beloved school, and it was in this speech that I believe we saw the true scope of his vision and love for Whitgift. From running tracks on top of sports halls to biodomes full of exotic flora and fauna, Dr Barnett wanted Whitgift boys to experience it, and whilst no-one could argue that what he did manage to achieve during his time in charge was not incredible, he still wanted more – a dichotomy expressed so eloquently in the words below, taken from Robert Browning’s poem, Two in the Campagna, in which the poet laments mankind’s flaws and limitations, whilst at the same time lauding our boundless energy and enterprise”. “Infinite Passion, and the pain Of finite hearts that yearn.” Finally, may I make my regular plea: many OWs are fascinated to hear news of the careers and other activities of OWs, whether or not they are contemporaries. This is particularly the case after many years of silence. Readers, please do not hesitate to make contact and let us know what you have been doing for the last ten (or sixty) years. OWs may also send letters and messages directly to the WA office at the School (donna@whitgiftianassociation.co.uk) or to the Clubhouse either by traditional or electronic means (clubhouse@owa.org). N I G E L PL AT T S Editor, OW News

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Joining the Whitgiftian Association...

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HE Whitgiftian Association is a members' organisation which welcomes past pupils of Whitgift School, current Sixth Formers and their parents, as well as other members of the Whitgift family". The Association maintains details of members, arranges Reunions and a variety of other social events (for which members receive a discounted ticket price), provides networking opportunities, mentoring and careers assistance and supports the School through notifying members of forthcoming events at Haling Park. The Association maintains an active website and stateof-the-art database for the benefit of its Members. In addition, the annual 'OW News' is dispatched to all Members via e-mail, together with the 'WA Newsletter' (bi-monthly) and 'Whitgift Life', published twice yearly by the School. The School occasionally publishes 'The Whitgiftian' magazine. When published, members are

notified and may request a copy, at cost price, to be sent by post at the prevailing rate. Additional benefits to members are always being sought. The Association also has affiliations with the O Golf Society, the OW Squash Club, the OW Fives Club, the OW Sailing Club and the Whitgift Veterans Rifle Club, all of whom welcome new members. Swimming, shooting, squash and fives facilities are provided at Haling Park. Other affiliated groups include the OW Chess Club, the Corps of Drums and The Prayer Fellowship. The Association also co-ordinates the activities of Old Whitgiftian Regional Branches who arrange their own reunions and social activities. These branches include: Sussex, East Anglia, Oxfordshire, South West and West Midlands/Warwickshire. Further regions are in the course of formation and a full list of current regional contacts is available from the Secretary.

The Whitgift Sports Club The Association maintains strong links with the Whitgift Sports Club in Croham Road where its principal sports continue to be rugby, cricket, football and hockey and water polo/swimming (at the School). Association members are encouraged to visit Croham Road and are welcome at all times. The WA Membership Card allows a discount on all bar purchases and lettings fees.

Members of the Association wishing to play sport at Croham Road may apply for membership of the Whitgift Sports Club separately. OWs who are Full Playing Members of the WSC receive free membership of the WA (Sports Members). Please call the Clubhouse Manager on 020 8686 2127 who will be pleased to send you an application form.

WA Subscription Charges Full Member - OWs living within 20 miles of Haling Park - £50 per year Country/Overseas Member - OWs living further than 20 miles from Haling Park - £40 per year Under 28s Member - OWs Under 28 at time of joining / renewal - £30 per year Friend of the WA (formerly Patron) - £25 donation (n.b. not a subscription therefore no access to benefits) Parent Member - Parents of current and Old Whitgiftians are welcome to become members of the WA - £50 per year. Membership is free to parents currently paying the Advanced Membership Scheme subscription for their sons. Please register by e-mail (see address below). Current Sixth Formers - Free. Please send an email or pop in to the WA Office (opposite Admissions) To join the Whitgiftian Association now, please go to the WA website at www.whitgiftianassociation.co.uk to subscribe via PayPal, credit or debit card. Alternatively, download and complete the WA Application form and then complete and return the Direct Debit form to the address below.

WHITGIFTIAN ASSOCIATION HALING PARK, SOUTH CROYDON, SURREY CR2 6YT Telephone: +44 (0) 20 8633 9926 e-mail: office@whitgiftianassociation.co.uk


1981 when they were in thousands of school children's teeth in their present house in the Chichester, Haslemere, Midhurst, Shenfield. Many family Petersfield and Petworth areas in the holidays were enjoyed in 1970s-1980s. He was proud to work their Glendale Motor for the National Health Service. Caravan in the UK and He attended Whitgift School from 1938 July 1945, when he HIS June, a group ofEurope. about 50 middle-aged men September will gather in the to Andrew Quadrangle Martin's Pilgrimage to left from the first year of the Advanced and share stories about life at the school. I will be among them as we mark the 30th Jerusalem, Course in Science, having gained his anniversary of our leaving Whitgift.over 13 years a great Certificateover As importantly, we willwas share newsachieveabout how our London families General and livesSchool have developed ment. blessed from by Matriculation, those three decades. Much of He thatwas progress will havewith beenExemption made possible the formative with six grandchildren including a Distinction in years we spent at Haling Park, gaining not just an excellent education but alsoScience learningand the a Dr Martin John Hoyle softer skills ranging from 11 months to 17 years. Credit in mathematics. that we need to succeed in life. (1950-59) talented artist, painting in respective He played a conspicuous part in outMany of He my was year agroup, now leaders in their fields including business, medicine, "I went outside my front door in military and oilslaw, and were belonged thetoMedical Art of-school life,can being a member only to able enjoy everything that Whitgift offer thanks toofitsthe Shenfield, Essex and walked the first 28 Society. Martin was Generations well known for his School 1st XI,the 1stfinancial XV, Athletic team, exceptional Bursary scheme. of Whitgiftians secured support miles of 3,235 that separated me from beautifully decorated cakes. The model Shooting VIII and a Sergeant in the required due to the foresight of our predecessors. the Holy City" steam in the garden Junior Training with Certificate However, thatrailway does not mean that wasn't we canbuilt be complacent. Times Corps, have changed. Action is Martin was born to Frederick andrequired until andofwas "A". reach He was school prefect. Hisfor if wethe are grandchildren to ensure thatarrived as many those who thea academic standard Nancy Hoyle in Colwyn Bay, NorthWhitgift are much loved by them all. school report states "the example he able to attend the School regardless of financial circumstances. Wales where his parents were Martin enjoyed family get-togethers, set and his general conduct and The Whitgiftian Association Bursary Appeal has made an excellent start in raising additional evacuated during the war, his father last being on 3allDecember whichwho have character were throughout excellent". funds, andthe I want to thank those old boys made donations, agreed legacies or being in the Estate Duty Office in supportedwas such aother treat.ways Martin died suddenly Brian was well-known in many with their time or resources. Thealso goodwill behindasthea Real appeal Llandudno. He spent his first 7 years December 2017 the age of Tennis and on played regularly at is fantasticonto23 see, but we are alsoateager to explore how weplayer can build this strong start. there and went to school in Guffin. That’s His why 77. I am really excited to be part of a small Petworth House Tennis Club. He working party looking at how the held sister Hilary and his brother David Whitgiftian five senior world Real Tennis and ThisAssociation, tribute was School, written by Martin's wife Foundation and all relevant stakeholder groups cantitles come were born 2 and 4 years later. Thetogether Molly. national titles. also that The apilgrimage to vision Rome and referred to inten to create compelling strategy thissenior important area. I amHe delighted family returned to their home in Headmaster on thetohistory of Real Tennis, by Molly wasisaleading remarkable walk and I lectured ChrisHoyle Ramsey the group look forward a constructive and Coulsdon, Surrey after the war andfruitful discussion. and co-authored a book - ‘Disturb'd from Shenfield to Jerusalem which he Martin was educated at St. Anne's To succeed, with Chaces’ with David Best accomplished in stages over 13and years. the School, Foundation Association must work -hand-in-hand, butinit’s2009. not Preparatory School and Whitgift going to happen Lastand summer he celebrated his The storyovernight. of his walkInand the the short term, I welcome encourage your continued School. diamond wedding anniversary resourcefulness determination support for the Bursary and Appeal, full details of which can be found on the Whitgiftianwith his Martin's parents were very involved in wife Judith, whom he first met at a required to complete it is described in his Association website. the Scouting Movement and he tennishelp partybut in think Bepton in 1957. Heofisthe fascinating bookof’Six Steps’. As I turned the pages thisMillion excellent review, I couldn’t how so many enjoyed both Cubs and Scouts. He survived bypossible his wife,thanks 4 children and 7 a copy achievements of his book at had been wonderful Martin stories donated and incredible made to financial attained the Queen's Scout award.support intheone WAway Oxford Dinner which and his me grandchildren. or another. It alsohereminded of the broad array of OW events that I Martin decided he wanted to be a have beenwife attended less twoover months lucky enough tothan attend the past yearThis - from the Southwas West Dinner in appreciation written by Brian's doctor and gained a place at Guy'sTiverton before his death. to Dinner at Templeton Green College in Oxford. youBlumfield to all our WA daughterThank Deborah Hospital Medical School. He met volunteers who have organised each event. Molly, who also lived in Coulsdon atThanks a Brian (1938-45) to NigelRich Platts for his editorship of this review, I amCoward sure you will enjoy. Dr which Julian (1957-64) District Cub Camp where he and his on 17 December Please doBrian keepRich the died Association informed of2017 any newsJulian you lived may ahave - thewith WAjoy Committee full life, in his parents were involved. His motherand I lookatforward St Richards Hospital, Chichester after family, satisfaction with his work, and to hearing from you, was a District Cub Commissioner and a short illness, aged 89. enthusiasm for his outdoor pursuits Molly was in charge of a Cub Pack.J O N AT H Brian ANwill B Ube N known N ( 1 9 8as0the - 8 8popular ) and creative interests. They married in March 1968 at St.Chairman, local Orthodontist who straightened Whitgiftian Association Julian Michael Henry Coward passed Francis Church, Coulsdon and away peacefully, with family by his side. remained in touch with the priest who Loved and sadly missed by his wife married them, Rev. Edmund Plaxton. Mary, sons Andrew and Michael, The first year of marriage was spent daughter-in-law Joan Marie, grandsons at Crawley Hospital, West Sussex Matthew, Andrew and Patrick, his sister where Martin was an anaesthetist. Tessa Kirby in England, and many They moved to the Cotswolds for the relatives and friends. next year for Martin to train as a GP, Julian was born in England. He studied then, in 1970, he obtained a partnerelectrical engineering at the University ship at Rockleigh Court Surgery, College London. In 1966, he met Mary Shenfield, Essex where he practised for who was on an exchange year from the next 31 years. University of Toronto. In 1968, he Philip was born in 1970, Elizabeth was followed her to Canada - and also to born in 1972 and Mary was born in do a Ph.D. in hydrogeology at

A Message from The Chairman

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A Message to OWs from The Headmaster

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T hardly seems possible that my family and I have already been at Whitgift for over two terms! I have been asked quite often what my impressions are to date, and it is not difficult to give an immediate answer: Whitgift is positive, ambitious and busy! Some of the obvious signs of this came in the Lent Term: in successive weeks we had two outstanding theatrical productions (Guys and Dolls and A Few Good Men), using both major performance venues. I was delighted to be able to welcome Nick Hewlett OW – another local HMC Head and star of Paul Wilson’s 1997 production – to the musical. During another working week I found myself at two national sporting finals, as the U15 rugby players won the national schools cup for their age group, and the U13 footballers won their schools’ title. Meanwhile I have had a steady stream of debaters, coders, fencers, writers and general high achievers telling me about what they are up to in break times (one of the best parts of being Headmaster!). Now of course, as I write in April, exam success is the focus. International Baccalaureate candidates are gearing up to start in early May, and we hope they will repeat last year’s feat of being the best boys’ IB school in the UK. A Level candidates are next out of the traps, and once again we are focussing on gaining the grades needed for some excellent Higher Education offers. Meanwhile I and other senior staff, along with Governors, are thinking and planning, as we consider what next for Whitgift. We are about to commission a firm of architects to undertake a root-and-branch review of the site, so that we can identify the right priorities for development. We are delighted to welcome some significant visitors to Whitgift over the coming weeks: Higher Education Minister Sam Gyimah will be visiting in late April, as will Sir Anthony Seldon (fondly remembered by many OWs no doubt) and, as our Guest at the Celebration of Whitgift Life, Chris Cooke OW (Newsnight editor and journalist). One particular tradition of Whitgift life continues, as no fewer than eight colleagues leave to take up senior, promoted posts elsewhere in HMC. As does another: the peacocks are currently in fine voice, and we have, now, a baby wallaby! We look forward to welcoming you back to Whitgift whenever you can join us. C H R I S R A MS EY

Headmaster, Whitgift School

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Leicester's Haymarket Theatre two He made his mark as joint artistic years later. director (with Paul Webster) of the As he had several times before, Library Theatre, Manchester in the late Blackmore inherited a venue in parlous 1960s, filling eight out of 10 seats in his difficulties. One of his first interventions first season in charge. In 1971, he was to sack the theatre's trustees en added responsibility for the newly masse in order to secure crucial Arts opened Wythenshawe Forum to his Council funding. Within four years, he remit before announcing his departure had grown box office income by half to run the Midlands Arts Centre (now and reduced a crippling £500,000 debt the Mac) in Birmingham the following to just £20,000. year. By the time he finished his twoHis abrupt departure in 1995 - when year contract, admissions had grown by the board imposed a "management more than half and earned income restructure" and made his job increased nearly 80%. redundant - proved an incongruous In 1974, Blackmore launched end to his time in Leicester. Birmingham's Second City Theatre with He went on to work as a producer Fired, a show devised by the company Colonel (V) Michael Knill with Bill Kenwright and, for Arts and playwright David Edgar. (1941-47) Council England, formulated plans to He moved to become artistic director Michael William Knill passed away amalgamate the Everyman and of the Dukes Playhouse, Lancaster in peacefully on 25th December, 2017 at Playhouse theatres in Liverpool. 1976, where he again grew audiences, the age of 87 after a long, full and by 50%, in his first year and secured the In 2000, he was appointed chief Past President, Sir Keith Lindblom, QC, President, Richard Bateman and friends enjoy the musicproductive of the OWlife. Corps of Drums Michael was the brother executive of the Octagon Theatre, venue's precarious financial future. of the engineering geologist Sir John Sam spoke enthusiastically about his time year'schallenge WA Dinner, hosted HisHIS biggest to that pointby the Bolton and charged with turning Knill (1944-52). Born the son of as a an at the School and, subsequently, President Drformation R ichar d ofBate around a failing venue with no reserves came with the the man water Old engineer in Wolverhampton in a active Whitgiftian. He referred to (1967-74), held at the historic Royal or guaranteed funding from national or Tynewearwas Theatre Company in 1978. 1930 Michaelhe’d was had destined to spend conversation with the College of Surgeons in Lincoln's Innthan Fields. local authorities. Within the year, he Intended to be a regional rather his life involved in water. Headmaster whilst in the 6th Form, There were 130 OWs itofhad all generations in had secured £200,000 from the Arts city-based company, an Growing upbeen in Croydon when he had told himduring he wouldn't attendance. Guests Council and restored the Octagon to ambitious brief to were serve welcomed the North to East WW2, Michael attended Whitgift get anywhere in life if all he did was play rousing music of the OW Corps of being a year-round producing of England. Blackmore's by then triedwhere he was a Victoria Scholar and rugby! Drums, pre-dinner were servedand in company. and-tested mix ofdrinks classics, modern captain of the shooting team. He He went on to emphasise his belief in the magnificent Edward and By the time he stepped down in new plays aimed at theLumley widestRoom possible studied civil the engineering at -City the importance of the WA and role it has not and only in then most took guided tour here of the(ascelebrated Hunterian 2012 as the theatre's longest-serving audience camea into its own it Guilds College, Imperial College. After keeping OWs in touch with each other but also in Museum prior to dinner. The President welcomed all OWs manager, he had returned a surplus was to do again when he took over his degree he completed further mentoring boys leaving the School to establish asstewardship well as his personal guests, who included colleagues every yearfrom and transformed the and assisting of Bolton's Octagon studies to achieve a Diploma in Public successful careers in their chosen fields. He concluded by the medicalin profession and fellow members ofOctagon the RCS. into one of the UK's most Theatre 2000). Health Engineering. proposing After dinner, were to be entertained by and a respected successful regional 'Floreat Domus'. It was put towethe test privileged with a lacklustre Michael had developed an interest In the response, Dr Christopher Barnett concluded with a in remarkable young OWofmusician, GrHe ig also oversaw theatres. opening production Ken Hill'sthe Thegifted violinist the military from a years youngatage speech outlining his twenty-six thejoining School Cuciuc (2009-11). Introduced by in the Headmaster, Grig in 2008 - brilliant appointment considered Three Musketeers, but followed the Junior Training Corps at Whitgift. He said treated us toyears a virtuoso performance violin that of wasa coup at and the the timemany - of changes over which he has presided. successive by gripping revivals on of solosomething Service in 1953 he sawwas hisleaving thatDavid he was sorry toNational be retiring but believed greeted with by an appreciative the Olivier award-winning Brecht's Theacclaim Resistible Rise of Arturo audience. selection an officer in the Royal point,asoffering an unequalled Richard Bateman spoke ofoftheVenice profound effect of his as the venue's the Thacker newschool artisticat its highest Ui (1979), The Merchant Engineers: he was posted to Germany experience to current students which would make many Whitgift that he could director. on (1980) education, and Arthursaying Miller's Death of a only speculate and then Belgium until he OWs wish they were attending Whitgift today!was where he would have ended up without it - almost In thecertainly mid-1990s, Blackmore Salesman (1984). demobbed. TheasPresident thanked the Headmaster for attending so notTerson's as a member of the He also developed a parallel career a Strippers theRoyal sameCollege year of Surgeons! Various engineering around many WA Annual Dinners over the years,posts especially thisthe one referred to the importance of the WA Bursary Fund in consultant, advising local authorities and marked the high-watermark of country saw Michael designing dams on the eve of his retirement and on behalf of all OWs helping boys who might otherwise to attend the on issues local arts boards of funding Blackmore's tenure andnot secured the be able and pipe works for aand number of him well achievements wished School so that theyWest couldEnd benefit from the outstanding and future viability for athanked range ofhim for his many company its first transfer. significant projects, including the River education it offers - and which he hoped OWs theatres andascompanies.in the future. Presenting Dr Barnett with a specially engraved Vivid stagings of Howard Brenton's Theas many Dee scheme and Bewl Water. He tankard possible support. He welcomed Naomi In Newstead, 1971, he was on thepewter working party from the Mary Rose Collection, he said that, Genius,would Tennessee Williams' A initially withand clean water but President of the WA, he worked was proud privileged to representing the Fund, to the dinner guests Equity'sasnew that developed directors' Streetcar Named Desire (1986) andand encouraged when he moved to Broadstairs as offer Dr Barnett honorary lifetime membership of the who feel in a generous make committee and remained a committed Alanmight Ayckbourn's Woman inframe Mindof mind to Divisional Manager for East Kent for Whitgiftian themselves known union activist throughout his career.Association. He (1987) proved toto beher. eloquently diverse Southern Michael was The were roundedWater, off with an unaccompanied The President wasNewcastle followed by Dr Sa m Bark (2000wase also the administrator of formalities the swansongs at the Playhouse. responsible for both water and dissembled 2005), a trauma and orthopaedic surgeon, amusingly Ludlow Festival in 2002.rendition of "Carmen" after which the company supply Blackmore returned to the Midlands in who sewage disposal. He was passionate into the night. A memorable evening - with thanks to our referred his memories of of theWarwick Edward Lumley Room, 1989 totobecome director John Ashurst Blackmore was born onand to all about improving the seainwater President, those who contributed everyand way to having been there twice previously to fail his entrance Arts Centre before joining the English January 20, 1941 and died on February beach quality. the occasion. exams! He finally gained his surgical credentials at the Shakespeare Company as an executive aged 77. Subsequent restructuring of (1955-62) the water Pip Burley Scottish of and the RCS some of regard20, as arch-rivals! directorbranch in 1991 chief who executive

122nd Whitgiftian Association Annual Dinner

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25 Years of Whitgift Sport

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N the Lent Term 2017, the penultimate term of his Headship, Dr Barnett hosted a dinner at The Ritz Hotel London to celebrate 25 years of sporting excellence. A special book was launched at the event as a reflection of two and half decades of amazing sporting achievements and development of sport at Whitgift. Members of the Sports Department, past and present, gathered along with an array of Old Whitgiftians, including Danny Ci pri ani, Mar lan d Y ar de, Jos e ph Choong, Laur ie Evan s, Jonty Gr if fiths, T roy Bro wn and Ad am Thom pston e. Sporting alumni and past members of staff travelled from all over the country -

some even came from the USA and South Africa. It was a momentous occasion to have so many people from the Whitgift sporting family together in one room. The Headmaster had composed a touching grace in honour of the evening. Interspersed between courses, Simon Beck led an amusing Question and Answer session, with Laurie Evans, JB Gill and Danny Cipriani gamely taking part. Dr Barnett concluded the evening with a poignant address, expressing his gratitude to the Sports Department and his pride in the path that Whitgift has helped the sportsmen achieve.

Vice Presidents' Dinner

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HE Vice Presidents' Dinner on 26 October 2017 was hosted by WA President, Richar d Bate man (1967-74) and was attended by some thirty Past Presidents, Vice Presidents and members of the WA Main Committee. Christopher Ramsey, in his first term as Headmaster, was Guest of Honour. Following drinks in the Raeburn Library, the party made its way to the nostalgic surroundings of the Old Library where the school chefs excelled themselves once again by serving a first-class four-course dinner. Guests were entertained in the Old Library by Dan -Iuli an Drut ec (2013-15) who played Bach's 'Chaconne' for Solo Violin. Dan, who won the School's International Music Competition in 2013, left School two years ago to study at the Guildhall School of Music. Since then he has performed the complete cycle of Beethoven Violin Sonatas and has appeared frequently in concerts and festivals in Moldova, Romania and Bulgaria. In summer 2017 he was leader of second violins at the internationally-renowned festival for youth orchestras, the "Young Euro Classic", held in the Konzerthaus in Berlin. The President welcomed everyone to the occasion -

especially the Headmaster, who was attending his first WA event - and proposed a toast to the School. He then introduced WA Chairman, Jonathan Bunn (1980-88), who gave an up-date on WA matters whilst welcoming Mr Ramsey and assuring him that the WA would offer him every possible assistance in the future - particularly in the area of fundraising which OWs were now beginning to accept as a priority. He concluded with a toast to the President, Past Presidents and VicePresidents. The Headmaster responded by reassuring those present that he fully intended to retain everything that is good about the School and that the "birds were safe". He went on to say how impressed he had been with both pupils and staff, who he described as being conscientious, enthusiastic and determined to give of their best. Referring to the Chairman's remarks, he said was also looking forward to a closer, rewarding and productive relationship with the WA, whose potential value to the School he fully appreciated and was keen to maximise. The evening concluded with a rousing performance of the Whitgift School song 'Carmen' sung by all those present with the possible exception of the Headmaster!.

