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Dream HAIR Expert tips & product picks

DEADLY THIN

THE SECRET EATING DISORDER KILLING OUR GIRLS

The Crown’s

CLAIRE FOY What the Queen did next

101 WAYS TO WEAR COLOUR

FROM PLAYBOY BABE TO POLITICS

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LOVE YOUR WORK How to create the career you want

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inspiring.

‘‘ IT’S IMPORTANT TO KEEP WORKING HARD

From an early age, she demonstrated an independent spirit and unparalleled work ethic. Despite enduring setbacks at the start of her career, she never listened to detractors. Instead, she rekindled her determination, and ultimately rediscovered her love for the game. Her ierce persistence and renewed passion brought her two Grand Slam® titles in 2016 and the number one ranking for the irst time. Rolex is proud of its association with Angelique Kerber, whose perseverance is an inspiration to us all. It doesn’t just tell time. It tells history.

AND KEEP GOING

MY OWN WAY.’’

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oyster perpetual datejust 36


CONTENTS F E AT U R E S

30

R E P O R TA G E

The best of the best from new season couture

38

AUSTRALIAN REPORT

The secret eating disorder killing our girls

44

C A M PA I G N

Join forces with our A-listers to find a cure for ovarian cancer

50

WORLD REPORT

The ex-Playboy bunny tipped to take over the Kremlin

56

E M OT I O N A L

The decision that haunts Jamie Bulger’s mother, 25 years after his murder

60

INTERVIEW

End of an era: Claire Foy on life after The Crown

67

SEX

The kinky world of pony play

70

REAL PEOPLE

Mentors making a difference

76

@ P L AY

Country music cool plus big and small screen hits

81

@WORK

The office of the future

191

L I F E S TO RY

194

LAST WORD

Donatella Versace Janelle Monáe on the women who inspire her


23 148 FA S H I O N

LIFESTYLE

23

178

F R I D AY N I G H T FEAST

182

SHACK CHIC

FA S H I O N F I R S T

Trends to try: stripes, sparkle and opulence

90 102

SPORT STYLE

Beach living South African style

P E R F E C T PA N T S

New season trousers

108

186 187

R E A DY T O W E A R

Best of the international collections

121 122

THE EDIT O N T H E ROA D

PROMOTIO N S

THE EDIT DESIGNER DOS S I ER

188

Max Mara

Subscription offer

SHOPPING

125

101 IDEAS

Colour me happy

132

HIGH STREET HITS

Style steals

135

C H E C K M AT E

136

R U N W AY T O R E A L W AY

Plaid office essentials

102

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHEW BROOKES/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPERMEDIA.COM; SIMON UPTON; PHILIP LE MASURIER; EDWARD URRUTIA.

BEAUTY

139

FLUSH PERFECT

140 D R E A M

HAIR

Longer, thicker, stronger

148

NAIL IT

WELLNESS

Master your mani

155 T H E E D I T 160 H O W -T O. . . Deal with sensitive skin

162

168

HAPPY HORMONES

170

PA C K A P U N C H

The boxing uprising

M O T H E R ’ S D AY

Petal power

164

132

172

T H E A RT O F S T R E TC H I N G

173

THE EDIT

BEAUTY RULES

Helena Christensen

G E T T HE COVE R LO O K Re-create Claire’s look with make-up by Estée Lauder. On face: The Mattifier Shine Control Perfecting Primer + Finisher; Double Wear Nude Fresh Water Makeup in Ecru; Pure Color Envy Sculpting Blush in Lover’s Blush. On brows: The Brow Multi Tasker in Chestnut. On eyes: Pure Color Envy Sculpting Eyeshadow 5 Color Palette in Currant Desire; Pure Color Envy Lash Mascara in Black. On lips: Double Wear Stay-in-Place Lip Pencil in Tawny; Pure Color Envy Hi-Lustre Sculpting Liptick in Crystal Baby. Claire wears Bottega Veneta dress. Photography by Matthew Brookes.


SL GOHRE’ SR EL E T T E R E DUI T

Above: cover girl Claire Foy trades The Crown (left) for Hollywood royalty status with three blockbuster films out this year (page 60). Below: singer Samantha Jade shows her support for ovarian cancer research in our White Shirt Campaign with Witchery (page 44).

FA C E B O O K FA C E B O O K .C O M / M A R I E C L A I R E A U I N S TA G R A M @ N I C K Y B R I G E R T W I T T E R @ N I C K Y B R I G E R W E B M A R I E C L A I R E .C O M . A U S H O P S T Y L E D B Y M A R I E C L A I R E C O M . A U

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHEW BROOKES/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER MEDIA; GEORGES ANTONI.

W

e’re a bit giddy with excitement in the oice at the moment. No, it’s not the fact stores are filling with fabulous new-season fashion to shield us from cooler weather, although that’s certainly cause for celebration. Our near-hysteria is due to two people and one world-stopping event: Harry and Meghan’s royal wedding. We’re all taking bets about the dress design, who will come, what they’ll wear... Guessing games aside, what we’re really looking forward to is reliving the pomp, ceremony and glamour of the extraordinary Netflix drama, The Crown. Earlier this year, the record-breaking show became an instant oice obsession and with it emerged a collective admiration for the young Queen: namely, actress Claire Foy. Like Harry and Meghan, Claire made the British royals compelling, intriguing and cool, even among cynics like myself. Which is why, with the Windsor wedding just weeks away, we leapt at the chance to have her helm this issue. And with three blockbuster films out soon, this screen queen is definitely cover-worthy as she takes the throne as Hollywood royalty. But what’s most surprising is her own underprivileged upbringing. Claire’s grandparents were impoverished Irish immigrants who “worked themselves to the bone” and she did telesales and pub jobs for years before landing acting roles. Turn to page 60 for her refreshingly relatable interview. Speaking of admirable women, I’d like to thank the 10 celebrities who agreed to join marie claire and Witchery for this year’s White Shirt Campaign (page 44). Since Witchery launched this incredible initiative a decade ago, more than $10 million has been raised for the Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation. It’s a cause close to these women’s hearts, especially for TV host and cancer survivor Sally Obermeder and singer Samantha Jade, whose mum passed away from cancer four years ago: all spoke with pure passion and commitment about finding a cure and an early detection test for this insidious disease. So head in-store now and buy a white shirt for winter – after all, it could just save a life.


NICKY BRIGER EDITOR

Deputy editor Melissa Gaudron Acting digital content manager Kate Mofatt Managing editor Lulu Dougherty ART

Creative director Alicia Moodley Deputy art & digital art director Larissa Yu Senior art editor Danielle Taylor Photographic director Debbie Walters Photo editors Robyn Fay-Perkins, Jemma Waud FASHION

Fashion director Jana Pokorny Junior fashion editor Tara Morris Market editor Monica Russell Fashion oice coordinator Ella Blinco Jury BEAUTY

Acting beauty director Sally Hunwick Beauty writer Jordyn Christensen Digital beauty editor Anna McClelland F E AT U R E S

Acting features director Alex Carlton Entertainment & news editor Alley Pascoe Lifestyle editor Anna McCooe Wellness editor Lucy E Cousins Digital content editors Isabelle Truman, Winsome Walker CONTENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

Copy directors Hannah Hempenstall, Chrystal Glassman, Daniel Moore ADVERTISING

Head of beauty & fashion Annalise Deakin 02-9394 2346 Group brand partnerships manager Simone Donovan 02-9394 2348 Brand partnerships manager Emma Vangelovich 02-9394 2208 Brand partnerships manager Christine Sterjovski 02-9394 2929 Brand executive, fashion, beauty & health Kayla Chapman 02-9394 2202 Brand coordinator Harry Parsons 02-9394 2401 Advertising production coordinator Calvin Simpson 02-9394 2938 Acting sales director, Victoria Angie Stavros 03-8636 7506 Account manager, Queensland Angela Coley 07-3368 7203 Account manager, Western Australia Vince Courtney 08-9344 0749 Account manager, South Australia Danielle Cofey-Carter 08-7231 5909 MARKETING

Group marketing director, fashion Susie Hogan 02-9394 2336 Marketing manager Michelle Kaplan 02-9394 2352 Marketing executive, fashion Isabella Hynes 02-9394 2173 C R E AT I V E S E RV I C E S

Creative director Adelina Cessario 02-9394 2210 Acting art director Evelyn Rueda 02-9394 2021 Designer Alana Falk 02-9394 2034 PRODUCTION

Production controller Megan Cosgrove PACIFIC MAGAZINES Chief executive officer Gereurd Roberts Chief financial officer Guy Torre Group marketing and retail sales director Mychelle Vanderburg Operations director Dean Porter Commercial director Nicole Bence M A R I E C L A I R E I N T E R N AT I O N A L Executive director of marie claire international development Jean de Boisdeffre International deputy & finance director Félix Droissart International publishing director Nicia Rodwell International chief digital officer Ludovic Lecomte International chief content officer Sèverine Harzo International fashion & beauty editor Sylvie Halic International advertising department director Elisabeth Barbier Syndication manager Thierry Lamarre

Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd, Media City, 8 Central Avenue, Eveleigh, NSW 2015. Tel: 02-9394 2000. Fax: 02-9394 2377. Email: marieclaire@ pacificmags.com.au. Website: marieclaire.com.au. Reader/subscription enquiries: 1300 668 118. Facebook: facebook.com/marieclaireau. Twitter: twitter.com/marieclaireau. marie claire is a registered trademark. Copyright © 2018

marie claire is the oicial magazine partner of the Australian National Committee for UN Women. Melbourne sales: Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd, Level 5, 160 Harbour Esplanade, Docklands, Vic 3008, tel 03-8636 7555, fax 03-8636 7566. Perth sales: Angie Stavros, tel 03-8636 7526. Adelaide sales: Brand New Media, tel 03-8636 7545. New Zealand sales: Neil Bowman, McKay & Bowman International Media, tel 649-419 0561. Printed by Blue Star Web, Silverwater. National distribution by Gordon and Gotch Australia Pty Ltd, tel 02-9972 8800. Published 12 times a year. Trademark “marie claire” owned and registered in Australia and New Zealand by Marie Claire Album, a French Société that has its registered office in Paris, France. Published under agreement by Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd, ABN 16 097 410 896, Media City, 8 Central Avenue, Eveleigh, NSW 2015. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in whole or part without prior written permission. No responsibility taken for unsolicited material. Use of trademark is strictly prohibited. Pacific Magazines Pty Ltd respects your right to privacy. We are bound by the National Privacy Principles (NPPs) contained in the Privacy Act 1988. The NPPs regulate most of our activities with respect to personal information collected, stored, used and disclosed by us. However, some of our activities relating to personal informationof current or former employees contained in employee records (and journalism) are not covered by the Principles.


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDWARD URRUTIA.

3 0 9 01 .

L A D O L C E V I TA Italian leather goods label Tod’s drew on the dreamy costume design of The Talented Mr. Ripley to devise these new-season delights: fringed leather loafers and a chic mini-satchel splashed with sunny lemon. Perfect for Positano – or simply to lighten up your winter wardrobe. Read on for more of the month’s must-try trends.


FASHION FIRST

CHRISTIAN DIOR S/S 2018

F.R.S For Restless Sleepers pants, $700, at matchesfashion.com STYLE TIP A touch of marabou elevates a classic black blouse.

