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M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

M. Scott Mahaskey

www.mahaskey.com mahaskey@mahaskey.com


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

INTERNATIONAL Recent Projects & Singles


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

Marine Lance Cpl Keith Bridges, 29, of Springfield, MO, and 2nd Light Armored Reconnaissance drags aways a detainee who refused to cooperate, May 18, 2005, during an early morning raid in a remote village near Akashatt, Iraq.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

An American humvee rests December 7, 2006, at the Defense Reutilization and Marketing Office (DRMO) yard in Iraq’s Al Anbar Province. The yard, which is typically restricted to journalists, houses all scrap metal, battle damage and wrecked vehicles for western Iraq.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

US Army Sgt 1st Class Felipe Azua, of Plainview, TX and the 478th Civil Affairs Battalion attached to the 1st Cavalry Division, distributes humanitarian relief rations August 24, 2004, to residents on the outskirts of Sadr City, Iraq. As residents learned of the relief effort, a mob scene broke out forcing soldiers to cut their effors short and leave the area.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

US Army soldiers from 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, take cover from outbound rockets and incoming mortars during a firefight, December 11, 2004, in Mosul, Iraq. The ambush occurred shortly after the soldiers were attack by a car bomb that set fire to one of their attack vehicles.


WAR IN IRAQ

M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio Excerpt from personal journal

to rest some distance away. The ramp dropped and the investigation began. To my shock, all were well and the vehicle that carried us through this attacked was not damaged.

MOSUL - In the silence that followed the initial blast, my eyes wandered in a dream-like state of consciousness. One moment, the ambient sounds of the Stryker engine. And when my hearing returned, the pained sounds of men searching for answers and calling out for possible casualties. After six months of covering military personnel deployed in Iraq, it was now my time to experience the source of anxiety for soldiers that live and work here. As the soldiers say, it is the experience of being “blown up”; the narrow escape from death after being hit directly with an improvised explosive device (IED). Twenty-four hours later, I would experience an even more horrific event. Approx. 15:30/ 10 December 2004 It was the oddest combination of slow motion and fast action. Everything happened at once…the explosion, the fire, the dust and the search for casualties. The bomb, an IED planted under fresh pavement and detonated by a remote-controlled device, targeted the vehicle of Lt. Col. Eric Kurilla, Battalion Commander of 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment. Immediately after the blast, my hearing was gone, but the ringing was deafening. The roar of the engine and the wheels upon the road went silent. In the confusion, as my head thrashed about, brilliant flames filled my vision. As my eyelids closed and woke again, the brightness has faded and darkness set in as a cloud of dust, which tasted of chalk, dirt and metal enveloped the vehicle. Our clothes and lungs filled with the fine mist of yellow-gray powder.

For this day, the bullets dodged were two 152mm artillery rounds. Approx. 15:50/ 11 December 2004

To my right: The knees of gunner Staff Sgt. Victor Brazfield, standing upright through the right rear hatch began to buckle as he struggled to remain conscious. For a moment, he blacked out entirely and was held upright by fellow soldier, Spc Chris Espindola, beneath him and across from me. As consciousness returned moments later, his knees straightened and Brazfield returned to the hatch and continued on with his security mission. To my left: In a series of staggered steps, my heart sinks as I watch the Battalion Commander slowly fall from his hatch. I could not see his face, and feared doing so, knowing that the blast was directly in front of him. Each second appeared as a further step into unconsciousness, eventually supported only by the arms of the soldier beneath him, Cpt. Robert Shaw. Like Brazfield, Kurilla was knocked out by the blast, but avoided being hit by shrapnel. He, too, returned to his post. For both soldiers, will overcame when the body failed. The vehicle accelerated through the kill zone and came

With the previous day’s headache only recently cleared, the soldiers of 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment gathered in the afternoon for another mission back into Mosul. The conversation was light and casual as the men recalled the events of yesterday. Hours later, the pained voices of these men would again cry out. With the ramp half open and the vehicle in direct line of sight, I wondered if what I was seeing was real. A few rounds of small arms fire moments before a fireball engulfs a Stryker about 100 meters to our rear. Located somewhere in the inferno and flying metal was the red mist remains of a suicide bomber. Before the attack, the soldiers of 1-24 scoured a junkyard in search of enemy weapons caches. A sizeable amount of artillery shells, ammunition and grenades were pilled neatly as explosives experts arrived to blow in place the enemy’s stash. Over and over the comment was made “I can’t believe we haven’t been attacked yet.” It took time for EOD to prepare the detonation, time in which the enemy prepared a counter-strike. Like the foreshadowing in a fine novel, the soldier’s concerns would soon be realized. As EOD prepared to detonate the cache, men were ordered to mount up and pull security along a busy stretch of roadway. The Stryker that was attacked, whose call sign is Hunter One, was located at a T-intersection with all