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never driven by numbers of vied for space with the tottering heaps publications, citation indices, the need of newspaper containing ferns, but to attend frequent conferences, or have since found permanent homes in even the need to maintain an up-tothe Canterbury Museum and the date curriculum vitae. In fact, he Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, Hutt. Undoubtedly theof thepursued Yet again Lower it is a pleasure to report news annual whatever reunion stimulated his and always to the very best of highlight this work The was doyen the discovery of Upper of V 1952-53. of scribes, Drinterest, Peter Warren his considerable abilities, developing of a Cretaceous angiosperm flower, CBE (1947-56), writes as he says "per pro Superior Quinti expert knowledge in many disparate something never before found in New 1952-53" fields. Zealand. Significantly, the School of He was a wonderful mentor to Biological Fifth Sciences at Canterbury Upper 1952-53 anyone whose interests intersected University listed him as "Emeritus On 25th October past, thanks to help fromwith the School his own,and and even after his own Professor of Palaeobotany", indicating a career that took him in unlikely WA staff and the excellence of the School Caterers, we contributions had ceased, he never lost that he was better known there for his directions, but to each phase he hugely enjoyed a quitefossil superb luncheon Old Library enthusiasm for hearing about the work on Cretaceous plants than in the brought focus, intelligence and and publicly register ourevolution. thanks here. discoveries that others were making. for his expertise in fern commitment. Ourwas annual began as rare tea parties inHe Cambridge in happy and healthy life, lived a full, John onereunions of an increasingly He was born in Sanderstead, Surrey, 1959 have continued, nowfrom lunch, L to which R: Derek Tisdall, John Hamilton, Gerald Haywood, Keith knee problems, breedand in University circles -initially a true as evening,apart to Sydney, a technician in the fur trade parties, largely thanks to the my wife, him greatly asRyde, Brewster, Nicholas Hartley, Kenneth Rokison, they David reduced polymath. He researched andculinary taught skills offrustrated and his wife, Helen (nee Johnson). At Angela, from 2012 our Honorary At mobility all of these, Peter his in the last part of Warren, his life. Roger Hilton, John Sutcliffe, Brian Halfacre, John University undergraduate courses Member. in Whitgift School, Croydon, Richard's we have prided ourselves that, whilst deference Webb, Noel Ronald Bernard, John Trott and Mr In the end, after a short illness, he Parkinson, was every aspect of botany, completing thegiving due interest in history was ignited by an to School forbefore all the his benefits we derivedovertaken from ourby kidney failure Robert andSchad died fullour range shortly retirement inspirational teacher, WD Hussey, and teachers, our discussions, whether at age 31peacefully or 81, have at Nurse Maude Hospice, with an advanced course in phycology. he went on to study history at Oxford primarily centred on thewhile worldfellow ahead of us Christchurch not behind - in the company Kenneth of hisRokis on (1947-55), gave full justice in his At postgraduate level, University, graduating with a the futures were for us,content our School and the UK. daughter Pamela and partner delivery it to us. Here it is. Jo.ofHe academics to provide congratulatory first in 1968. He was a Butofthis year (2017), since wealert and attentive The poet his regrettable absence from the had been until envisages the part a single course,inhecelebrating ran four on65 years lecturer in European history at Reading were the Upper Fifth of 1952-53 and, for some, 70 years last couple of days, livingReunion: at home, Pteridophytes, Palaeobotany, Evolution University from 1971 to 1984. sinceBiogeography we entered the School together in the First continuing his passion for wine and and entirely onportals his own. His first book, Political Change in Form,was it was different. In talents a seemingly enjoyingact hisoffriends and family. He will, are my true and my instinctive words John a man of many - in hisunconscious "These France under Richelieu and Mazarin, collegiality, weachose, back and enjoy course, be sadly missed by them, butthus caparison'd as you fondly are younger days handy unashamedly, left-arm spin to look of and 1624-1661, came out in 1978. It all the memories we shared. Robert ('Bob')also Schad, the sole by pteridologists and bowler in school and university cricket you will your analysed foray to more the hornèd moonvolumes assay of than 1,000 survivora now of those whogoal-keeper had taught us inpalaeobotanists 1952-53 was around the world. teams, surprisingly good and in its light make sport as if 'twere day; French state council records covering ourhockey, guest and the standard with masterlyThis reminiscences appreciation is based on that toand be any man who is not of your cloth in and set a tenacious that period, when France was of his fellow magistri, not least their part in the Domini published in the Bulletin of the Britishor any man conservationist who almost singlewhose time outinternal of joint, recovering fromisits divisions Cricket Club. Memories conversation freely; Society (the societywhose Pteridological for fernphysic will not meld with that of yours, handedly saved the lady'sand slipper orchid flowed and fighting the Thirty Years War. collegiality grew in visibly as did the realisationenthusiasts) of the with extensive assistance from extinction Britain. needs mustOther but have to hold himself aloof works followed, confirming immense changeofwe have seen. from Pamela Lovis. He was aamount seriousofstudent wines, and count himself he ishistorian not there Richardaccurs'd as a leading of early Little could epitomise that better than the vast contrast Although he spent much of histo lifetake In his meat and sust'nance at your board, collecting and learning about them modern France; his best known books between the meal we had enjoyed and ourNew memories of John Lovis retainedand Zealand, deep from his undergraduate days onwards; at your were tablesThe withEuropean fine damask draped Dynastic States Mrsran Henry's school lunches of thefor late 40s and 50s so affection for his time at Whitgift. When in he wine appreciation courses so to carouse with you (1991) that heand might think 1494-1660 L'Absolutisme stalwartly carved (forgive the pun) out of the restricted England, he attended the annual reunion Canterbury University's Department of the dalliance gave the answer to his wish. (1989). ingredients of rationedand foodsometimes plus bully beef,ofhorsemeat Prefects ofand his vintage that continued Continuing Education, If only he could make the lonely travail at Richard became a professor whale.part But,inlest we forget,tastings. it was her successful that In addition, heand untilefforts very recently. kept up thence to gather with you others took competitive journey Leicester University in 1984 and was enabled to playdevoted our sports with vigour and, dare I say, with Raman Subba correspondence Row he could join that band of brothers, He wasusequally to quality if only head of the history department there. contributed to the longevity we have since enjoyed. and others of his friends. His daughter, and excellence in his other passions and catching hold of time erudite During that he sobriety became the leader Come January all but two of us will be in our 80s and the Pamela, reports that among the personal including philately, photography, rugby, become elected to your Social bright Fund society". of a European project on 15 of us music, presentcheese, (see photo) 50% of the original class possessions that he left were classical Ceylonwere tea and PK October 2017 the origins of the modern state, which and three-quarters of those known to us asphotographs, extant. Our blazers and cricket caps growing species of Fritillaria. He passed established an important database and absent colleagues, namely: Ro Br asi er,from Ian school Bro wn, days. As a recognition of hisand back now to facing forward, if toward an on to his children Graham andger Pamela Bright? Yes, accompanying volumes on that subject. Geof Ho waplants, rd, Pet er an Kenn edy andlifeAlasana Stocks loyal Whitgiftian,uncertain he was buried a lovefrofeyscience, and inbuilt future on many But we initiative are optimistic It was fronts. also Richard's in 1986 were by reason of distance (Australia), medical wearing an OW tie. love ofsocollecting. enough to promise more reports yet and daring enough to found the Society for the Study of challenge/mobility sent their news and we Despite masteringoratboth. least All two quite even to expect some to beHistory, celebrating a 70th anniversary. French whose journal he reciprocated with adisciplines toast to them all our different academic and and remembered Rev Professor Richard Who knows? edited for a decade and is his enduring class-mates of 1952-53. several different hobby interests, he Bonney (1957-65)Peter Warren (1947-56) legacy. He continued as professor of To mark thisaunique occasion, (1947- carried the title the Rev never owned computer in his Pet life. er He Kenne Fewdyacademics modern history at the University of 54) went further and kindly let his bardic talents out from Sadly, since usually communicated by letter in an Professor with the ebullience of mythis article was written, David Brewster, a Leicester until 2006, a visiting under the and sent an especially poem -Bonney, who member the reunion group, passed awaywith peacefully at elegant andbushel distinctive hand,usonly rarely penned friend Richard has of died professorship at Kyoto University in Vincit qui Patitur, which our written resident thespian, home, aged 81 condescending toto send a note aged 70. A historian of ancien regime Japan (2002). on a type-writer. He was certainly France and a priest in Leicester, he had

Reunions

Page Seven Page Thirty-One


South West Dinner On 30th September fifteen Old Whitgiftians and their partners gathered at the Tiverton Hotel for the biennial South West Dinner. Most arrived early to enjoy a pre-dinner drink and chat in the bar prior to moving to the dining room. The informal setting allowed couples to sit together and enjoy a convivial evening conversing with other OWs and their partners. The excellent meal was served by very efficient and attentive staff, after which Simon Kennedy welcomed the attendees and proposed the health of the Association and the School. WA Chairman, Jonathan Bunn, responded, updating the gathering on events in Croydon - in particular the arrival of the new headmaster. He also worked out that although he

had left the school in 1988 - and the most senior attendee in 1949 - our school careers were covered by only four headmasters. After the 'team' photograph the school song was sung ably conducted by choirmaster J. Bunn. It was noted that improvement was needed by 2019! The evening was enjoyed by all, partners included, and demand was there for a repeat in 2019, even one suggestion that it should become an annual event. These informal events are a great opportunity to renew friendships and make new ones while catching up on lives after school. Watch the newsletter and website for details of the 2019 dinner so you don't miss out. Simon Kennedy (1959-66)

Oxford Dinner The Oxford Dinner 2017 was held at Green Templeton College in the stunning eighteenth century Radcliffe Observatory. The dinner, which had the additional aim of supporting the Whitgiftian Association Bursary Appeal, was hosted by Prof esso r Paul Wor ds worth (1965-70), and a Fellow of the College. The Observatory, designed by James Wyatt, has a distinctive tower based on the Tower of the Winds in Athens. Approaching the College, one can view Atlas and Hercules supporting a globe atop the tower. The College certainly looked beautiful as the Autumn sun faded behind the tower. Guests approached the Observatory through gardens and a cobbled courtyard before ascending to the base of the tower for drinks in the common room of the College. Paul Wordsworth led guests to the octagonal observatory room, which is usually closed to the public. This is a remarkable space where those with a head for heights climbed the spiral staircase to the balcony at the very top. Dinner was served in the stunning candle-lit semi-circular room at the base of the Tower. Those present included current President Richa rd Bat eman (1967-1974) and Chairman Jonath an Bunn (1980-88) and his wife Kate. Four OWs currently studying at Oxford also attended: Seba stian Or bell (2008-15), Menon A bhish ek (2010-

17), Arthur For dham (2010-17) and Jer ry A mok wan doh (200916). We wish them the best of luck in their studies. We had two authors in our midst, Dr Ma lcol m P arl ett (1952-59) and Dr Ma rtin Hoyle (1950-59), both of whom kindly donated copies of their books to the School, for the benefit of the WA Bursary Appeal. After dinner, Paul Wordsworth spoke about the College and provided guests with a fascinating insight into the history and architecture of the Observatory. Pi p Burl ey (1955-1962) then introduced the WA Bursary Appeal and the necessity of fundraising. He was supported by Jerry, the youngest of three Croydon brothers educated at Whitgift with bursary support, who spoke movingly and persuasively about the need to maintain bursary provision and how much the boost of a great education has meant to him and his family. Pip then undertook an auction in aid of the WA Bursary Appeal. Thanks go to all those who donated and bid for auction lots. The evening raised over ÂŁ2,000 for the WA Bursary Appeal. Thanks go particularly to Professor Paul Wordsworth for hosting a very convivial dinner at this remarkable venue. Paul and Christine Wordsworth had a few days earlier become grandparents: with so much going on in their family, greatly appreciated.

If you are in terested i n orga nisin g a regio nal di nner or fundraisi ng e ve nt for th e W A B ursary Ap peal , plea se do get in t ou ch . T he WA Office is ha ppy to help wit h arrange men ts. A lo t of a cq uai nta nce s are re newed as a result a nd it gi ves us t he c ha nc e to raise mo ney.

Page Eight


Jeff's other interests included golf banning certain practices, he read it 1959 Prefects Reunion a lovefrom for that which he inherited from out on the air while audibly They swelled the numbers year's all-conquering his parents. He Souster, had beenBrian a member contravening it by lighting a cigar. In 1st XV, joining Mike Wilkinson, Peter at and Holtye GCHolt. near That Edenbridge in the mid-1960s, Gudgin turned Councell, Grant Eustace Robin would have Sussex for more thirtythey'd years. freelance after establishing that he made a pretty good seven-a-side team, than and what Jeff also When hewere first would thus get more work than as lost in speed most had made uploved for in cars. weight. They met and they subsequently married staff. It also enabled him to accept reminded of that season when won every game his when he his owned a FrogofEyed employment from the independent Pet er Cox (1955-64)wife readPat, from Memories Whitgift which he soldfrom in order to buy sector, for instance fronting an in- the Boys' Own Tales Sprite, (£20, still available all good an Guardian engagement ring.ofFrom then on, vision commercial for Square Deal Whitgiftian offices) - the review the harda navigator/wireless operator with a as his daughters andcrowd Anneof grew Surf washing power, which enabled him fought Dulwich match, watched by aJacquie 'fantastic view to flying a Mosquito - which he. there a succession of 'sensible' to buy his house. In the early Seventies, 2000'. Whitgift wonup, with the was game's only try, when Kibble never did because, soon after he was cars. But he had a spell based on the Isle of Man took Wilkinson's scoring passafter and Pat's racedpremature through todeath score called up, Hitler surrendered he bought a sports car and announced: as a public relations consultant to its under the posts with 'a huge theatrical joyful leap'. His leap Returning to the UK, Jeff took a willsmile be the last as carbroad. I ever buy!" and government before returning to the may now be missing"This but his is still correspondence course and qualified as then proceeded replace it with a BBC. Pi p Bu rley (1955-62) then joinedtoCox in reading a surveyor, whilst working in the new model every two years - his last After retiring, Gudgin occasionally extracts from the story of what became known as The (L to R) Roger Lambert, Peter Stevens, Martin Estates Osborne,Departments John of a number of onlyinsold few of months stood in for presenters onDavid his local Great Desk Swap ofJaguar Marchwas 1960, the aweek Martin Trembath, Michael Wilson, Mash, Davidlocal Purdell-Lewis authorities - including Croydon, before his death. radio station and voiced talking Jarvis's memorable Hamlet. An earlier generation of senior and Tim Forbes Basildon and Birmingham - before P ip Burbyley newspapers for the blind. He remained prefects, led (it could His nowcousin, be revealed) the(1953-1961), school finally settling at the City of London in Onavid Thursday 13th July 2017, OWs attended the 58th an watcher of rugby, cricket, golf recalls: "Jeffhatched was a man's man; an oldcaptain Peter Stevens himself, an intricate plan to 1959 where he spent the next thirty Reunion of the 1959 prefects' room. The reunion was held and tennis. Because of his origins in keptnight. his feelings swap masters' desksschool over ingentleman the middlewho of the years. In the process he rose to the at the Horse and in Belgravia, South London, heGroom supported Crystal where once again close his chest, possessed Nowadays the desks aretoflimsy affairs,and andwho masters don't a challenging and responsible role of Aiden Ganley and but his team madethat us extremely welcome. Palace at football, confessed stoicism so typical of hisheavy generation. own them. Back then they were extremely kneehole Deputy Surveyor of the City of he had never seen them play a match. was already 19 when born desks, and the teamHe - who'd have been infantsI was in the London, at a time when the City was 1962 Prefects Reunion In 1956 he married Jenny Daly, whom andwere had been at Whitgift between wartime blackout, and hardened by years of rugby undergoing great change. he had met at the BBC. She 1936 and 1940, where was tocorridors follow training - moved them stealthily in the dark Idown Over the years he was concerned predeceased him and he is survived by him thirteen yearsmoved later. without He wenta on and up and down stairs. All 27 were with many major projects, both inside five daughters and a son. to enjoy a distinguished career in the the hitch, and next morning the ensuing chaos delighted and outside the City. For example, with The Daily Telegraph 15 November 2017 City,some crowned by the of others. an OBE whole school, enraged masters and award amused the funding of open spaces such as in 1988. The urbane headmaster Geoffrey Marlar admired the Burnham Beeches and the Kent and Jeff never revelled any of that, audacity too much to"But attempt to identify theinculprits, Jeffery George Mathieson, Surrey Commons, which were (and still quite simplyhebecause he was the best beyond telling Stevens, whom clearly suspected: OBE (1936-1940) are) owned by the Corporation of example you could hope to want meet that of a "Funniest thing I've seen for years. But we don't Jeff Mathieson died on August 14th, London. He also managed the sale and modest, self-effacing sort of thing to become a habit, do we?" man - in fact, you 2017, aged 92. lease back of countless properties in had were to work hardPrefects' to persuade him to Eight of the attendees in the play of that Jeff was born in Sydenham Road, London and Westminster, leading to talk Whitehall about himself. despite his by summer, an uproarious farce Still, wittily reviewed Croydon, on 17th February 1925. His the redevelopment of outdated diffidence, he could also be funny Dick Glynne-Jones: "Miss Archdale (Souster) wasvery quite parents lived in Thornton Heath, and buildings and the upgrading of local and twinkling glamorous in a rural with sort aofsharp way, wit although her legs sense were of Backwas (L to R) Robin Holt, Jeff's Tony father, Bairstow, Gordon Brackstone, Jeff their only child. areas. Another of his well-publicized remember a century rather hairy and her humour. padding Irather loose...half Kibble, that ago Brian Councell, David Goodwin, Ray Knight, Graham Hill, Tony however, had been the youngest of 17 projects was the re-location of The attending weddinginwhen he gave splendid old warhorse, had noa difficulty projecting hisa Stockwell, Alan George, Penfold. and had fought on the David western front in City of London School for Boys when speech. I can still picture himyears telling irascibility and fuddled bewilderment... Eustace's in FrontFirst (L toWorld R) KenWar. Ellis,He Grant Mike Wilkinson, Peter (situated on the Victoria the wasEustace, awarded the old school of the his young groomlook driving the jazz group must the havestory facilitated practised of Cox,Military Robert Kibble, Peter Souster,but, Piplike Burley, Michael Symes. was sold - with the the Cross for gallantry Embankment) his his own wedding he had a a vacuity... while Burleytohid guile behindwhen as impregnable nearly all the WWI heroes who came proceeds funding the building of the puncture and had to change the wheel. façade of geniality as ever made a Captain of the Third XI Eighteen wizened 1962 met in back fromincreasingly the trenches, never prefects talked fromnew school in Upper Thames Street An hour later lapped in church, dishevelled formidable." The school audience it up, and the cast London on Remembrance Day enough, to about what happened. Later, he2017, joinedsuitably near the River. One of his last major and perspiring, when asked forwere the ring, manfully battled to keep straight faces. Yes, those celebrate surviving years. Rounded morewas by the siting and construction the Civil Service and55became Secretaryup once projects he fished around in his pocket and indeed the Days. the the tireless Pete rCommission, Souste r (1957-62), we of met at prior to his retirement for Boundary for theagain Barbican produced a wheel nut. Not the Peter Cox the Horse and Groom in Belgravia, a weekday pub opened which he received the OBE. How in 1990. Thereafter, he retained an greatest of jokes, you might think, but specially us onhave a Saturday, which in recent proud hefor would been when hishas hosted active interest in the City as a of 1978 Jeff Class Reunion told it well enough for me to recall yearsinreunions several groups of early OW son, turn, wasofawarded the OBE in Sixties Liveryman, frequently making the trip It was with some trepidation that a party of OWs it fifty years later. veterans. Not that the Sixties had yet impinged on the 1988. from his home in Tonbridge to livery assembled themselves for a weekend reunion onmodesty, a "I will remember him for his School in any way in 1962. were still short-backJeff grew up in Purley and Haircuts went to St. dinners in the City. He was also aMay keen beautiful weekend this year. Who were these his complete lack of pomposity fellows, and and-sides, and caps were definitely We were John's Primary (popularly known as to be worn. member of BOFS, and looked forward what were they to expect and would they get on after 38 self-aggrandisement, his great charm, in a real sense last of a Road, generation, pretty to healthy Miss Polly's) in the Pampisford going but aeagerly their monthlyyears? London Why did they do it, what did they do, and how did it his tolerance and sense of humour". andtowell-educated one, Towards to judge by and on Whitgift in 1936. theour animation luncheon meetings - and, noThe doubt, a comprised ten pupils from VI Science B go? party appetite. had flownwith in from Robert Kibble Jeff is survived by two daughters, end of theSeveral War he served the distance: Air chance to savour a glass1976-8. of goodInred addition, Jacquie there was retired from San Diego and Gordon Brackstone from Ottawa, andone Anne, and lab twotechnician grandsons. Force and trained in Canada in 1945 as wine! (John Oliver), and four long-suffering WAGs, who while Graham Hill had hopped over from Montpellier.

Page Page Twenty-Nine Nine


OWs in Hong Kong Old Whitgiftians find themselves passing through, and sometimes remaining, in all parts of the world and it is unsurprising that a fair number find themselves in the global business hub of Hong Kong. In May a call went out on social media to see if any OWs were available, with just a few hours' notice, to meet for some drinks before Sa m Bark e (2000-2005) flew back to the UK. Four OWs answered the call and a number of others who were unable to make it expressed an interest in meeting in the future. managed to inject moderation and charm to a potentially rumbustious occasion. We met on Saturday at our hotel in Nutfield and proceeded in convoy order to descend upon Whitgift itself. We were met by Donna Lewis, the school's splendid and welcoming Marketing and Alumni Relations Assistant, and two very smart boarding pupils, and led on a memorable tour of the school. Big School elicited nostalgia, the old science labs brought back very special memories, and we marvelled at the swimming pool, sports facilities and the magnificent grounds. Returning to our hotel at Nutfield, we convened for a drinks reception and splendid dinner, spiced with nostalgia, bonhomie and tales of yore. But, most importantly, we welcomed our special guests of honour, Dr Peter King, Head of Biology and our inspirational teacher from those days, and his gracious and lovely wife, Marigold. We marvelled at their astonishing youth and vigour compared with our advancing frailty, receding hairlines and failing sight, and exchanged memories, stories and laughter. D avi d Grant (1970-78) rounded off the event with a superbly witty and natural after dinner speech. After a round or two in the bar, we repaired to bed. The next morning, we all breakfasted together and, trying not to show too many emotions, wended our various ways home, from Cornwall to Edinburgh. This was a wonderful, light hearted and positive experience. We rejoiced in friendships rekindled, effortlessly taking up where we had left off after the field trips, post A-level parties and associated misbehaviour. We toasted absent friends, gave thanks for lives enriched by the legacy of Whitgift, and felt a deep sense of gratitude to all our teachers for their patience and skill. In particular, we were honoured by the presence of the inestimable Peter King, and were touched by sadness that our other teacher of Biology from that era, John Yeo, was no longer with us. We would thoroughly encourage old friends from any era who wish to arrange a reunion, to contact Donna. And if we can offer any tips in doing so, please do not hesitate to get in touch. Julian Gunn (1970-78)

(L-R) Andrew Dougan (OWRFC), Rob Farrall (1974-82), Rory Caines (2003-10), James Mabbutt (2002-09), Sam Barke (2000-05)

1957 Leavers Reunion Event Rev D r Rich ar d Bu xton (1951-57), contemporaries and wives gathered at the School on Friday 2nd June for lunch in the Old Library with a tour of the School and the recently refurbished Water Gardens.

