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Classroom Management Training by

Utah Education Consulting

Michael Westover Executive Director michael.westover@utaheducationconsulting.com Copyright 2008. Utah Education Consulting. All rights reserved.


Introduction The Truth


Introduction Training Resources • Classroom Management that Works: Research-Based Strategies for Every Teacher by Dr. Robert J. Marzano, et al. (2003) • Discipline Through Virtue: A Discipline Approach That Assists Teachers and Parents in Effective Use of the Book of Virtues by Dr. Thomas F. Morley (1996) • “How To Maintain Classroom Discipline: Good And Bad Methods Training Educational Video” by McGraw Hill and Caravel Films, Inc. (1947, viewed at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHzTUYAOkPM) • Positive Discipline in the Classroom by Dr. Jane Nelsen, et. al (2000) • “Responsive Discipline” by Dr. Charles A. Smith (2003, viewed at http://www.k-state.edu/wwparent/courses/rd/rd1.htm) • The Book of Virtues by Dr. William J. Bennett (1993) • The Color Code by Dr. Taylor Hartman (1998) • "The Key to Classroom Management" by Marzano, R.J. & Marzano, J.S. (2003)


Introduction Training Objectives 1. For educators to more completely understand the dynamics and strategies involved in good classroom management (increased knowledge). 2. For educators to more confidently and successfully handle difficult classroom management problems when they arise (increased skills). 3. For the school to be more unified in effective classroom management attitudes and practices.


Introduction Big Ideas/Essential Understandings • Most educators already have a good understanding and practice of what to say and do and what not to say and do – this training will only add to educators’ knowledge and abilities. • Most educators know immediately when they have handled a difficult situation well or poorly – educators must recognize that it’s never too late to apologize and/or change poor classroom management.


Introduction Assessments/Evidence of Learning 1. Thoughtful discussions regarding classroom management during the training. 2. Complete and thoughtful journal entries showing increased knowledge/understanding. 3. Complete and thoughtful classroom management goals to address/implement skills. 4. Highly functional classrooms, individually and collectively as a school.


Classroom Management That Works Research Foundations • “... Management skills are crucial and fundamental. A teacher who is grossly inadequate in classroom management skills is probably not going to accomplish much” (Brophy and Evertson, 1976, p. 27). • “One of the more significant conclusions from these studies was that early attention to classroom management at the beginning of the school year is a critical ingredient of a well-run classroom” (Marzano, et al., 2003, p. 5). • “… Apparently it can happen relatively quickly ... Teachers’ skills at classroom management could be significantly improved even by the simple intervention of providing them with a manual and two half-day workshops” (Marzano, et al., 2003, p.11).


Classroom Management That Works Research Foundations • Meta-analysis research results - “Four Management Factors” from Classroom Management that Works (Marzano, et. al, 2003, p. 8): Factor

Average Effect Size

Number of Subjects

Number of Studies

Percentile Decrease in Disruptions

Rules and Procedures

-.763

626

10

28

Disciplinary Interventions

-.909

3,322

68

32

Teacher-Student Relationships

-.869

1,110

4

31

Mental Set

-1.294

502

5

40

(“withitness” and emotional objectivity)


Classroom Management That Works Research Foundations • Meta-analysis research results - “Effects of Classroom Management on Engagement and Achievement” from Classroom Management that Works (Marzano, et. al, 2003, p. 10). Outcome

Average Effect Size

Number of Subjects

Number of Studies

Percentile Increase

Student Engagement

.617

784

7

23

Student Achievement

.521

553

5

20


Classroom Management That Works Positive Consequences • Meta-analysis research results - “Findings from Stage and Quiroz Study” (1997) from Classroom Management that Works (Marzano, et. al, 2003, p. 29). Disciplinary Technique