WAR IN IRAQ

M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio its crew and dismounts aboard and ready to move. I was casually looking out, not at anything particular, but just so happened to be looking directly at Hunter One. The ramp began to rise when a tremendous explosion erupted and an enormous fireball filled the sky. As the fire crept toward us, the men in my vehicle lurched toward the front, turning our eyes to the blinding light; more a result of

natural reflex as opposed to intentional movement. There was no time to think. And when that time did come, we all thought the worst. The radios called out and my present dreams are now haunted by the panicked calls heard from the commanders; A mortar? Did the Stryker explode? Was there anybody alive? A call for the medic. Our vehicle, the same vehicle hit the day prior by the IED, turned and moved toward the now partially engulfed Stryker. Our ramp dropped and a horrific sight emerged. Could it be that the men inside were burning alive, if alive at all, or had those who lived managed to escape? At this point, all Hell broke loose. Soldiers gathered fire extinguishers from multiple vehicles, which were now in a security posture for a recovery mission. They began to fight the flames. At one point, the soldiers had to pull back as the flames grew too intense to control. But, if the fire continued the rounds inside were certain to cook off and the vehicle would be completely destroyed. At the forceful encouragement of Staff Sgt. Shannon Kay, a second effort was made and the fire finally extinguished.

A search of the vehicle was then conducted and I simply could not believe what I was seeing. There was nobody inside. Everybody had made it out. Suicide bombers typically attack solo, but it was quickly clear that he was not acting alone. In a surprisingly sophisticated attack, the soldiers of 1-24, still attempting to make sense of what had occurred, were now thrown into a high intensity gun battle that came from multiple directions. It became apparent that the enemy was going for the disabled vehicle.

I could feel the pride swell. Concentrated smiles emerged from the scopes of the still firing weapons. What appeared as a morale breaking defeat miraculously turned into a tremendous victory. For this day, the bullet dodged was despair.

It seemed like an eternity as soldiers scurried about returning fire with both small arms and rockets. Enemy mortars pounded around us…bullets cracked overhead. Air Force SRA Grailin Blamer, the Battalion’s JTAC, called in for air support which resulted in three gun runs including at least one pass at a mere 500 feet above the deck. In “danger close” proximity to the remaining Strykers, a JDAM bomb made the defensive effort complete. In the chaotic noise of battle, a radio call was clearly over-heard. The Stryker vehicle that was just hit by a car bomb had restarted, a credit to the crew who concentrated their efforts on that vehicle during even the heaviest of fighting. It was now believed that the vehicle could be driven back to base under its own power. Although soldiers had been wounded, none were serious enough to require medivac. The original crew, aboard at the time of the attack, jumped back onto Hunter One and rejoined the patrol back to the base…fighting along their way out.

Although wounded, Staff Sgt. Shannon Kay, of 1st Battalion, 24th Infantry Regiment, returns fire after being attacked with a car bomb and wounded, December 11, 2004, in Mosul, Iraq.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

Iraqi men grieve as the body of a relative is pulled from a vehicle, December 5, 2004, after being shot and killed by an insurgent sniper in Mosul, Iraq. Although details of the event were unclear, insurgents have regularly targeted Mosul citizens in a recent wave of violence.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

US Army soldiers from 2nd Battalion, 2nd Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, detain a group of Iraqi men seconds after an improvised explosive device detonated near the Bradley fighting vehicle they were riding in, June 15, 2004, near Baqubah, Iraq. There were no known injuries in the blast. The soldiers were attacked as they left from pulling security at the sight of another IED about 200 meters away, which was safely destroyed in a controlled detonation.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

US Army soldiers with 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, assist a fellow soldier wounded in an attack during a humanitarian relief mission September 7, 2004, in eastern Baghdad’s Sadr City. The patrol came under an RPG attack and one US soldier was seriously injured in the blast. The soldier injured was the company’s medic.