They enjoyed their trip to the school so much that they are planning on returning next year!

OWs s hould re member t hat re unio ns are alw ays wort h while. The WA will alw ays be ha ppy to help c ont act grou ps of O Ws on your be half .

Page Ten


Remembering 1916 Exhibition

indigestion tablets, perhaps to guard the ambiance and the happy times Similar problems had arisen earlier in against the rigours of married life, spent at the farm remained with him other dioceses and he was the last though he need not have worried for the rest of his life and he celebrated suffragan bishop to be also a The remarkable War exhibition closedthere. at Easter 2017. As someone who visitedanon several because Anna became his 80th birthday residentiary canon. InFirst 1991,World therefore, found it a profoundly moving and fascinating experience some previously unseen aspect cook and a charming and At Whitgift, Martin's sporting talent withaccomplished itoccasions, was agreedI that he should be thoughtful hostess.by They a to the fore.visited He became relieved of his cathedral responsibilities or artefact to marvel at each time.came Friends who with the me were all mesmerised thewere quantity, devoted couple and the family was scrum halfexhibition in the School's and move to and the outskirts of quality sheer professionalism of the - in 1st an XV, array of such astonishing breadth it was enlarged by the addition of John and Captain (opening batsman and wicketBasingstoke. perhaps the portraits of Allied participants in the War by Eugène Burnand that most expressed the Mark. Martin was a proud, keeper) of the cricket 1st XI, Captain There, without the support of the sheer range of peoples involved and the tragic waste of war. Burnand himself died in 1921 as a result of alwayspublic there for of the 1st IV fives team andthe champion cathedral's community, felt lonely, an even the Spanish Flu he pandemic, greater slayer than War itself.conscientious That such father, a splendid the boys when the need arose. Many gymnast. He was also Captain of however, and his unease was exhibition could be mounted at a school is a remarkable tribute to Whitgift and to the vision and long vacations were spent in north Smith's House, a senior prefect and compounded by the General Synod's determination of Dr Christopher Barnett. Nigel Platts Cornwall, close to the coast, where senior NCO in the RAF section of the decision that women could be Martin was rebuilding a derelict ordained to the priesthood - something School's Combined Cadet Force. ON cottage, mostly with his own hands and leaving School he proceeded to read he had strongly opposed because of its involving many skills. for a physics degree at Brasenose effect on relations with the Orthodox Back inthe Marlborough, joined it College, Oxford and continued his churches.ITH our new, larger School, andMartin the sacrifices the Samaritans, manning sporting activities. These included After about 18 months, made inregularly the conflicts of thetheir Association flag and having telephone linecentury". overnight offer help membership of BNC's Cuppersreached the age of 65, decided to 20th Thetomemorial proudly flying above theheWar and advice tocentre those in need, ranging winning rugby team, scrum half for the retire and to house in the Close takes stage during the Memorial, therent WAa President from victims of domestic violence to Oxford Greyhounds, cricket for the at School's annual Remembrance DrChichester. Richard Bateman (1967Daysuicidal Servicethoughts. and its listing 74) laidbrought our wreath redlease of life. those with He helps Oxford Authentics and the award of This him aofnew becamemark moreitsactive in church Half-Blues for Rugby Fives in 1951 and A short, on tubby figure, with an excellent significance andand offers poppies Friday 10th community affairs. He was in appointed 1952. Like his father J W Har rison sense of humour, he am played a full part specific protection managing November at 11.00 Lay Pastoral Assistant in the Church in the life the cathedral, serving for (1916-22) and uncles GT Ha rris on its future. during theoftraditional giving Communion to those unable several years onService its Chapter, (1918-24) and S HLV ( "Shove l") The memorial for the First to Remembrance at the and as an attend. He and War Annawas both sang ininthe assistant Smith (1906-13), Martin played in World unveiled School. bishop in the diocese of 1922 at abecame ceremony A large number of Oldfound many College March choir and both Chichester and Europe OW rugby and cricket teams - on involvedattended in naturebyconservation. In of opportunities to exercise and his episcopal some occasions the OW 1st XI the Archbishop Boys were in attendance 2016 theyand celebrated Golden vocation. Thethe leisure to write theand music contained three Harrisons. Martin's Randall Davidson Canterbury Sir John their Raynsford appreciated readings, singing from the boys character, Martin was a biography of Bishop John Moorman successwhen in sports was not attributable Longley, KCMG CB, Wedding. Colonel ofInthe East Surrey Regiment. and especially the parade of the Corps of Drums good manCroydon-based and extremely added to his sense of fulfilment. massive physique but to great It was designed andthoroughly constructed by the our President commented that the last timetohea had self-effacing. He had strong sense of His greatest in literary achievement, agility, quick thinking, a good and Ebbutt funeraleye directors & Sons, with the aassistance of local participated this Service was as the School's Drum ex-servicemen. The humour memorialand wasmade moved from the old Major. was the meticulous warm friendships however, tactical ingenuity. peoplePark in many walks of adjacent life, was correction of theattendance of OWs After university Service School in North Endwith to Haling in 1931. The It is hoped of forthe an proofs even bigger at next and National kind generous, especially to his monumental third edition of the as a2018 junior the for the fallen of mural theand Second World War, also year's larger Service on Friday 9th November to RAF officer in several Oxford of thehostilities Christianwhich willOperational of by Ebbutts,grandchildren designed was unveiled and in May 1949God-children. at a mark theDictionary end of WW1 be followedResearch Branch had increasingly severeCuthbert health Church (1997). lunch at the School. Bomber Command, Martin soughtattended a ceremony byHethe Bishop of Croydon, by a celebratory problemsWinSlater lifeCB, butCBE was (1906never He is survived his wife and by three school as and a Major General Bardsley Tope, OWs may beby interested to hear that earlier in theteaching year appointment 09). the School's War Memorial was granted Listed Building heard to complain and continued to daughters. physicist, hoping that this could be enjoyglobes, many one things, from The Daily Telegraph 12 August 2017 in depicts two The mural forranging each hemisphere, Status, Grade II, in recognition of its historiccombined interest "aswith an an involvement watching cricket at Lords with John and coaching between which is a cross fleury. eloquent witness to the tragic impact of world eventsrugby on and/or cricket. Mark to surveying, with Anna, the bed Marlborough offered him just such a Mar tin Harr is on (1947-52) of the river Kennet for caddis fly larvae. position which he occupied until he Martin, aged 83, died peacefully at He made a difference to many lives retired. His aim was not only to impart home on June 21st 2017 after a long and will be much missed. the principles of physics but also to get illness bravely and cheerfully endured. This obituary was written by Martin's his young charges to understand them Almost all his professional life was Professor Bryan Harrison, and he co-authored a well-respected spent teaching physics to boys at the age of 16 on his brother first voyage on the steam cargoFRS, ship N the year to the end of March 1918, nearly eighty OWs FRSE book written with this objective in Marlborough College, Wiltshire, and he Don Arturo which was sunk with all hands on 28 June were killed: this was the most destructive year of the Thebyregard in which MartinUC-62 Harrison mind. He 200 also continued1917 to play was a gifted all-round by arugby, torpedo fired German submarine War.also Thus, after three andsportsman a half years of war about was held at Marlborough was now at county level, for Dorset and and coach. approximately 90 nautical miles West-South-West of The OWs had fallen. This was still a war of immobility and recognised in a lengthy appreciation Wilts. When WWII out, the Harrison Scilly Islands. Brabner's name is among 24,000 on the in attrition and thebroke overwhelming majority of fatalities the obituaries section of the Marlburian Before long he met and married family was in Cornwall, staying at a Merchant Navy War memorial at Tower Hill. Herbert occurred on the Western Front, particularly in the Third Club website in which heArcadian, was Anna, also a young teacher, andalso theydrowned farmhouse near(Paschendaele). St Austell, and having Thacker in the sinking of HMS a Battle of Ypres described as "a thoughtful, innovative immediately set sail for his year's made enduring friendships with the liner converted to act as a troopship, while en route to the The death of a dozen OW pilots in that year indicates roleSubmarine model and at Phillips Exeter farming remained there until Middle Academy East: she wasteacher sunk byofa physics torpedoand from both thefamily, increasing significance of air powersecondment and the the most approachable of mentors; in New Hampshire, USA. In 1943 before returning to the Croydon UC-74. The unfortunate Thacker had survived gallant extraordinary danger of the machines involved. Among this heldFront in high esteem by students andfor preparation for this he equipped area for the two boys' secondary action on the Western where he was decorated list of young and often very talented men the names of colleagues alike ... irretrievably modest, himself with a generous supply of education at Whitgift. Martin's love of his part in the first tank attack in history. two stand out: Midshipman Harold Brabner, drowned at

Remembrance 2017

W

Whitgift and the First World War‌ a Hundred Years On

I

Eleven PagePage Twenty-Seven


OWs Who Died in the Year to 31 March 1918

Rfm James Raymond Adams - Queen's Westminster Rifles, died in Italy 19 July 1917 aged 24 as a result of gassing; mentioned in despatches 2nd Lt L E Atha - Royal Flying Corps, killed 5 March 1918 on his first operational flight at St Quentin, aged 18; Lt (Adj) G E Bassett - Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, killed at Enghien Redoubt, St Quentin on 21 March 1918, aged 24 Pte S Botterill - London Rifle Brigade, killed near Ypres on 20 September 1917 aged 39 Midshipman H S Brabner - Royal Naval Reserve, drowned on his first voyage in the sinking of the transport ship "Don Arturo", aged 16 Lt F C Brown - Queen's Westminster Rifles, killed in Jerusalem 8 December 1917 aged 25; mentioned in despatches Pte H T Buckworth - London Irish Rifles, killed near Ypres 26 February 1917 aged 36; a decorated veteran of the Boer War 2nd Lt H R H Bullman - Machine Gun Corps, killed by shrapnel at Marcoing near Cambrai on 30 November 1917 aged 20 2nd Lt E A Burgess - Royal Fusiliers, killed at Miraumont, Somme 17 February 1917 aged 19 Lt (acting Captain) J A Carter - Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, died of wounds as a prisoner of war 4 April 1917 aged 25; classical scholar of The Queen's College, Oxford and rowed in the Queen's VIII; brother of MR Acting Captain M R Carter - East Surrey Regiment, wounded at Guillemont, Somme in September 1916, killed at St Quentin 23 March 1918 aged 25; brother of JA 2nd Lt G A Cawson - Royal Flying Corps, killed near Cambrai 30 November 1917 aged 18 Pte G Chart - South African Infantry, died of wounds at Passchendaele 23 September 1917 aged 36; a decorated veteran of the Boer War Pte W Comber - Civil Service Rifles, fought on the Somme and at Ypres where he was killed on 10 April 1917 aged 20 Lt F N N Cooper - Army Service Corps, served at Gallipoli and in Mesopotamia, returned to action at Cambrai, missing in action 21 November 1917 and never seen again, aged 21; brother of CEN, killed in action 16 September 1916 Captain R A Coppin - Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, wounded at Givenchy in March 1916 and killed by shrapnel at Arras on 12 April 1917, two days before his 20th birthday Lt H A Cutler - Machine Gun Corps, killed at St Quentin 23 March 1918 aged 36; as an engineer he had extensive experience of bridge and railway building over the Andes Sergt Major T R Dalziel - Artists' Rifles, killed at Passchendaele 29 October 1917 aged 24 2nd Lt T F P T Dennett - Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps, shot down over La Panne, near Dunquerque 4 August 1917 aged 22; he was a medical student at Guy's Hospital 2nd Lt H C Evans - Machine Gun Corps, killed on a date unknown in 1918 aged 36 Lt G Evezard - Royal Warwickshire Regiment, killed on a date unknown in 1917 aged 24 Sergt C R Exelby - Queen's Westminster Rifles, killed at Achicourt 8 April 1917 aged; he was due to return home to receive a commission the week after he was killed Captain R P Fenn, CdeG - Royal Flying Corps, missing in action on the Western Front presumed killed 25 March 1918; awarded the Croix de Guerre and recommended for the MC Lt J W Freeman - Royal Engineers, killed in action on the Ypres-Menin road 23 September 1917 aged 23 Captain A B Frost, MC - Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment - killed in action 23 March 1918 aged 22; awarded the MC in May 1917 for conspicuous gallantry at Polygon Wood Pte W E Fulcher - King's Liverpool Regiment, died on 3 August 1917 of wounds received at Ypres four days earlier Lt L A Fuller - Royal Flying Corps, killed on 17 May 1917 aged 25; a graduate of Imperial College 2nd Lt E P Fuller - Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, killed near Ypres 20 September 1917 aged 25; brother of MR 2nd Lt M R Fuller - Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, killed in action at Monchy le Preux 11 April 1917; brother of EP Lt (Acting Captain) M Gliddon, MC - Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds near Ypres on 16 August 1917 aged 24; awarded the MC "for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty" Lt S M Godfrey - Artists' Rifles, killed at Passchendaele 30 December 1917 aged 25 Gnr H C Goodwin - Tank Corps, killed on his 20th birthday, 24 March 1918, at Bapaume when the tank he was driving received a direct hit. 2nd Lt C L Green - Essex Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps, killed in action on 9 June 1917 three days after he went to France as a pilot aged 23; studied medicine at Guy's Hospital and Edinburgh University 2nd Lt W Harman - Royal Field Artillery, killed near Caix on 27 March 1918 Lt R G Hill, MC - Royal Army Medical Corps attached Coldstream Guards, killed on 11 October 1917 near Ypres; he was awarded the MC for "conspicuous bravery and a fine devotion to duty during an attack on the Pillkem Ridge on 31 July 1917 aged 30; he trained and was a prize winner at St Bartholomew's Hospital 2nd Lt C M Hodgson - Royal Field Artillery, died at Ypres on 17 June 1917 aged 33; he had gone to the USA to farm before the War 2nd Lt B K Hooper - London Regiment, killed at Polygon Wood on 26 September 1917 aged 21 2nd Lt H R Isaacs - Suffolk Regiment, killed on 9 April 1917 at Arras aged 20 2nd Lt H S S de Jastrzebski - London Regiment, killed at Havrincourt Wood near Ypres on 5 April 1917 aged 22; an ancestor commanded the Polish army in the 14th century

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L/Cpl C E Johnson - Artists' Rifles, killed at Passchendaele 30 October 1917 aged 30 Lt H B Keable - Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, killed on HMS Manxman on a date unspecified in 1918 aged 30; brother of R, Army Chaplain and subsequently best-selling novelist 2nd Lt T F Kesterton - Royal Air Force, killed on a date unknown in 1918 aged 27 2nd Lt N H Kimpton - Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds caused by shell fire at Boesinghe near Ypres on 14 July 1917 aged 20 2nd Lt L Lloyd - Hampshire Regiment, killed by shell fire at Langemarck Station near Ypres on 9 October 1917 aged 19 We have, with regret, to record the deaths of the following OWs reported since the preparation Captain J H N Mabey - London Regiment, died in Cairo on 18 November 1917 of wounds received at Beersheba aged 36; one of the of the previous edition of OW News: original founders of the OWRFC Lt F R Matthews - East Surrey Regiment, missing and subsequently presumed dead at Morey near Arras on 23 March 1918 aged 26; fought on the Somme, at Ypres, in Italy,BEDBROOK at Arras and Messines; mentioned in2017 despatches; Surrey trials for rugby - On 7 November Eric Willis (1937-43), aged 91 2nd Lt L W Middleton - Royal Flying Corps, killed while on artillery observation duty at Hollebeke near Ypres on 8 November 1917 aged BENCE - On 23 December 2017, Roger Thomas John (1950-57), aged 78 22 BLACKMORE - On 20 on February 2018, John Ashurst 77 Captain A L W Neave - The Guides Indian Army, killed a date unknown in 1918 aged(1951-60), 24; he had aaged distinguished career at Sandhurst Lt H B New - Essex Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps, by a fall from an aeroplane at Boiry onaged 31 October 1917 aged 25; railway BONNEY - In August 2017, killed Rev Professor Richard John (1957-65), 70 engineer in South America; brother of AW who was killed in May 1918 BREWSTER - On 4 December 2017, David John (1948-54), aged 81 Lt J S Noble - Royal Berkshire Regiment, died of wounds received at Cambrai on 30 March 1918 aged 19; he was a professional soldier having left school for Sandhurst BUSTIN - On 2 December 2017, Ronald George (1953-59), aged 76 2nd Lt D R Nyren - Royal Fusiliers, killedCLOUTTE during the German offensive Bertincourt on 23aged March - In January 2017,near Bruce (1934-38), 95 1918 aged 24; a graduate of Trinity College, Cambridge, he was a rubber planter in Malaya at the outbreak of War COLLETT - On 6 October 2017, John Ambrose (1948-53), aged 81 Captain W H Parker - London Regiment, Royal Fusiliers, killed at Bullecourt on 15 June 1917 aged 23 COWARD On September Dr received Julian Michael Henry (1957-64), aged 71 aged 19 2nd Lt A C C Pendrigh, died in Rouen -on 175August 1917 of2017, wounds near Ypres some three weeks earlier Sergt Major G N E Pentelow - South Staffordshire died 2017, of wounds at Wyatt Ypres on 7 Octoberaged 191779 aged 24; his poor sight CROSSLEY - On Regiment, 2 December David (1949-56), precluded him from taking a commission CULVER - On a date unknown, Dr Denis (1953-61), aged 75 Captain T F Perrin - Royal Engineers, died of heatstroke in Mesopotamia on 24 July 1917 aged 46 DOWN - Onkilled 22 September (1944-49), 86 2nd Lt A H Petrie - East Surrey Regiment, in the Ypres 2017, salient Geoffrey on 31 July Wyndham 1917 aged 20; mentionedaged in despatches Lt T S Pitman - York and Lancaster Regiment, wounded at Messines June 1917 Henry and killed at Poelcapelle, DUBOIS - On 1 December 2017, Martin (1937-39), agedYpres 90 on 26 September 1917 aged 26; he was a classical scholar of The Queen's College, Oxford where he graduated with first class honours EDDOLLS - In August 2017, Gerald John (1944-50), aged 84 Sub Lt E A Planterose - Royal Naval Air Service, killed near Otranto while returning from aerial pursuit of an enemy submarine on 17 July GOULD - On 19 August 2017, John Dudley Ernest (1939-43), aged 90 1917 aged 24 Lt T W Purves - Middlesex Regiment, severely wounded YpresPhilip November and(1945-52), killed by shellfire GOWER - On 23 Juneat2017, Henry1914 Frank aged at 83Voormezeele, Ypres, on 7 June 1917 aged 22 GUDGIN - On 8 November 2017, Timothy Andrew Leonard (1944-48), aged 87 Captain A E Ryan, MC - Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, wounded twice in 1917, wounded and missing presumed dead near HARRISON - On 21 aged June 20; 2017, Martin John the (1945-52), 83, son of JW (1916-22), brother Professor BD Bapaume 23 March 1918 he was awarded MC, wasaged mentioned in despatches and received twoof cards of thanks for(1943-49) outstanding service from the divisional general and nephew of GT (1918-24) and SHLV Smith (1906-13) 2nd Lt R Saword - Royal Fusiliers, missing presumed killed in action between OppĂŠ Wood and Gavrelle on 29 April 1917 aged 27 HEARN - On 29 March 2018, Derek Victor (1935-42), aged 93 2nd Lt J H Sayer - Royal Flying Corps, killed carrying out photo reconnaissance near Croiselles on 3 April1917 aged 19 HOYLE - On 23 December 2017, Dr Martin Johnfire (1950-59), 77,1917 brother Gwas (1955-63) L/Cpl C V Smethurst - Honourable Artillery Company, killed by sniper at Arras onaged 1 April agedof37;Dhe due to receive a commission HUISH - On 9 October 2017, Derek Alan (1960-69), aged 65 Captain A D Thornton-Smith, DSO - King's Royal Rifle Corps, killed at Langemarck, Ypres, 16 August 1917 aged 25; awarded DSO in April HUNTER - In January 2018, Alan Livingstone Haig (1952-59), aged 75 1917 for "brilliant observation work" and also mentioned in despatches - On -25 December 2017, Colonelkilled Michael William (1941-47), aged brother of the late Sir John (1944-52) 2nd LtKNILL G H Smith Northamptonshire Regiment, at Lombartzyde, Ypres, on 10 July87, 1917 aged 19 Pte FLACK G Walker-Smith - London2018, Scottish, died ofJohn wounds at Bapaume on 21 aged December 1917 aged 33 (1951-58) and AI (1955-63) - On 2 February Nicholas Gordon (1958-66), 69, brother of MC Lt H D B Snelgrove - Queen's Own Rifles (Canada) attached Royal Flying Corps, missing at Lens on 15 August 1917 and reported dead in LOVIS - On 5 September 2017, Professor John Donald (1941-49), aged 87, brother of the late FB (1936-41) German newspaper a month later aged 23 - In May 2017, John aged 85 Pte M E Sturges - Artists' Rifles, killed LUXTON at Paschendaele 30 October 1917Michael aged 19;(1946-48), his entire platoon was killed 2nd Lt H L Thacker,- MC, - Royal Army2017, Service drowned in the sinking of HMS Arcadian off Milos, Greece in April 1917 aged MANKTELOW On MM 23 September RtCorps, Rev Michael Richard John (1938-45), aged 89, brother of DBS (1940-48) and 21; he drove a tank at Flers in the first ever tank attack for which he was awarded the MM and subsequently after receiving a commission he PAR (1942-49) was also awarded the MC - On 15inAugust Jeffery George OBE 92 Flt Sub Lt J R Tulley - Royal MATHIESON Naval Air Service, killed a flying 2017, accident at Dunquerque on 29(1936-40), June 1917 aged aged 18 Lt T A Turner - Royal Field Artillery, killed in action 26 April 1917 aged 39; a veteran of the 82 Boer War MORGAN - Onat2Arras Aprilon 2018, David William (1946-54), aged 2nd Lt G H Walker - Northamptonshire Regiment, killed in action near Houlthurst Wood, Ypres, 10 November 1917 aged 23 RAE - On 17 August 2017, John Duncan (1934-40), aged 95, father of PJ (1964-70) 2nd Lt H J Warner - Northamptonshire Regiment, killed near Arras on 2 June 1917 aged 30 - On 17near December Brian1917 Cecilaged (1938-45), aged 89 Captain G Whitaker - London RifleRICH Brigade, killed Ypres 20 2017, September 25 2nd Lt E W Whitehead - Royal Air Forece, killed in a flying on Salisbury Plain on 16aged February TOVEY - In Aprilaccident 2017, Alan John (1953-60), 74 1918 aged 19 Rfmn H E Williams - London Rifle Brigade, killed on Menin Road near Ypres on 20 September 1917 aged 25; he was a graduate of London VINCENT - In 2017, Robert (Member of Staff and Director of Music 1980-95), aged 76 University - In February 2017, Dr Fraser on (1943-52), aged 83 22; he was due to transfer to Corpl H W Williams - MiddlesexWADDELL Rifle Volunteers, died of heatstroke in James Mesopotamia 17 July 1917 aged Egypt to take up a commission in the Royal Flying WOOD - OnCorps 19 July 2017, Michael Richard (1937-44), aged 90 2nd Lt P J Williams - East Surrey Regiment, died of wounds in Salonika on 17 May 1917 aged 22; he was a classical scholar of Corpus Christi WRIGHT - On 5 July 2017, Richard Alan Blackmore (1943-51), aged 83 College, Oxford where he was awarded a first class degree and won the Craven and Hertford Scholarships and the Chancellor's Prize for Latin Essay; he was also cox of the Corpus boat Lt C W Wise - Royal Field Artillery, killed at Boesinghe, Ypres on 31 July 1917 aged 25; he was mentioned in despatches