Tony Bianco shoes, $149.95, tonybianco.com.au

Of Rare Origin earrings, $1825, at modaoperandi.com

Prada top, $2710, at net-a-porter.com

TREND #1

ORIENT EXPRESS

Wynn Hamlyn skirt, $535, shop. wynnhamlyn.com

Opulence is an order. Opt for rich embroidery and mandarin collars H:E925:DE:?4E62DE6C?:?^F6?46

H&M dress, $59.99, hm.com/au

GUCCI S/S 2018

BlazĂŠ Milano blazer, $2248, at matchesfashion.com

Ellery top, $895, elleryland.com Attico shoes, $675, at matchesfashion.com Marques’Almeida bag, $705, at matchesfashion.com

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Attico skirt, $3067, at modaoperandi.com


FASHION FIRST

H&M dress, $299, hm.com/au Chanel necklace, $8440, 1300 242 635 Max Mara top, $1025, maxmara.com

Maggie Marilyn shirt, $775, maggiemarilyn.com

Kenneth Jay Lane earrings, $113, at net-a-porter.com Rochas shoes, $670, at modaoperandi.com

Alice McCall top, $260, at modaoperandi.com STYLE TIP Lighten up the look with a rule handbag.

ERDEM S/S 2018

TREND #2

MODERN PRINCESS A royal wardrobe requires elegant silhouettes and a sprinkle of sparkle

Deadly Ponies bag, $509, deadlyponies.com

Trelise Cooper coat, $799, trelisecooper.com

SIMONE ROCHA S/S 2018

H&M jumper, $59.99, hm.com/au

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Miu Miu shoes, $2450, 02-9223 1688


FASHION FIRST

Maggie Marilyn skirt, $1080, maggiemarilyn.com

Marni bag, $2118, marni.com

H&M dress, $79.99, hm.com/au

J.W. Anderson earrings, $495, at matchesfashion.com

Maje shirt, $315, 02-9327 3377

TREND #3

FENDI S/S 2018

H&M shirt, $59.99, hm.com/au

LINE OF DUTY )EC2:89E2?5?2CC@H3FE?6G6CDEFRJ – fresh colours and modern cuts 56]?6E96?6HD62D@?DEC:A6

Ginger & Smart skirt, $399, gingerandsmart.com

Marni skirt, $1837, at matchesfashion.com

J.W. ANDERSON S/S 2018

Prada shoes, $1350, 02-9223 1688

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STYLE TIP A pointed kitten heel is still the shoe du jour.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHILIP LE MASURIER; GO RUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA. COMPILED BY TARA MORRIS. TEXT BY KATHRYN MADDEN.

Attico dress, $2870, at net-a-porter.com


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RADO HYPERCHROME AUTOMATIC DIAMONDS PLASMA HIGH-TECH CERAMIC. METALLIC LOOK. MODERN ALCHEMY.

TIME IS THE ESSENCE WE ARE MADE OF


GIAMBATTISTA VALLI In attempts to make the rarefied world of haute couture relevant, designers regularly resort to practicality. But armed with Italian flair, Valli zigs where others zag. Pleated tulle dresses in sweet shades flowing over the runway showed the outrageous advantage of thinking big when it comes to glamour.

BEST in

The 2018 spring couture collections grounded sugary excess with structure


PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEVIN TACHMAN.

R E P O RTAG E

SHOW

and sophistication. This is fashion at its purest. By Damien Woolnough


CHRISTIAN DIOR

PHOTOGRAPHY BY KEVIN TACHMAN; SONNY VANDEVELDE.

On a chequerboard runway, Maria Grazia Chiuri drifted away from the stirring feminist slogans of past collections into a black-and-white dream world. Gowns with hypnotic stripes, caged bustiers and extravagant feathered capes were inspired by the surrealist artists Christian Dior befriended in the 1930s, creating a fantasy from which no-one stirred.


R E P O RTAG E

VIKTOR & ROLF Every outing from Viktor Horsting and Rolf Snoeren is a riddle waiting to be solved, but sweet '60s silhouettes and candy-stripe patterns in pretty pastels cleverly hid the punchline. On closer inspection, each piece was executed in duchess satin, giving the Dutch duo the last laugh, again.


The softness of Giorgio Armani’s revered tailoring in slim jackets and shining satins was made even lighter by swirling cloud prints that drifted across the collection. A change in weather came with the down-to-earth inclusion of simple silk trousers and playful evening shorts that spoke to clearer skies ahead.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY BENOIT PEVERELLI/CHANEL; SONNY VANDEVELDE; KEVIN TACHMAN.

ARMANI PRIVÉ


R E P O RTAG E

CHANEL Having taken us to the moon in 2017, Karl Lagerfeld stayed closer to home, creating a traditional French garden inside the Grand Palais. Tiered chifon gowns, crystal-encrusted bodices and sheer, shimmering skirts took centrestage as the Chanel woman made herself known.

GIVENCHY With structured blazers and precise coats over sinuous silky skirts and layers of rainbow tulle, Clare Waight Keller made a confident and ultimately cool haute couture debut. There were no signs of Keller’s bohemian past as a designer for Chloé, as the new Givenchy woman emerged like a clenched fist from a velvet glove.

ELIE SAAB Intricate embellishments in Art Deco patterns were at the beating heart of Saab’s saucy step back in time to the 1920s. Sheer fabrics carefully crafted to cover more than modesty were anchored by exaggerated bows around the neck, suggesting that with the gentlest of tugs all would be revealed.


JEAN PAUL GAULTIER

(right & below) What started as a tribute to 95-year-old frontrow guest Pierre Cardin quickly became a riotous celebration of Gaultier’s own theatrical signatures, with fringed gowns, padded power shoulders and Blade Runner bobs. All was forgiven, thanks to top-notch tailoring and decade-defying humour.


R E P O RTAG E

VALENTINO

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF VALENTINO; BY KEVIN TACHMAN.

Against all odds, a collection with opera coats, feathered hats and a jewellery-box palette was the season’s most modern show. The setting of a former Rothschild mansion emphasised Pierpaolo Piccioli’s considered touches of oldworld extravagance. But louche trousers and the occasional tank top contributed to the enlightened atmosphere of elegant ease.


THE SECRET

G

eorgie Peters has just eaten lunch – a salad – and she knows what she ought to do next. Lying on her bed and fiddling with her insulin injector pen, she toys with the idea of not doing it. She’ll feel terrible if she doesn’t, but it’ll keep her skinny. She’ll still fit into that tiny summer dress. Friends will tell her she looks great and, besides, it was only a salad. She doesn’t really need that life-saving injection. Eventually, the demons in her head win and, letting the pen fall from her

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fingers, she resolves to do it later. Not the full dose she has been prescribed, of course – just enough to avoid a coma and hospitalisation. For five years, Georgie, now 25, danced with the devil by restricting her vital insulin injections in an efort to lose weight. Even in the face of debilitating vision loss, potential loss of limbs and organ failure, the Melbourne teacher struggled with a condition that is relatively unknown but prevalent across Australia and the world. Termed diabulimia, the chronic eating disorder is killing people with diabetes.

Experts estimate that between 40 per cent and 60 per cent of type 1 diabetics have experimented with restricting their insulin to lose weight. While there are no firm figures on how many young women have died from the disorder, anecdotally, the number of cases appears to be increasing, with the associated risks well documented. “Eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental health disorder,” confirms Dr Susan Hart, a clinical senior lecturer at The Boden Institute. The term diabulimia is not accepted by the medical fraternity, so in


AUSTRALIAN REPORT

EATING DISORDER killing our girls

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES.

It’s destroying lives and impacting women all over the globe, but it’s a condition most of us have never even heard of. Emma Levett investigates

Australia there is very little recognition and therefore treatment for it. As a result, there are no specialist units, few experts and no evidence-based treatment options for suferers. As in the rest of the world, thousands of women and girls are falling through the gaps. Georgie was a typical suferer. Diagnosed with diabetes at 17, she was in a high-risk category for diabulimia, but it was never mentioned to her or her family. When she began taking her prescribed insulin, she struggled with the way her body changed. “From the start, I hated my new body,” she remembers.

“Before being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, I had lost weight – which is typical – but then the insulin injections put it all and more back on. I was bigger and had bruises all over me as I was learning to inject and kept hitting blood vessels. My body had failed me.” Dr Hart says Georgie’s story is one she hears regularly, as young diabetic women struggle with the dual stressors of disease management and ordinary teenage pressures. “The nature of diabetes diagnosis involves stress and anxiety,” she explains. “Couple this with weight gain – which is common at the

start of insulin introduction – [as well as] an adolescent who’s potentially already body-conscious and the stars are aligning to make diabetics at an increased risk of developing an eating disorder.” To add to the cocktail of danger, diabetics are routinely advised to pay close attention to their diets, which can include counting carbs and weighing their food. It’s easy to see how this monitoring could become an obsession. Angry and depressed, Georgie figured out early on that less insulin would lead to weight loss, but it wasn’t until she left home, away from her parents’

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AUSTRALIAN REPORT

B

ritish teen Lisa Day was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 14. Almost immediately, she began experimenting with insulin restriction, and weight loss followed. Her family sent her to an eating disorder clinic that understood little about diabetes. The lack of understanding of her condition meant her struggles with insulin continued on and of for the next decade. She was left with serious health problems and, tragically, passed away due to complications from her diabetes on September 12, 2015. She was just 27 years old. “It’s just such a waste of life,” her

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“Trying to get [Lisa] the right help was like banging your head against a brick wall. There’s a massive gap in care” – Katie Edwards, sister of Lisa Day

THE NUMBERS

10% 90%

of all diabetes cases are type 1*

of all diabetes cases are type 2* About

1.7 million Australians have diabetes. This includes all types of diagnosed diabetes (1.2 million known and registered) as well as silent, undiagnosed type 2 diabetes (up to 500,000 estimated)* More

males (5.7%) had diabetes than females (4.6%) in 2014–15 and, as with many health conditions, the rate of diabetes increased with age^

After years of battling diabulimia, Georgie (left) is now in recovery; Lisa Day (centre) and mum-of-two Elizabeth Tomas (right) died due to a lack of appropriate treatment.

sister, Katie Edwards, said. “If she’d had the proper care, maybe it would have turned out diferently. Lisa fell through the cracks. She had a great diabetics doctor who she got on well with, but they didn’t know much about the eating disorders. She then went to an eating disorders clinic, but they didn’t know much about diabetes. “Trying to get her the right help was like banging your head against a brick wall. There’s a massive gap in care.” Mother-of-two Elizabeth Tomas from the US also died waiting for appropriate treatment. “No-one around our area had even heard of diabulimia,” her mother, Betty, told marie claire. “I was searching the internet for diabetic advice because I knew something wasn’t right.” Elizabeth spent 10 years in and out of hospital, yet no-one would, or could, do anything to help her. “I said to her, ‘You are going to be 30, skinny and dead and I will be 50 and raising your children. That is not OK,’” Betty remembers. Betty’s awful prediction turned out to be correct. She now cares for Elizabeth’s eight-year-old daughter and five-year-old son. “Almost four years after her death, I’m still angry,” she sighs. And echoing the frustration of a whole community, she adds: “I don’t follow the support pages anymore because young girls are still dying when they shouldn’t be.” Dr Hart says that without better understanding of the condition, more girls and young women will lose their lives. “Insulin misuse has been recognised as a significant problem since 2005, but in Australia nothing has changed in 12 years. We need an

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES. *DIABETES AUSTRALIA ^AUSTRALIAN BUREAU OF STATISTICS

protective gaze, that insulin restriction became a way of life. “Moving to London, I discovered I could function OK without much insulin,” says Georgie. “I had a job in admin, which didn’t require much energy.” For the first time, nobody was checking up on her, either, so it was easy to let things slip. “I’d take a little bit after meals and if I needed to be in a bikini, I’d cut it back even further. It made me tired, but I also looked good. Gradually I hated taking it. From a healthy weight I lost about 25 kilos in a year.” For diabetics, insulin afects body weight in two ways. When they begin using it, it can cause an initial weight gain. Yet if they stop or skip doses, the body typically starts attacking itself. “Without insulin, the body panics and has to find another way to get energy,” explains Jacqueline Allan, director of UK organisation Diabetics with Eating Disorders. “It starts cannibalising itself, which means it burns fat and muscle tissue and eventually tissue from major organs. In some people, mostly women but increasingly a lot of men, this practice becomes chronic.”