WAR IN IRAQ


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

A truck with at least two injured Iraqi men was intercepted by US Army soldiers with 2nd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, while on patrol September 7, 2004, in eastern Baghdad’s Sadr City. The Iraqi men claimed they were shot by US forces during a gun battle, Tuesday, and US commanders believed the truck contained at least one insurgent who fired an RPG at their patrol. The men were released and no detainees were taken.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

Excerpt from personal journal Sunday, April 11, 2004/ 23:51 (Easter Sunday) On this day of rebirth, death came again to Camp Al Fallujah. Flesh is soft and metal does not discriminate. The damage warfare can do to a young man defines the sublime; it mangles, alters…bleeds. The first Marine brought in was the most seriously wounded; a bullet had entered in the front and exited through the back of his skull. A Corpsman at the scene was forced to plunge an emergency respirator, a tracheotomy, into the neck of this 18 or 19-year-old Marine. If not, he most likely would have died in the field from his own blood or the cerebral fluid pouring from his scalp. The Marine’s prognosis was not good. Surgeons seemed in awe that he had survived to this point. Full recovery seemed impossible, at the very least, this young Marines will survive with serious brain damage, if he survives at all. His right lung now punctured with a ventilation tube, suction tubes extend from his mouth carrying fluid to a machine on the deck, bandages soaked in blood about his head.

Navy medical teams with the Bravo Surgical Company check for a pulse in the foot of a Marine wounded in combat, April 11, 2004, at Camp Al Fallujah near Fallujah, Iraq. Details of the battle were not made available, but occurred Easter Sunday (April 11, 2004) during a temporary halt of offensive operations by US military forces in the Fallujah area.

The other Marine should recover, although the damage of his injuries may not be apparent for days to come. Both legs were injured, his right leg worse than his left. As the blood soaked bandages were removed and his leg lifted for x-ray, he barely made a sound. Despite pain medication, the stinging sensation of his injuries must have been intolerable. Surgeons searched for minutes to find a pulse in this toes, indicating that he would most likely be able to keep his leg. These Navy surgeons are the angels among us who prevent angel flights. Angel flights is the phrase used to describe any aircraft carrying KIAs – a disturbing sickly-sweet term to describe the end result of warfare. The team effort, patience, concern and humor under stress of the men and women of Bravo Surgical Company is awe inspiring. Cool at all times, despite the constant horror they must witness and the failures of man they must correct.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

Iraqi children crowd together as Marines from the 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion hand out candy while on a mission near Al Qaim, April 7, 2004, in western Iraq.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

An elder Iraqi man, who could not be identified, kisses the hand of Marine Corporal Joseph Sharpe, 21, of Peoria, IL, and Weapons Company, 1st Battalion/5th Marine Regiment, as a sign of gratitude for food and water the Marines left him during a mission, April 19, 2004, in Fallujah, Iraq.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

VALOR: Portraits from the Frontlines in Iraq US Army soldiers with A Company, 4th Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, attached to 4th Squadron, 14th US Cavalry Regiment, 172d Stryker Brigade Combat Team, submitted for awards of valor for combat actions in Al Anbar and Ninewah Province in Iraq, photographed July, 2006 in Rawah, Iraq.

WAR IN IRAQ


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ Excerpts from personal journal Tuesday, April 13, 2004/ 17:32 Death is not beautiful, not here. It is the bastard child of horror… bloody and gruesome. Today’s vision will haunt me forever, but I am strangely able to cope. I can only process what I saw, because it was not me...then the company started arriving, multiple causalities and they were in a hurry. The walking wounded came off first, many struggling to hold onto the shoulders of Navy medics assisting them. Then came the most seriously wounded. His body was limp as he was dragged from the rear of the high back humvee. His legs collapsed and folded on top of each other as they cleared the gate. Two Marines were unable to support him…two more came to assist. Clutching his shoulders and pants legs, they carried him to the nearby medics. He was classified with a tag, red, indicating urgent care needed. His intestines dangled in the shade, there was little the medics could do. His face was visible as if looking at me, perhaps through me. Black skin made ghostly white; he was already dead. The surgeons spent several minutes looking for life before calling for the Recorder. The time went undocumented to me, as if everything was in slow motion. I, stunned at the sight, as were the Marines surrounding me still with a mission to accomplish. But I didn’t think of the dead Marine’s family, not at that time. My thoughts were only about the Marines around me. How are these young men able to cope? Their friend, only moments ago, now transformed into a horrible organic mass…lifeless and silent. The medics closed his eyes for the final time and his remains placed in a black body bag. Careful, although without dignity, his body was carried to a 7-ton truck…his gear thrown beside him. I took the picture, but a far more horrifying image remains in my mind, not visible to others. The walking wounded quickly became prone causalities. For some, relieved by the medical attention. Others seemed to digress quickly. One Marine, face bloodied and in agony while walking, quickly calmed while needles injected him with unknown fluids. The Battalion Commander walked quietly, as if lost in thought, to each of the wounded. Examining them, their clothes…saying little with a stone cold face. The company who lost their Marine today had returned…the Chaplin was counseling them and their eyes looked heavy. I could feel their desire to cry, but the Marine Corps myth is strong. To them, grief will come later. For now, it is the mission that is their lives.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

