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LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?

5.8. Gay male questionnaire responses

// Reaction of family and friends

“My family is really cool and I don’t have any problems or

issues with them. One of the relationships I was in was pretty painful because I heard a lot of bad talk indirectly from her

family. I was really annoyed. But in general, I haven’t had many problems. I often feel like I don’t belong to society and feel like maybe I should change who I am, but I also think about how that would affect my family”

5.8

Gay Male QUESTIONNAIRE RESPONSES 1.

// Trust

“I usually trust people right off the bat but, unfortunately, this

trust has backfired a number of times. I still like to be optimistic, which is especially important for us [homosexuals] because our number is limited and it’s difficult to find like-minded people.

The initial trust is very important … Actually, all of my friendships and relationships began in the virtual world. I do think meeting people in person is better, but for me the virtual world was the

best way to find people like myself … One of the disadvantages of the virtual world is that you can’t really get an accurate picture of what someone is really like before you meet them in person”

// Coming out

“I was about 14 when I first heard the word ‘hamjensgara’

[homosexual] … but it took longer to find out more. My classmates were after girls but I was after my classmates! … When I was

14 I also fell in love for the first time, but the person I was in love with was not homosexual and it was very hard for me …

LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?  

A Small Media report revealing how Iran’s LGBT communities use global communicationstechnology in their everyday lives.

LGBT Republic of Iran: An Online Reality?  

A Small Media report revealing how Iran’s LGBT communities use global communicationstechnology in their everyday lives.

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