Deaths

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OWs in the News Simon Tho mas (198593), Deputy Head of Mission at the British Embassy in Harare, was the most senior British diplomat resident in Zimbabwe at the time of the resignation of President Mugabe. As Chargé d'Affaires and acting British ambassador, it was his responsibility to advise British nationals in Zimbabwe. With the initial fear of civil unrest, he went on Twitter to say "Stay at home, stay in your hotel room & follow @ FCO travel advice". A few days later, as the situation became less tense, Simon was able to say "It is a huge privilege to be here in Zimbabwe at this historic moment and I got to see for myself last night the amazing outpouring of emotion on the streets of Harare. Today, it really feels as though there's hope in the air. My hope, for the people of Zimbabwe who have suffered so much for so long is that today really marks a turning point and that Zimbabweans will finally get the bright future they deserve". Rory Bu rns (2001-06) has been appointed Captain of Surrey for the coming cricket season. Dominic S ib ley (2007-14), having transferred mid-season from Surrey to Warwickshire, has been named as Vice-Captain of that county for 2018.

enormous change for the company, and serving the board through this has been both challenging and rewarding. It has been extremely satisfying to have played my part in all that we have achieved'. Tari k O'R egan (1989-96) has been made an Honorary Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford, a remarkable acknowledgement of his significance as a composer. It is rare for anyone so young to receive to become an honorary fellow since such an accolade is usually reserved as an acknowledgement of a long and distinguished career not for someone in their thirties. Tarik is working on a fullscale opera about the life of Lorenzo Da Ponte, librettist of three of Mozart's greatest operas, The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni and Cosi Fan Tutte. This work was commissioned by Houston Grand Opera for 2019. Highlights of the 2017/18 season include the Amsterdam revival of Mata Hari, an evening-length ballet commissioned by the Dutch National Ballet, and performances by the Orchestra of the Opéra de Rouen, Lausanne Chamber Orchestra, and the Alexander String Quartet. Benja min Coyl e-La rne r (2006-09), or Loyle Carner as he is known on stage, was nominated for two Brit Awards in 2018 - "British Breakthrough Act" and "British male Solo Artist".

Sir G erry Gri mston e (1960-67) has announced that he will retire as Chairman of Standard Life Aberdeen in 2019. He was widely regarded as being instrumental to the merger with Aberdeen in 2017 and announced his retirement at the same time as it was announced that the group would sell its insurance arm to Phoenix. Gerry Grimstone said "It has been my privilege to serve as chairman for eleven years and I will continue to do so until my successor is in place. The announcement that we have made today, if approved by shareholders, marks the completion of the transformation of the company from Europe's largest mutual life assurance company, to a global investment powerhouse. This has been a period of

Chris Coo ke (1992-2000) will be Guest of Honour at The Celebration of Whitgift Life 2018 to be held in early July. As the Policy Editor of BBC Newsnight, it could be argued that Chris is not "in the news" but makes the news. Chris has been in his present position since 2014, prior to which he successively a leader writer, education correspondent and comment editor for the Financial Times. He has also been an adviser to the former cabinet minister, Lord Willetts. OWs are seen frequently on television financial programmes. Ro bert Par ker (1965-70), former Vice Chairman of Credit Suisse Asset Management, now at Quilvest Wealth, is a regular guest on Bloomberg TV where his views on international markets are listened to with great care. One senior interviewer described his advice “to be measured and pretty accurate over the years". In February 2018, in response to a sharp international sell off, he broadcast his opinion that "nothing had changed from a fundamental perspective" and although he did not know exactly where the market would bottom, this would be likely to be no more than a correction since

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the fundamentals were still intact. R ob Mo ff at (1988-96), of Balderton Capital, when interviewed by Bloomberg on "cryptocurrencies and fintech start-ups" offered views on Bitcoin and suggested that increased demand and swiftly rising prices reflected increased demand stemming from tensions on the Korean peninsula. "It's just created new value out of nowhere," he said "there's no fundamentals behind any of this - it's all based on public perception, so you can start to see some really strange phenomena." Among the companies where Rob is a director is Carwow, a specialist car supplier offering "great offers from the UK's top dealers". The group with host, Kirstie Allsopp Three OWs appeared on the 13th September 2017 edition of Channel 4's ‘Location, Location, Location’. Joe Mur ray (2004-11) Wi lli am Do wnes (2003-11) and Jo e Ra wlinson (2003-11) appeared on the show where hosts Phil Spencer and Kirstie Allsopp try to help them get onto the property ladder. The Croydon Advertiser reported that the three friends applied to be on the show after seeing an online advertisement "a friend suggested we apply on the off chance - you could get on, you never know. It was out of curiosity and almost as a bit of a joke. The show got in touch with us a few minutes after we applied, it was all really quick. I think it's because you don't usually get three The avant-garde artist Anthony l (1956-64) best people applying together to be onMc theCal show." known for his 'solid-light' installations, a series that he began in 1973 with Line Describing a Cone in which a volumetric form composed of projected light slowly Last year WA News noted the remarkable feat of Ollie evolves in three-dimensional space, was the subject of a Stoten (2000-08) in becoming the youngest person to reach major interview in ‘The Spectator’ of 24 February 2018 to the South Pole: newsat ofthe OW expeditions had beenhis sparse mark his exhibition Hepworth Wakefield, first inin previous but when comes along why"The should we not Britain foryears ten years. Theone interviewer writes: be surprised to of findworks it closely followed by three others? Ollie's impermanence of art is a worry for curators icy trek was certainly spectacular but each of these though not usually for artists ... but in New York inenterprises the worthy admiration. early 1970s McCalliscame upofwith the idea of 'solid light works', animated projections of simple abstract shapes in which the beams of projected light assumed a physical presence". Unfortunately, these artworks were only truly effective in dusty, smoky galleries: moving to a modern art gallery rendered them invisible. Frustrated by this, Anthony McCall moved into another career as a designer of art books and catalogues before returning to his original love when the availability of haze machines meant that his work could survive cleanliness. The work that marked his return to his career as an artist, Doubling Back, is among those on show in Wakefield. The interviewer describes it as "magical - viewed from the outside, the slowly moving beam of light appears to be contained by a gauzy membrane that gilds your hand ifP ere youira penetrate its surface; the Dominic (2004-12) and his step friendthrough and fellow membrane andCharlie you enter another dimension, ethereal army reservist Simpson drove the 2018anMongol atmosphere of swirling vapour where you can imagine Rally, one of eight extreme travel charity challenges yourself on organiser the cloudsThe of heaven lookingThe down arrangedseated by event Adventurists. paira shaft of celestial light". raised funds for Help for Heroes, The Brain Tumour

OW Expeditions

Charity, and Cool Earth. The Marchparticipants 2018 included interview with TheTimes rules of are26simple: may an only use a car with the composer Mark-Anthony Turnage who has adapted an engine up to 1 litre in capacity. There is no backup, no ‘Coraline’, the best-selling book by Nei l G aim an (1974-

support and no set route to follow, so those taking part 77),their which inspired a and a have to rely solely on themselves, companions successful film, an opera car wholly unsuitable for the task (in their caseasa 2002 VW for children. Turnage, who Polo). is described in the Dom and Charlie left the Goodwood Circuit on interview Sunday as "one of the grittiest 16th July and took a route through 20 different countries composers", (England, France, Luxembourg, contemporary Netherlands, Germany, chose to adapt ‘Coraline’ Czech Republic, Austria, Hungary, Slovakia, Romania, because of its great Turkey, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, because to of Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakstan,characters Russia andand Mongolia) its appeal to children "all the best children's stories are the conclusion of the Rally in Ulan-Ude in Russia. The dark". ‘Coraline’,a commissioned the Royal Opera as a route featured variety of toughbyterrains, environments "family friendly" work was performed at the Barbican and extreme weather conditions, notably in the five "Stan" Theatre March and April. For Neil himself it has been countriesinand Mongolia. another successful year: ‘Norse Myths’ appeared in paper Dom takes up the Rally experience in his blog: back in early 2018 and immediately went to the higher "Planning the Mongol Rally route really makes clear the reaches of The Times bestsellers; American Gods was scale of this journey. In 38 days we will drive through 20 adapted as a television series (the first series was broadcast countries, over 10,000 miles, across deserts, mountains and in 2017 and the second appears in mid 2018) to seas. If all goes to plan we will set off on from the UK on considerable acclaim; Neil's short story How to Talk to 16th July and arrive in Ulan-Ude in Russia on 22nd August. Girls at Parties has been turned into a film which will be The finish line had been up until last year Ulaanbaatar in shown from May 2018 - in summary this film is described Mongolia, but the Adventurists, who run the Rally, wanted thus "An alien touring the galaxy breaks away from her to mix things up. We'll still drive though Mongolia, they group and meets two young inhabitants of the most have just moved the finish line a day's drive north of the dangerous place in the universe: the London suburb of Mongolian capital, to Ulan-Ude in Russia, so as to make it Croydon" (Need we say more? Ed). Neil is Executive even more of a challenge." Producer for both of these projects. A later entry reads as follows: "Our first day on the Pamirs There is never a quiet time was a baptism of fire. Even at this lower part of the highway for D err en B ro wn (1981- we went through valleys, between mountainname passes, had small rocks falling on the 89). A household in the roof,indrove large rocky overhangs, had roads with no UK, 2017 under he successfully edgeshis whatsoever, sometimes took talents to the USA. only marked out with smaller stones. Of his show ‘Secret’ the New On Times this firstwas legof wethe had misjudged the timings and so this York view was how ourselves that "The we titlefound 'Derren Brown:on top of a mountain at 2am trying tothe findenthrallingly somewhere to camp. There was a wide side Secret', to a bend in the road,show comfortably enough off the road baffling one-mentalist itselfopened and at this in the that on time Tuesday at morning we were happy with anywhere. we pulled up we saw a sign thatTheater, we could the AtlanticAs Theater Company's Linda Gross turns just make out symbol of children As stop we drew out to have soamany meanings thatplaying. you soon closer theThe headlight also revealed a picturesecrets of a skull. counting. most obvious and manifold are This the was a minefield. Alongofsections of thetrade." highway, especially closely guarded tricks Mr. Brown's near borders, thereYork are wrote: old unexploded minesofoff Time Out, New "There areSoviet two kinds the sideatofathe roads. WeThose turned around as be quickly as we people magic show: who like to tricked, and could and made for the nearest town. those who fancy themselves untrickable. Wherever you It was momentitthat had our major car a bit land on at thisthis spectrum, will we be hard not first to be at least trouble. over Just after turning the around pinged, bowled by ‘Secret’, latestsomething from "psychological however by then the car was making many odd noises magician" Derren Brown. Though he'ssoa sizable celeb in his and the roads were so poor that we ignored it. 500 meters native Britain, thanks to his numerous TV specials on further down the road car pingedinagain and something Channel 4, Brown is lessthe well-known the States. But it's fell off. waswhy thehe's bottom of the such front aleft coil. in the easy to Itsee developed following ThisHe wasoozes our first day on the andthe already a part of U.K.: confidence andPamirs charisma, kind you the suspension had given up. We tried running through don't quite trust but can't turn away from nonetheless. In plans of he action: we couldofjust drive really slowly, ‘Secret’, usesmaybe a combination psychological hopefully find hypnosis a spare orand even fill the coil with tennis balls, manipulation, old-fashioned misdirection to but even that where would weIt'sget tennis balls in the spin a webat around his audience. hard to describe the Tajik mountains?" show in detail without giving away the game - and a grand game it is - but suffice to say, it's a combination of jawCongratulations themmoments for completing this journey. dropping "Howtodidthehetwo doofthat?" and inspirational

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speeches that veer dangerously close to the litanies of motivational speakers (perhaps the most influential flimflam artists of our age). Brown is of two minds about all of this: he both wants to wow you with his sleight of mind and debunk the notion that mysticism and divination hold any water. But he takes such obvious pleasure in inspiring wonder at his tricks that it's hard to believe he isn't a believer himself. However you feel about Brown and his mental machinations, what transpires in Secret is enough to make even the most hardened sceptic think twice." Recently Derren appeared on the popular US daytime Today Show with Megyn Kelly to discuss his Channel 4 television special ‘The Push’ and try a social compliance experiment with the studio audience. He was also interviewed on ‘The Late Late Show’ with James Corden, where "he simultaneously read James's mind and persuaded him to snack on a lightbulb". Derren was nominated for a 2018 Olivier Award for his show Underground which will be touring the UK and Ireland later in 2018. Stuart Nunn (2006-12) has been appearing in the acclaimed production of Network at the National Theatre which ended its run in March 2018. This stage adaptation of the Oscar winning 1976 film starred Bryan Cranston (of ‘Breaking Bad’ fame) in the part of Howard Beale originally played in the film by Peter Finch. Stuart studied English and theatre studies at Warwick University and then continued his training at the Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama. A mixture of present and Old Whitgiftians have been very active in the theatrical world. In October 2017, Upper Sixth Formers G eorg e Ja que s, Macau ley Kee per an d Harry S eag er, along with OWs, Gus Flin d- Hen ry (2011-16) and Byron Ea smon (2011-16), performed three sold-out performances of ‘Dilate’, a cautionary tale

about youth drug culture. The Athenaeum Theatre Company, which focuses on current issues relevant to adolescents, was set up earlier the year by George, who wrote the play, and his fellow Whitgiftians (also including Sam W e bber and O scar Nicholson) and was soon expanded to welcome other young people with a passion for acting. The current Whitgiftians are all Drama Scholars (Macauley has been a professional actor for several years) and have appeared in numerous Whitgift productions including ‘Hamlet’, ‘Spamalot’, ‘Bugsy Malone’ and ‘Journey's End’. Hen ry Pa rrit t (2009-16), an experienced Whitgift stage and technical crew member now reading for a degree in technical theatre and stage management at RADA, was a most professional technical director for the production. George was delighted with the response to his work "The play was more positively received than I could ever have hoped for. For me the most powerful response, after gathering audience feedback following the show, came from a boy in his early teens who said that the experience 'changed my perspective on drugs'." George's next project is ‘Breathe’, a play that explores the anxieties of everyday life for adolescents. George has encouraged audiences to support charities involved with young people: for Dilate this was the Daniel Spargo-Mabbs Foundation, which helps educate young people, parents and schools about drug and alcohol issues, and for Breathe it was ‘Childline’.

Honours, Awards and Appointments Timothy Fancourt, QC (197482) has been appointed a judge of the High Court. Sir Timothy will sit in the Chancery Division. After Whitgift he studied law at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge and was called to the Bar by Lincoln's Inn in 1987. He started practice specialising in real property and landlord and tenant law and in 1996 was elected to the Bar Council of England and Wales. He became a Queen's Counsel in 2003 and subsequently practised mainly in contentious contract and property law. He chaired a

regulatory working group on implementation of the Legal Services Act at the newly-devolved Bar Standards Board from 2007 to 2010. He was appointed as a Recorder (Crime) in 2009, became chairman of the Chancery Bar Association in 2012 has also written and edited a number of legal textbooks. He was appointed a Deputy High Court Judge in 2013. Queen's Birthday Honours List 2017: Bri an (1946-53) and Alan (1949-54) Stannah were both awarded the MBE for services to British manufacturing. The brothers are joint Chairmen of their family business, which celebrated its 150th anniversary in 2017. They have worked together for

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MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology as a Career OW Sportsthe Clubs Development Fellow where he investigated how the

over fifty years and have transformed Stannah into a household name: Stannah Stairlift has become the generally used name for the product as surely as Thermos or Hoover. Robbi e Bul loch (1982-90) has been appointed Deputy Rugby Head of Mission the British Embassy in Berlin. to 1 After ten years ofatbeing close to promotion fromPrior Surrey that he served from 2015 to 2017 as Private Secretary to league, it is a pleasure to report that season 2017/18 has the Permanent Under-Secretary of the Foreign and ended with OWRFC at the top of the table and earning Commonwealth Office.Division 3 for next season. Surrey 1 promotion to London is a tough league from which to gain promotion so the In December 2017, Prof esso r An dre w Che sher, FBA team is greatly to be congratulated. It will be interesting to (1960-67), was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of see how they adapt to the higher and more geographically Science by Birmingham University. Andrew Chesher spread league next season. graduated from the University of Birmingham in 1970 with The lower sides and the numerous juniors thrive - and a Bachelor of Social Science in Mathematics, Economics the juniors, in particular, have considerable success. and Statistics. He was a lecturer at Birmingham until 1983 before becoming Professor of Econometrics at the Football & Hockey University of Bristol. He is now Jevons Professor of Both football and hockeyCollege have performed wellrecently in 2017-18: Economics at University London, and the football and Economic 2nd XIs were bothInin2000, the top President of 1st theXI Royal Society. he three of their leagues whilst the Hockey Club 1st XI held its own founded the ESRC Centre for Microdata Methods and in Surrey/Hampshire Regional 1st Division and the 2nd XI Practice. Professor Chesher develops methods to deliver won the Surrey Open League Premier Division. knowledge of human behaviour using observational data.

Cricket

The career of Dr An dr e w Ho ld ing In cricket, the 1st XI(1996-2001) was relegated from Division is remarkable. He1 isofathe Surrey Championship: the pre-season loss of two key Senior Research Associate at Cancer players to other clubs and very variable availability was and too Research UK's Cambridge Institute much to cope with.aThe 2nd XI finished mid table but the Fellow of Downing College, 3rd XI were the starCambridge. turn achieving their second successive promotion - next season will be in thechemistry Premier Division of Andrew studied at Oxford 3rd XIs, majora PhD challenge. and thenatook at the Cambridge focussing on how For the Whitgift Mitres, thewe 2017 Cup was a nature makes the antibiotics useCricketer to treat antibioticfiasco we were unable to raise a team and were obliged resistant infections including MRSA. In 2009, he moved to to concede the first round match to Eastbourne. At a time when the array of excellent OW cricketers has never been greater this is a desperately disappointing state of affairs. Never mind our numerous current and recent county representatives there are many OWs playing in the Surrey Raman Su bbaPremier R ow, Division C BE (1943-50), Championship (on manydoyen weekends in the of OW cricketers, is the subject of aand delightful 2017 season, Wimbledon, Ashtead Weybridge each biography by Douglas Miller entitled featured three OWs, Sutton had twoRaman and Banstead as Subba Row - Cricket Visionary. many as five) from whom we should be able to pick a Millerteam. says of Raman that his considerable strong achievements on the cricket field were secondary to his subsequent impact as an administrator whereMore he pioneered commercial det ail of all t hese sponsorship acti vities ca n be read o n a

machinery within cells interacts to undertake basic processes including the replication of DNA. In 2013, Andrew moved to the Cambridge Institute, where he leads a team focusing on the molecular processes that drive breast cancer. In 2015, Andrew was awarded Cancer Research UK's inaugural 'Rising Star in Research Engagement' prize for his work. Andrew Holding was also selected as one of 175 faces of Chemistry by the Royal Society of Chemistry for a combination of his research in "fields of science crucial for improving human wellbeing" and his investment of "huge amounts of time and energy in establishing science communication, engagement, and outreach initiatives for scientists and laypeople alike" In 2015 he was appointed as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry. Alongside his Golf research, Andrew has worked hard to promote academic The Halford Hewitt competition 2018He ended early with science and engagement with thefor public. has written for a first round defeat to Downside (3-2)and butconvinced at least weand the Guardian, presented for the BBC progressed to thetosemi-final of the Plate competition trained scientists do stand-up routines about their beating Wellingborough, Forest and Loretto before losing .research at local comedy venues. to Edinburgh Academy. The OW Golf Society continues to thrive: members play a mixture of matches, golf days and even a few days on tour.

Chess Under the careful guidance of Nig el Cal lo w (1983-91), the Chess Club is moving forward and has now joined the Croydon District Chess League Division 2. Having warmed up with an 8-0 win over the School in the 25th annual Leonard Barden Cup match (the OWs lead the series 191/2 - 51/2), the team have beaten Coulsdon Chess Fellowship 21/2-11/2and South Norwood 31/2-1/2 with On Wednesday Ma jor PatClubhouse. rick Crystal Palace the18th nextOctober opponents at the Ma rslan d-Ro TD sets (1953-60) was the The Club usesber thetschess supplied byinstalled the WA,aswhich the. new Master of The Worshipful Company of Carmen helped launch the Chess Club on its winning way. at The Services: Church of St Martin Within, Ludgate Hill,, where he was supported by other OW liverymen Shooting In its 121st year, the Whitgift Veterans Rifle Club continues

The to flourish.Services

Jon Swi ft, OBE (1983-91) has been promoted Brigadier Water Polo &Swimming and appointed to command 38th Irish Brigade. Mi ke Corn we ll (1984-92) andClub Matth e w B irch (1987The Old Whitgiftian Swimming (OWSC) is made up 92) have both been to the rank Colonel. of two distinct parts promoted = the “wallowers� andofthe water polo players, both of whom use the pool at Whitgift School. The water polo teams compete in four water polo competitions. During March to October one team is entered in the London league (currently playing in Division 2) followed by two teams in the Surrey league (in Divisions potential of television 1 and 2). Inand therecognised winter onethe team competes in the money. Thameside league. The former Minister This breadth of introduction competition by means thatPrime players span aSir John Major (whose thoughts on cricketing wide range of ages and abilities and have games all year matters are always worth reading) describes round. Raman as having the "remorseless logic and inner steel to take the action that turned ideas intoinaccomplished regular ba sis t he bi-mo ntfact". hly O W Ne wsletter.