WAR IN IRAQ

The bodies of three members of the Iraqi National Guard, believed murdered by insurgents, were discovered December 2, 2004 in Mosul, Iraq.

Staff Sgt. Carroll Bundy, 39, Hertford, NC, and with the 30th Brigade Combat Team searches through a home for insurgents June 24, 2004 after a Bradley fighting vehicle pushed through the wall to allow the soldiers access in Baqubah, Iraq. The search was part of a larger effort to quell insurgent activity following an outbreak of violence earlier that day.

US Army soldiers from F Troop, 4th US Cavalry, the brigade reconnaissance troop for the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division take rest, June 17, 2004 during a gun battle that lasted about 12 hours in an area south of Baqubah, Iraq. US commanders reported 13 insurgents confirmed killed and no US casualties.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

US Army Specialist Adam Brown, 21, of Charlie Company, 9th Eng. Battalion, 1st Infantry Division, navigates through high brush in an attempt to find impact areas of rounds fired from US troops at insurgent positions, July 7, 2004, near Balad, Iraq

WAR IN IRAQ

US Army soldiers with the 3rd Brigade Combat Team document an insurgent killed June 26, 2004 during fighting in Baqubah, Iraq. The soldiers will turn over their images to intelligence in an effor to identify the nationality of the insurgent, which they believed was Syrian. Alarmed at a passing military convoy, a child cr i e s Ma y 2 , 2005, in a remote village north of Baghdad, Iraq.

Hidden in a room lined with Walt Disney wallpaper, Lance Corporal Ryan Deady, 20, of Chicago, IL and Weapons Platoon, Alpha Company of the 1st Battalion/ 5th Marine Regiment, keeps watch on an alleyway April 14, 2004 in Fallujah, Iraq.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

INDIA

The Muslim Burn Victims of Ahmedabad

RIGHT - A stunned Shajahan Sheikh, 18, listens as her mother asks “Who will take her now?� referring to the scars she wears across her face after she was burned during the 2002 riots in Ahmedabad. She recovers from the riots in a Muslim resettlement area, known as Faizal Row House, outside of Ahmedabad. TOP LEFT - Ahmed Badshah, 21, rubs his ear while recounting the night that Hindu mobs set him ablaze in 2002. The man was burned over ninety percent of his body. Once lit on fire, he charged the mobs in what he thought would be his last act alive. He lived, and now suffers the pain of recovery in a Muslim resettlement area, known as Faizal Row House, outside of Ahmedabad. LOWER LEFT - Although healed, a woman burned in the riots of 2002 has lost normal usage of her hand. She now lives in the Faizal Row House settlement outside of Ahmedabad.


INDIA

M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

Muslim Recovery in Ahmedabad

ABOVE - A tattered Indian flag lies on the third floor of Tanveer Jafri’s home in Ahmedabad’s Gulbarg Society. The home was just one of many locations in which rioters burned people alive in 2002. The home now quarters armed Indian Security Force troops who have been stationed in the area to restore calm. TOP RIGHT - Sarifa Ajmeri, 35, recalls the night in which Hindu rioters passed by her window during the 2002 riots in which hundreds of Muslims were burned and scores killed. LOWER RIGHT - Even after Hindu rioters threatened to burn his home, Ejaz Ajmeri, 11 continues to make Hindu prayer cloths which are offered, along with coconuts, to the goddess Durja. “A Muslim makes this and it goes to a Hindu goddess, we want to live with peace and love,” said his mother Sarifa Ajmeri.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

INDIA

The Rise of Hindu Fundamentalism

ABOVE - Members of the Hindu fundamentalist organization known as the RSS during a shakha, a type of drill, in Pune. “Through physical and intellectual programs, the understanding of the ideology and discipline come about naturally. Physical programs marked with strict discipline, vigor, and heroism help rouse the spirit of fortitude� as quoted from an HSS website http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Delphi/2745/mainframe.htm TOP - Inauguration of Narendra Modi, chief minister of Gujarat. History was made this day, as it was the largest inauguration ceremony for any chief minister in Indian history. Occurring in an Ahmedabad sports complex, about 120,000 people, mostly members of the BJP and RSS, attend and chanted support for the continuation of the BJP doctrine. LOWER RIGHT - Suicide squad training camp east of Bombay. Instructors demonstrate attack tactics.