HELP CAN HAPPEN integrated approach with experts in both eating disorders and diabetes working together, which doesn’t exist here. We could do so much better.”

L

ike many in the same situation, Georgie’s life became a seesaw of weight loss, followed by serious health episodes. In the UK, without a GP regularly checking up on her, her condition was easy to hide, until a routine blood test exposed her deception. “A doctor read me the riot act,” Georgie remembers. “He said my blood sugar levels were so high I could lose limbs, have nerve damage and even go blind. I completely broke down as I’d never really thought of the consequences.” But although the prospects were grim, it made little diference to Georgie. “In one year I’d damaged my eyes to the same level of someone who’d had diabetes for 15 or 20 years. Although I was upset, I couldn’t stop. I found it hard to take full doses. The voice in my head told me to keep [restricting] as I was too fat, even though everyone else was telling me I looked great.” Spiralling out of control, Georgie ended up in hospital a year later, close to a potentially fatal diabetic coma. “I’d moved back to Australia and got my first teaching job,” Georgie remembers. “For years I’d been manipulating my insulin so my weight was stable or I was losing, but suddenly I was in a job where I needed to be on the top of my game. I had to take full doses of insulin to keep going and within a week the weight had piled on. I panicked and stopped taking any insulin for three full days.” Georgie knew she was in trouble and admitted herself to hospital that week, but even then the medical system didn’t seem to see the danger she was in. “Someone told me to perk up and take my insulin. Nobody understood. It’s like telling someone who’s anorexic they just have to eat. It’s not going to happen.” The failing system meant Georgie was sectioned in a mental health unit where she easily tricked nurses into believing she was taking insulin. Initially eating disorder units wouldn’t accept her as she had a normal BMI and when they did, nobody was qualified to deal with her dietary needs, much less insulin use. “Once I was in,

Becky Rudkin was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2008 when she was 19 years old. She says one of the factors that led to her developing diabulimia was people’s assumption that she sufered from diabetes because she was overweight. “It was all over the media that diabetes is caused by an unhealthy lifestyle,” she says. “In fact, it’s type 2 that’s linked to lifestyle. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease.” She began restricting her insulin right away. “I went into three diabetic comas and was in and out of an eating disorder unit for three years.’’ But Becky’s experience was diferent to that of many other diabulimics. The nurses had little understanding of the misuse of insulin, but they were prepared to

learn. They developed a program that’s become a blueprint for treating diabulimia that involves eating disorder dietitians and diabetic teams working together. Today, at 29, Becky’s body still wears the scars of what she went through. The bones in her feet “have disintegrated into what the doctor described as ‘honeycomb and mush’,” she says, meaning they’re so fragile they regularly break. “The nerve damage is so bad I can’t even feel it. But I know I’m very lucky to have no other issues. I’ve been contacted by people all over the world with photos of [people] who passed away because of diabulimia.” The unit Becky was sent to in Aberdeen, Scotland, has since helped more girls with diabulimia.

Road to recovery Becky’s journey difered to other diabulimics as her medical team helped develop a blueprint for treatment. These images tracked her progress from 2013 to 2015.

people started realising how serious it was,” Georgie says. “And I got very lucky because my dietitian worked in diabetes for five years.” It was a hard slog for six months, and Georgie says she felt like she spent half the time educating her carers and psychologist. As a result of her treatment and determination, Georgie has been in recovery for three years. She is now a healthy weight and manages her diabetes responsibly. “My eyes have even recovered, which is incredible, and I feel good again,” she says. As part of her journey to wellness, she hopes to help other young women sufering from

the condition. Along with fellow diabetes advocate Lisa Ingle, she’s formed a support group called Diabetes & Eating Disorders Awareness (DEDA). “It sometimes feels like we’re fighting a losing battle,” Lisa says. “It’s frustrating at times, but each person who finds us discovers they are not alone; that provides hope. It’s why we’re here and why we keep going.” For help in Australia and New Zealand visit deda.org.nz. The first international conference on diabetes and eating disorders will take place in New Orleans on November 9-11, 2018.

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“It’s so shocking that one woman dies every 10 hours from ovarian cancer in Australia” JESSICA ROWE JOURNALIST, 47

“When I was 12, my mum had a growth on her ovary. Luckily it turned out not to be cancer, but the fact that this cancer is so aggressive is frightening” MADDISON BROWN ACTRESS, 20

“It’s really important to support the White Shirt campaign because everyone has a mum, a sister, an aunty” SAMANTHA HARRIS MODEL, 27


CAMPAIGN

The

Power of

10 Celebrating 10 years

of

THE WHITE SHIRT CAMPAIGN

Since Witchery launched its White Shirt campaign a decade ago, more than $10 million has been raised for the Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation. To mark the milestone, 10 prominent Australian women are wearing Witcheryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s capsule collection of 10 iconic white shirts to C8?GD859BCE@@?BD6?BD8531EC5 I<<5I&1C3?51>4*9K1>IE>;

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CAMPAIGN

“The symptoms of ovarian cancer aren’t always obvious” S A M A N T H A A R M Y TA G E SUNRISE HOST, 41

“I think ovarian cancer is something all women should be aware of. You have got to know your body and notice any changes because the symptoms of ovarian cancer aren’t always obvious. As women, we tend to put ourselves last, [but] we cannot do that because if it’s too late, then it’s too late.”


“I will do anything I can to take a stand against cancer” SAMANTHA JADE SINGER, 30

“Unfortunately we live in a world where everybody has been touched by cancer. It’s a very close issue to me because of my mum, Jacqui [who passed away in 2014 after a short battle with an aggressive cancer]. Cancer is a horrible disease, but the fact that there’s no early detection test for ovarian cancer is scary. That’s why I’m going to keep using my voice and being a part of these campaigns. “What I learnt from my mum’s experience with cancer is that you need to appreciate the people you have in your life – which you often don’t until they’re gone. Tell your family you love them and give them a hug, because you might not be able to one day.”

If detected and treated early, survival rates increase to more than

90%

“I need to help my fellow women” KYLIE GILLIES THE MORNING SHOW HOST, 50

“I went to a very powerful lunch hosted by the OCRF where I heard firsthand stories from women afected by ovarian cancer. One of the women was in her early 30s, she had two small children and her whole life in front of her and bang! The diagnosis came out of nowhere. She hadn’t done anything wrong, it was just thrust upon her. That’s why it’s so important we find an early detection test.” marieclaire.com.au

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“As a mum of two girls, I’m especially aware of ovarian cancer” K AT E WAT E R H O U S E JOURNALIST AND TV PRESENTER, 34

“It’s really devastating that only three in 10 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer survive. The thought of one of the amazing women in my life ever getting ovarian cancer is heartbreaking. Without research, we won’t find a cure.”

“Because of this funding and research, we’re already starting to see improvements in treatments.” KSENIJA LUKICH TV PRESENTER, 28

“I wear my shirt to show support for the OCRF’s tireless research” JODI GORDON NEIGHBOURS ACTRESS, 33


CAMPAIGN

50% of the community incorrectly believe a Pap smear diagnoses ovarian cancer. Unlike other cancer, there is no early detection test.

“Cancer destroys families – we need a cure”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GEORGES ANTONI. STYLED BY JANA POKORNY. HAIR BY KOH/VIVIEN’S CREATIVE. MAKE-UP BY ANDREA BLACK/RELOAD.

S A L LY O B E R M E D E R THE DAILY EDITION HOST, 44

“Because I’ve been sick [with breast cancer in 2011], I know how cancer can completely destroy families and break them apart. Even though breast cancer and ovarian cancer are diferent, at the end of the day, it’s all one sickness. “You don’t realise how important research is until someone you know and love is touched by cancer. We can’t let this happen to the women in our lives. We need to find a cure, find an early detection test and make progress. The OCRF’s work is imperative to that. “This year, I’m wearing a white shirt on May 8 because it’s such a simple way to make a big diference. It’s easy to feel helpless and think only scientists at the forefront of medicine can make a diference. This is a way of taking the power back and being part of the solution. If we all buy a white shirt, we can help to find a solution.”

THIS WHITE SHIRT C A N S AV E L I V E S In the lead up to World Ovarian Cancer Day on May 8, Witchery has released a collection of 10 white shirts, worn throughout. 100 per cent of proceeds will be donated to the Ovarian Cancer Research Foundation. Witchery’s 10 white shirts are available in-store now from $99.95. Add your voice to the cause with the hashtag #WHITESHIRTCAMPAIGN.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES; INSTAGRAM/@XENIA_SOBCHAK.

Russia s â&#x20AC;&#x2122; next president? Is this


WORLD REPORT

Ksenia Sobchak is a TV star and It girl turned politician. She may not have won Russia’s recent election, but whispers say Vladimir Putin has her earmarked as his successor. Anna Nemtsova reports

O

n a cold March night in Paris last year, the fashion elite were out in force and ready to celebrate. At the sexy cabaret-themed soiree for supermodel Natalia Vodianova’s birthday, Anna Wintour chatted to photographers Mario Testino and Patrick Demarchelier. Sienna Miller posed with Vodianova. The wives of Russian oligarchs gossiped on red velvet banquettes, while Diane von Furstenberg happily snapped pictures of the crowd. Amid it all, sipping champagne and smiling broadly, was a glamorous blonde woman clad in slinky red. In a room full of A-listers, she was far from the most famous. And while few people outside of Russia might have been able to put a name to her face that night, it’s possible she is set to become one of the most powerful people on the planet. As if one ex-reality TV star running a global superpower isn’t enough, the former Playboy bunny seems the girl


WORLD REPORT

Clockwise from top: Natalia Vodianova (right) and Sobchak (second from left) at Vodianova’s birthday party last year; Sobchak at a bar launch in 2009; and one of her many Instagram pics.

