Page 1

Smart Beginnings: Growing Success!

2011 Annual Report

Our mission is to help all children enter school healthy and ready to succeed. We are building partnerships in the cities of Harrisonburg, Staunton and Waynesboro, and the counties of Augusta, Page, Rockingham, and Shenandoah.

Alysia Davis, Coordinator 601 University Blvd., MSC 9008 Harrisonburg, VA 22807 davis4am@jmu.edu Phone: 540-568-8968 Fax: 540-568-6409

www.valleysmartbeginnings.org


2


Welcome from the Coordinator

In 2011, Smart Beginnings Shenandoah Valley worked hard to grow success. We worked to grow not only the success of our coalition, but also the school success of every child in the central Shenandoah Valley. School success entails more than cognitive skills and scoring well on exams. It also reflects the success of our community in valuing the potential of every young child to grow into a well-rounded, productive citizen. Every Smart Beginnings coalition volunteer understands well the interconnectedness of early childhood education and the growth of our community. We understand that successful children must be healthy. Successful children must grow up in safe environments. Successful children must have meaningful role models. Successful children need resources, innovation, and commitment. One of the main goals of our coalition is to build a system for ready children. No one knows the school readiness needs of local children better than the parents, child care and education professionals, and business and civic leaders living and working here in the central Shenandoah Valley. Every member of our community has a place in this system. You all are the faces and the fire behind Smart Beginnings - working to build a network of local partnerships for improving early childhood services. I am always impressed by the level of community collaboration that goes into making any early childhood initiative a success. Collaboration among Smart Beginnings coalition volunteers is testament to the comprehensive nature of our early childhood development system and of how powerful it can be. It is my hope that you will look over the accomplishments of Smart Beginnings in 2011 and see just how much we have grown, and at the same time imagine how much more than we can do with your participation. Come, grow with us!

Alysia Davis, Coordinator 3


2010-2012 Strategic Priorities 

Priority 1: Maximize access and usage of available community resources and services for families with young children.

Priority 2: Provide families of young children with resources to ensure school readiness.

Priority 3: Equip child care providers with resources to ensure quality care and school readiness.

It All Adds Up Quality childcare facilities, involved families, and committed businesses are needed to prepare our children for school and life. Ready Services Ready Schools Ready Families + Ready Communities Children Ready for School

4


SBSV History SBSV, originally Success By 6, operated primarily in the Harrisonburg, Rockingham, and Page communities beginning in 2001 with volunteers coordinating efforts. During that time, representatives from the Greater Augusta and the Shenandoah County localities participated in various aspects of the coalition such as the Early Childhood Leadership Summit (ECL Summit) and action teams; however, funding limitations prevented full participation. In 2009, a Planning Grant awarded by the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation enabled SBSV to expand its region to include Greater Augusta and Shenandoah County. This expansion strengthened the unified voice for young children in the Shenandoah Valley and enabled these communities to capitalize on the resources each had to build a larger and stronger coalition. In the state of Virginia, there are 29 Smart Beginnings coalitions engaged in collaborative partnerships with childcare professionals, business leaders, schools, faith based organizations and government officials to identify and implement long-term strategies for improving school readiness for our youngest citizens. Coalitions are supported by the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation (VECF), a public-private partnership founded in 2005.

  

Investing in early childhood makes solid Economic sense. A study by the Federal Reserve Bank reports that every $1 we spend on quality early learning Education pays returns of $7-$17. 85% of the human brain is developed by age 5. Virginia spends approximately $90 million/year on children who repeat grades K-3. In 2009, 1 in 4 children in the Shenandoah Valley entered school not ready to learn.