INDIA

M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

Kashmir: Paradise Lost

TOP LEFT - Homes once owned by Hindu Pundits, lay in ruins throughout Srinagar as a result of militant uprisings that began in 1989. ABOVE - A boy looks out the window of his military style school in a refugee area of Jammu. The area was created to house Hindu Pundits forced out a Kashmir. ABOVE RIGHT - Men paddle across Dal Lake in Srinagar, Kashmir. Considered by many to be one of the most beautiful places on Earth, the region has suffered greatly since 1989 when militant action began and forced the Hindu Pundit population to flee. RIGHT - A woman grieves while telling of how her son died as a result of bombing by the Pakistani Army at the Pakistan-India border in Jammu.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

INDIA

The Sikh Faith: Their Golden Temple

A man washes himself in the waters that surround the sacred site of The Golden Temple (right) located in the Punjab region of Amritsar, India. Although not mandatory, the act of washing oneself is common practice while visiting the site, considered to be the most holy of structures for the Sikh faith.


INDIA

M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

Nagaland for Christ

ABOVE - A guerilla fighter with the IM Naga Army said he killed at least six government soldiers before he was shot and lost an eye in the battle. TOP - With the largest Christian church in the background, a man calls villagers to the annual Christmas games held each year to kick off the Christmas festivities in Nagaland. CENTER - Village elders during tribal council meeting. Although the majority of the village has converted to Christianity, the village still retains its links to it headhunting customs which include maintaining its council of village leaders. The history of the village is only recorded through oral tradition. As such, village elders are brought to the council to serve 30 year terms in order to maintain their history. LEFT - A guerilla fighter keeps watch over the general headquarters of the Naga Army in the mountains of Nagaland.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

INDIA

Bringing Faith to America: the Swaminarayan Faith

ABOVE - Workers near Pindwara carve the marble that will be used in the creation of a Swaminarayan Temple in the United States. TOP LEFT - Akshardham, the main monument of the Swaminarayan faith. LEFT - A man prays at a Swaminarayan temple in Ahmedabad.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

INTERNATIONAL

An airplane makes a final approach into Kabul, Afghanistan September 29, 2005.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

DOMESTIC Recent Projects & Singles


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

ABOVE - New Orleans’ Firefighter Doug Balser, of Engine 20, treats 3-year-old Deonte Hurst after the Super Dome was evacuated following an early morning fire during the aftermath relief efforts of Hurricane Katrina, Sept. 1, 2005, in New Orleans, LA. RIGHT - An unidentified woman pleads for Air Force security personnel to take a baby in need of medical attention during the aftermath relief efforts of Hurricane Katrina Sept. 2, 2005, in New Orleans, LA. A witness said the baby had been handed forward by “body surfing” over the crowd which was hundreds deep and shoulder to shoulder. LOWER LEFT - While most evacuees wait outside in line to load buses, an unidentified man sleeps inside the Super Dome during the aftermath relief efforts of Hurricane Katrina Sept. 2, 2005, in New Orleans, LA. LOWER RIGHT - Residents of New Orleans (LA) assist each other from escaping rapidly rising flood waters after a levy gave way August 30, 2005, during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

HURRICANE KATRINA


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

HURRICANE KATRINA

ABOVE - A woman is dragged from a holding area after passing out at the Super Dome during the aftermath relief efforts of Hurricane Katrina, Sept. 1, 2005, in New Orleans, LA. UPPER RIGHT - A military helicopter lifts off from the roof nearby parking facility at the Super Dome during the aftermath relief efforts of Hurricane Katrina, Sept. 1, 2005, in New Orleans, LA. MIDDLE RIGHT - Flood victims rest inside the Superdome during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, photographed August 30, 2005, in New Orleans, LA. Athough not all residents followed the mandatory evacuation policy, those who stayed are not allowed to leave the confines of the arena. LOWER RIGHT - LA National Guardsman SPC Vincent Lopezvito, of the 769th Eng. Battalion, attempts to dry off his feet for a moment while pulling security during the aftermath relief efforts of Hurricane Katrina Sept. 2, 2005, in New Orleans, LA.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