Average Effect Size

Number of Effect Sizes

Percentile Decrease in Disruptions

Reinforcement and Punishment

-.97

12

33

Reinforcement

-.86

101

31

Punishment

-.78

40

28

No Immediate Consequence

-.64

70

24


Classroom Management That Works Negative Consequences • Meta-analysis research results - “How Parents Rank Negative Consequences” from Classroom Management that Works (Marzano, et. al, 2003, p. 31). Negative Consequences

Parent Rank

Student Rank

Average Rank

Parents informed about disruptive behavior

1

2

1.5

Student sent to the Principal

2

5

3.5

Teacher explaining privately what was wrong

3

6

4.5

Teacher confronting student publicly

4

4

4

Teacher confronting student privately

5

8

6.5

Student kept in at playtime

6

9

7.5

Teacher explaining what is wrong in front of the class

7

3

5

Student held back from going on a school trip

8

1

4.5

Student moved to another seat in the classroom

9

10

9.5

Student took unfinished work to another classroom

10

7

8.5


Discussion #1 – Large Group • What research identified in Classroom Management that Works are you currently practicing? • What good results have you seen from implementing these research-proven practices? • What research, if any, is surprising to you? • Why? • Will you change any of your classroom management techniques/behaviors based on the research you’ve seen?


Personal “Journal” #1 (Journals are confidential, unless you want to share)

• Write at least 3 things from the research that you are doing well that you want and need to continue doing in the classroom. • Write at least 3 things from the research that you could change to be more effective in the classroom. • Rank each of the items listed above in order of most importance. (1 = most important)


Classroom Management that Works 5 Categories of High-need Students • “Five Categories of High-need Students” from Classroom Management that Works (Marzano, et al., 2003, p. 56): 1. Passive (fear of relationships and failure) 2. Aggressive (hostile, oppositional, and covert) 3. Attention Problems (hyperactive and inattentive) 4. Perfectionist (won’t settle for less than the best) 5. Socially Inept


The Color Code Personality Overview • “Personality Overview” from The Color Code addresses personal motives, needs, and wants (Hartman, 1998, p. 50): Red

Blue

White

Yellow

Power

Relationships

Peace

Fun

Needs:

To be right and respected

To be understood and appreciated

To have space and be tolerated

To be noticed and praised

Wants:

Productivity

Quality and Security

Independence and Contentment

Freedom and adventure

Motives:


How To Maintain Classroom Discipline


Positive Discipline in the Classroom 4 Mistaken Goals • “4 Mistaken Goals” from Positive Discipline in the Classroom (Nelsen, et. al, 2000, pp. 84-85): 1. Undue attention (I’m only important when I’m noticed/have your attention) 2. Misguided power (I’m only important when I’m the boss/have choices) 3. Revenge (I’m not liked/I’m important, too) 4. Assumed inadequacy (I’m not capable of success).


Discussion #2 – Pair Share • Which “color(s)” do you think you are? • Why? • Does any one “color” group tend to be more “high-need” than the other colors? If so, which? • Why do you think this color group causes more problems? • How can you do a little better as educators when dealing with “high needs” students in highlighting their personality strengths and re-directing their “mistaken goals”?


Personal “Journal” #2 (Journals are confidential, unless you want to share)

• List the “color” you feel best represents you (everyone has one “primary” color). Why does this color represent you? • List the other color you think represents you (most people have a strong “secondary” color). Why does this color represent you? • Write what you think your strengths and weaknesses are as a “member” of the color group(s). • Write how you think you can more aptly deal with “high needs” students (i.e., recognizing personality differences, emphasizing personality strengths, re-directing “mistaken goals”).