The quality of life for a child and the contributions the child makes to society as an adult can be traced back to the first few years of life. 5


SBSV Organizational Structure SBSV is a regional coalition serving the Counties of Augusta, Page, Rockingham, and Shenandoah and the cities of Harrisonburg, Staunton, and Waynesboro. Smart Beginnings Shenandoah Valley recognizes the interconnectedness of these localities with families often living and working in more than one of the above communities and receiving services from another. While there are common regional characteristics, each community is viewed as uniquely individual in their own right. To address this, SBSV utilizes a multi-tiered organizational structure that maintains a regional viewpoint, through the work of the Leadership Council, as well as a local viewpoint through the use of Locality Teams. Leadership Council

Steering Committee

Transition to Kindergarten Committee

Locality Teams

Staunton-AugustaWaynesboro

HarrisonburgRockingham

Page

Shenandoah

6


Investing in early learning is one of the smartest ways to reduce the deficit and grow economic productivity. Studies confirm that every $1 invested in early childhood can return yields up to $16. 2010-2012 Financial Data Funding from the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation (including required cash match) accounts for 92% of SBSV coalition funding. Additional grants received in 2011 are listed below. Individual and corporate donors and gifts for 2011 are listed on page 13. 2011 Additional Grant Funds Shenandoah Community Foundation—$4,500; Staunton Rotary Club—$660; WHSV Project 3 (funded by the Shenandoah Valley Electric Cooperative) - $1,000 Net Proceeds Entering into 2012 VECF #2 Planning Grant

$

(500.00)

VECF #3 Getting Ready I Grant

$ 16,382.46

UWGA Grant Annual

$ 4,903.09

UWGA Grant Mini

$

UWHR Grant

$ 3,249.68

Shenandoah Community Foundation Grant

$ 1,648.34

Augusta Health Gift

$ 1,050.00

WHSV Project 3 Grant

$ 1,000.00

Staunton Rotary Grant

$

Summit Registrations

$ 2,044.04

Contributions

$ 3,012.77

Sponsorships

$

Interest/Miscellaneous Income

$ 1,298.97

4 03.96

0.00

75.72

$ 35,569.03 7


Key Community Statistics Below are some important community and state-level statistics in the areas of ready children, ready families, ready communities, ready services, and ready schools. For the most recent SBSV community needs assessment, please contact SBSV Coordinator, Alysia Davis, at davis4am@jmu.edu. Ready Children Language and literacy skills enable children to develop cognitive skills and knowledge to interact effectively with peers and adults Measure: % of children who are identified as behind in the acquisition of literacy skills on the Phonological Awareness Literacy Screening (PALS) at kindergarten entry 2008 Regional Average: 19.6% 2009 Regional Average: 16% 2008 Regional Range: 14% - 30% 2009 Regional Range: 11% - 22% Source: Virginia Department of Education

Ready Families Children born to teen mothers are more likely to be born with a low birth weight, suffer poor health, experience behavior problems, and have limited language and literacy skills Measure: # of pregnancies per 1,000 teen girls ages 15-17 2008 Regional Average: 23.3/1000 2010 Regional Average: 27.4/1000 2008 Regional Range: 11 - 40.7 2010 Regional Range: 9.1 - 54.4 Source: Virginia Center for Health Statistics

Ready Communities Children living in low-income families are less likely to be ready for school due to lack of economic resources as well as poverty-associated social factors including low parental education and teen parenting Measure: % of children under age 6 living below the federal poverty threshold 2000 State Average: 13% 2010 Stave Average: 17% Source: The Annie E. Casey Foundation Kids Count Data Center

Ready Services Low birth weight babies are at greater risk than normal weight infants for physical and developmental problems and are more likely to be enrolled in special education classes or to repeat a grade Measure: % of infants born weighing under 2,500 grams (5.5 pounds) 2008 Regional Average: 6.9% 2010 Regional Average: 6.4% 2008 Regional Range: 6.1% - 8.1% 2010 Regional Range: 3 %- 8.2% Source: Virginia Department of Health Division of Health Statistics

Ready Schools Grade 3 reading scores are a key predictor of future academic success, a reliable indicator of a child’s school readiness and a measure of whether or not children’s needs have been met between birth and third grade Measure: % of children with reading proficiency in 3rd grade as measured by state proficiency tests 2008 Regional Average: 84.7% 2009 Regional Average: 83.1% 2008 Regional Range: 79% - 87% 2009 Regional Range: 78% - 88% Source: Virginia Department of Education