HURRICANE KATRINA

UPPER LEFT - Soldiers with the LA Army National Guard draw their weapons on a man who they feared had a weapon during aftermath relief efforts following Hurricane Katrina, September 1, 2005, in New Orleans, LA. LEFT - Major Ed Bush, Public Affairs Officer with Joint Force Headquarters, LA Army National Guard, pleads for evacuees to stop from pushing forward during aftermath relief efforts at the Super Dome following Hurricane Katrina, September 1, 2005, in New Orleans, LA. A large scale evacuation of hurricane victims at the Super Dome is now underway in which they will be transported to the Astrodome in Houston, TX. ABOVE Residents of New Orleans (LA) assist each other from escaping rapidly rising flood waters after a levy gave way August 30, 2005, during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. RIGHT - A Coast Guard helicopter flies over the area of a massive explosion and fire early Friday morning during the aftermath relief efforts of Hurricane Katrina Sept. 2, 2005, in New Orleans, LA.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

DOMESTIC SINGLES

ABOVE - A child goes down a tube slide at the Langendorf Park swimming pool in Barrington, IL UPPER LEFT - A long exposure and a slight breeze create an impressionist image of flowers at Spring Valley Nature Sanctuary in Schaumburg, Illinois. MIDDLE LEFT - A firefighter works to pull a hose to extinguish a fully engulfed car on Route 60 east of Vernon Hill, IL. LEFT - Chicago Bulls’ #34 Charles Oakley fights for the ball over Atlanta's #11 A.J. Guyton at the United Center in Chicago.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

DOMESTIC SINGLES

ABOVE - Cubs catcher Todd Hundley hangs onto the ball following a collision play-at-the-plate with Rich Aurillia in the first inning at Wrigley Field in Chicago. UPPER RIGHT - About 800 kids from Illinois came together to compete in the 19th annual St. Valentine’s Classic Invitational held February 5, 2000, at Mundelein High School, IL. Here, Coach Ben Hardy assists Mitchell Erickson to find the rings in the age 7-9 catagory. The two are from Gymkinetics of Mokena, IL. LEFT - Prospect’s #42 forces Buffalo Grove’s quarterback #9 to fumble in the first half of their game at Buffalo Grove High School in Buffalo Grove, IL. RIGHT - A loose ball gives Ray Durham a stolen base under the Eric Young in the sixth inning at Comiskey Park in Chicago.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

DOMESTIC SINGLES

UP P E R L E F T - The swimming leg takes to the lake as more than 1,000 competitors competed in the annual Lake Zurich (IL) Triathlon. LOWER LEFT - Stevenson High School’s David Hoesly, went on to complete his race even after losing a shoe during the Varsity 440 M.H.H. Shuttle relay held at Palatine (IL) High School. TOP - Carolina Cobras #26 Reggie Carthon breaks up a touchdown pass attempt to Chicago Rush #4 Joe Douglass during the first offical home game for the arena ball team at the All-State Arena in Rosemont, IL. ABOVE - Jose Valentin reacts after hitting the game winning home run in the bottom of the ninth against the Cubs at US Cellular Field in Chicago.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

ABOVE - Gary Waldman spends a quiet moment with his daughter, Serena, during her birthday at her special assistance home in Lake City, Iowa. Serena, who suffers from cerebral palsy, was the inspiration behind the hot air balloon named Serena’s Song, the world’s only FAA approved wheelchair accessible hot air balloon. Serena, born with severe cerebal palsy, is unable to speak but as a child came alive with excitement after her father held her for her first hot air balloon ride. So moved by the experience, Gary created Serena’s Song and the balloon today has flown more than 10,000 passengers throughout the United States. UPPER RIGHT - Pole vaulting during the 26th Annual Cougar Track Classic held at Conant High School in Hoffman Estates, IL. RIGHT - “World’s Fastest Half-Mile” in action during the 2006 Sharpie 500 in Bristol, TN.

DOMESTIC SINGLES


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

DOMESTIC SINGLES

ABOVE - A teen trips on the club drug Ecstasy at a rave in Rockford, IL. UPPER RIGHT - An estimated 18,000 runners start out Sunday, October 26, 2003, during the 28th Marine Corps Marathon in Arlington, VA and Washington, DC. RIGHT - Navy’s #7 Reggie Campbell stops Army’s #82 Scott Wesley during the annual Army-Navy Game held December 3, 2005, at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia.


M. Scott Mahaskey - Portfolio

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