most likely to be next in line for Russia’s top job. Her name is Ksenia Sobchak and she’s a woman with big presidential plans. Sobchak’s life story has more twists and turns than a John le Carré novel, with mysterious poisonings, reality shows and police raids. She is a model turned TV presenter turned millionaire socialite turned wannabe politician. Trawl through Sobchak’s Instagram account and you can see why her shots of expensive champagne, private jets and her sultry selfies helped earn her the moniker “the Paris Hilton of Moscow”. But it is the 36-year-old’s next chapter that might be her most shocking, with reports that the country’s long-term autocratic ruler, Vladimir Putin – who easily reclaimed victory in the country’s March presidential election – is set to give this former Playboy cover girl a significant role in his new government, before finally handing her the reins when he eventually concedes power. This is even more intriguing when you consider Sobchak just ran against Putin in the Russian elections. Her announcement of her move into politics in October last year was remarkable for a number of reasons. First, entering the political fray in Russia can be a fatal decision. Putin has ruled the country with an iron fist for nearly 18 years and, at last count, at least 11 political opposition leaders are alleged to have been assassinated in an efort to stifle any threat to his stranglehold on the country’s top position. Second, Sobchak is reportedly Putin’s beloved goddaughter. Depending on who you asked, all of this meant she was either incredibly brave and principled, given there was no

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chance she could win the race, or proof something more sinister was going on. After declaring her candidacy, Sobchak crisscrossed Russia, passionately campaigning. In late January, marie claire joined her in the town of Vladimir, several hours from Moscow. Wearing gold heels, a black coat and glittering gold jewellery, she was there to make her case to a new crowd and eager to deliver her usual rousing stump speech. Taking to the stage in a spacious auditorium, she listed Putin’s failures to the crowd of several dozen people, mostly students: Russia’s economy is fading away, business is sufering from the Kremlin pressure, bureaucrats have stolen state money, and the West treats Russia like a criminal. “I am a Russian patriot, but most things we are proud of in Russia have nothing to do with Putin,” she said. Privately, she told marie claire that she was optimistic and that younger

generations were ready to step up and lead the way: “I know that creative Russians can make a diference [for the country’s future].” Given the grisly ends met by others who have taken on Putin, was she ever scared? “I am not afraid. I do not consider fear acceptable,” she replied. “They can accuse me of anything but not of being a coward.” In the end, neither the mood of the younger generation, nor Sobchak’s lack of cowardice made any diference. With seven candidates standing in the March election, insiders declared the outcome was a foregone conclusion long before the first ballot was cast. Putin ended up winning with more than 76 per cent of the vote (albeit amid the usual accusations of rigging). His nearest competitor, millionaire communist Pavel Grudinin, received about 12 per cent. Sobchak managed less than two per cent. She insists that her run was fuelled by altruism. However, critics – even some of her friends in the liberal opposition – have argued that Sobchak was a Putin plant, designed to demonstrate that the president had “real” opposition.

“They can accuse me of anything but not of being a coward”


Clockwise from above: Sobchak at a rally to support education last year; with her mother Lyudmila Narusova and Russia’s President Putin at the cemetery where her father Anatoly Sobchak was buried; a billboard in Saint Petersburg promoting Sobchak as a presidential candidate; on the cover of Russian Playboy in late 2006.

“Last summer, Sobchak began negotiating a possible run with the administration,” Kremlin adviser and member of the ruling United Russia, Sergei Markov, told marie claire. “When she told Putin she would run, he said, ‘Do whatever you like.’” (A statement that constitutes a glowing “go for it” in Russian political parlance.) Sobchak has simply shrugged of the suggestion she was essentially a decoy, saying, “I am responsible for my words and actions.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY INSTAGRAM/@XENIA_SOBCHAK; ALAMY; GETTY IMAGES.

S

ince bursting into the limelight in 2004, Sobchak has astounded fans and irritated critics. Putin had been in oice for four years when Sobchak, then aged 23, was cast as the host of House-2, a reality TV show that was akin to a Russian version of Big Brother. For a while, her career followed the tried-and-true course of celebs the world over: there were clothing and shoe lines, a restaurant, a talk show, a Playboy cover. She also wrote a book called Marry a Millionaire. “For as long as I [have] known her, she tries to grab every cool project and turn it into her own. And for as long as the project excites her, she stays sincere and serious about it,” Mikhail Zygar, Sobchak’s former producer and manag-

er at the independent television channel TV Rain, has said. But Sobchak insists this latest career project – politician – is much more than a dalliance. After all, Russian politics is in her blood. She was raised in Saint Petersburg and both of her parents were politicians. Her father, Anatoly Sobchak, was the city’s first democratically elected mayor. Her mother, Lyudmila Narusova, won a seat in the Russian parliament in 1995. During her father’s tenure as mayor, much of the day-to-day running of Saint

Petersburg fell to one of his deputies, one Vladimir Putin. It was said to be a formative experience for Putin, a former middling KGB oicer with political aspirations of his own. Such was Putin’s closeness to Anatoly and his family, the president to this day is said to call Sobchak the afectionate “Ksiusha” – instead of Ksenia – leading to the belief that he is her godfather. Anatoly was ultimately forced out of his job, facing accusations of corruption, which he claimed were fabricated to stop him running for president. He fled to Paris while his protégé, Putin, climbed the ranks. In the late ’90s, Putin helped Anatoly return to Russia and he joined Putin’s campaign. But, in 2000, Anatoly died suddenly. While at first he was said to have had a heart attack, his death was later ruled a possible murder, but his assailants remain unknown. Putin wept at the funeral.

E

leven years later, “Ksiusha” made her most radical move to date – publicly turning on Putin and establishing herself as his political opponent. In 2011, protests swept Moscow and tens of thousands of people took to the streets to voice their anger after Putin was

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WORLD REPORT

Clockwise from far left: Sobchak with her politician father, Anatoly, in 1993; at the first meeting in Moscow with supporters of her #againstall campaign; Sobchak’s own family have speculated what role Putin might have in mind for her.

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continued to negatively impact her life, even afecting her blossoming career in the media. In 2012, she fronted a new series, an MTV Russia talk show called GosDep (or State Department), which was set to cover hot-button political and social interviews. It was cancelled after only one episode, reportedly due to government pressure.

D

“I think [Putin will retire]. It’s just hard to convince him there’s an exit”

espite her political leanings, there are many who are adamant Sobchak has a bright, Putin-approved political future. The president will be 71-years-old by the end of his fourth term in oice and the likelihood of retirement is high. However, he would need to find an anointed successor, a politician who would nominally represent a more liberal shift to mollify the people, but who would also be enough of an ally to guarantee he would not face prosecution for alleged crimes and corruption he may have been responsible for while in oice. Sobchak could turn out to be that successor. The argument goes that her family’s ties and her relatively moderate

PHOTOGRAPHY BY INSTAGRAM/@XENIA_SOBCHAK; ALAMY.

returned to the presidency in a likely rigged election. Organisers of one rally asked Sobchak – with her vast fan base – to speak to help attract more attendees. She took to the stage at the anti-Putin rally, standing shoulder to shoulder with activists who had spent months in Russian prisons for their political activity. The crowd before her roared in fury. Protesters whistled to demonstrate their disrespect for the spoilt child of the Kremlin’s elite. Undeterred, she was quickly anointed one of the opposition’s leading figures and started a relationship with one of the most radical revolutionaries, Ilya Yashin. Several months later, eight men knocked on the door of the upscale apartment building where she lived. Over six hours, they tore her apartment apart, humiliating her by making her go to the bathroom with a guard, and reading love letters from a former flame in front of Yashin. They also left with €1.5 million in cash. ‘‘Whether it’s prison or exile, they’re out to silence me,” she told The New York Times. Those who’ve weathered long years in the opposition wilderness tentatively welcomed Sobchak’s new-found political passion. “I am glad Ksenia joined us,” opposition leader Boris Nemtsov said in an interview in 2012. “[But] she probably does not realise how dangerous this political path can be.” (Two years later, Nemtsov, a former deputy prime minister, was murdered outside the Kremlin wall, shot six times in the back.) Sobchak’s evolving political views

views would make her a highly attractive inheritor of the Kremlin. “Yes, I think [Putin really will retire],” Sobchak has said. “It’s just hard to convince him that there’s an exit and ... that nothing like what happened to ... [former Libyan dictator Muammar] Gaddafi would happen to him. He is really afraid of that.” Sobchak has made it clear she doesn’t believe in “retribution”, a view that would go some way to reassuring a retreating Putin. Moscow insiders, including Sobchak’s own family, have speculated what high-powered role Putin might have for “Ksiusha” after his May inauguration. Zygar – Sobchak’s former boss at TV Rain – told marie claire, “Everybody I spoke with, even Ksenia’s mum, was convinced that Putin will give her a big role in the government.” Tatyana Felgenhauer, a famous Russian journalist who was stabbed in a newsroom at Echo of Moscow radio station last year, tells marie claire that she can see Putin giving Sobchak an even more significant post. “I won’t be surprised if Putin makes her a minister or a governor,” she said. “What would surprise me [is] if Sobchak turned down [a job from Putin] and promised not to [take] a Kremlin promotion. I would respect [her] then.” While there are a vast number of unknowns in this situation, Sobchak’s ambition is plain. A few years ago, she sat down for an interview at her own restaurant in Moscow, admitting that she adored the “powerful Iron Lady”, Margaret Thatcher. “[And] I do have iron balls,” she asserted.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY ANTONIO OLMOS.

“There aren’t words to describe how I feel. I was the one who let go of James’ hand. I was the one who was supposed to protect him”

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EMOTIONAL

I still blame myself

It’s been 25 years since Denise Fergus lost sight of her two-yearold son, James Bulger, in a crowded shopping centre. It took mere seconds for two 10-year-old boys to lure him away to a brutal death. This is how Denise has endured a lifetime of grief

O

n February 12, 1993, Denise Fergus, nee Bulger, made a decision that has haunted her for more than 25 years – heading to her local shopping centre, she left her nearly three-year-old son James’ pram at home. Later that afternoon at the butcher’s counter, the young mum was forced to let go of her toddler’s hand to pay for the lamb chops the family planned to eat for dinner. And that was the last time she would ever see her son, who she likes to remember as “real and fizzing with life” instead of as a little boy whose name is forever entwined with those of the 10-yearolds who abducted and murdered him: Jon Venables and Robert Thompson. In a UK trial that made international headlines, the two boys were found guilty of torturing and tormenting Jamie over a 4km walk before arriving at a railway line where he succumbed to his multiple injuries. They then arranged Jamie’s body on the tracks, hoping a hit from a train would

cover up their role in his death. Pathologist Dr Alan Williams later said the toddler’s injuries were so numerous – 42 in total – it was impossible to discern the fatal blow. Venables and Thompson served just eight years behind bars for the crime. Upon their release they were granted new identities, meaning they could then start new lives without the public knowing who – or where – they were. It was a sentence that enraged both the Bulger family and the wider community and forced Denise into a lifelong battle with Britain’s judicial system over many issues, including the toughening of sentencing of minors. “It dawned on me that Thompson and Venables would mess up this chance at freedom; that this wasn’t the end of the fight because they would do something wrong and the process would start all over again,” Denise writes in her memoir, I Let Him Go. She was proven right, as Venables has twice reofended and is now back in jail. In an exclusive extract from her book, for the first time Denise reveals the toll

James’ death has taken on her family – and why she wants her little boy remembered for the cheeky, happy child he was, not for the grisly way he died. DENISE ’S STORY

W hen I gave birth to my baby boy, I was full of hopes and dreams for him. But the one thing I didn’t ever imagine was burying my son’s tiny body after his murder. People often ask me if I blame myself for what happened that day – for taking my eyes of him for that split second. For letting go of his hand as I looked for my purse. They ask if I blame myself for not seeing what the CCTV footage later showed: Venables and Thompson beckoning James away from my side and out of the shop at 3.39pm. The answer is: of course I do. There aren’t the words to describe how I still feel now, every day. I was the one who let go of his hand; I was the one who was supposed to protect him. marieclaire.com.au

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EMOTIONAL

As James’ third birthday [neared], just four short weeks after his body had been found, [my marriage to James’ father, Ralph] hit rock bottom. Not only did I have the grief of losing James, but Ralph just stopped coming home. We couldn’t communicate; Ralph was either drunk or out. And none of this was helped by the fact that when I was at my lowest ebb, I felt Ralph blamed me for losing James. I had lost my son and now I felt like I was losing my marriage. And then, just like a gift from God, at the end of March I discovered I was pregnant again. Yes, it was very soon after James’ death, but, in all honesty, if I hadn’t

“There is no forgiveness in my heart for my son’s killers” been pregnant with Michael in those early months after James’ funeral, I wouldn’t be here today. The baby became my lifeline; I didn’t know how low it was possible for a human being to go. Did I try to kill myself? Not quite. Did I think about killing myself? Absolutely. Very often and in great detail.