8


Smart Beginnings by the Numbers in 2011 

Leveraged more than $10,000 in grants and private contributions

Gave

    

4 invited presentations Exhibited at 5 community fairs Hosted 2 family outreach events Offered 3 parenting class series in English Offered 2 parenting class series in Spanish Hosted 6th annual Early Childhood Leadership Summit with 220 attendees

Developed 1 transition to kindergarten training for early childhood educators  

Hosted 3 professional development events for early childhood educators

Coordinated QRIS rating and mentoring in 5 childcare centers

Coordinated regional kindergarten registration with 7 school systems

Collected Snapshot Assessment data from 43 childcare centers

Coordinated focus groups with more than 100 teachers in 5 school systems

Hosted 10 mayors in literacy events during the Week of the Young Child

Worked with more than 40 JMU students in coalition activities

Virginia Star Quality Initiative (VSQI) VSQI awards early childhood programs one of five star levels of increasing quality. Participation and the award of a one-star or higher rating reflects a program’s choice to raise the bar in commitment to quality beyond expectation or requirement.

Augusta County Beverly Manor Elementary VPI Clymore Elementary School VPI Hugh K. Cassell Elementary School VPI North River Elementary School VPI Riverheads Elementary School VPI Stuarts Draft Elementary School VPI Stump Elementary School VPI Page County Shenandoah Elementary School VPI Shenandoah County The Presbyterian Preschool

Augusta County Churchville Elementary School VPI Littlest Lamb Childcare Center Verona Elementary School VPI

Augusta County Wonder Land Enrichment Center

Harrisonburg Roberta Webb Childcare Center Page County Weezie’s Wonderful World Staunton Bears and Blankets Academy of Early Learning Community Child Care Center 9


2011 SBSV Accomplishments—Narrative

Leveraged funds: 

Received financial gift of $1,050 from Augusta Health to print transition to kindergarten resource booklets in Staunton-Augusta-Waynesboro

Received a grant of $4,500 from the Shenandoah Community Foundation to fund four preschool scholarships in Shenandoah County

Received grant of $660 from Staunton Rotary Club for parenting classes

Received a grant of $1,000 from WHSV Project 3 to print transition to kindergarten resource booklets in Harrisonburg, Page County, and Shenandoah County

Invited Presentations: 

Gave SBSV informational presentations to the Luray-Page County Chamber of Commerce, Wells Fargo Shenandoah district retail branch managers, and the Staunton Rotary Club

Hosted a Quality Rating and Improvement System (QRIS) informational session with Family Resource and Referral Center at Staunton City Library

Parenting Classes and Parent Outreach: 

Hosted “Positive Solutions for Families” parenting class series in English at Community Fellowship Church of the Nazarene in Waynesboro, Clymore Elementary School in Fort Defiance, and Generations Crossing in Harrisonburg

Hosted “Positive Solutions for Families” parenting class series in Spanish at Basic United Methodist Church – Casa de Amistad in Waynesboro and at Clymore Elementary School in Fort Defiance

Exhibited at Kids Matter Day in Staunton, Family Affair Night at Robert E. Lee High School in Staunton, the RMH Family Birthplace Fair in Harrisonburg, the Community Resource Fair sponsored by the Harrisonburg Community Health Center, and the Shenandoah County Fair

Hosted Celebrating Parents event at the Augusta County Government Complex

Hosted the Children’s Fair at W.W. Robinson Elementary School in Woodstock with over 300 attendees

10


2011 SBSV Accomplishments– Narrative

Trainings and Professional Development: 

Sponsored the 6th Annual Early Childhood Leadership Summit with over 200 attendees at James Madison University

Transition to Kindergarten committee developed a Ready, Set, Go! transition to kindergarten training for early childhood educators

Assisted in planning for the 2012 Celebrating Teaching Conference co-sponsored by RMH Childcare Connection

Hosted a Directors Roundtable on early intervention with Infant and Toddler of AugustaHighland and Infant and Toddler of Staunton-Waynesboro at Valley Community Services Board