Positive Discipline in the Classroom Significant 7 • The “Significant 7” from Positive Discipline in the Classroom – perceptions and skills needed for students to achieve success (Nelsen, et. al, 2000, p. 12): 1. Personally Capable (ability to complete a task) 2. Personal Importance (perception of self-worth) 3. Personal Power/Influence (ability to influence the outcome) 4. Intrapersonal skills (perception/understanding of personal feelings) 5. Interpersonal skills (perception/understanding of others’ feelings) 6. Systemic skills (ability to adapt to difficult situations responsibly) 7. Judgment (ability to evaluate difficult situations responsibly)


Positive Discipline in the Classroom 6 Criteria for Successful Class Mtg.s • “6 Criteria for Successful Class Meetings” from Positive Discipline in the Classroom point out (Nelsen, et. al, pp. 60, 148-149): 1. Daily class meeting 2. Circle format (developing communication skills with compliments and appreciation) 3. Solutions focus (as non-punitive as possible) 4. Talking Stick (discuss “Mistaken Goals”) 5. Ask for agenda items 6. Allow learning time (address separate realities, brainstorming, role-playing)


Developing High-quality Relationships "Teachers who had high-quality relationships with their students had 31 percent fewer discipline problems, rule violations, and related problems over a year's time than did teachers who did not have high-quality relationships with their students" - Marzano, R.J. and Marzano, J.S. 2003. "The Key to Classroom Management." Educational Leadership 21 (no. 38): 6-13. Alexandria, VA: ASCD


Personal Journal #3 (Journals are confidential, unless you want to share) • List your top student of all time. • Which qualities of the “Significant 7” does/did the student lack, if any? (Which color do you think the student is?) • List your most “high need” student of all time. • Which qualities of the “Significant 7” does/did the student lack? (Which color do you think the student is? Which “mistaken goal” did he or she have?) • How might holding a regular, consistent class meeting help you develop high-quality relationships?


Responsive Discipline 5 Discipline Emphases • 5 Discipline Emphases from “Responsive Discipline” (Smith, 2003, Lesson 1): 1.

Teaching

2.

Decision-making

3.

Alternatives

4.

Self-esteem

5.

Responsibility


Responsive Discipline Discipline Sequence • The “Discipline Sequence” from “Responsive Discipline” (Smith, 2003, Lesson 2): 1.

Stop (take a second or two and a deep breath)

2.

Look and Listen (consider all physical signs of what happened)

3.

Think (take a moment to): A. Evaluate the Problem B. Have a Guiding Purpose (long-range goal) C. Set Targets (achievable goals) D. Consider Alternatives

4.

Act (ONLY act when #s 1-3 are followed)


How To Maintain Classroom Discipline


Responsive Discipline 3 Classroom Management Tools • “3 Classroom Management Tools” from “Responsive Discipline” (Smith, 2003, Lessons 6-8): 1.

Prevention

2.

Guidance

3.

Consequence


Responsive Discipline Consequences of Last Resort (7 Rs) • 7 Rs/“Consequences as a Last Resort” from “Responsive Discipline” (Smith, 2003, Lesson 8): 1.

Recognition

2.

Really Immediate

3.

Related

4.

Rather Consistent

5.

Reasonable

6.

Reprimand in Private

7.

Rarity


Discussion #3 – Small Groups (separate into small groups of 3-4 people) • How do you treat your own children in discipline situations at home? • Which attributes and qualities do you portray at home? • Which skills do you demonstrate at home? • Are your attributes/qualities and skills different when dealing with the students in your class? • If so, what is different? Why? • Should they be different? Why?


Personal Journal #4 (Journals are confidential, unless you want to share) • Explain which qualities/attributes and skills you have at home that you would like to demonstrate more at school. • Explain which qualities/attributes and skills you have at school that you would like to demonstrate more at home. • Rank the qualities/attributes and skills listed above by the importance and order you would like to implement them (1 = most important). • Which of the 7 Rs do you do well? • Which of the 7 Rs can you improve upon the most? • Rank the Rs listed above by the importance and order you feel each should be addressed.


Book of Virtues/Discipline - Virtue Character Education Tool • A literary, character education approach can be used to address classroom management by using the following books: 1.

The Book of Virtues by Dr. William J. Bennett (1993) and

2.