W

hen I attended the sentencing of Venables and Thompson, all I could focus on was the moment I would see my son’s killers for the first time. Suddenly there they were, my worst nightmare come true – two podgy, unremarkable children who had

stolen and murdered my baby. I had built the moment up so much in my head that nothing was ever going to feel good enough. Looking at them, it all seemed so pointless, such a waste for an inexplicable and evil kick. My stomach lurched and I felt sick. It had been decided that eight years was all my baby’s life was worth – that wasn’t even a year for every hour his severed body had lain on the track. It was nothing and it was a disgrace. They had snufed out my baby’s life and they would be free to start theirs at 18, when they would be eligible for release. That was the age when people flew the nest anyway and set out on their adult paths; it was as if they were being rapped on the knuckles and sent to boarding school – I couldn’t accept it. Michael James Bulger was born on December 8, 1993. Just months later, Denise’s marriage to Ralph collapsed. I was devastated that we hadn’t made it, but there was also another reality: Ralph was the only other person who could comprehend the utter devastation I felt about our son. In less than 18 months, my simple and perfect life as a wife and mother had imploded. The day that Thompson and Venables stole my son from my side, they lit a match underneath everything I had and it all went up in flames. Never in my wildest dreams had I imagined a simple shopping trip with James would end the way it did and, as a result, I was terrified of everything. The deep-seated paranoia and worry never left me, and I can see now that it did get in the way of us enjoying some things that other children took for granted. It also meant that Michael was never out of my sight – he slept in my bed and we spent every minute together. There was no playgroup or nursery, play dates without me, staying over with his cousins; I had him with me all the time. Even now, Michael is in his 20s; if

TIMELINE OF TEARS February 12, 1993: James is abducted and murdered. His body is found two days later. February 20, 1993: Jon Venables and Robert

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Thompson are charged. November 24, 1993: They receive eight-year sentences, making them the youngest convicted murderers in recent British history.

July 23, 1994: The original term is increased to 15 years but this is overturned. June 24, 2001: Thompson and Venables are freed and granted lifetime anonymity.

March 2, 2010: Venables is imprisoned for downloading child pornography. 2013: After being granted another new identity, Venables is released.

November 2017: Venables is recalled to prison for possession of child pornography. He is reported to be engaged to a woman who he met on the outside.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES; COURTESY OF DENISE FERGUS; BY ALAMY.

People often ask at what point I realised James being with two kids wasn’t going to end well and the answer is never. Even after the funeral and the thousands of letters, even during the court case when those two boys were standing trial for his murder. Even then I thought he was coming home. It was after the trial that my world truly collapsed and the reality of never seeing my baby again hit me. It is important to say here that I have never found out the exact nature of all that was done to James in his final hours and I never will – I know as much as my heart can take. We couldn’t view James. As the funeral approached I did ask if I could see him one last time, but I was advised by the police not to. I didn’t get the chance to touch my little boy, kiss him goodbye or tell him how much I loved him. Perhaps it was for the best, as my imagination had already been working overtime at the thought of what he might look like after all that had happened to him. I picked his outfit the day before he was collected from the mortuary and moved to the undertakers. I decided on the corduroy suit that he wore on his last Christmas Day. I decided not to put shoes on him, I’m not sure why. I couldn’t face looking at the outfit so a member of the family got everything ready for the undertaker to collect. They packed the suit neatly into a bag along with his favourite teddy, a toy motorbike and a torch – I remember thinking that he always took his torch to bed so that he could see in the dark and not be scared, so it was really important he had that with him in his coin. I am not sure anything prepares you for the sight of a tiny white box that holds your lively, funny, cheeky son’s remains – I could have seen it a thousand times and it wouldn’t have been any less shocking. Ralph and I cried until I didn’t think there were any tears left.


he texts to say he’s on his way home, I time him. If he’s a few minutes late, I go into a blind panic. I don’t think the chilly fear I felt when I realised James wasn’t by my side will ever leave me. In 1996, Denise met her second husband, Stuart Fergus, and they later had two sons, Thomas Stuart in 1998 and Leon Gary in 1999. But even as she celebrated her growing family, James – and the fight to see justice served – was never far from her mind. Friday June 24, 2001, turned out to be one of the worst days of my life. Little over eight years after murdering James, Thompson and Venables were released on life licence and my carefully compartmentalised box of emotions went up in flames. I’ve always answered questions the kids have as honestly as I can – they know what I know – and we have always talked about James. But they never saw me cry until that day, when it all seeped into a big meltdown triggered by a deep ache for James and the very real feeling that I’d let him down. James is a part of everything we do, especially when it comes to special occasions. There is a Christmas tree planted next to his grave and we all go to the cemetery to decorate it as a family. We put lights and baubles on it and hang his stocking on there to make sure he is included. On Christmas Eve, as it is getting dark before the cemetery closes, Michael will put the star on top of James’ tree. It’s the last touch for James once darkness falls. There is no forgiveness in my heart

Clockwise from top left: Denise and James on a holiday in Wales; Ralph Bulger carries his son’s coin on March 1, 1993; little James was “real and fizzing with life”.

for my son’s killers. Nor is there any peace since [they have been] released. Time [and my family] have given me happiness I could never have imagined after the day James left my side. I will continue to do all I can for James until there is no breath left in my body. He will always be my son and I will protect him and his memory forever. The fight continues; it just changes as the years go on. This is an edited extract from I Let Him Go by Denise Fergus (Echo, $29.99). A portion of the proceeds from the sale of the book will be donated to the James Bulger Memorial Trust, supporting families of victims of crime.

Clockwise from top right: Ralph and Denise with the petition signed by more than 270,000 people to keep their son’s killers behind bars for life; Denise with James; and finding renewed happiness with her second husband Stuart and her new family.

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From Buckingham Palace to the gritty underbelly of Berlin and the dizzying heights of NASA – The Crown actress’ career has hit the stratosphere. By Jonathan Dean

bout an hour into a long conversation in Berlin, the subject of my chat with Claire Foy turns to breastmilk. She volunteers personal information as if we’ve known each other forever, using her incredibly flexible face to run through emotions from surprised (big blue eyes wide open) to appalled (scrunched-up nose). There seems to be near-constant bafflement at how her life has reached this point, but with her career in hyperspace, and having her daughter, Ivy, just turn three, it has been a hectic couple of years. What’s been the hardest part of that period? “It’s been physically quite hard,” she says. “I’ve had to take care of myself after a baby and working those hours, then feel bad about working, so [I’d] wake up early to see my child. Just being a mess in every single place I was in. “But everything is hard,” she continues, more resilient than sad. “Everything is a challenge. You have a really amazing day, then an ‘armpit of the world’ day, but the next, you know, you’re still here ... The thing I find hard is that my child is continuously getting older. As am I [she is 34]. And I really have to pay attention to where the time is going.” Shortly after we meet, Foy and her husband, actor Stephen Campbell Moore, release a statement saying they have been separated for a while. Foy is a very good actress, totally convincing in her best roles as the taciturn Elizabeth II in The Crown and the catty Anne Boleyn in Wolf Hall (first screened in Australia in 2015 on Foxtel) – it’s easy for her to pretend. Also, maybe I’m an idiot who only thought a lack of wedding ring was due to her being in Germany to play the resolutely single Lisbeth Salander in The Girl in the Spider’s Web. Either way, with this breaking news, some of our chat suddenly seemed staged, such as when I asked whether Campbell Moore was jealous of her career, like the Duke of Edinburgh was in The Crown as his wife achieved a far greater profile than him. “I can’t speak for anybody else,” she said, “but I’ve never been like that, and there’s no way I could be in any partnership with anyone where that’s the case.”


INTERVIEW


Self-deprecating and honest, Foy is aware of the instability of her industry. “I don’t necessarily think it’s going to last,” she says of her fame.

Gossips should read little into this. Foy makes up answers as she goes, testing what she thinks. She makes invigorating company, often appearing stunned by something she has just said, then laughing at herself for saying it. “I think Jude Law’s over there. Isn’t that exciting?” she exclaims, beaming, at one point. “Or is it just a man with a shaved head and glasses on?” Dressed sensibly for winter, she arrives in a red woolly hat that, when removed, reveals a cropped Salander ’do. “Weirdly, Berlin is the best city to have this haircut,” she says. “Everybody has it. If I was at home, people would say, ‘Bit bold!’” And thus our chat winds, spending so long discussing a rave event she went to for parents and babies – “We’re all trying to hang onto a semblance of life” – that eventually I mention I should really start interviewing her. “Oh God, don’t,” she says sharply. “What are we supposed to be talking about?” A film she made with Steven Soderbergh: Unsane. In it, Foy plays the improbably named Sawyer Valentini, who is driven at work and on Tinder, but stalked by a man who looks not unlike a pregrey Bill Bryson. Early on, she signs up for “voluntary” confinement at a local mental health facility and directed by anybody but Soderbergh, starring anyone but a committed Foy, the hokey horror that plays out could be terrible. Oh, and it was shot on an iPhone, in 10 days, as the director likes experiments. Foy says he called it a “student film”, and both felt free making it. The subject matter, though, is grim. Has Foy experienced anything like the stalking Valentini sufers? “Dear God, no,” she gasps. “I was once burgled, and thinking about someone in my house made me feel ill. Christ. Stalking is the biggest violation.” She groans in agony at the thought. “It’s like The Fall, isn’t it?” It’s a topic that is, literally, too close to home. She nods. “At least with The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, you rationalise, ‘I’m not sure some man’s going to come with a machine to slice me up.’” Touch wood. “People do!” she laughs, the second word pitched high and long. It has been an exceptional time for Foy, who for years was best known for the title role in a BBC adaptation of Little Dorrit. Later this year, she will star as Janet Armstrong, Neil’s wife, in First Man, an Oscar-bait movie about the moon landing, starring Ryan Gosling as the astronaut. With that, Unsane and The Girl in the Spider’s Web, based on Stieg Larsson’s iconic characters, 2018 is working hard to make an earlier quote that she is “never going to be a film star” seem very silly indeed.