Hosted a Directors Roundtable on school-based services for 3 and 4 year olds with Augusta County Public Schools, Staunton City Public Schools, and Waynesboro City Public Schools at Augusta Health

Hosted a training for child care professionals, “Creating a Positive Classroom: Classroom Management for Preschool and Early Childhood Teachers,” at McSwain Elementary School in Staunton

Coordinator attended the VSQI Family Child Care Home Demonstration Conference in Richmond

Coordinator attended a training titled “Working in Teams and Collaboration: Partnering for Success” sponsored by Virginia Community Capital in New Market

Coordinator attended the Early Childhood Professional Development Summit sponsored by VDOE T/TAC and the National Professional Development Center on Inclusion in Staunton

Virginia Star Quality Initiative - Quality Rating and Improvement System: 

Completed mentoring at Bears and Blankets Academy of Early Learning in Staunton

Completed mentoring at Community Child Care and Bears and Blankets Academy of Early Learning in Staunton

Coordinated rating and mentoring for Weezie’s Wonderful World (3-star-rating) in Luray, The Presbysterian Preschool (4-star-rating) in Woodstock, and Roberta Webb Child Care Center (3-star-rating) in Harrisonburg

Six mentors attended a refresher training hosted by the Virginia Star Quality Initiative 11


2011 SBSV Accomplishments-Narrative

Community Collaboration and Partnership: 

Coordinated regional kindergarten registration

Coordinator served on the Harrisonburg-Rockingham Chamber of Commerce Vision 2020 Leadership Board in the World-Class Education and Workforce Cornerstone workgroup

Began work to create a 0-5 Nutrition Workgroup in the Greater Augusta area

Began a literacy collaboration with Augusta County library

The coalition joined the Woodstock Chamber of Commerce and is active in the non-profit sector workgroup

The coalition became a member of the obesity task force of the Healthy Community Council in Harrisonburg-Rockingham County

Coordinated Week of the Young Child events, including the participation of 10 local mayors in an early childhood literacy event and media coverage on WHSV

Assessment and Publications: 

Updated the Shenandoah County Preschool Guide and distributed in the community

43 childcare centers participated in the Transition to Kindergarten Snapshot Assessment, sharing key information to kindergarten teachers about transitioning 4 and 5-year olds

Conducted focus groups with more than 100 kindergarten and preschool teachers in five school systems: Harrisonburg, Rockingham , Waynesboro, Page and Shenandoah. Students from JMU’s Inclusive Early Childhood Education program assisted in the focus groups

Coalition Development and Sustainability: 

Established coalition by-laws

Elected a Leadership Council chair (Lauren Kibler, Marketing Director, Chick-fil-A of Harrisonburg

Established three Leadership Council subcommittees: Operations, Board Development, and Resource Development

Established a social media presence with Twitter, Facebook and an e-newsletter

Recruited Neal Menefee of The Rockingham Group to serve on the Speakers Bureau

Launched Grow Success! fundraising campaign 12


Partners SBSV partners are organizations that contribute cash or in-kind matches in order to secure grant funding from the Virginia Early Childhood Foundation. Their partnership requires a substantial investment in the coalition’s strategic planning process. BEST FIT • Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services at James Madison University • James Madison University • United Way of Harrisonburg-Rockingham • United Way of Greater Augusta • Virginia Early Childhood Foundation • WHSV

Sponsors SBSV Sponsors are organizations or individuals that provide financial or in-kind support for specific coalition initiatives.

Augusta County Government Center • Augusta County Public Schools • Augusta Health • Basic United Methodist Church – Casa de Amistad • Chick-fil-A of Harrisonburg • Community Fellowship Church of the Nazarene • Family Resource and Referral Center • Generations Crossing • Harrisonburg City Public Schools • Health Bites • Infant and Toddler Connection of Augusta-Highland • Infant and Toddler Connection of Staunton-Waynesboro • JMU Department of Health Sciences • JMU Inclusive Early Childhood Education program • JMU Department of Public Administration • Kira Newman • Luray-Page County Chamber of Commerce • Massanutten Regional Library—Harrisonburg • Neal Menefee, The Rockingham Group • Migrant Education • Mt. Calvary Day Care • Office on Children and Youth • Page County Public Schools • The Reading Road Show—Gus Bus • RMH Childcare Connection • Rockingham County Public Schools • Rockingham Memorial Hospital • Shenandoah Community Foundation • Shenandoah County Department of Social Services • Shenandoah County Library • Shenandoah County Public Schools • Shenandoah Valley Electric Cooperative • Shentel • Staunton Rotary Club • Staunton City Library • Staunton City Public Schools • The Advocate • Valley Community Services Board • VDOE Region 5 T/TAC • Virginia Head Start Association • Waynesboro City Public Schools • Woodstock Presbyterian Preschool

