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Readers published a diverse range of comments to Kamangir’s

post. On 30 March 2008 Soroush said, “I really think more people should write about these things in their blogs”. Reza Pesar (on

behalf of the 5pesar blog) said, “Even though changing the rules

of the game isn’t really appropriate, I’d like to say thanks for your reply”. But Kamangir’s question certainly invited some more critical responses.

“The term faggot has evolved. It became homo, then homo-

sexual and now queer. It would be easier to understand if these

people were simply attracted to the same gender, but what’s in-

teresting is that some of these dear people like both the opposite gender and the same gender [are bi-sexual]. In Arsham’s [Parsi]

own words on the BBC show, queer is a lifestyle. And this lifestyle kills me. (I’m still willing to discuss how a society should have

the right to ban queers the same way they can justify banning drugs)”

Kamangir replied, “Sorry, what is the problem with somebody liking both genders?”, a question to which SH chose a less

tactful response: “What’s wrong with having sex with a child if they consent? Or with someone who’s mentally retarded?”

// The argument disintegrated and continued for about a

week before the thread went quiet. More than a year later, on 28 July 2009, Hamid posted,

“I am a gay guy from this damned city of Yazd: dry, religious

and holy. I’ve been suffering under the heavy burden of my sexuality for years but my voice is not heard. Dear Kamangir, I don’t

think your activities will help my peers and I, but what is clear is that the welfare of future generations [of homosexuals] will be protected [through your endeavours]”

These quotations reveal a number of important issues. Firstly, blog readers are not afraid of being critical of homosexuality

online. There are no repercussions for online homophobia and those who publish homophobic content are generally not

LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?  

A Small Media report revealing how Iran’s LGBT communities use global communicationstechnology in their everyday lives.

LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?  

A Small Media report revealing how Iran’s LGBT communities use global communicationstechnology in their everyday lives.

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