Publications with a Whitgiftian interest

Seventeen PagePage Twenty-One


In his new book, The English People at War in the Age of Henry VIII, P rof esso r Steven Gunn (1971-78) examines the many wars fought by Henry VIII against the French and Scots, against rebels in England and the Gaelic lords of Ireland, even against his traditional allies in the Low Countries and asks how much these wars really affected his subjects and what role Henry's reign played in the long-term transformation of England's military capabilities. The answers to these questions are sought in parish and borough account books, wills and memoirs, buildings and paintings, letters from Henry's captains, and the notes readers wrote in their printed history books. It looks back from Henry's reign to that of his grandfather, Edward IV, who in 1475 invaded France in the afterglow of the Hundred Years War, and forward to that of Henry's daughter Elizabeth, who was trying by the 1570s to shape a trained militia and a powerful navy to defend England in a Europe increasingly polarised by religion. War, it shows, marked Henry's England at every turn: in the news and prophecies people discussed, in the money towns and villages spent on armour, guns, fortifications, and warning beacons, in the way noblemen used their power. War disturbed economic life, made men buy weapons and learn how to use them, and shaped people's attitudes to the king and to national history. War mobilised a high proportion of the English population and conditioned their relationships with the French and Scots, the Welsh and the Irish. War concludes Professor Gunn should be recognised as one of the defining features of life in the England of Henry VIII. In addition, Steven Gunn's talk entitled Everyday Death in Shakespeare's England is available on the Bodleian Library Podcast (or BODcast) and offers a fascinating insight into accidental deaths in Shakespeare's day. Coroners' inquest reports into accidental deaths tell us about the hazards of everyday life. There were dangerous jobs, not just building, mining and farming, but also fetching water; travel was perilous whether by cart, horse or boat. Even relaxation had its risks, from football and wrestling to maypoledancing or a game of bowls on the frozen River Cherwell. The latest book of G eof frey Elliott (1949-55) is entitled A Forgotten Man and is a biography of John Lodwick (1916-1959), one of the great novelists of the early twentieth century whose novels, and indeed his own extraordinary life story, have been virtually lost to the mists of time. Geoffrey Elliott, for the first

time, pieces together Lodwick's eventful life, from his youth in Ireland, to his wartime experiences in the SOE and Special Boat Service, his subsequent literary career and his untimely death in a car crash in Spain at the age of just 43. Initially acclaimed by Somerset Maugham and Anthony Burgess, soon after his death Lodwick's novels fell out of fashion and they have largely remained out-of-print since. Elliott makes the case for a revival in the fortunes of this singular English novelist, in a biography which sheds new light on the early twentieth century literary scene, the surrealist art world and the real-life experiences of World War II. Geoffrey Elliott has written numerous books, most with a link to the secret world of intelligence and special operations which reflects his National Service as a Russian language specialist. Dr Tony Percy (195665), whose award of a PhD at the advanced age of 69 was recorded in last year's edition of WA News, has published a book based on his doctoral thesis. Misdefending the Realm, which is described as "a shocking account of MI5's failings during the era of the Nazi-Soviet Pact. Its author, historian Dr Antony Percy, is the world's leading authority on Russian espionage within MI5 during the Nazi-Soviet Pact. He spent four years piecing together the untold extent of communist infiltration of MI5 and other government departments during the Second World War�. The book has been well received by knowledgeable critics and provides a glimpse of the extraordinary depth of knowledge that Tony has acquired through the most diligent research of archives and recently declassified documents: the revelations of complacency and connivance in the face of subversion is truly alarming even after several generations. Dr Ja mes E vans (198994) has written a book described by The Times as 'Marvellously engaging' and by the Daily Telegraph as 'Brisk, informative and eyeopening'. Emigrants was an Evening Standard Number 1 Bestseller. During the course of the seventeenth century nearly 400,000 people left Britain for the Americas, most of them from England. Crossing the Atlantic was a major undertaking, the voyage long and treacherous. There was little hope of returning to see the friends and family who stayed behind. Why did so many go?

Page Eighteen


A significant number went for religious reasons, either on the Mayflower or as part of the mass migration to New England; some sought their fortunes in gold, fish or fur; some went to farm tobacco in Virginia, a booming trade which would enmesh Europe in a new addiction. Some went because they were loyal to the deposed Stuart king, while others yearned for an entirely new ambition - the freedom to think as they chose. Then there were the desperate: starving and impoverished people who went because things had not worked out in the Old World and there was little to lose from trying again in the New. Emigrants casts light on this unprecedented population shift - a phenomenon that underpins the rise of modern America. Using contemporary sources including diaries, court hearings and letters, James Evans brings to light the extraordinary personal stories of the men and women who made the journey of a lifetime. James Evans read history at Oriel College, Oxford and subsequently published his DPhil thesis under the title Great Britain and the Creation of Yugoslavia: Negotiating Balkan Nationality and Identity. Since university he has worked on producing multiple television historical

documentaries as well as helping to write the accompanying books for the series. His first major book, Merchant Adventurers: The Voyage of Discovery that Transformed Tudor England (2013) used the primary source of a story he came across during a television project. It tells the story of the failed 1553 voyage to reach China and the Spice Islands of the Company of Merchant Adventurers to New Lands and the principals, Richard Chancellor, Sebastian Cabot and Sir Hugh Willoughby. It was published in the USA as Tudor Adventurers: An Arctic Voyage of Discovery: The Hunt for the Northeast Passage. For those with a taste for the macabre, G raha m Mast erton (1957-62) has published his latest Katie Maguire crime novel, which will be available in paperback in the autumn. Dead Men Whistling starts with the discovery of a decapitated policeman in a graveyard ...

Sport It is a privilege to report that we have a World Cup winning OW footballer. Cal lum Hudson - Odo i (2012-15) of Chelsea FC Academy was a member of the Under 17 World Cup winning England team. He has since made his first team début for Chelsea. In the World Cup final, Callum laid on perfect passes that led to goals for England in their 5-2 defeat of Spain. Continuing the footballing theme, Victor Mos es (2004-07) became the first OW to win a Premiership League title medal. In May 2017, with Chelsea crowned as champions, the Independent included the following statement: "Victor Moses is the indispensable man on the best side in the country. No-one else at Chelsea can do what he does and without him, Antonio Conte's 3-4-3 system, his 93-point team, would collapse" - this was an astonishing turn round for Victor after a number of years languishing on loan or failing to make the first team. Victor was also the first OW to appear in an FA Cup Final, although Chelsea did not win, and has now made over 200 Premier League appearances as well as earning 29 caps for Nigeria. He was voted ‘Goal African Player of the Year’ and Nigerian ‘Player of the Year’ and was shortlisted for the BBC ‘African Player of the Year 2017’.

After a period of mixed fortunes with Chelsea, Vitesse Arnhem and Ajax, Be rtran d T rao ré (2011-13) moved for a transfer fee reputed to be worth up to £16m to Olympique Lyon in the French Ligue 1. Season 2017-18 has proved to be an outstanding one for Bertrand. As at end March 2018 he had scored 14 goals, including four in the Europa League, and Lyon were third in the table. Bertrand has continued to play in the Burkina Faso national team. During the successful 2017/18 one day campaign against Australia, Jason Roy (2004-08) went past the milestone of 50 appearances for England. This included a record score of 180 (off 151 balls) at the Melbourne Cricket Ground, the highest individual score for England in ODIs and the highest ODI score at the ground. In that match Jason and Joe Root had the highest ever 3rd wicket partnership for England, with 221 runs off 220 balls. By March 2018 he had represented England in 57 one day and 27 T20 international matches. Elliot D aly (2006-11), who played in all three Test Matches for the British and Irish Lions on their successful 2017 tour to New Zealand, scored tries against Australia and Samoa in the autumn 2017 internationals and, in England's disappointing 2018 Six

Page Nineteen


Nations' tournament, scored two tries against Ireland and a penalty goal from his own half against France. Ma rlan d Yar de (2008-10) went on the England tour to Argentina in summer 2017 and scored a try in one of the two international matches. Part way through the 2017-18, Marland made a much publicised move from Harlequins to Sale Sharks. He was joined on the Argentinian tour by Har ry Will ia ms (2002-10) who played in both internationals, earning his first England caps. Harry has since played in the three autumn internationals and in three of the 2018 Six Nations' matches. Congratulations are due to D anie l Bo wry (2008-16), who made his full international début for the Antigua and Barbuda football team in March 2018 against Jamaica and to R enny Smith (2010-13), now playing for Südtirol in Bolzano, Italy who has played for Austria under 19, for whom he qualifies through an Austrian grandfather. The School's website also reports news of current pupils or recent leavers representing age group teams for Belgium, Germany, Ireland and Wales. Jonty Griffiths England and Great Britain (right) Previous editions of WA News have reported on the successes of OW hockey players, particularly at England under 21 level. Jonty Gri ffith s (2009-13) has become an established England and Great Britain international and has been joined by Luke Taylor (2009-13) -right - who made his début for England in the Odisha World Hockey League Finals in India and has since gone on to represent Great Britain. Rhys Smith (2007-15) was a member of the England U21 team in the EuroHockey Junior Championships. What is striking about this particular tournament is that although England finished in 5th place, Rhys was named Player of the Tournament, hinting at his influence and future potential. In the competition Rhys was joined by Jack W all er (201315) who was captain of the team and by Zach Wal lace a current VI former. Zach, aged only 17, has since gone on to train with the full England squad. Joe Choon g (2008-13) and S am Cur ry (2005-12) both appeared in the Modern Pentathlon World Cup event held in Los Angeles in March 2018. In the Rugby Premiership for 2017-18 there has been OW representation as follows: London Wasps - E lliot Daly (2006-11), Danny Ci pri ani (2001-07); Harlequins:

Henry Ch ees em an (2006-14), Geor ge Merr ick (2009-11), Stan South (2012-14); Exeter Chiefs: Har ry Will ia ms (2002-10); Sale Sharks: Mar lan d Yar de (200810) after his move from Harlequins; Saracens: Matt Gall aghe r (2013-15); Leicester Tigers: A da m Thom pstone (1999-2006). Both Stan South and Matt Gall aghe r were among nominees for Breakthrough Player of the Year for their performances in the Anglo-Welsh Cup. There were three OW players at Twickenham for the 2017 Premiership cup final Wasps v Exeter. Alex Hog g (2009-16) of Keble College again won his Blue in the losing Oxford team at Twickenham in December 2017. The 2018 Oxford v Cambridge hockey match was even more a celebration of Whitgift than that of 2017 as the three OWs who played for Oxford last year, G eorg e Oye bo de (2008-16) of Exeter College, Noah Francis (2008-16) of St John's College and Ryan Kavan agh (2007-14) of Worcester College were joined by a Cambridge representative, Ma rcel He dm an (2009-17) of Churchill College. Oxford's 3-1 win was merely a reflection of the Whitgiftian representation. Davi d Pea rson (2009-15), now of St Hilda's College, made his second varsity match appearance against Cambridge in the Duathlon competition held in February 2018. He won the competition by a convincing margin and was part of the successful Oxford team. In domestic first class cricket Rory Burns (2001-06) again scored over 1000 Championship runs in 2017. Jason Roy (2004-08), was required regularly for England one day matches but, when available for Surrey, also scored heavily. Rory became the third OW batsman (after Do minic Sibl ey and L auri e Evans) to score a double century in recent seasons. Rory scored 219 not out against Hampshire. By the end of the 2017 season Rory had scored 11 centuries and 35 half centuries in first class cricket. After a good start to the season, Do min ic Si bley (2007-14) announced his move from Surrey to Warwickshire, where he made an immediate impact in all forms of the professional game. L auri e Evans (19982004) played for Sussex in 2017, did not establish himself in the Championship side but had some successful performances in the shorter forms of the game. Michae l Burg ess (2004-08) played for Sussex and for whom he made a promising start. His score of 146 against Nottinghamshire made him the seventh OW to score a first class century in recent years. Fre ddie v an den Ber gh (2003-10) played in the Surrey team during 2017 but mainly played 2nd XI cricket, often as captain. Ryan Pate l (2009-16), Captain of School Cricket in 2016 played four matches for Surrey with a highest score of 81 against Hampshire. The 2018 season has started with J am ie S mith, the current School Cricket Captain, touring with the full Surrey squad and scoring useful runs against first class opposition. This Surrey tour included no fewer than four OWs, namely Burns, Patel, Smith and van den Bergh.

Page Twenty


OW Sports Clubs

Rugby

Golf

After ten years of being close to promotion from Surrey 1 league, it is a pleasure to report that season 2017/18 has ended with OWRFC at the top of the table and earning promotion to London Division 3 for next season. Surrey 1 is a tough league from which to gain promotion so the team is greatly to be congratulated. It will be interesting to see how they adapt to the higher and more geographically spread league next season. The lower sides and the numerous juniors thrive - and the juniors, in particular, have considerable success.

The Halford Hewitt competition for 2018 ended early with a first round defeat to Downside (3-2) but at least we progressed to the semi-final of the Plate competition beating Wellingborough, Forest and Loretto before losing to Edinburgh Academy. The OW Golf Society continues to thrive: members play a mixture of matches, golf days and even a few days on tour.

Football & Hockey Both football and hockey have performed well in 2017-18: the football 1st XI and 2nd XIs were both in the top three of their leagues whilst the Hockey Club 1st XI held its own in Surrey/Hampshire Regional 1st Division and the 2nd XI won the Surrey Open League Premier Division.

Cricket In cricket, the 1st XI was relegated from Division 1 of the Surrey Championship: the pre-season loss of two key players to other clubs and very variable availability was too much to cope with. The 2nd XI finished mid table but the 3rd XI were the star turn achieving their second successive promotion - next season will be in the Premier Division of 3rd XIs, a major challenge. For the Whitgift Mitres, the 2017 Cricketer Cup was a fiasco - we were unable to raise a team and were obliged to concede the first round match to Eastbourne. At a time when the array of excellent OW cricketers has never been greater this is a desperately disappointing state of affairs. Never mind our numerous current and recent county representatives there are many OWs playing in the Surrey Championship Premier Division (on many weekends in the 2017 season, Wimbledon, Ashtead and Weybridge each featured three OWs, Sutton had two and Banstead as many as five) from whom we should be able to pick a strong team.

Chess Under the careful guidance of Nig el Cal lo w (1983-91), the Chess Club is moving forward and has now joined the Croydon District Chess League Division 2. Having warmed up with an 8-0 win over the School in the 25th annual Leonard Barden Cup match (the OWs lead the series 191/2 - 51/2), the team have beaten Coulsdon Chess Fellowship 21/2-11/2and South Norwood 31/2-1/2 with Crystal Palace the next opponents at the Clubhouse. The Club uses the chess sets supplied by the WA, which helped launch the Chess Club on its winning way.

Shooting In its 121st year, the Whitgift Veterans Rifle Club continues to flourish.

Water Polo &Swimming The Old Whitgiftian Swimming Club (OWSC) is made up of two distinct parts = the “wallowers� and the water polo players, both of whom use the pool at Whitgift School. The water polo teams compete in four water polo competitions. During March to October one team is entered in the London league (currently playing in Division 2) followed by two teams in the Surrey league (in Divisions 1 and 2). In the winter one team competes in the Thameside league. This breadth of competition means that players span a wide range of ages and abilities and have games all year round.

More det ail of all t hese acti vities ca n be read o n a regular ba sis in t he bi-mo nt hly O W Ne wsletter.

Page Twenty-One


Miscellaneous

Capel Manor House The death in 2016 of the world famous architect, Michael Manser, drew considerable attention to one of his smaller but highly regarded commissions, Capel Manor House, built as a weekend house for John Ho wa rd (1924-30), MP for Southampton Test and Parliamentary Private Secretary to Edward Heath. The obituary of Manser in the Daily Telegraph included the following: "(he) was a prolific pioneer of steel-framed houses in the 1950s and 60s, bringing the industrial clarity of Mies van der Rohe's glass boxes to rural south-east England. He built several masterpieces of the genre, most notably Capel Manor House in Kent, built in 1971 ... amid the ruins of an Italianate villa which had been demolished after the Second World War. Writing in The Sunday Telegraph in 2000, Caroline McGhie described it as a 'deliciously minimalist 1960s glass oblong... a jewel of a building, influenced by Mies van der Rohe's idea of the 'transparent envelope'.' In 2013 English Heritage recognised the house as one of the most important examples of modernist architecture in Britain, awarding it a Grade II* listing.

Rev Can on Feli x B oyse, L VO (1930-35) celebrated his 100th birthday on 6th July 2017. He has been a priest for 76 years. His church, St Peter and St Paul, West Wittering, where members of the congregation include Juli an K enne dy- Cooke (Staff 1953-89) and Nig el Cart er (1953-62), who is a church warden, marked this notable occasion with choral evensong on the preceding Sunday. Felix Boyse was appointed LVO in the Queen's Birthday Honours in 1978 for his services as an Honorary Chaplain to the Queen. During his long and varied career, Canon Boyse was principal of St George's Anglican theological college in Jerusalem and was later chaplain at Hampton

Court Palace. He recalls that as a boy in the 1920s he was much struck by the beauty of the Ethiopian processional cross at Croydon Parish Church. This cross is still in regular use at what is now Croydon Minster; it incorporates an etching of the Madonna and Child, Geez inscriptions and avian embellishment. The birds represent messengers of peace and call to mind the dove which returned to Noah's Ark with "an olive leaf pluckt off." By coincidence, the Chapel Royal at Hampton Court also holds a splendid Ethiopian processional cross presented by an Ethiopian priest who had studied at St George's Anglican theological college in Jerusalem when Canon Boyse was Principal.

Mar tin J arv is, OBE (1953-60) filled the chilly afternoon of 28th March 2018 with delight as BBC Radio 4 broadcast ‘Moonraker’ by Ian Fleming. Martin directed this production, which was produced by his wife Rosalind Ayres. This was their seventh James Bond adaptation for radio described by the BBC as "this surprisingly up-to-date, all-star guided missile drama" - it was the third book in the James Bond series and was published in 1955. The production starred Toby Jones as Bond and Samuel West as Sir Hugo Drax but the true delight for all OWs was to hear Martin Jarvis taking the part of Ian Fleming as narrator. The Times described Martin as sounding like Just William who, having grown up, has gone to the bad!

Page Twenty-Two


the fundamentals were still intact. R ob Mo ff at (1988-96), of Balderton Capital, when interviewed by Bloomberg on "cryptocurrencies and fintech start-ups" offered views on Bitcoin and suggested that increased demand and swiftly rising prices reflected increased demand stemming from tensions on the Korean peninsula. "It's just created new value out of nowhere," he said "there's no fundamentals behind any of this - it's all based on public perception, so you can start to see some really strange phenomena." Among the companies where Rob is a director is Carwow, a specialist car supplier offering "great offers from the UK's top dealers". The group with host, Kirstie Allsopp Three OWs appeared on the 13th September 2017 edition of Channel 4's ‘Location, Location, Location’. Joe Mur ray (2004-11) Wi lli am Do wnes (2003-11) and Jo e Ra wlinson (2003-11) appeared on the show where hosts Phil Spencer and Kirstie Allsopp try to help them get onto the property ladder. The Croydon Advertiser reported that the three friends applied to be on the show after seeing an online advertisement "a friend suggested we apply on the off chance - you could get on, you never know. It was out of curiosity and almost as a bit of a joke. The show got in touch with us a few minutes after we applied, it was all really quick. I think it's because you don't usually get three The avant-garde artist Anthony l (1956-64) best people applying together to be onMc theCal show." known for his 'solid-light' installations, a series that he began in 1973 with Line Describing a Cone in which a volumetric form composed of projected light slowly Last year WA News noted the remarkable feat of Ollie evolves in three-dimensional space, was the subject of a Stoten (2000-08) in becoming the youngest person to reach major interview in ‘The Spectator’ of 24 February 2018 to the South Pole: newsat ofthe OW expeditions had beenhis sparse mark his exhibition Hepworth Wakefield, first inin previous but when comes along why"The should we not Britain foryears ten years. Theone interviewer writes: be surprised to of findworks it closely followed by three others? Ollie's impermanence of art is a worry for curators icy trek was certainly spectacular but each of these though not usually for artists ... but in New York inenterprises the worthy admiration. early 1970s McCalliscame upofwith the idea of 'solid light works', animated projections of simple abstract shapes in which the beams of projected light assumed a physical presence". Unfortunately, these artworks were only truly effective in dusty, smoky galleries: moving to a modern art gallery rendered them invisible. Frustrated by this, Anthony McCall moved into another career as a designer of art books and catalogues before returning to his original love when the availability of haze machines meant that his work could survive cleanliness. The work that marked his return to his career as an artist, Doubling Back, is among those on show in Wakefield. The interviewer describes it as "magical - viewed from the outside, the slowly moving beam of light appears to be contained by a gauzy membrane that gilds your hand ifP ere youira penetrate its surface; the Dominic (2004-12) and his step friendthrough and fellow membrane andCharlie you enter another dimension, ethereal army reservist Simpson drove the 2018anMongol atmosphere of swirling vapour where you can imagine Rally, one of eight extreme travel charity challenges yourself on organiser the cloudsThe of heaven lookingThe down arrangedseated by event Adventurists. paira shaft of celestial light". raised funds for Help for Heroes, The Brain Tumour

