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LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?

4.2. Homophobia online

One guest commented, “Better late than never. Finally an artist has put their best foot forward and I’m really grateful. This is

called true courage. What are the rest of [Iran’s] artists waiting for?” Yusef replied,

“In the past I wasn’t really a fan of hers [Shohreh] … but now

that she has supported us with this action and will hopefully

do so more in the future, I’m going to seriously reconsider my

stance. I hope that this forces the Iranian people to emotionally reconsider their traditional feelings”

Nonetheless, some of our respondents were not so sure that

traditional feelings were entirely to blame for the prevalence of homophobia in Iran. We asked our respondents whether

homophobia was worse before or after the Iranian Revolution and Saghi Ghahraman poignantly replied,

“Homophobia is, without a doubt, absolutely worse now.

Before the revolution, homophobia wasn’t on the surface and

it could be gently brushed away. It was brushed away by those

who had the means to do so such as artists, writers, the intellectual community, and even men and women who were rich or

had strong characters practiced their sexual orientation freely, to a certain degree.

It was after the 1979 revolution that a witch-hunt for gay,

lesbian and transsexuals began. And, for a short while, there was no distinction between transsexuals and homosexuals and both

groups were hanged/killed. During the years after the revolution, with all the frenzy over homosexuality in Sharia and in the new

laws, Iranian society took to being horrified by the idea of having a homosexual or transsexual family member. I have a strong

feeling that most of the harsh feelings toward homosexuals and transsexuals are because of the fear of being associated with

them and sharing their fate. The authorities expect parents, re-

latives, and friends to punish homosexual members of their own family under Sharia law.

LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?  

A Small Media report revealing how Iran’s LGBT communities use global communicationstechnology in their everyday lives.

LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?  

A Small Media report revealing how Iran’s LGBT communities use global communicationstechnology in their everyday lives.

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