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4.2. Homophobia online

LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?

“A lack of information, and more importantly the fear of talking about social phenomena results in negligent people and neg-

ligent experts. Today, in Iran, there is a total taboo on homose-

xuality, either in rejecting it or accepting it, in the official media. Scientific societies have strengthened homophobia in Iran and

any judgemental conclusions about this phenomenon have led to further speculation”

The author of Nejabat weblog aligns their definition of 23

http://nejabat.wordpress. com/2010/01/07/29/

homophobia with a more commonplace understanding of the term,23

“[Homophobia is] anger and hatred toward homosexuals,

avoidance of homosexuals, considering same-sex orientation

to be worthless and invalid, fear of homosexuals, prejudice and

bigotry toward homosexuals, reluctance to obtain accurate and scientific knowledge about homosexuality and insistence on ingrained biases”

While most homophobic content online appears in the comments posted to gay or gay friendly blogs posts and articles,

there are a few intentionally and exclusively homophobic and

anti-gay blogs and websites (one of which will be discussed in

the section concerning homosexuality and Islam). In addition, it is very uncommon for anyone to take a stand against homo-

phobic content when it appears in the Persian language in the public domain.

A very specific example of homophobia in the public domain

occurred during an episode of Befarmaeed Sham, a franchised

Iranian version of Come Dine With Me, which screens weekly on popular Persian-language satellite channel Manoto TV.

The conversations that take place around the dinner table

provide a perfect window into the diverse mind-sets of Iranians

LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?  

A Small Media report revealing how Iran’s LGBT communities use global communicationstechnology in their everyday lives.

LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?  

A Small Media report revealing how Iran’s LGBT communities use global communicationstechnology in their everyday lives.

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