OW Expeditions

Charity, and Cool Earth. The Marchparticipants 2018 included interview with TheTimes rules of are26simple: may an only use a car with the composer Mark-Anthony Turnage who has adapted an engine up to 1 litre in capacity. There is no backup, no ‘Coraline’, the best-selling book by Nei l G aim an (1974-

support and no set route to follow, so those taking part 77),their which inspired a and a have to rely solely on themselves, companions successful film, an opera car wholly unsuitable for the task (in their caseasa 2002 VW for children. Turnage, who Polo). is described in the Dom and Charlie left the Goodwood Circuit on interview Sunday as "one of the grittiest 16th July and took a route through 20 different countries composers", (England, France, Luxembourg, contemporary Netherlands, Germany, chose to adapt ‘Coraline’ Czech Republic, Austria, Hungary, Slovakia, Romania, because of its great Turkey, Georgia, Azerbaijan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, because to of Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakstan,characters Russia andand Mongolia) its appeal to children "all the best children's stories are the conclusion of the Rally in Ulan-Ude in Russia. The dark". ‘Coraline’,a commissioned the Royal Opera as a route featured variety of toughbyterrains, environments "family friendly" work was performed at the Barbican and extreme weather conditions, notably in the five "Stan" Theatre March and April. For Neil himself it has been countriesinand Mongolia. another successful year: ‘Norse Myths’ appeared in paper Dom takes up the Rally experience in his blog: back in early 2018 and immediately went to the higher "Planning the Mongol Rally route really makes clear the reaches of The Times bestsellers; American Gods was scale of this journey. In 38 days we will drive through 20 adapted as a television series (the first series was broadcast countries, over 10,000 miles, across deserts, mountains and in 2017 and the second appears in mid 2018) to seas. If all goes to plan we will set off on from the UK on considerable acclaim; Neil's short story How to Talk to 16th July and arrive in Ulan-Ude in Russia on 22nd August. Girls at Parties has been turned into a film which will be The finish line had been up until last year Ulaanbaatar in shown from May 2018 - in summary this film is described Mongolia, but the Adventurists, who run the Rally, wanted thus "An alien touring the galaxy breaks away from her to mix things up. We'll still drive though Mongolia, they group and meets two young inhabitants of the most have just moved the finish line a day's drive north of the dangerous place in the universe: the London suburb of Mongolian capital, to Ulan-Ude in Russia, so as to make it Croydon" (Need we say more? Ed). Neil is Executive even more of a challenge." Producer for both of these projects. A later entry reads as follows: "Our first day on the Pamirs There is never a quiet time was a baptism of fire. Even at this lower part of the highway for D err en B ro wn (1981- we went through valleys, between mountainname passes, had small rocks falling on the 89). A household in the roof,indrove large rocky overhangs, had roads with no UK, 2017 under he successfully edgeshis whatsoever, sometimes took talents to the USA. only marked out with smaller stones. Of his show ‘Secret’ the New On Times this firstwas legof wethe had misjudged the timings and so this York view was how ourselves that "The we titlefound 'Derren Brown:on top of a mountain at 2am trying tothe findenthrallingly somewhere to camp. There was a wide side Secret', to a bend in the road,show comfortably enough off the road baffling one-mentalist itselfopened and at this in the that on time Tuesday at morning we were happy with anywhere. we pulled up we saw a sign thatTheater, we could the AtlanticAs Theater Company's Linda Gross turns just make out symbol of children As stop we drew out to have soamany meanings thatplaying. you soon closer theThe headlight also revealed a picturesecrets of a skull. counting. most obvious and manifold are This the was a minefield. Alongofsections of thetrade." highway, especially closely guarded tricks Mr. Brown's near borders, thereYork are wrote: old unexploded minesofoff Time Out, New "There areSoviet two kinds the sideatofathe roads. WeThose turned around as be quickly as we people magic show: who like to tricked, and could and made for the nearest town. those who fancy themselves untrickable. Wherever you It was momentitthat had our major car a bit land on at thisthis spectrum, will we be hard not first to be at least trouble. over Just after turning the around pinged, bowled by ‘Secret’, latestsomething from "psychological however by then the car was making many odd noises magician" Derren Brown. Though he'ssoa sizable celeb in his and the roads were so poor that we ignored it. 500 meters native Britain, thanks to his numerous TV specials on further down the road car pingedinagain and something Channel 4, Brown is lessthe well-known the States. But it's fell off. waswhy thehe's bottom of the such front aleft coil. in the easy to Itsee developed following ThisHe wasoozes our first day on the andthe already a part of U.K.: confidence andPamirs charisma, kind you the suspension had given up. We tried running through don't quite trust but can't turn away from nonetheless. In plans of he action: we couldofjust drive really slowly, ‘Secret’, usesmaybe a combination psychological hopefully find hypnosis a spare orand even fill the coil with tennis balls, manipulation, old-fashioned misdirection to but even that where would weIt'sget tennis balls in the spin a webat around his audience. hard to describe the Tajik mountains?" show in detail without giving away the game - and a grand game it is - but suffice to say, it's a combination of jawCongratulations themmoments for completing this journey. dropping "Howtodidthehetwo doofthat?" and inspirational

PagePage Twenty-Three Fifteen


"Tour de Edimbourg": 2 men. 2 bikes. 400 miles. 48 hours. On Thursday 27th July 2017, two OWs - Ben Ol ive ira (2002-09) and Ca rl Plins ton (2002-09) set off on a 400 mile cycle from Windsor Castle to Edinburgh Castle: they aimed to complete the ride in just 48 hours and to raise money for Great Ormond Street Hospital. Surpassing their expectations, they arrived on Saturday 29th July at 10am, with 30 minutes to spare. The challenge was not plain sailing: one of Ben's spokes broke near Kendal, Cumbria - the pair decided to risk it and carry on, as they were not sure they could spare the time to get it fixed. Then, 35 miles from Edinburgh, with only 5 hours left until the deadline, Carl's gear chain snapped which forced a hasty roadside repair and resulted in Carl having only three gears for the final stretch. Relatively speaking the bikes completed the course in considerably better condition than both cyclists - Ben and Carl endured the whole 48 hours with only a single hour of sleep (in Carlisle). In total, Ben and Carl cycled 400 miles and climbed 8,856 metres - 8 metres higher than Mount Everest. Professional photographer D anny Fitz pat rick (1987-93) and his university friend Andrew Strachan set themselves a challenge for April 2018: travel to Laos and paddle board down the Mekong River. They came up with the idea whilst enjoying a paddle boarding expedition from the source of the Thames. That trip took a week to cover the 215mile journey. Danny commented on his Thames experience, "It was essentially my first time on a paddle board. The slow progress on the initial day due to the shallow water, reed beds and fallen trees meant we had plenty of catching up to do. It was a fantastic experience

from start to finish though, what with the constantly changing scenery and wildlife along the way. It made me realise that if you just put your head down and focus on the immediate task in front of you, it will happen. Don't think about the next 24 miles, just focus on the next mile and forget about the rest". Danny and Andrew's website explains their motivation: "Danny had something that had been bugging him for nearly 20 years. On honeymoon, he and his wife talked about buying a local canoe and paddling down the Mekong from the Chinese / Laos boarder - but they didn't. Danny wimped out. And it has bugged the hell out of him ever since... But Andy liked the idea and so Danny had a chance to redeem himself although Andy did suggest making it harder by doing it on SUPs (paddleboards). Oh, and Andy also suggested that we collect all the rubbish we find in the river during our journey. And not use any single use plastic ourselves.... So there it is - Paddle boarding down the Mekong from Huai Xai to Luang Prabang in 35 degree heat, sleeping on the river bank, collecting rubbish and drinking from the river. Sorted." The intrepid travellers met up in Huai Xai, on the Thai/Laos boarder on 8 April ready for their 199 mile trip on the Mekong to Luang Prabang, in central Laos. Among the challenges: heat, sleeping on river banks and filtering river water to drink. When asked about the trip, Danny said "Initially, I thought the biggest challenge would be the heat - 40 degrees is not a temperature you want to be doing any exercise in, let alone paddling 50 km per day. However, now we have managed to find out more about the river, the heat will be the least of our concerns! A 7 knot current with sharp rocks, back flow, whirlpools and unexploded ordnance may be encountered along the way. We are, however, very much looking forward to meeting the locals on our travels. Laos is a very friendly country and I am sure the kids will go crazy when we arrive on paddle boards". Danny and Andrew are raising money for charity the Mine Advisory Group (MAG), an NGO which helps people in conflict-affected communities rid their land of unexploded landmines and UXO (unexploded ordnance).

For thos e OWs who h ave not visit e d the School fo r a long t im e it can be quit e daunting to return suffic e to say th ere will be a wa rm welcom e. C onta ct the Whitg ifti an Assoc iation o ff ice at th e School, visit an d be amaz e d!

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L/Cpl C E Johnson - Artists' Rifles, killed at Passchendaele 30 October 1917 aged 30 Lt H B Keable - Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, killed on HMS Manxman on a date unspecified in 1918 aged 30; brother of R, Army Chaplain and subsequently best-selling novelist 2nd Lt T F Kesterton - Royal Air Force, killed on a date unknown in 1918 aged 27 2nd Lt N H Kimpton - Royal Field Artillery, died of wounds caused by shell fire at Boesinghe near Ypres on 14 July 1917 aged 20 2nd Lt L Lloyd - Hampshire Regiment, killed by shell fire at Langemarck Station near Ypres on 9 October 1917 aged 19 We have, with regret, to record the deaths of the following OWs reported since the preparation Captain J H N Mabey - London Regiment, died in Cairo on 18 November 1917 of wounds received at Beersheba aged 36; one of the of the previous edition of OW News: original founders of the OWRFC Lt F R Matthews - East Surrey Regiment, missing and subsequently presumed dead at Morey near Arras on 23 March 1918 aged 26; fought on the Somme, at Ypres, in Italy,BEDBROOK at Arras and Messines; mentioned in2017 despatches; Surrey trials for rugby - On 7 November Eric Willis (1937-43), aged 91 2nd Lt L W Middleton - Royal Flying Corps, killed while on artillery observation duty at Hollebeke near Ypres on 8 November 1917 aged BENCE - On 23 December 2017, Roger Thomas John (1950-57), aged 78 22 BLACKMORE - On 20 on February 2018, John Ashurst 77 Captain A L W Neave - The Guides Indian Army, killed a date unknown in 1918 aged(1951-60), 24; he had aaged distinguished career at Sandhurst Lt H B New - Essex Regiment attached Royal Flying Corps, by a fall from an aeroplane at Boiry onaged 31 October 1917 aged 25; railway BONNEY - In August 2017, killed Rev Professor Richard John (1957-65), 70 engineer in South America; brother of AW who was killed in May 1918 BREWSTER - On 4 December 2017, David John (1948-54), aged 81 Lt J S Noble - Royal Berkshire Regiment, died of wounds received at Cambrai on 30 March 1918 aged 19; he was a professional soldier having left school for Sandhurst BUSTIN - On 2 December 2017, Ronald George (1953-59), aged 76 2nd Lt D R Nyren - Royal Fusiliers, killedCLOUTTE during the German offensive Bertincourt on 23aged March - In January 2017,near Bruce (1934-38), 95 1918 aged 24; a graduate of Trinity College, Cambridge, he was a rubber planter in Malaya at the outbreak of War COLLETT - On 6 October 2017, John Ambrose (1948-53), aged 81 Captain W H Parker - London Regiment, Royal Fusiliers, killed at Bullecourt on 15 June 1917 aged 23 COWARD On September Dr received Julian Michael Henry (1957-64), aged 71 aged 19 2nd Lt A C C Pendrigh, died in Rouen -on 175August 1917 of2017, wounds near Ypres some three weeks earlier Sergt Major G N E Pentelow - South Staffordshire died 2017, of wounds at Wyatt Ypres on 7 Octoberaged 191779 aged 24; his poor sight CROSSLEY - On Regiment, 2 December David (1949-56), precluded him from taking a commission CULVER - On a date unknown, Dr Denis (1953-61), aged 75 Captain T F Perrin - Royal Engineers, died of heatstroke in Mesopotamia on 24 July 1917 aged 46 DOWN - Onkilled 22 September (1944-49), 86 2nd Lt A H Petrie - East Surrey Regiment, in the Ypres 2017, salient Geoffrey on 31 July Wyndham 1917 aged 20; mentionedaged in despatches Lt T S Pitman - York and Lancaster Regiment, wounded at Messines June 1917 Henry and killed at Poelcapelle, DUBOIS - On 1 December 2017, Martin (1937-39), agedYpres 90 on 26 September 1917 aged 26; he was a classical scholar of The Queen's College, Oxford where he graduated with first class honours EDDOLLS - In August 2017, Gerald John (1944-50), aged 84 Sub Lt E A Planterose - Royal Naval Air Service, killed near Otranto while returning from aerial pursuit of an enemy submarine on 17 July GOULD - On 19 August 2017, John Dudley Ernest (1939-43), aged 90 1917 aged 24 Lt T W Purves - Middlesex Regiment, severely wounded YpresPhilip November and(1945-52), killed by shellfire GOWER - On 23 Juneat2017, Henry1914 Frank aged at 83Voormezeele, Ypres, on 7 June 1917 aged 22 GUDGIN - On 8 November 2017, Timothy Andrew Leonard (1944-48), aged 87 Captain A E Ryan, MC - Queen's Royal West Surrey Regiment, wounded twice in 1917, wounded and missing presumed dead near HARRISON - On 21 aged June 20; 2017, Martin John the (1945-52), 83, son of JW (1916-22), brother Professor BD Bapaume 23 March 1918 he was awarded MC, wasaged mentioned in despatches and received twoof cards of thanks for(1943-49) outstanding service from the divisional general and nephew of GT (1918-24) and SHLV Smith (1906-13) 2nd Lt R Saword - Royal Fusiliers, missing presumed killed in action between OppĂŠ Wood and Gavrelle on 29 April 1917 aged 27 HEARN - On 29 March 2018, Derek Victor (1935-42), aged 93 2nd Lt J H Sayer - Royal Flying Corps, killed carrying out photo reconnaissance near Croiselles on 3 April1917 aged 19 HOYLE - On 23 December 2017, Dr Martin Johnfire (1950-59), 77,1917 brother Gwas (1955-63) L/Cpl C V Smethurst - Honourable Artillery Company, killed by sniper at Arras onaged 1 April agedof37;Dhe due to receive a commission HUISH - On 9 October 2017, Derek Alan (1960-69), aged 65 Captain A D Thornton-Smith, DSO - King's Royal Rifle Corps, killed at Langemarck, Ypres, 16 August 1917 aged 25; awarded DSO in April HUNTER - In January 2018, Alan Livingstone Haig (1952-59), aged 75 1917 for "brilliant observation work" and also mentioned in despatches - On -25 December 2017, Colonelkilled Michael William (1941-47), aged brother of the late Sir John (1944-52) 2nd LtKNILL G H Smith Northamptonshire Regiment, at Lombartzyde, Ypres, on 10 July87, 1917 aged 19 Pte FLACK G Walker-Smith - London2018, Scottish, died ofJohn wounds at Bapaume on 21 aged December 1917 aged 33 (1951-58) and AI (1955-63) - On 2 February Nicholas Gordon (1958-66), 69, brother of MC Lt H D B Snelgrove - Queen's Own Rifles (Canada) attached Royal Flying Corps, missing at Lens on 15 August 1917 and reported dead in LOVIS - On 5 September 2017, Professor John Donald (1941-49), aged 87, brother of the late FB (1936-41) German newspaper a month later aged 23 - In May 2017, John aged 85 Pte M E Sturges - Artists' Rifles, killed LUXTON at Paschendaele 30 October 1917Michael aged 19;(1946-48), his entire platoon was killed 2nd Lt H L Thacker,- MC, - Royal Army2017, Service drowned in the sinking of HMS Arcadian off Milos, Greece in April 1917 aged MANKTELOW On MM 23 September RtCorps, Rev Michael Richard John (1938-45), aged 89, brother of DBS (1940-48) and 21; he drove a tank at Flers in the first ever tank attack for which he was awarded the MM and subsequently after receiving a commission he PAR (1942-49) was also awarded the MC - On 15inAugust Jeffery George OBE 92 Flt Sub Lt J R Tulley - Royal MATHIESON Naval Air Service, killed a flying 2017, accident at Dunquerque on 29(1936-40), June 1917 aged aged 18 Lt T A Turner - Royal Field Artillery, killed in action 26 April 1917 aged 39; a veteran of the 82 Boer War MORGAN - Onat2Arras Aprilon 2018, David William (1946-54), aged 2nd Lt G H Walker - Northamptonshire Regiment, killed in action near Houlthurst Wood, Ypres, 10 November 1917 aged 23 RAE - On 17 August 2017, John Duncan (1934-40), aged 95, father of PJ (1964-70) 2nd Lt H J Warner - Northamptonshire Regiment, killed near Arras on 2 June 1917 aged 30 - On 17near December Brian1917 Cecilaged (1938-45), aged 89 Captain G Whitaker - London RifleRICH Brigade, killed Ypres 20 2017, September 25 2nd Lt E W Whitehead - Royal Air Forece, killed in a flying on Salisbury Plain on 16aged February TOVEY - In Aprilaccident 2017, Alan John (1953-60), 74 1918 aged 19 Rfmn H E Williams - London Rifle Brigade, killed on Menin Road near Ypres on 20 September 1917 aged 25; he was a graduate of London VINCENT - In 2017, Robert (Member of Staff and Director of Music 1980-95), aged 76 University - In February 2017, Dr Fraser on (1943-52), aged 83 22; he was due to transfer to Corpl H W Williams - MiddlesexWADDELL Rifle Volunteers, died of heatstroke in James Mesopotamia 17 July 1917 aged Egypt to take up a commission in the Royal Flying WOOD - OnCorps 19 July 2017, Michael Richard (1937-44), aged 90 2nd Lt P J Williams - East Surrey Regiment, died of wounds in Salonika on 17 May 1917 aged 22; he was a classical scholar of Corpus Christi WRIGHT - On 5 July 2017, Richard Alan Blackmore (1943-51), aged 83 College, Oxford where he was awarded a first class degree and won the Craven and Hertford Scholarships and the Chancellor's Prize for Latin Essay; he was also cox of the Corpus boat Lt C W Wise - Royal Field Artillery, killed at Boesinghe, Ypres on 31 July 1917 aged 25; he was mentioned in despatches

Deaths

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Obituaries The Right Reverend Michael Manktelow (1938-45) The Right Reverend Michael Manktelow, who has died aged 89, was suffragan Bishop of Basingstoke from 1977 to 1993, and for 14 of these years combined this post with that of Canon Residentiary of Winchester Cathedral. Before that he had been, successively, Vicar of the Yorkshire parishes of Knaresborough and St Wilfrid's, Harrogate, and the strong pastoral gifts he had exercised in these parishes made him an admirable bishop. They were enhanced by a deep spirituality and theological acumen that earlier had equipped him for the training of ordination candidates. Manktelow was also much concerned to strengthen relations between the Anglican and Orthodox churches and, as President of the Anglican and Eastern Churches Association from 1980 to 1987, travelled widely in eastern Europe, representing the Archbishop of Canterbury on official visits and taking part in unity conversations. Following his retirement to Chichester in 1993, he became an assistant bishop in the diocese of Europe and was able to indulge his love of travel, including visits to Scandinavia to minister to the Englishspeaking congregations there. Michael Richard John Manktelow was born on September 23 1927. His father, Richard (later Sir Richard) Manktelow, was senior civil servant at the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries and would be responsible for the wartime "Dig for Victory" campaign. Young Michael went from Whitgift School, Croydon, to Christ's College, Cambridge, as a scholar to read History. After National Service in the Royal Navy he prepared for Holy Orders at Chichester Theological College, where he imbibed the Catholic ethos of the college and was greatly influenced by its principal, the Franciscan scholar John Moorman,

under whom he would later serve in Ripon diocese and whose biography he would publish in 1999. In 1953 Manktelow became a curate of Boston parish church in Lincolnshire, a church and parish for which he retained the greatest affection, but after four years he returned to Christ's College, Cambridge, as chaplain. During his time there he edited a second edition of a widely read collection of letters by Forbes Robinson, who had been chaplain of Christ's at the beginning of the 20th century and, having died aged 37, was venerated as an outstanding scholar and a saint. At Lincoln Theological College, to which Manktelow moved in 1961, he was first chaplain, then sub-warden, and in both offices was a useful foil to the Warden, Alan Webster - a future Dean of St Paul's who had a new idea most days. In 1966 he married Rosamund Mann, secretary to the Bishop of Lincoln, and embarked on what proved to be a notably happy family life. In 1966 he became Vicar of Knaresborough and, seven years later, Vicar of the important parish of St Wilfrid's, Harrogate, also serving as Rural Dean of Harrogate. In both parishes he was much involved in the life of the wider community and greatly loved. It was always apparent, however, that sooner or later he would become a bishop, and the opportunity came in 1977 when the Bishop of Winchester, John Taylor, invited him to become suffragan Bishop of Basingstoke. This involved particular responsibility for the New Town and of north Hampshire but, since there was neither stipend nor house for the recently created bishopric, it was necessary for

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Manktelow to undertake also the duties of a Canon Residentiary of the Cathedral and live in the Close at Winchester. For several years he valued this arrangement. The cathedral provided him with a spiritual base and he was assiduous in attending its daily services and sharing in its sacramental life. He, in turn, contributed a great deal through his spirituality and pastoral sensitivity, and his home became a centre of warm and generous hospitality. He was also much valued for his care of the parishes and their clergy, and his Catholic outlook helped to balance the liberal evangelicalism of Bishop Taylor. He was president of the Association for Promoting Retreats from 1982 to 1987. After 10 years, however, two problems arose. Although Manktelow was in no sense ambitious he had, rightly or wrongly, been given to understand that, after an appropriate spell as a suffragan bishop, he would become a diocesan - but no offer ever came. This was probably because he lacked the dynamic style of leadership deemed to be essential to the struggling Church of the late 20th century. The offer of the Deanery of Worcester, which he rightly declined as he was no fundraiser, added to his frustration and disappointment since it signalled the end of episcopal possibility. The second problem came with the appointment of Trevor Beeson as Dean of Winchester in 1987. Under Beeson's predecessor Michael Stancliffe, the cathedral's life had been tranquil and none too demanding of its Chapter. But Beeson initiated a programme of reform and fundraising that made the cathedral hum with activity. Manktelow approved of this, but because of his episcopal responsibilities found himself unable to share in the work of the new regime without considerable stress.