“Ridiculous!” she says, throwing her head back. Thing is, she believed it. Partly, surely, because she was so bloody-minded, in a business that doesn’t like newbies with opinions, and turned down much of what her US agents ofered her. Films such as High School Musical 3 are “not going to happen!” she told them. In addition to being choosy, she also “actively avoided” Harvey Weinstein. “I knew what he was like,” she tells me. “There was a real element of ‘You have to kiss the ring’, but I was like, ‘I’m not fucking doing that.’ No, ta. Gross. Not going there at all. I would never work with anyone I thought was a bit shady.” Now he has gone, and here she is, a queen in Hollywood, with a new team and a nascent, if massive, movie career – all of it down to The Crown, which started barely a year and a half ago. The show – Netflix’s best – is the story of Elizabeth (Foy) and Philip (Matt Smith) living through eras of social upheaval. Foy’s involvement ended in the recent second series. (Olivia Colman now takes over as Her Majesty.) Many ignored the program initially – “Royal Family,” scofs a deadpanning Foy, with a snore – and its success was due to excitable word of mouth about its lavishness and acting. It has, along with Harry and Meghan, made the Windsors cool among cynics. Yet Foy’s grandparents were working-class immigrant Irish, who “worked themselves to the bone”, while Foy herself was always “very aware of money and not having any”. She did telesales and pub work and is not ... “posh in any way,” she interrupts. So did she feel awkward boosting the highest reaches of a British society that doesn’t exactly encourage upward mobility? “I’m not ashamed, as a British person, of the Royal Family,” she says. “I don’t think anybody should go, ‘They’re a twat because they’re well-of.’ The world could do with everybody realising everyone can have empathy. But it’s easier to hate, I suppose.”

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHEW BROOKES/TRUNK ARCHIVE/ WWW.SNAPPERMEDIA.COM.

“I knew what Weinstein was like. I was like, ‘I’m not doing that’”

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his empathy is what won Foy her Golden Globe, but it happened fast and she was overwhelmed at the awards, surrounded by fame she didn’t feel part of. When I say Mariah Carey mentioned her in a tweet, the actress bursts out with another loud laugh, shakes her head and says, “That’s weird.” Still, a couple of years into this circus must make her feel more comfy? “I don’t know. You just get more prepared, and now I’m able to see the Globes as a lovely thing that I don’t necessarily think is going to last.”

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INTERVIEW

Clockwise from top left: Foy, in the thriller Unsane; and playing the Queen in the wildly successful Netflix series, The Crown. With nowestranged husband Stephen Campbell Moore in 2013.

hich brings us to Lisbeth Salander. “She’s like James Bond, if James Bond were a woman,” Foy says, which immediately starts the push for her to play a female 007. But that isn’t the headline here. Salander is a leather-wearing vengeful angel, into S&M and fluid sexuality. The Queen is – well, let’s wait until series three of The Crown, but probably none of those. Surely this is just a blatant attempt not to be typecast? “I’m an idiot,” Foy says, smiling. “And I realise that, with Lisbeth, I’m pushing myself to the absolute edge of my ability. It’s slightly alarming.” Someone once told her that after doing a well-known part such as Doctor Who or the Queen, you yourself don’t change, but everyone’s opinion of you has changed forever. “And that’s the fucked-up thing,” Foy says. “Suddenly, you’re at a wedding and your friend’s family are taking a picture of you. Everyone around goes, ‘You’re worth something,’ and you don’t completely understand what that is, because you’re still you.” Her daughter was with her in Berlin, and conversation often returns to her. She sees her every day and has had family there, too, to try to keep everything normal. This is a rare position in film, which has a less-than-perfect record of childcare provision, but from The Crown on, when Foy breastfed dressed as our monarch, the actress seemed to have forged a position of power on set; though recent admissions that her co-star Smith was paid more than her may suggest otherwise. (Foy was yet to comment on the pay gap at the

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time of publication.) However, getting back to work so soon after giving birth was something she says every woman deserves. “When a woman gets to child-bearing age, she has to disappear or not have children and then be judged – it’s really weird,” she says, face scrunched. “Women find it incredibly diicult to go back to work after children. It’s not encouraged. It’s just not the norm. “I have decided that I don’t want to bring up my child in the same world I was brought up in and, therefore, I need to change how I think about things.” When asked how, she says that, before, she was scared of hurting feelings, too worried about people liking her. “It’s a long process to unravel,” she continues. “It’s 34 years of stuf you haven’t really thought about. But I’ve never been in a position where me being anywhere is helpful at all, and I’ve realised that now I am.” A burgeoning spokesperson, then – she is set to be the patron of a rape crisis charity – and the start, perhaps, of something wider, as yet undefined. In person, as crass as this sounds, she exudes the simmering passion she does on-screen, a furious, human panic that knows answers are around the corner but, as yet, just out of reach. And it was about here that we started to talk about breastfeeding. Her sister and friends gave her advice when she was struggling. “I’ve realised, in the past two years, that my friends have become the people ...” It’s a rare time she dithers for words. “I feel so accepted by them, and women need that more. Less judgement. Less people having a go. Being able to say ‘I feel shit’, and everyone going, ‘That’s alright.’ It’s such a relief to realise everyone else is finding it just as hard. Life is hard.” She is smiling as she says that, and I don’t think it’s a rictus grin, like the familiar one the Queen often had to do. Unsane is in cinemas on April 25.

Above: Director Steven Soderbergh, Foy and Joshua Leonard at the Unsane premiere in Berlin in February this year. The film was shot on an iPhone over 10 days.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MATTHEW BROOKES/TRUNK ARCHIVE/SNAPPER MEDIA; GETTY IMAGES. SUNDAY TIMES CULTURE/NEWS LICENSING.

She surely doesn’t think that? “Well, I know how fickle the industry is,” she says. “Everybody does! I am lucky I have done one job in my lifetime that has been watched by an audience, and by people I admire. All I can do now is completely fuck that up.”


â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel so accepted by my friends. Women need that more. Less judgementâ&#x20AC;?


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bout nine years ago, D, my boyfriend at the time, introduced me to BDSM. We were falling in love and I wanted to try everything. I fell for it just as hard as I fell for him. I discovered pony play seven years ago, at one of my very first BDSM events: a private play party. People were being spanked, hot wax was being poured on bare skin, a man was walking around with heavy weights hanging from his balls – anything was possible. So it didn’t shock me when a woman with a soft voice and a soft face pulled out a leather horse bridle and told me that she liked putting it on other people and steering them around. I was intrigued. I wanted to know what it would feel like to have this soft-spoken woman in control of me.

P O N Y P L AY Her bridle was heavy. Blinders narrowed my field of vision. I couldn’t see her, but I could feel her movements through the reins she held behind me. She made a clicking noise to prompt me to move. Wearing a form-fitting cocktail dress, high heels and the bridle, I slowly walked – straight backed – from one room to another, enjoying the eyes I’d see on me before they disappeared past the blinders. This was the part I was most comfortable with – the exhibition. When I moved and stopped at her command, she’d say, “Good girl!” in the high-pitched tone we reserve

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And yet that night, when K and I slept together, I gave myself permission to dig into that primal part of myself. I imagined two strong horses and their instincts to breed. Two animals attracted to each other and simply going at it. I bit his lip and he groaned. Primal. He fucked me from behind. Animal. We nuzzled and touched foreheads, and the animal parts of us and the human parts of us blended together. He was a stallion and I was a mare, and I couldn’t help wondering what I had been so worried about. Sex – good sex – activates us on so many levels. It can be sweet, intimate and raw all at the same time. The next day, we went to see a movie. Afterwards, at a bar, while talking about jobs and families, he asked me, “Do you want to be my mare?” I asked him what that would look like, and he shrugged and grinned. “I think we have a lot we can learn from each other,” he said. I wasn’t yet ready to sign on but I, too, was curious what we could learn from each other. So, instead of an answer, I nuzzled his neck, and he whinnied back.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES.

for children and animals. I enjoyed pleasing her, but, at the same time, I wondered if I really wanted to be treated like an actual animal. I didn’t feel empowered by my small pony play scene. Yes, the experience turned me on, but it also made me uncomfortable. I stayed away from pony play for years after that. But, in the BDSM community you learn to reserve judgement and approach things you don’t understand with an open mind. And so, inevitably, I was tempted to try it again. At a recent kink-themed conference, two of the presenters were nationally renowned pony play experts – one a gruf cowboy, the other a petite, lively woman; let’s call her Grace. They agreed to teach me how to be a pony. I wondered, could the act be empowering? And less dehumanising? Some “ponies” simply enjoy dressing up and elaborate fetish wear. Others enjoy being groomed. Some pull carts while others like to be ridden. Then there are jumping competitions and simulated fox hunts. That night I would be led through the dungeon as a pony. I stripped down to a bra and panties, and the cowboy fitted me in a leather body harness with an attached tail and a headpiece with a mane. The headpiece had a bridle that clipped to a set of reins and a bit. I admit I felt sexy as this pony-human hybrid. With the bit between my teeth, communication was diicult. The cowboy placed a leather hood over my eyes so I could see only the ground in front. To him, pony play was all about the pony relinquishing control and ofering him complete trust. He gave me commands by pressing on my back, telling me to switch between a walk and a trot. By pulling on the reins, I knew when to stop or turn. As soon as we got back from the dungeon, we ran into Grace and I switched to her bridle and bit to test out being a beast with her. Grace told me I could only communicate with her as a pony. She neighed and I neighed back. If something was wrong, she told me to stamp my foot. I tried it out. I liked this physical language. Not speaking is a way of letting go. Other ponies I’ve spoken to say that when they roleplay, they cease being themselves. They’re an object, an animal. It’s about the experience of being free, wild or “other”. I haven’t yet reached that headspace. But then I met K. I had heard he was one of the only active ponies in my city, so I reached out to him after the conference and asked if he would be interested in meeting me at a local bar. He showed up wearing a black latex suit, boots shaped like horse hooves and a leather horse mask. We left to get tacos, then drinks. With his permission, I picked up his tail and played with the end. It made him blush and eye me with a grin. We kissed and nuzzled each other’s necks, kind of like ponies. In the past, when people asked me if pony play was a sexual thing, I told them I didn’t think so. I was worried about what it would mean to be sexualised as an animal. Was the concept akin to bestiality?


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Corban has taught me that running and training are important,â&#x20AC;? says aspiring rugby player Madena, 7, with her mentor Corban McGregor.

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REAL PEOPLE

Grow Up... WHEN I

What does it take to realise your dreams? Four aspiring leaders of the future meet their professional 85B?5CD?V>4?ED  By Alley Pascoe

Corban McGregor, elite rugby league player, 24, with Madena Moussa, 7 “Nothing beats the feeling of running onto the field wearing the green and gold jersey in front of a screaming crowd,” says Corban McGregor, who has played rugby league professionally for three years and helped the Harvey Norman Jillaroos win last year’s World Cup. McGregor’s number-one fan is seven-year-old Madena, who plays for her local under-10s touch footy team and has grand plans to follow in McGregor’s footsteps and represent Australia when she’s older. McGregor’s advice to Madena is to work hard: “If you want to do something in your life, make it a priority and work your butt of for it.” The fact that young girls can aspire to be rugby league players is astounding

to McGregor. “When I was Madena’s age, us girls had to stop playing footy when we were nine or 10,” she says. “Now, there are full competitions for women and a pathway to a professional career. The opportunities that are open to girls now are amazing.” And it’s players such as McGregor who are paving the way for the next generation of women in sport. “When I started playing for the Jillaroos, I was really nervous,” she says. “I only knew a handful of girls. Some of the senior leadership girls mentored me and it really helped to have someone guide me through. Now I’m doing the same thing for the younger girls and it feels really nice.”