Discipline through Virtue: A Discipline Approach that Assists Teachers and Parents in Effective Use of The Book of Virtues by Dr. Thomas F. Morley (1996)

• Give me a discipline problem, and I’ll show you how it works! Any problem!


Book of Virtues/Discipline - Virtue Presentation/Demonstration • Which discipline area do you feel is most common in your classrooms? • Demonstrate the use of The Book of Virtues with the help of Discipline Through Virtue. • Which uncommon discipline area may emerge/need special attention? • Demonstrate the use of The Book of Virtues with the help of Discipline Through Virtue. • Questions/Concerns?


How To Maintain Classroom Discipline Presentation

Video “How To Maintain Classroom Discipline: Good And Bad Methods Training Educational Video” by McGraw Hill and Caravel Films, Inc. (1947, retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHzTUYAOkPM)


How To Maintain Classroom Discipline


Discussion #4 – Small/Large Group (separate into small groups of about 4 people) • Two of you share your worst classroom management experiences you remember while growing up. • Why were these classes/experiences the worst? • The other two members of the group, share your best classroom management experiences growing up. • Why were these classes/experiences the best? • Discuss as a large group and list on the board both the bad and good classroom management traits and techniques discussed in the small groups.


Personal “Journal” #5 (Journals are confidential, unless you want to share) • How were you generally treated/managed at school when you were growing up? • How do you generally treat/manage your students now that you are an educator? • Do you see a correlation between how you were treated and how you treat/manage your students (note: this is sometimes a good thing)? If so, explain. • If your answer to the previous question is affirmative, and it’s not a good thing, do think your classroom management behaviors can change? If so, explain.


Basic Classroom Management Strategies


Basic Classroom Management Strategies • Be a role model by controlling your own behavior and leading by example • Create a calming and welcoming atmosphere • Make sure each student knows his/her opinion is important and valued • Get to know the students • Teach students, not subjects • Allow students to create a few class expectations and rules (they can’t supersede school or classroom rules) • Clearly post class expectations and rules • Establish clear communication with parents (i.e., periodic and consistent phone calls, emails, notes home, P/T Conferences) • Write the class Syllabus/Disclosure so that students and parents understand, and make sure students and parents keep a copy


Basic Classroom Management Strategies • Always have a lesson plan (follow the course curriculum map) • Work hard to incorporate students’ interests and what they already know into lessons • Allow flexibility with lesson plans, adjusting to individual class needs • Utilize a variety of quality methods and resources, not just one or two • Always have a backup lesson plan when using technology • Maximize/Utilize time wisely • Always have an extra activity for students who finish early • Allow advanced students to help struggling students • Encourage creativity and imagination as much as possible


Basic Classroom Management Strategies • • • • • • • • •

Move about the class as much as possible Allow movement in the classroom as much as reasonable Allow breaks and rest minutes as reasonable Use a quality and secure hand out and retrieval system Provide prompt feedback on homework and assignments Offer extra help after school Reward often Use consequences sparingly, but don’t be afraid to use them Remove emotion from consequences, simply follow established rules • Get as much peer/colleague feedback as possible


Journal Write #6 - Goal Setting (Journals are confidential, unless you want to share)

• What are you going to do differently this year when your students begin to disrupt your classroom? • What are you going to do differently this year when your students seriously misbehave in your classroom? • List your primary classroom management goals for this upcoming school year (note: you may want to refer to Journal Writes #1-4 for ideas).


Summary “There are no easy solutions when it comes to discipline. There is no simple formula.” – Dr. Charles A. Smith (“Responsive Discipline,” 2003) Treat the child as your own – considering the child’s personality and background – then use the tools outlined in the research, according to your best judgment, to reward and discipline with purpose!


Thank you! Utah Education Consulting info@utaheducationconsulting.com (801) 822-6437 www.utaheducationconsulting.com Copyright 2008. Utah Education Consulting. All rights reserved.

Classroom Management Training  

Most educators already have a good understanding and practice of what to say and do and what not to say and do – this training will only add...