Similar problems had arisen earlier in other dioceses and he was the last suffragan bishop to be also a residentiary canon. In 1991, therefore, it was agreed that he should be relieved of his cathedral responsibilities and move to the outskirts of Basingstoke. There, without the support of the cathedral's community, he felt lonely, however, and his unease was compounded by the General Synod's decision that women could be ordained to the priesthood - something he had strongly opposed because of its effect on relations with the Orthodox churches. After about 18 months, and having reached the age of 65, he decided to retire and to rent a house in the Close at Chichester. This brought him a new lease of life. A short, tubby figure, with an excellent sense of humour, he played a full part in the life of the cathedral, serving for several years on its Chapter, and as an assistant bishop in the diocese of Chichester and Europe found many opportunities to exercise his episcopal vocation. The leisure to write the biography of Bishop John Moorman added to his sense of fulfilment. His greatest literary achievement, however, was the meticulous correction of the proofs of the monumental third edition of the Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church (1997). He is survived by his wife and by three daughters. The Daily Telegraph 12 August 2017

Mar tin Harr is on (1947-52) Martin, aged 83, died peacefully at home on June 21st 2017 after a long illness bravely and cheerfully endured. Almost all his professional life was spent teaching physics to boys at Marlborough College, Wiltshire, and he was also a gifted all-round sportsman and coach. When WWII broke out, the Harrison family was in Cornwall, staying at a farmhouse near St Austell, and having made enduring friendships with the farming family, remained there until 1943 before returning to the Croydon area for the two boys' secondary education at Whitgift. Martin's love of

the ambiance and the happy times spent at the farm remained with him for the rest of his life and he celebrated his 80th birthday there. At Whitgift, Martin's sporting talent came to the fore. He became the scrum half in the School's 1st XV, Captain (opening batsman and wicketkeeper) of the cricket 1st XI, Captain of the 1st IV fives team and champion gymnast. He was also Captain of Smith's House, a senior prefect and senior NCO in the RAF section of the School's Combined Cadet Force. ON leaving School he proceeded to read for a physics degree at Brasenose College, Oxford and continued his sporting activities. These included membership of BNC's Cupperswinning rugby team, scrum half for the Oxford Greyhounds, cricket for the Oxford Authentics and the award of Half-Blues for Rugby Fives in 1951 and 1952. Like his father J W Har rison (1916-22) and uncles GT Ha rris on (1918-24) and S HLV ( "Shove l") Smith (1906-13), Martin played in OW rugby and cricket teams - on some occasions the OW 1st XI contained three Harrisons. Martin's success in sports was not attributable to a massive physique but to great agility, quick thinking, a good eye and tactical ingenuity. After university and National Service as a junior RAF officer in the Operational Research Branch of Bomber Command, Martin sought a school teaching appointment as a physicist, hoping that this could be combined with an involvement in coaching rugby and/or cricket. Marlborough offered him just such a position which he occupied until he retired. His aim was not only to impart the principles of physics but also to get his young charges to understand them and he co-authored a well-respected book written with this objective in mind. He also continued to play rugby, now at county level, for Dorset and Wilts. Before long he met and married Anna, also a young teacher, and they immediately set sail for his year's secondment at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire, USA. In preparation for this he equipped himself with a generous supply of

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indigestion tablets, perhaps to guard against the rigours of married life, though he need not have worried because Anna became an accomplished cook and a charming and thoughtful hostess. They were a devoted couple and the family was enlarged by the addition of John and Mark. Martin was a proud, conscientious father, always there for the boys when the need arose. Many long vacations were spent in north Cornwall, close to the coast, where Martin was rebuilding a derelict cottage, mostly with his own hands and involving many skills. Back in Marlborough, Martin joined the Samaritans, regularly manning their telephone line overnight to offer help and advice to those in need, ranging from victims of domestic violence to those with suicidal thoughts. He became more active in church and community affairs. He was appointed Lay Pastoral Assistant in the Church giving Communion to those unable to attend. He and Anna both sang in the College choir and both became involved in nature conservation. In 2016 they celebrated their Golden Wedding. In character, Martin was a thoroughly good man and extremely self-effacing. He had a strong sense of humour and made warm friendships with people in many walks of life, was kind and generous, especially to his grandchildren and several God-children. He had increasingly severe health problems in later life but was never heard to complain and continued to enjoy many things, ranging from watching cricket at Lords with John and Mark to surveying, with Anna, the bed of the river Kennet for caddis fly larvae. He made a difference to many lives and will be much missed. This obituary was written by Martin's brother Professor Bryan Harrison, FRS, FRSE The regard in which Martin Harrison was held at Marlborough was recognised in a lengthy appreciation in the obituaries section of the Marlburian Club website in which he was described as "a thoughtful, innovative teacher of physics and role model and the most approachable of mentors; held in high esteem by students and colleagues alike ... irretrievably modest,


deceptively casual - but always on the ball" This tribute ends with a revealing sentence "Martin rarely got things wrong, but when asked by Anna if he would like a Thanksgiving Service, he replied 'no, because nobody would come'. The large congregation at St Mary's proved he got that one spectacularly wrong".

Tim Gudgin wearing an OW tie for his last reading of the classified football results

Tim Gudgin (1944-48) The broadcaster whose reading of the football scores on television was a teatime fixture for millions, Tim Gudgin, has died aged 87. He possessed one of the most familiar voices in broadcasting. His reading from 1995 of the classified football results on BBC Television's Grandstand, the scores intimated by his characteristic risingand-falling intonation, was for millions of viewers as much a part of Saturday tea-time as buttered crumpets. Gudgin's reassuringly capable tones had been heard regularly in a presenter's role on the wireless since the 1950s and on screen since the 1960s, doing voice-overs for clips on Sportsview (later Sportsnight). It was hosted by Frank Bough, who had got the job in preference to Gudgin. Gudgin went on to appear on Grandstand, the BBC's Saturday flagship sports. programme, following a tragedy at its Lime Grove studios. The regular announcer, who also ran two restaurants in London as well as a Bentley, failed to appear. Then a policeman came to the studio door. "The chap had financial difficulties;' recalled Gudgin. A desperate last bet had failed to come off earlier that afternoon. "It turned out that he had gone upstairs and jumped out of the window:' Gudgin was brought in to

give the team a much-needed fillip, initially announcing rugby and racing results, while the Australian Len Martin took care of soccer. On one occasion, Bing Crosby came in to the studio. The pair had noticed that a horse called Uncle Bing was due to race that day and when they told the entertainer he insisted that they put on £20 each way for him. Uncle Bing romped home, at 10-l. When Martin died in 1995, Gudgin took on football as well. Soon he became as much identified with the job as was his counterpart James Alexander Gordon on radio. Although this was largely due to their habit of signalling a result by modulating their inflection - rising for a win, dropping to commiserate in defeat - both men were in fact following the method pioneered by John Webster. Webster had read the results in Sports Report, presented by Eamonn Andrews in the days when the nation's favourite flutter was the pools. The varied intonation was to help viewers keep their eyes on their coupons. Even after the onset of the National Lottery, Gudgin managed to command audiences of up to eight million in the 1990s, though that dwindled as the internet became a rival medium. Much of the attraction for the neutral viewer was Gudgin's unruffled air of calm despite the fact that he was broadcasting live, with all that potential for catastrophe. He never had to essay the dreaded tongue-twister "Forfar 5, East Fife 4" (though Martin did), although he admitted that it took a while to master the smooth saying of ‘Hamilton Academical’. The worst that happened was a computer failure which left him with a blank screen for a few seconds, which he managed to cover up, and an "idiosyncratic" contribution from Mark E Smith. The singer with the band ‘The Fall’ was once brought on to help to read the results on the BBC's interactive service, although not without first having resorted to some medicinal brandies. After.Grandstand was scrapped, Final Score became a standalone programme from2004. Gudgin announced his retirement seven years later, when he was almost 82. His decision was prompted in part

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by the BBC's move to Manchester, when he lived on the South Coast. He was delighted that his final set of results included the euphonious "Airdrie 11, Gala Fairydean 0", and to be presented with a retirement present of a BBC Sports Personality of the Year trophy. And he had a confession to make: having not played football at school, he did not entirely comprehend its rules, nor was he much of a fan. Timothy Andrew Leonard Gudgin was born at Croydon, then in Surrey, on November 25 1929. His father worked in an insurance company. Tim went to school, first in Dorset during the war, then finished his education back in Croydon at the Whitgift School. There he told the careers master of his ambition to enter broadcasting, having become entranced by his brother's collection of 78 rpm big band records. He was peremptorily told that there was no hope of realising his dream since there was no prospect of his getting a First Class degree from Oxford or Cambridge. As it was, he never went to university, and instead in 1949 was called up for National Service. Yet, having been posted to Hohne, Germany, he beat 200 other applicants to win one of four posts for newsreaders on the British Forces Network. He was based first in Hamburg and afterwards in Trieste, Italy, then under an Allied military administration. In 1952, his service over, he moved with his boss to the BBC's European Service as a studio manager and newsreader. By the Sixties, he was an established presence on the Light Programme and Home Service. He hosted shows such as Top of the Form, Music Box, Housewives' Choice and Friday Night is Music Night, as well as Hancock's Half Hour. For many years, he read the news for Terry Wogan's show. His voice was also heard accompanying the animated Bleep and Booster stories on Blue Peter. He especially enjoyed presenting latenight music shows, such as ‘You and The Night and the Music’, which allowed him to indulge his love of jazz (and of a glass of red wine). He was known by colleagues for not tolerating any management nonsense and, when a nannyish memorandum appeared


banning certain practices, he read it out on the air while audibly contravening it by lighting a cigar. In the mid-1960s, Gudgin turned freelance after establishing that he would thus get more work than as staff. It also enabled him to accept employment from the independent sector, for instance fronting an invision commercial for Square Deal Surf washing power, which enabled him to buy his house. In the early Seventies, he had a spell based on the Isle of Man as a public relations consultant to its government before returning to the BBC. After retiring, Gudgin occasionally stood in for presenters on his local radio station and voiced talking newspapers for the blind. He remained an avid watcher of rugby, cricket, golf and tennis. Because of his origins in South London, he supported Crystal Palace at football, but confessed that he had never seen them play a match. In 1956 he married Jenny Daly, whom he had met at the BBC. She predeceased him and he is survived by five daughters and a son. The Daily Telegraph 15 November 2017

Jeffery George Mathieson, OBE (1936-1940) Jeff Mathieson died on August 14th, 2017, aged 92. Jeff was born in Sydenham Road, Croydon, on 17th February 1925. His parents lived in Thornton Heath, and Jeff was their only child. Jeff's father, however, had been the youngest of 17 and had fought on the western front in the First World War. He was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry but, like nearly all the WWI heroes who came back from the trenches, never talked about what happened. Later, he joined the Civil Service and became Secretary for the Boundary Commission, for which he received the OBE. How proud he would have been when his son, in turn, was awarded the OBE in 1988. Jeff grew up in Purley and went to St. John's Primary (popularly known as Miss Polly's) in Pampisford Road, going on to Whitgift in 1936. Towards the end of the War he served with the Air Force and trained in Canada in 1945 as

a navigator/wireless operator with a view to flying a Mosquito - which he. never did because, soon after he was called up, Hitler surrendered Returning to the UK, Jeff took a correspondence course and qualified as a surveyor, whilst working in the Estates Departments of a number of local authorities - including Croydon, Basildon and Birmingham - before finally settling at the City of London in 1959 where he spent the next thirty years. In the process he rose to the challenging and responsible role of Deputy Surveyor of the City of London, at a time when the City was undergoing great change. Over the years he was concerned with many major projects, both inside and outside the City. For example, with the funding of open spaces such as Burnham Beeches and the Kent and Surrey Commons, which were (and still are) owned by the Corporation of London. He also managed the sale and lease back of countless properties in London and Westminster, leading to the redevelopment of outdated buildings and the upgrading of local areas. Another of his well-publicized projects was the re-location of The City of London School for Boys when the old school (situated on the Victoria Embankment) was sold - with the proceeds funding the building of the new school in Upper Thames Street near the River. One of his last major projects was the siting and construction of the Barbican prior to his retirement in 1990. Thereafter, he retained an active interest in the City as a Liveryman, frequently making the trip from his home in Tonbridge to livery dinners in the City. He was also a keen member of BOFS, and looked forward eagerly to their monthly London luncheon meetings - and, no doubt, a chance to savour a glass of good red wine!

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Jeff's other interests included golf a love for which he inherited from his parents. He had been a member at Holtye GC near Edenbridge in Sussex for more than thirty years. Jeff also loved cars. When he first met and subsequently married his wife Pat, he owned a Frog Eyed Sprite, which he sold in order to buy an engagement ring. From then on, as his daughters Jacquie and Anne grew up, there was a succession of 'sensible' cars. But after Pat's premature death he bought a sports car and announced: "This will be the last car I ever buy!" and then proceeded to replace it with a new model every two years - his last Jaguar was only sold a few months before his death. His cousin, P ip Bur ley (1953-1961), recalls: "Jeff was a man's man; an oldschool gentleman who kept his feelings close to his chest, and who possessed a stoicism so typical of his generation. He was already 19 when I was born and had been at Whitgift between 1936 and 1940, where I was to follow him thirteen years later. He went on to enjoy a distinguished career in the City, crowned by the award of an OBE in 1988. "But Jeff never revelled in any of that, quite simply because he was the best example you could hope to meet of a modest, self-effacing man - in fact, you had to work hard to persuade him to talk about himself. Still, despite his diffidence, he could also be very funny with a sharp wit and twinkling sense of humour. I remember half a century ago attending a wedding when he gave a speech. I can still picture him telling the story of the young groom driving to his own wedding when he had a puncture and had to change the wheel. An hour later in church, dishevelled and perspiring, when asked for the ring, he fished around in his pocket and produced a wheel nut. Not the greatest of jokes, you might think, but Jeff told it well enough for me to recall it fifty years later. "I will remember him for his modesty, his complete lack of pomposity and self-aggrandisement, his great charm, his tolerance - and sense of humour". Jeff is survived by two daughters, Jacquie and Anne, and two grandsons.


John Lovis in 1978 at the time of taking up his Chair as Professor of Botany at the University of Canterbury

Professor John Lovis (1941-49) John Donald ("Joe") Lovis was born in Clapham on 24 April 1930, and had an older brother, Frank (1936-41), to whom he remained close until Frank's death in 1995. As with many children of that time and place, John's early secondary school years were dominated by the Second World War, and the need to spend lengthy periods in air-raid shelters. However, in his sixth form year at Whitgift he was fortunate to come under the tutelage of Cecil Prime, a teacher of remarkable ability. John had always had an interest in insects and anticipated becoming an entomologist, but his future took a defining turn when he was introduced to botany, chromosomes and the secret life of plants. He went on to Queen Mary College at the University of London to study Botany. There he met Joan Valerie van der Smagt, and they married in 1953. Valerie had been born and bred in Ceylon - her mother being a Dutch Burgher and her father a British tea planter. John developed an enduring interest in Sri Lanka and they spent time together in the country on more than one occasion. After graduating, John moved to the University of Leeds where he did his PhD with the formidable Professor Irene Manton, who had pioneered research on the cytology and biosystematics of European ferns and who inspired a generation of British and overseas students including John to

work with her over the next two decades and extend their fern research world-wide. John chose to work on Asplenium trichomanes for his PhD - an extremely variable and widespread species throughout the northern hemisphere. Very quickly he discovered that it was even more complex than he had realised because Garth Brownlie at the University of Canterbury, who had pioneered fern cytology in New Zealand, published a chromosome count showing that it was hexaploid in New Zealand - quite different from the diploid and tetraploid populations in Europe. So, John applied for and, in 1955, won a DSIR Postgraduate Fellowship to study in New Zealand for a year In the limestone country of Hawkes Bay, and, among the first plants that John collected, proved to be tetraploid unlike the hexaploid plants found elsewhere in New Zealand: even now, very few plants of this tetraploid form have ever been found and few botanists have seen it in the wild.. John had a very successful stay in New Zealand and developed a strong desire to return. Using this new data to good effect, John was able to submit his PhD in 1958. Thereafter he was appointed to a lectureship at the University of Leeds and so began perhaps the most productive period of his career with the publication in Nature and other learned journals of numerous papers. He quickly established good working relationships with people such as Clive Jermy at the Natural History Museum in London, and with European collaborators, above all, with Tadeus Reichstein - a Nobel Prize winning organic chemist from the University of Basel who in his retirement had taken up the study of fern cytology. Almost half of John's published papers came in the next 20 years at the University of Leeds where he and his collaborators unravelled the complexities of evolution through hybridisation and polyploidy in the genus Asplenium. Amongst many other achievements, he was able to effect the first artificial reconstruction of a naturally occurring polyploid fern, A. adulterinum, and later to synthesise a completely new and artificial alloploid species unknown in

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the wild. This work culminated in his magnum opus - 'Evolutionary patterns and processes in ferns' - published in Advances in Botanical Research in 1977, which summarised all the work that had been done up to that time based on cytology and breeding systems in ferns. In 1978, he was awarded the degree of Doctor of Science from the University of London, recognising his tremendous contribution to the understanding of fern evolution. It was also at the beginning of this period when his two children, Graham and Pamela, were born. Their modest house in Headingley was a fascinating place to visit because, in addition to the usual paraphernalia associated with young children, John retained an interest in insects, breeding moths in the dining room, keeping numerous cats and beginning to accumulate the piles of pressed ferns in newspaper that became a hallmark of his occupation wherever he went. For many students at Leeds, John's courses in plant taxonomy, evolution and especially in plant biosystematics, took Botany to a new level. John was a knowledgeable, patient and inspiring teacher who helped students study evolutionary origins by growing plants in experimental gardens, conducting artificial crosses, and looking at chromosomes to investigate polyploidy and species relationships. When the Chair at the University of Canterbury became vacant in 1977, the chance for John and Valerie to move back to New Zealand was too good to miss and they travelled across the world and settled in Christchurch. John's interests took a change of emphasis as he became involved in fossil botany, spending more and more of his time in the Clarence Valley and other parts of Marlborough and Canterbury where there was a rich Cretaceous fossil flora. John had always been interested in fossil botany, being well-acquainted with the Jurassic flora of North Yorkshire, and the work of his colleagues at Leeds on this and other deposits. In New Zealand, he became a serious palaeobotanist, supervising two postgraduate students whose work generated massive numbers of specimens; these initially


vied for space with the tottering heaps of newspaper containing ferns, but have since found permanent homes in the Canterbury Museum and the Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences, Lower Hutt. Undoubtedly the highlight of this work was the discovery of a Cretaceous angiosperm flower, something never before found in New Zealand. Significantly, the School of Biological Sciences at Canterbury University listed him as "Emeritus Professor of Palaeobotany", indicating that he was better known there for his work on Cretaceous fossil plants than for his expertise in fern evolution. John was one of an increasingly rare breed in University circles - a true polymath. He researched and taught University undergraduate courses in every aspect of botany, completing the full range shortly before his retirement with an advanced course in phycology. At postgraduate level, while fellow academics were content to provide part of a single course, he ran four on Pteridophytes, Palaeobotany, Evolution and Biogeography entirely on his own. John was a man of many talents - in his younger days a handy left-arm spin bowler in school and university cricket teams, a surprisingly good goal-keeper in hockey, and a tenacious conservationist who almost singlehandedly saved the lady's slipper orchid from extinction in Britain. He was a serious student of wines, collecting and learning about them from his undergraduate days onwards; he ran wine appreciation courses for Canterbury University's Department of Continuing Education, and sometimes took part in competitive tastings. He was equally devoted to quality and excellence in his other passions including philately, photography, rugby, classical music, cheese, Ceylon tea and growing species of Fritillaria. He passed on to his children Graham and Pamela a love of science, plants, and an inbuilt love of collecting. Despite mastering at least two quite different academic disciplines and several different hobby interests, he never owned a computer in his life. He usually communicated by letter in an elegant and distinctive hand, only rarely condescending to send a note written on a type-writer. He was certainly

never driven by numbers of publications, citation indices, the need to attend frequent conferences, or even the need to maintain an up-todate curriculum vitae. In fact, he pursued whatever stimulated his interest, and always to the very best of his considerable abilities, developing expert knowledge in many disparate fields. He was a wonderful mentor to anyone whose interests intersected with his own, and even after his own contributions had ceased, he never lost enthusiasm for hearing about the discoveries that others were making. He lived a full, happy and healthy life, apart from knee problems, which frustrated him greatly as they reduced his mobility in the last part of his life. In the end, after a short illness, he was overtaken by kidney failure and died peacefully at Nurse Maude Hospice, Christchurch in the company of his daughter Pamela and partner Jo. He had been alert and attentive until the last couple of days, living at home, continuing his passion for wine and enjoying his friends and family. He will, of course, be sadly missed by them, but also by pteridologists and palaeobotanists around the world. This appreciation is based on that to be published in the Bulletin of the British Pteridological Society (the society for fern enthusiasts) with extensive assistance from Pamela Lovis. Although he spent much of his life In New Zealand, John Lovis retained deep affection for his time at Whitgift. When in England, he attended the annual reunion of Prefects of his vintage that continued until very recently. In addition, he kept up correspondence with Raman Subba Row and others of his friends. His daughter, Pamela, reports that among the personal possessions that he left were photographs, blazers and cricket caps from school days. As a recognition of his life as a loyal Whitgiftian, he was buried wearing an OW tie.

Rev Professor Richard Bonney (1957-65) Few academics carried the title the Rev Professor with the ebullience of my friend Richard Bonney, who has died aged 70. A historian of ancien regime France and a priest in Leicester, he had

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a career that took him in unlikely directions, but to each phase he brought focus, intelligence and commitment. He was born in Sanderstead, Surrey, to Sydney, a technician in the fur trade and his wife, Helen (nee Johnson). At Whitgift School, Croydon, Richard's interest in history was ignited by an inspirational teacher, WD Hussey, and he went on to study history at Oxford University, graduating with a congratulatory first in 1968. He was a lecturer in European history at Reading University from 1971 to 1984. His first book, Political Change in France under Richelieu and Mazarin, 1624-1661, came out in 1978. It analysed more than 1,000 volumes of French state council records covering that period, when France was recovering from its internal divisions and fighting the Thirty Years War. Other works followed, confirming Richard as a leading historian of early modern France; his best known books were The European Dynastic States 1494-1660 (1991) and L'Absolutisme (1989). Richard became a professor at Leicester University in 1984 and was head of the history department there. During that time he became the leader of a European Social Fund project on the origins of the modern state, which established an important database and accompanying volumes on that subject. It was also Richard's initiative in 1986 to found the Society for the Study of French History, whose journal he edited for a decade and is his enduring legacy. He continued as professor of modern history at the University of Leicester until 2006, with a visiting professorship at Kyoto University in Japan (2002).


In 1996 Richard's ordination into the Church of England opened up a second vocation, and his Centre for Religious and Cultural Pluralism in Leicester (1997-2006) put him on the frontline of interfaith relationships. He directed Leicester University's Institute for the Study of Indo-Pakistan Relations (2001-05) and did more than most to counter simplistic "clash of civilisations" notions between Islam and the west. His main contacts in this sphere were at the National Defence University in Islamabad, Pakistan, where he lectured and supervised research students and where his personal book collection is now to be based. In Leicester many may best remember him at St Guthlac's church in Knighton, where he was curate from 2011, leading its congregation's successful efforts to become a separate parish in 2016, after which he was its priest in charge. He is survived by his second wife, Margaret (nee Camsell), by their daughters Katherine, Sarah and Christine, and a son, Alexander, from his first marriage to Clare Tillett,, which ended in 1982. Obituary by Mark Greengrass - The Guardian 28 August 2017 For those who were School contemporaries of Richard Bonney the transformation from rugby playing rebel to Oxford scholar came as something of a surprise. Douglas Hussey clearly saw promise in this cheerful member of the School's awkward squad and an open scholarship at Pembroke College, Oxford ensued. I used to see Richard fairly often during his first two years at Oxford when we overlapped. His descriptions of tutorials in Pembroke were always entertaining: it appeared that most of the time was spent explaining failure to meet essay deadlines because of a very active social life. Nonetheless, in 1968, Richard emerged with a congratulatory first (reputed at that time to be the best since the War) - legend has it that the only question asked at the formal viva for his degree was: "Where do you propose to carry out your research?" to which Richard responded "Where the sun is warm and the wine cheap". The specific location turned out to be

Toulouse.. I admired Richard's career from afar as lectureship at Reading was followed by Professorship at Leicester. He produced a succession of wellregarded books, principally on French history: The European Dynastic States 1494-1660 is a gem. He was a man of great intellect and personal charm as well as a first class historian; from his School days onwards he knew how to surprise, but I doubt if any of his School friends would have predicted his eventual ordination as an Anglican priest, his incumbency at a Leicester church and his leading role in the study of Islamic-Christian relations. Nigel Platts (1955-64)

John Blackmore (1951-60) Prior to Whitgift, John attended school in Alexandria, Egypt. Once settled back in the UK,, he went on to become House Captain of Cross's and a Senior Prefect, John was a keen sportsman and represented the School at rugby, cricket, hockey, fives, squash and boxing, obtaining his Colours in a number of sports. An early brush with the arts saw John become a member of the Whitgift School Dramatic Society performing in Macbeth in 1959. After leaving Whitgift, John attended Hull University where he studied Psychology. Many will know that John went on to become artistic director at a number of theatres - the Tynewear Theatre Company, Library Theatre, Manchester, Wythenshawe Forum and the Midland Arts Centre. In the theatre world, he was known for his 'Midas touch' - rescuing several leading theatres from the brink of closure and restoring them to health.