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REAL PEOPLE

Wannabe hip-hop dancers Taylor [jumping] and Jaime (kneeling), 12, bust a move with professional dancer and choreographer Amy Zhang.

Amy Zhang, hip-hop dancer, 24, with Taylor and Jaime Kaplan, both 12 “Five, six, seven, eight,” professional dancer Amy Zhang is counting in 12-year-old twins Taylor and Jaime for their hip-hop dance routine. Zhang started dancing seven years ago as a way of coping with the stress of high school. While the endorphins got her hooked, it was the creativity and music that drove her to pursue dance as a career. In the past few years, Zhang has worked with brands including Nike and Wrangler, and currently teaches weekly Groove Therapy classes at 107 Projects in Redfern, Sydney. “When I started out, I didn’t realise that dancing was a job and that you can make money from it,” she says. “Then I started getting thrown gigs, and I thought, ‘I can do this.’” As well as performing and teaching for a living, Zhang also choreographs

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and directs photo shoots. The biggest lesson she’s learnt is to try everything once. “You might think that you want to be the star, but you need to try everything to find out what you really want to do,” she says. “When I tried choreographing and directing, I really liked it.” Taylor and Jaime, who started dancing five years ago, share Zhang’s passion for all things hip-hop and dream about dancing professionally when they’re older. Zhang’s advice for the girls is to do what makes them smile. “I know that’s a cliche, but if you keep doing what makes you happy, you’ll get to where you want to be. You need to do what makes you feel most yourself,” she says. For Taylor and Jaime, that means dancing to Drake and doing handstands.

“She’s an inspiration to me,” s ays Pia, 14, of Kylie Stark, the nurse who helped treat her heart condition when she was only two years old at the Sydney Children’s Hospital.


PHOTOGRAPHY BY KRISTIAN TAYLOR-WOOD. HAIR AND MAKE-UP BY JOEL PHILLIPS/VIVIEN’S CREATIVE.

Leading senior constable Vanessa McGrath, police dog trainer, 39, with Sophie Lowry, 11

Sophie, 11, who has her own dog-walking business, was in heaven at the police dog unit with her mentor Vanessa McGrath and police dogs Mabel (below) and Arrow (left).

In her 16-year career in the police force, Vanessa McGrath’s proudest moment was when her drug detection labrador made her first bust. “Because I trained Mabel from scratch and taught her how to snif out drugs, I was so proud when she made her first find at a dance party. It was a big supply, so knowing that we’ve gotten those drugs of the street and may have saved someone from overdosing is very rewarding,” says McGrath, who celebrated by giving Mabel a handful of treats and pats. McGrath was a police oicer for six years before she pursued her childhood dream of becoming a dog handler. “My commander told me it was very hard to get into the dog unit – everyone wants to run around with dogs all day,” recalls McGrath, who had to pass a series of fitness and personality tests to get into the exclusive unit. Now she trains the junior dog handlers, as well as patrolling with Mabel at music festivals, railway stations, pubs and clubs. Sophie – who fell in love with police dogs after seeing a video of a German shepherd doing push-ups with his trainer – would love to follow in Vanessa’s footsteps. “Back yourself and be confident,” she tells the dog-crazy 11-year-old.

Kylie Stark, nurse manager, 52, with Pia Dunlop, 14 Kylie Stark vividly remembers the day Pia, then aged two, was brought into the emergency department at Sydney Children’s Hospital (SCH). The toddler came in with a fever but while waiting for test results she went into cardiac arrest. The doctors and nurses worked for 53 minutes to restart Pia’s heart using a brand new machine that had only been in the department for a week. Over the years, Pia has had several return visits to hospital – in fact, less than a week after this photograph was taken, Pia sufered another heart attack, from which she is

now recovering – and her history has fuelled her ambition to become a nurse. “It’s special to have someone kind and compassionate nursing you back to health,” Pia says. Stark says kids such as Pia are the reason she got into nursing: “I signed up to save children’s lives.” After working all over the world in a career spanning 34 years, Stark is now the nurse manager at the SCH’s emergency department. She looks forward to the day Pia will return to hospital as a nurse rather than a patient. “The extraordinary thing Pia will have is experience. Her ability to connect and be empathic will be an asset,” she says. Her advice for the aspiring nurse? “Don’t let anyone tell you that you can’t do something. Just go out and do it.’’

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FEARLES S BEAUTY Total hair repair and the freedom to style with confidence.

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ONE BR AND: A WORLD OF OIL-INFUSED BE AUT Y


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GIRL OF THE MOMENT

SAMARA WEAVING Samara Weaving is superstitious – with good reason. When filming the new Picnic at Hanging Rock miniseries on location in the eerie Victorian hinterland, the show’s cast and crew were struck down with a mystery illness. “When we shot at the rock itself, everyone got violently sick. It was almost as if the rock was telling us it didn’t want us around; really spooky,” says Weaving of the real-life rock where a fictional group of schoolgirls disappeared in Peter Weir’s 1975 film. In the new series, Weaving plays Irma, one of the girls who vanishes. When she returns, Irma’s schoolmates confront her and demand to know what happened. “That scene was so fun to film,” Weaving says. “One of my best friends Ruby Rees [who plays Edith] got to spit on me. She very much enjoyed it.” When she’s not getting spat on in Australia, Weaving, 26, is modelling in the new Bonds campaign and walking red carpets in Hollywood, having starred in the multiple award-winning film Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, and TV series SMILF. In both, she plays the “ditzy” new girlfriend, but Weaving insists the characters aren’t clichéd home wreckers. “What I love most about [those roles] is that even if the women bicker, they all get along,” she says. “You’re not just watching women be cruel to each other. That’s really refreshing.” No spitting in sight.

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WATC H I T Picnic at Hanging Rock airs on Foxtel in May.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY TĀNE COFFIN.

The Australian actress returns from Hollywood to star in the reprise of the iconic Picnic at Hanging Rock


THE WEIRD WORLD OF WES Watching a Wes Anderson film is a lot like stepping into a choose-your-ownadventure colouring book. His latest release, an animation called Isle of Dogs about talking dogs living on Trash Island, is no exception. Here’s a look back at Anderson’s most aesthetically pleasing films…

T H E R O YA L T E N E N B A U M S , 2 0 0 1

T H E G R A N D B U DA P E S T H OT E L , 2 0 1 4

The dead-straight bob, kohl eyeliner and blank stare made Gwyneth Paltrow’s look in The Royal Tenenbaums instantly iconic. Not to mention the hair clip…

Wes Anderson made pink the colour of the moment way before millennial pink was a thing. This scene with Tony Revolori and Saoirse Ronan is every hipster’s dream Instagram aesthetic.

H O T E L C H E VA L I E R , 2 0 0 7

T H E DA R J E E L I N G L I M I T E D, 2 0 07

This 13-minute short film is basically an ode to the colour yellow. Natalie Portman wearing a yellow bathrobe in a yellow bed with a yellow blanket in a yellow room with a Bloody Mary on the bedside table is pure gold. (Yellow gold.)

The Darjeeling Limited follows three estranged brothers on a soul-searching, mishap-ridden train trip through India – a story perfectly captured in this scene with Jason Schwartzman, Owen Wilson and Adrien Brody.

4 OF THE BEST

PEACH

BOOK CLUB

by Emma Glass

Trauma, Alzheimer’s and a cheating husband; it’s all about the big issues this month. Out now

(Bloomsbury, $24.99) This book is unlike anything you’ve read before. Emma Glass captures the pain, confusion and struggle of trauma in this eloquently-written debut.

BEFORE I LET YO U G O

by Kelly Rimmer (Hachette, $29.99) Could you choose between your sister and her baby? Bestselling Australian author, Kelly Rimmer, serves up a heart-pounding dilemma for fans of Jodi Picoult.

SOMEBODY I USED TO KNOW

THOSE OTHER WOMEN

by Wendy Mitchell

(Harper Collins, $29.99) When Poppy finds out her husband has been having an affair with her best friend, her world implodes. A pageturner from Nicola Moriarty (yes, Liane’s sister).

(Bloomsbury, $24.99) At 58, Wendy Mitchell was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s. This memoir captures her positivity and staunch independence.

by Nicola Moriarty

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COUNTRY COMEBACK

GENRE BENDER

From Kylie Minogue to Kesha, country music is suddenly cool again – yee-haw

These stars are abandoning their pop roots and embracing new soundscapes VE

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SAMANTHA JADE out April 20

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OF THE

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JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE out now

The fifth album from the undisputed Prince of Pop is genre defying – mixing blues, folk and electric funk.

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DA M I I M out now

Dami Im gets her jazz hands out on this nostalgic tribute album with covers of Aretha Franklin and Ella Fitzgerald.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES.

R#1I25*1I<?B)G9ð shouldn’t have been so quick to ditch country music”

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hen Kylie Minogue, the grand dame of Australian pop music, released her long-awaited new single “Dancing” earlier this year, no-one expected to hear a country banger. We certainly didn’t expect to see cowboy boots, line dancing and tassels in the music video, either. Yet the Nashville-inspired, rhinestonestudded single became an overnight hit. Why? Because we’re not laughing at country music anymore – we’re loving it. Country is cool. The evidence, your honour? Kesha’s comeback album Rainbow

featured both yodelling and a duet with Dolly Parton. Miley Cyrus’ Younger Now showed off her pure country pipes. And Lady Gaga’s “Million Reasons” gave us a million reasons to fall in love with Western melodies. Once dismissed as music’s most-hated genre, country has converted some of the world’s biggest pop stars, and a new generation of artists are feeling the love (maybe Taylor Swift shouldn’t have been quite so quick to ditch it). Tickets to the recent CMC Rocks Queensland festival sold out in under an hour. The stellar line-up included American Grammy-nominee Kelsea Ballerini, who became the first female country artist to bank three consecutive number one songs from her debut album The First Time. Then there’s Australian hitmaker Melanie Dyer, who topped the Aussie charts with her single “Fresh”, and Missy Lancaster, whose latest track “Forget” is so catchy it’ll be stuck in your head for weeks. With a slew of artists racing up the charts, closeted country music fans are throwing their cowboy hats in the air. Knowing all the words to every Kasey Chambers song is no longer considered a dirty secret. It’s time to brush up on your line dancing, y’all.

A I HE R A S O

Kylie Minogue’s album Golden is released on April 6.

Australia’s sweetheart Samantha Jade is bringing disco back, baby. Her new album includes classic disco covers of Donna Summer and Cher songs.


@ P L AY

D I D YO U KNOW Last year, Becky Lucas saw a man on crutches trying to walk a dog and she spent a year trying to write a show funnier than that.

5 MINUTES WITH

BECKY LUCAS Ahead of her Sydney Comedy Festival show cute funny smart sexy beautiful, we sat down with Becky Lucas – and haven’t stopped laughing since

It’s getting cold out there. Warm up with a laugh or three

C O M E DY C E N T R A L

My comedy show is called cute funny smart sexy beautiful. I would describe myself as… Someone who really hates describing myself. The audience at my Sydney Comedy Festival gig should be prepared to… Fight to the death. Just kidding, I hope they come after a few wines, ready to not take anything too seriously and have fun. Before I walk on stage, I always… Tell myself, “you can always go back to university.” Being a comedian is a lot like… Being unemployed. If I weren’t a performer/writer/fervent tweeter, I would be… Emotionally stable? Just kidding, I’d probably work at a dog pound and wear a little bumbag with treats and own 27 dogs.