Grow Success! Campaign Special thanks to the following businesses and individuals for their contributions in the Grow Success! Fundraising campaign.

Bright Minds Society ($100-$999 annually)

Cargill Meal Solutions John and Sandra Downey Harman Construction Hollister Pioneer Bank The Rockingham Group RR Donnelly Valley Eye Clinic

Benefactors Circle (Continued financial support from past Leadership Council members)

Mary Price Thomas “Ikey” Rosazza

13


Affiliates SBSV affiliates are organizations that generously designate personnel for coalition membership.

Augusta County Public Schools • Bears and Blankets Academy of Early Learning • Exceptional Education Department at JMU • Family Resource and Referral Center • Generations Crossing • Hand-in-Hand Resource Mothers • Harrisonburg City Public Schools • Healthy Families of the Blue Ridge • Infant and Toddler Connection of Augusta-Highland • Infant and Toddler Connection of Harrisonburg-Rockingham • Infant and Toddler Connection of Shenandoah Valley • Infant and Toddler Connection of Staunton-Waynesboro • Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services at JMU • Literacy Volunteers-Shenandoah County • Mt. Calvary Day Care • Office on Children and Youth • Page Alliance for Community Action (PACA) • Page County Public Schools • Roberta Webb Child Care Center • Rockingham County Public Schools • Rockingham-Harrisonburg WIC—Central Shenandoah Health District • RMH Childcare Connection • Shenandoah County Library System • Shenandoah County Public Schools • Shenandoah Valley Child Development Clinic at JMU • Shenandoah Valley Head Start and the Regional School-Based Preschool Network • Staunton City Public Schools • The Speech and Language Center PLLC • United Way of Greater Augusta • Valley Community Services Board • Valley Eye Clinic • VDOE Region 5 T/TAC • Waynesboro City Public Schools • WHSV • Woodstock United Methodist Child Care Center

Leadership Council Mr. Patrick Coffield County Administrator, Augusta County Government Dr. Robin Crowder Superintendent, Waynesboro City Public Schools Mrs. Melissa Deibert Page County School Board Member and Owner, Valley Eye Clinic Mr. Kai Degner Harrisonburg City Council member and Realtor, Kline May Realty Mr. Floyd Heater President, Shenandoah Memorial Hospital Mrs. Lauren Kibler—Chair Marketing Director, Chick-fil-A of Harrisonburg Mr. Nicholas Martino Retail Branch Manager, DuPont Community Credit Union Dr. Sarah Pumphrey Pediatrician, Augusta Pediatrics Mrs. Nancy Reed Attorney, Reed & Reed, P.C. Mr. Alan Shelton Senior Food Scientist, Cargill Karen Whetzel School Board Member, Shenandoah County Public Schools Dr. Jelisa Wolfe Director of Student Services, Staunton City Public Schools Dr. Rhonda Zingraff Associate Dean of the College of Integrated Science and Technology at JMU 14


For more information about Smart Beginnings Shenandoah Valley, contact:

Alysia Davis, Coordinator 601 University Blvd., MSC 9008 Harrisonburg, VA 22807

davis4am@jmu.edu Phone: 540-568-8968 Fax: 540-568-6409

www.valleysmartbeginnings.org

15

Smart Beginnings Shenandoah Valley 2011 Annual Report  

This is the 2011 Annual Report for the Smart Beginnings Shenandoah Valley coalition. Our mission is to ensure that all children start school...

Advertisement