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Above: John Blackmore pictured in 2012 with the cast of ‘The Rise and Fall of Little Voice’ at Octagon Theatre Bolton. Photo: K Shipley

The following obituary by Michael Quinn appeared in 21 February 2018 edition of The Stage: John Blackmore had something of the Midas touch about him, rescuing several leading regional theatres from the brink of closure and restoring them to rude health, both artistically and commercially, over a career that spanned six decades. He was also responsible for the formation of the Tynewear Theatre Company (now Northern Stage) with a regional remit that saw it dividing its time between Newcastle, Sunderland and Hartlepool, and Birmingham's first community theatre company, Second City Theatre. Born in Singapore, Blackmore spent much of his childhood in Africa, coming to the UK to read psychology at Hull University. He began directing in his 20s and, despite his successes in turning around ailing companies and a West End run at the Phoenix Theatre in 1985 with his Tynewear premiere of Peter Terson's Strippers, never considered himself a particularly gifted director. Modest, good-humoured and avuncular, often to the point of Dickensian indulgence, when it came to helping young actors and directors, he was also a shrewd manager, a deft negotiator and a stalwart champion of public funding of the arts. His regular letters to The Stage politely clarifying reports of troubled budgets showed a keen eye for financial detail and a clear strategic vision.


He made his mark as joint artistic director (with Paul Webster) of the Library Theatre, Manchester in the late 1960s, filling eight out of 10 seats in his first season in charge. In 1971, he added responsibility for the newly opened Wythenshawe Forum to his remit before announcing his departure to run the Midlands Arts Centre (now the Mac) in Birmingham the following year. By the time he finished his twoyear contract, admissions had grown by more than half and earned income increased nearly 80%. In 1974, Blackmore launched Birmingham's Second City Theatre with Fired, a show devised by the company and playwright David Edgar. He moved to become artistic director of the Dukes Playhouse, Lancaster in 1976, where he again grew audiences, by 50%, in his first year and secured the venue's precarious financial future. His biggest challenge to that point came with the formation of the Tynewear Theatre Company in 1978. Intended to be a regional rather than city-based company, it had an ambitious brief to serve the North East of England. Blackmore's by then triedand-tested mix of classics, modern and new plays aimed at the widest possible audience came into its own here (as it was to do again when he took over stewardship of Bolton's Octagon Theatre in 2000). It was put to the test with a lacklustre opening production of Ken Hill's The Three Musketeers, but followed in successive years by gripping revivals of Brecht's The Resistible Rise of Arturo Ui (1979), The Merchant of Venice (1980) and Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman (1984). Terson's Strippers the same year marked the high-watermark of Blackmore's tenure and secured the company its first West End transfer. Vivid stagings of Howard Brenton's The Genius, Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire (1986) and Alan Ayckbourn's Woman in Mind (1987) proved to be eloquently diverse swansongs at the Newcastle Playhouse. Blackmore returned to the Midlands in 1989 to become director of Warwick Arts Centre before joining the English Shakespeare Company as an executive director in 1991 and chief executive of

Leicester's Haymarket Theatre two years later. As he had several times before, Blackmore inherited a venue in parlous difficulties. One of his first interventions was to sack the theatre's trustees en masse in order to secure crucial Arts Council funding. Within four years, he had grown box office income by half and reduced a crippling £500,000 debt to just £20,000. His abrupt departure in 1995 - when the board imposed a "management restructure" and made his job redundant - proved an incongruous end to his time in Leicester. He went on to work as a producer with Bill Kenwright and, for Arts Council England, formulated plans to amalgamate the Everyman and Playhouse theatres in Liverpool. In 2000, he was appointed chief executive of the Octagon Theatre, Bolton and charged with turning around a failing venue with no reserves or guaranteed funding from national or local authorities. Within the year, he had secured £200,000 from the Arts Council and restored the Octagon to being a year-round producing company. By the time he stepped down in 2012 as the theatre's longest-serving manager, he had returned a surplus every year and transformed the Octagon into one of the UK's most successful and respected regional theatres. He also oversaw the appointment in 2008 - considered something of a coup at the time - of the Olivier award-winning David Thacker as the venue's new artistic director. In the mid-1990s, Blackmore developed a parallel career as a consultant, advising local authorities and local arts boards on issues of funding and future viability for a range of theatres and companies. In 1971, he was on the working party that developed Equity's new directors' committee and remained a committed union activist throughout his career. He was also the administrator of the Ludlow Festival in 2002. John Ashurst Blackmore was born on January 20, 1941 and died on February 20, aged 77.

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Colonel (V) Michael Knill (1941-47) Michael William Knill passed away peacefully on 25th December, 2017 at the age of 87 after a long, full and productive life. Michael was the brother of the engineering geologist Sir John Knill (1944-52). Born the son of a water engineer in Wolverhampton in 1930 Michael was destined to spend his life involved in water. Growing up in Croydon during WW2, Michael attended Whitgift where he was a Victoria Scholar and captain of the shooting team. He studied civil engineering at City and Guilds College, Imperial College. After his degree he completed further studies to achieve a Diploma in Public Health Engineering. Michael had developed an interest in the military from a young age joining the Junior Training Corps at Whitgift. National Service in 1953 saw his selection as an officer in the Royal Engineers: he was posted to Germany and then Belgium until he was demobbed. Various engineering posts around the country saw Michael designing dams and pipe works for a number of significant projects, including the River Dee scheme and Bewl Water. He initially worked with clean water but when he moved to Broadstairs as Divisional Manager for East Kent for Southern Water, Michael was responsible for both water supply and sewage disposal. He was passionate about improving the sea water and beach quality. Subsequent restructuring of the water


industry led to Michael taking up a new role as a Regional Training Officer for the Institution of Civil Engineers where he inspired and encouraged many young engineers. In parallel with his civilian career Michael continued to serve the Royal Engineers in the Army Reserve gradually rising up the ranks to Full Colonel and commanding the only unit responsible for operating water and sewage works. On retirement from the Reserve Michael remained involved as Honorary Colonel of the Kent Army Cadet Force Regiment and as a member of the National Council of the RE Association. His membership of Round Table and Rotary was an important part of his life, and he was an active participant in community fundraising projects and enjoyed the conferences, international exchanges and friendships. Michael was the churchwarden at St Peter-in-Thanet where his skills of diplomacy, precise record keeping and legendary attention to detail were integral to the smooth running of the Parish. Within the Canterbury Diocese he also served on the Deanery and Diocesan Synods and later as a Cathedral guide in Canterbury where he enthusiastically shared with visitors his immense knowledge and enthusiasm for its history. Michael will be remembered as a quiet achiever, kind, gentle, meticulous and a prolific keeper of records. He led a life of dedication to serve and improve the quality of life of others. Michael was a family man married to Pauline for 58 years. He is survived by his children Andrew, Elizabeth, Richard and Katherine and 6 grandchildren. This tribute was written by Michael Knill's daughters, Elizabeth and Kate.

Nicholas Lack (1958-66) My younger brother, Nick Lack, came to Whitgift in 1958, joining my elder brother, Mike and myself at the school. I seem to remember we were called Lack major, Lack minor and Lack minimus. We had all been to the same dame school and prep school, Elmhurst. Nick was a school prefect and played plenty of games, representing Whitgift in seven sports, and was in the First XI as an opening bat and

the First XV as a blind side forward. He was also an active member of the arts and literary societies, and on the committee of the Sixth Form Society. After leaving Whitgift, Nick went up to University College, Oxford in 1967 to read History. I enjoyed having a brother at the college, where we overlapped for a year. He gained a second, played cricket, acted, made friends for life and above all, met and married Nora. His career was with The British Council, where he worked for 30 years. He found The Council stimulating and believed in its work. Over the years he and Nora had several overseas postings, along with their growing family of Jessica, Ben and Hannah. He was first in India, and found time to play plenty of cricket for the British High Commission team. I have a report of one game: 'Nick Lack showed brilliant form from the start. He proceeded to pierce the off-side field with perfectly timed cover drives. He was a joy to watch and gave immense pleasure to all those present. He played the senior role in a large second wicket stand'. The other batsman in that stand was the great Indian Test cricketer, Abbas Ali Baig! After India, Nick and the family spent five years in Bangladesh, his most enjoyable posting as he much enjoyed Bengali culture. In one year, he attended 300 events and still found time to take his family round Burma in

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a pick-up truck, having bribed a driver with bottles of Jack Daniels. Further postings included Saudi Arabia, Portugal and Kenya. He retired in 2008. It was an interesting and sometimes adventurous life. Nick had to interview new employees for the Palestinian office at gun point at Israeli checkpoints and was honoured by The British Council for his work in Iraq after the invasion, where he organised in difficult and dangerous circumstances the re-opening of the Council offices in Basra and Baghdad, always travelling with an armed guard. The honour referred to was internal and was one awarded to a number of outstanding members to mark the 70th anniversary of The British Council - it took the form of a beautiful rose bowl. Nick was always much liked by his staff. When he returned to Dhaka, many former employees made long and difficult journeys by boat or on foot to greet him again. And when he left Kenya, he was presented with a 'talismanic' walking stick, signifying that he was an honoured and wise man he was proud of that. Nick had an interesting and sometimes adventurous career - I should add that Nick was heroically unambitious though very talented in several fields including administration, writing and diplomacy. In retirement in Kingston he worked for the Citizens Advice Bureau, continued travelling and had a late flowering as a writer and historical lecturer. Above all, Nick was a family man, happiest when surrounded by Nora, Jessica, Ben, Hannah, partners and grandchildren. He died of a lymphoma and bore his illness with courage and stoicism. He was 69. Nick's funeral was a warm and uplifting occasion. Many family, friends and colleagues from all stages of his life gathered to remember a man who was intelligent, sensible, loyal, witty and universally liked. This appreciation is by Nick's brother Alastair La ck (1955-63)


Dr Martin John Hoyle (1950-59) "I went outside my front door in Shenfield, Essex and walked the first 28 miles of 3,235 that separated me from the Holy City" Martin was born to Frederick and Nancy Hoyle in Colwyn Bay, North Wales where his parents were evacuated during the war, his father being in the Estate Duty Office in Llandudno. He spent his first 7 years there and went to school in Guffin. His sister Hilary and his brother David were born 2 and 4 years later. The family returned to their home in Coulsdon, Surrey after the war and Martin was educated at St. Anne's Preparatory School and Whitgift School. Martin's parents were very involved in the Scouting Movement and he enjoyed both Cubs and Scouts. He attained the Queen's Scout award. Martin decided he wanted to be a doctor and gained a place at Guy's Hospital Medical School. He met Molly, who also lived in Coulsdon at a District Cub Camp where he and his parents were involved. His mother was a District Cub Commissioner and Molly was in charge of a Cub Pack. They married in March 1968 at St. Francis Church, Coulsdon and remained in touch with the priest who married them, Rev. Edmund Plaxton. The first year of marriage was spent at Crawley Hospital, West Sussex where Martin was an anaesthetist. They moved to the Cotswolds for the next year for Martin to train as a GP, then, in 1970, he obtained a partnership at Rockleigh Court Surgery, Shenfield, Essex where he practised for the next 31 years. Philip was born in 1970, Elizabeth was born in 1972 and Mary was born in

1981 when they were in their present house in Shenfield. Many family holidays were enjoyed in their Glendale Motor Caravan in the UK and Europe. Martin's Pilgrimage to Jerusalem, over 13 years was a great achievement. He was blessed with six grandchildren ranging from 11 months to 17 years. He was a talented artist, painting in oils and belonged to the Medical Art Society. Martin was well known for his beautifully decorated cakes. The model steam railway in the garden wasn't built until the grandchildren arrived and was much loved by them all. Martin enjoyed family get-togethers, the last being on 3 December which was such a treat. Martin died suddenly on 23 December 2017 at the age of 77. This tribute was written by Martin's wife Molly. The pilgrimage to Rome referred to by Molly Hoyle was a remarkable walk from Shenfield to Jerusalem which he accomplished in stages over 13 years. The story of his walk and the resourcefulness and determination required to complete it is described in his fascinating book ’Six Million Steps’. Martin donated a copy of his book at the WA Oxford Dinner which he and his wife attended less than two months before his death.

thousands of school children's teeth in the Chichester, Haslemere, Midhurst, Petersfield and Petworth areas in the 1970s-1980s. He was proud to work for the National Health Service. He attended Whitgift School from September 1938 to July 1945, when he left from the first year of the Advanced Course in Science, having gained his London General School Certificate with Exemption from Matriculation, including a Distinction in Science and a Credit in mathematics. He played a conspicuous part in outof-school life, being a member of the School 1st XI, 1st XV, Athletic team, Shooting VIII and a Sergeant in the Junior Training Corps, with Certificate "A". He was a school prefect. His school report states "the example he set and his general conduct and character were throughout excellent". Brian was also well-known as a Real Tennis player and played regularly at Petworth House Tennis Club. He held five senior world Real Tennis titles and ten senior national titles. He also lectured on the history of Real Tennis, and co-authored a book - ‘Disturb'd with Chaces’ - with David Best in 2009. Last summer he celebrated his diamond wedding anniversary with his wife Judith, whom he first met at a tennis party in Bepton in 1957. He is survived by his wife, 4 children and 7 grandchildren.

Brian Rich (1938-45)

Dr Julian Coward (1957-64)

Brian Rich died on 17 December 2017 at St Richards Hospital, Chichester after a short illness, aged 89. Brian will be known as the popular local Orthodontist who straightened

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This appreciation was written by Brian's daughter Deborah Blumfield

Julian lived a full life, with joy in his family, satisfaction with his work, and enthusiasm for his outdoor pursuits and creative interests. Julian Michael Henry Coward passed away peacefully, with family by his side. Loved and sadly missed by his wife Mary, sons Andrew and Michael, daughter-in-law Joan Marie, grandsons Matthew, Andrew and Patrick, his sister Tessa Kirby in England, and many relatives and friends. Julian was born in England. He studied electrical engineering at the University College London. In 1966, he met Mary who was on an exchange year from University of Toronto. In 1968, he followed her to Canada - and also to do a Ph.D. in hydrogeology at


wooden steamboat named "Hotspur" to putter up and down the Gorge. He volunteered at Heritage Acres and enjoyed the Victoria Symphony. And he found time to write a history of himself and his family. Despite coping with Alzheimer's for 10 years, and melanoma for the past two years, Julian always found the best in life. He always expressed his gratitude for his full and satisfying life of family, work, travel, and interests. He faced his challenges with patience, humour and gentleness. McMaster University in Hamilton. They married in 1969 and for their "honeymoon", drove with eight friends from England to Nepal on a caving expedition. Julian's first job was in Toronto with the Ontario Ministry of the Environment. In 1976, the family moved to Edmonton where Julian worked for Syncrude for almost 30 years in the Research Department. Life in Edmonton was rich with family, community, and work. Julian enjoyed outdoor activities - skiing, hiking, and camping. Also, indoor pursuits woodworking, science projects, and acting as an "extra" in the Edmonton opera. Caving, or spelunking, was a passion from his university days. He explored the caves in England and Europe, went on expeditions to Nepal, Peru, and Mexico, and expanded caving knowledge through research, mapping and "speleo electronics". Travel was also an ongoing enthusiasm. He hitchhiked through Norway as a teenager, travelled with Mary as a student to Nepal, South and Central America, made many trips with his young family to visit grandparents in England and Toronto, and finally, in retirement, enjoyed tours and cruises with friends. He took great pleasure from his children, and latterly with his grandchildren, passing on his engineering talents and love of "making things" as well as his outdoor pursuits and travel. In 2005, Julian moved to Victoria, where he and Mary enjoyed an active retirement. They loved their house on the Gorge, enjoyed hiking and bridge with friends. Julian bought a small

Alan Hunter (1952-59) Alan Hunter, who died in January 2018 after a lengthy fight with cancer at the age of ** spent his working career with the Bank of England for part of the time in their Scottish office but is best known to OWs as the most active of members of the Whitgift Veterans' Rifle Club: although in recent because of ill health he was unable to attend the range through ill health, his services were immense over many years - he was treasurer for almost fifteen years and for a long time wrote articles about the WVRC for the WA Newsletter. His School contemporary Graham Clark writes as follows: "We joined Whitgift in 1952 in the class of 1 B and were together virtually all through school. We started shooting together and after leaving school joined the WVRC and saw each other every Tuesday evening for decades. Thereafter it was about every second Tuesday until his illness took hold. One could not have a more loyal supporter of the club than Alan".

Hewitt team in the 1950s and 60s, has died at the age of 90. He was a familiar sight after his Hewitt playing days at that remarkable competition which is held at Royal Cinque Ports Golf Club, where he had been club captain. John was captain of the OW Golfing Society in 1968 and appears as a past winner of the Hornsey Walker Cup, the oldest OWGS competition, as far back as 1951. He was a most genial companion to OW (and other) golfers of all ages and will be sadly missed.

Dr John Waddell (1943-52) Dr James Fraser Waddell was at Whitgift from 1943 to 1952. He spoke of his time at Whitgift as the "best time of his life", and where he made lifelong friends. While there he played the tenor lead in four Gilbert & Sullivan operettas, HMS Pinafore, Iolanthe, The Gondoliers and The Mikado. He was the drum major in the Corps pf Drums and loved to tell his family about how wonderful it was to bang the bass drum. While at Whitgift he also sang in the Chapel Royal choir at St James's Palace. These days shaped his life, as he was still playing and conducting in two bands up until his death. After School, John Waddell went to St Catharine's College, Cambridge on a music scholarship but read medicine. He married in 1959 having met his wife met at Cambridge. He did his residency at St. Mary's Hospital, London from where he joined the Royal Canadian Navy as a Surgeon-Lieutenant on the aircraft carrier HMCS Bonaventure. After military service, he set up a family medical practice in Bedford, Nova Scotia, where he raised his family of three daughters, Jean, Alison and Catharine. In 2007 John moved to Burlington, Ontario, Canada to be again closer to his 3 daughters and 2 grandchildren, who had all moved to Ontario.

John Rae (1934-1940)

John Gould (1939-43) John Gould, well known to OW golfers as a leading member of the Halford

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John Rae left Whitgift aged 17 and spent a year as a trainee journalist before joining the RAF in 1940. After initial flight training in the US and Canada he joined Bomber Command with 51 Squadron based in


survived by his wife Maryanne, son, Peter (1963-1968), daughter, Susie and seven grandchildren. This tribute was written by John Rae's son Peter.

David Morgan (1946-54)

Snaith, Yorkshire where he saw active service on several missions over Europe as a navigator on a Halifax bomber. On the ninth mission, a raid over Duisburg, the Halifax came under heavy antiaircraft fire and although one of the crew was wounded and the plane severely damaged they were able to successfully bomb the target. Returning home the plane was attacked simultaneously by a FW 109 and a JU 88 and had to be abandoned over Holland. The crew all escaped by parachute and John, aged only 19, spent the next three years as a POW in Germany during which time he penned several poignant poems and short stories. John was later to be inducted into the "Caterpillar Club" for aircrew that survived a jump using an Irving silk chute. After the war John joined British American Tobacco where as a senior trainee, his responsibilities included mentoring new trainees including a German who amazingly was the pilot of the FW109 on that fateful day a few years earlier. John's career spanned many years in the tobacco industry as a production engineer and in all corners of the world from Java to Central America. In the latter years of his career he was a senior production manager for Philip Morris based in Lausanne, Switzerland. On retirement, John and his Danish wife Maryanne, with whom he shared 65 years of happy marriage, spent many enjoyable years between their homes in Portugal and Sussex when not passionately exploring the world. John is

David William Morgan was born in Norbury, England on November 13, 1935, the eldest child of Betty (Hooper) and Arthur Morgan, and passed away peacefully in Denver, Colorado on April 2, 2018 at age 82. He married Sally Brown on December 17, 1960. Sally preceded him in death on February 22, 2017. His children, Helen and Bruce, his sister Anne and her family, his brother Chris and his family, and his grandchildren David and Jake survive him. David was a citizen of the world, who enjoyed travelling the globe both personally and professionally. He fulfilled his national service in the Royal Navy, before completing his degree at the University of Durham. He was lifelong family man, a loyal friend, a lover of classical music, a choirmaster in the Episcopal Church, a true train aficionado, and, along with his wife, the ultimate host. His smile and wit will be sorely missed. David's funeral service was held at St. Margaret's Church in Horsmonden, England followed by an interment service at St. Mark's Episcopal Church in San Antonio, Texas. David Morgan's career was typical of the lifestyle required by working for a multinational company. He worked for IMI, a British based company, in the early 60's and that job took him, and eventually his family, all round the world managing various production David

Morgan - train lover

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facilities and operations/division. He and his family lived in Horsmonden from 1964 to 1970 and he was able to commute for work. It is also where both his children were born, and where he was a choirmaster in the local church. According to his son, it was his parents "happiest time" - they both requested to have their ashes buried there. David and Sally were married for 56 years until Sally died in February 2017. In 1970 David's job moved from Horsmonden to Montreal and lived there until 1973 before returning for nine years to the U.K (Edgbaston and Bewdley). In 1982, David was offered an opportunity to manage a recent U.S. acquisition in Minneapolis. David and Sally continued to own property in the U K and returned many times to see family and friends but remained resident in the U.S. for the rest of their lives. In 1994 David semi-retired and invested in businesses in Texas, occasioning a move to San Antonio. After his wife's death he moved from San Antonio to Denver, Colorado, to be close to his daughter. This tribute is adapted from an appreciation written by David's son Bruce.

John Collett (1948-53) John Collett, who has died at the age of 81, trained as an engineer after leaving School and worked in his family business, Foster Magneto, where he met his wife. He patented plastic mouldings for mattresses and developed mouldings for beekeepers being a beekeeper himself. Later he moved from a bungalow with five acres at Limpsfield Chart to a livestock farm in Nutfield where he embraced life as a farmer. John’s interests included canals, history and archaeology and he had a great passion for architecture, particularly churches. His funeral took place at St Oswald’s, Norbury where he had been baptised. Adapted from an appreciation by John’s cousin, Robert Collett


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