My favourite comedian is… Chelsea Peretti. To people who think women aren’t funny, I say… Eat shit and die. The last thing I read was… An email from a man who saw me on TV and asked me if I wanted to stay on his farm with him … Hmm a big property with guns, no reception and no-one around to hear me scream? How could I resist? When I woke up today, my first thought was… I’m still tired.

I don’t leave the house without… My KeepCup and water bottle. I’ve become really obsessed with minimising my day-to-day waste and I’ll tell anyone who’ll listen to me. My Instagram consists of... Photos of Dolly Parton, miniature donkeys and Simpsons memes. I’m most passionate about… Trying to get as many likes as possible. Before I go to bed, I always… Make a list of my enemies and prepare for my revenge. Oh and floss, brush, wash my face, et cetera. My biggest regret is… A fringe I got seven years ago. The Sydney Comedy Festival runs from April 23 to May 20.

WA N DA A N D M E L Melbourne International Comedy Festival

RHYS NICHOLSON Sydney Comedy Festival

D I L R U K J AYA S I N H A Melbourne International Comedy Festival

This sassy mother-daughter duo ofers up truth bombs, parenting tips and giggle fits.

Modestly called Seminal, Nicholson’s new show is as smart as his bow tie.

Jayasinha’s show Bundle of Joy is a solid mix of self-deprecation, brutal honesty and loser humour. marieclaire.com.au

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present...

A MASTERCLASS TO L A U N C H YO U R S TA R T U P I D E A marie claire has partnered with education company Tech Ready Women to help budding entrepreneurs take their business idea from side hustle to success. This 2-day workshop aims to close the skills gap by providing non-tech-savvy women with the tech and business tools needed to transform an idea from concept to creation. Be inspired by experts, learn fundamental steps on how to validate your business idea, and meet your mentors – as well as like-minded entrepreneurial women – in a non-intimidating, friendly environment.

P A R T I C I P A N T S W I L L W A L K A W AY W I T H :

1 A step-by-step process to refine your business idea 2 Resources, templates and startup hacks to increase your success 3 Actionable steps to attract your first customers 4 Insights into technology platforms and popular tech products to help launch your business 5 A free pitch-ready course to learn how to pitch your idea to investors and secure seed capital

You’ll hear from some of Australia’s top technology entrepreneurs and experts including:

CHRISTIE WHITEHILL Founder, Tech Ready Women

LANA HOPKINS Founder, Mon Purse

DAVID BOLTON Head of Engineering, Woolies X

TARYN WILLIAMS Founder & CEO, TheRight.fit

LAUREN SILVERS Co-Founder, Glamazon

BLAISE MCCANN Founder & CEO, Hear Us Roar

HAYLEY WARREN Founder & CEO, Halo Medical Devices

SHELLEY LASLETT Co-Founder & CEO, Vitae.Coach

EMMA SHARLEY Co-Founder & CMO, ShopYou

MAGDA CORTEZ Senior Product Manager, Gumtree

WHERE: marie claire oices, 8 Central Avenue, Eveleigh Sydney DATE: May 25 and 26, 2018, 9am – 5pm TICKETS: $495 for the two days. $395 early bird special. To purchase tickets & for more information, visit marieclaire.com.au/events. (Only 60 places available so get in quick!)


YOUR PLAYBOOK FOR CAREER SUCCESS

EDITED BY ALLEY PASCOE

THE FUTURE I S NOW What will the workforce look like in 20 years? This month, we consulted our magic 8 ball – and industry experts – to predict how our jobs and oices will change in the future. Plus, there are tips on quitting your safe job to follow your passion, and must-have tech accessories for your desk.


@WORK

C R E AT I N G F L E X I B L E W O R K P L A C E S T H AT SUPPORT WOMEN

BRIGHT FUTURE Ahead of this month’s Global Summit of Women, we asked three female CEOs to share their hopes and advice for the future

40%

of the jobs we have today won’t exist in 20 years*

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By 2030 we will have drone tea trays that make tea and deliver it from the kitchen**

CEO and managing director of property group Mirvac Susan Lloyd-Hurwitz on her company’s people-friendly policies that promote diversity and create a happy, productive workforce. “The property industry has always been male-dominated, but this has provided a unique opportunity to drive change so that the unusual becomes the norm. Now, it’s normal for our employees to have flexible working; it’s a given that we have gender pay parity and that we have 50 per cent female board representation. It’s also accepted that new parents are ofered 20 weeks paid leave. We are very focused on flexible working and now over 75 per cent of all Mirvac employees have some form of flexibility in their working arrangements. We are also passionately committed to gender equity and have achieved that by implementing pay parity across our roles and creating support programs for people dealing with domestic violence. The key I have found is to persist until innovation becomes convention. And it’s my hope that gender equality becomes convention across all industries and all workplaces.”

Women will have to wait

217 years for the pay gap to close†


WORK BY NUMBERS

W H AT T O E X P E C T I N T H E N E A R A N D D I S TA N T F U T U R E In just two years, freelancers working the gig economy will make up 40 per cent of the workforce.^

Physical meetings will be a thing of the past, with virtual reality gettogethers replacing face-to-face chats.‡

Artificially intelligent oice assistants will schedule meetings, book travel and do your leastfavourite admin jobs.‡

Robots will replace half of Japan’s workforce, including taxi drivers, security guards and receptionists.ˆˆ

Self-driving cars will transport you from your home to your oice so you can work during your commute – joy.ˇ

2020

2025

2030

2035

2040

TOP JOBS IN 2030 According to the imaginative folk at Crimson Education

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES. *COMMITTEE FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF AUSTRALIA **PLUSNET †WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM ^UPWORK ‡THE TELEGRAPH ˆˆNOMURA RESEARCH INSTITUTE ˇJOHNSON CONTROLS

HOW TO BE A CHANGE MAKER

Instead of fearing change, instigate it, says president and CEO of Krug Champagne Margareth Henriquez, who brought the iconic French brand into the 21st century. “For many years, we’ve lived and worked in a changing world and the key is to change before you are forced to change. In my 40-year career, I’ve implemented strategies to manage companies in diicult circumstances. I’ve learnt that being a gamechanger is about making your own original decisions, not copying others. That’s why we launched Krug ID, an app that allows today’s tech-savvy wine drinkers to find out more about the bubbly they’re sipping. To be a change-maker, it is necessary to have courage and to move fast. It is about taking risks and assuming responsibility for the consequences. If they are good, give the benefit to the team; if they are bad, own your mistake. The most important thing is to be engaged with change and communicate well. This is the responsibility of a good leader – and a good game-changer.”

Trash Engineer

Memory Surgeon

Solve the Earth’s rubbish problem, one Diet Coke can at a time

Remove bad memories, mental illness and destructive behaviours

Earthquake Forecaster

Medical Mentor

Predict when and where earthquakes will hit

Make sure patients are following their robotdoctor’s orders

Organ Creator

Personal Productivity Person

Create body parts with stem cell technology that doesn’t exist yet

Teach people to avoid distractions: Facebook, Instagram and Netflix

HOW TO FUTUREP R O O F YO U R CAREER

Inés Juste is the CEO of Grupo Juste, a 95-year-old Spanish pharmaceuticals company. Here she shares her advice for working in an ever-changing world. Have perseverance. What matters is not how many times we fall, but the number of times we get up again. Surround yourself with the best possible talent – people who share your values. Keep your enthusiasm up, because passion is what sets you apart. Serve others, don’t feel better than anyone else and be ready to listen. Be genuine, do what you say you will do and always speak from the heart. Be positive, because what you think and how you approach it will condition the outcome. Have a sense of humour because everything is relative. Lastly, enjoy what you do. Simple.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Hear these women and other inspiring leaders speak at the Global Summit of Women from April 26 to 28 in Sydney: globewomen.org/globalsummit marieclaire.com.au

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@WORK

How to

óUIT

successfully

Your heart wants to leave your soulsucking cubicle, but your head fears for your wallet. Author Mike Lewis, who ditched his day job to follow his passion, explains how to make the leap

PHASE 1:

LISTEN TO THE LITTLE VOICE PHASE 2:

MAKE A PLAN

This is the nitty-gritty phase of the Jump Curve – when you decide to listen to that voice, and begin moving forward on what I call the 10,000 unsexy steps towards making the jump. It’s the ugly stuf – the saving, the budgeting, the sketching, the planning, the cofee chats, the googling, the early mornings and late nights. The planning can be done in a few key ways: through financial planning, safety-net sewing and pre-jump practice. In other words, saving money, building a safe foundation on which you can fall back and practising your jump. For me, this meant creating a savings account solely for my jump, a budget spreadsheet and a slideshow to use in pitching to potential PHASE 3: pro-squash sponsors. It also meant talking to colleagues LET YOURSELF BE LUCKY so they knew why I was preparing to chase this This is the hardest part, arguably, of the dream, as well as joining the pro-tour part time, Jump Curve: you’ve solved the “knowns”, you so I could see what the jump would have many “unknowns” remaining and now it’s time bring me before leaving. to jump. At some point you can’t continue to plan and save and budget. It’s time to say, “OK, I’ve done as much PHASE 4: work as I can, I have put myself in a position to find some DON’T LOOK BACK luck and now I am going to jump so that I can collide with that luck.” By following the first two phases of the Jump In the final phase of the Jump Curve, Curve, you are in a position to “collide” with the people, we’re reminded not to look back. If you’ve opportunities and experiences that will make your jump listened to the little voice, made a plan and let worthwhile. And it’s at this point when you jump to get yourself be lucky, you’ve put yourself in position there. For me, this was a tough crossroads, because for a worthwhile jump – regardless of the outcome. I’m an analytical Type A person who truly feared Hard as it may be, refrain from judging your jump the unknown. But I had planned one month as a success or a fail. By planning, preparing and well and somewhere after that I had jumping with real thought, you will end in a better to believe I would collide position than where you started, regardless of with luck. what the position may be. Never look back. When to Jump by Mike Lewis (Hachette Australia, $32.99) is out now.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES. EDITED BY ALLEY PASCOE.

When thinking about leaving your job, there will be a little voice in the back of your mind that won’t go away. This first phase of what I call the Jump Curve is all about listening. If you’re going to jump, the very first thing you need to do is sit still in silence and turn up the volume on this little voice. When I started thinking about leaving my job in finance to follow my dream of playing squash professionally, I took time out to walk, reflect and listen.


love being you

beautiful natural looks Cherish your uniqueness with luminous shades of nude, bronze and rose. Find the free how-to guide in store or online. www.natio.com.au


@WORK

theBUZZ

ND

ER WOM

A N

W

O

INS PI RAT I ON F RO M G AM E- C H AN G I N G WO M EN

Jade Hameister is the only Australian woman – and the youngest woman ever – to have trekked from the Antarctic coast to the South Pole unassisted.

TIRANA HASSAN Amnesty International’s global crisis response director H E R S TA RT

When Tirana Hassan sees injustice, she has to do something about it. This compulsion to right wrongs drove her to become a social worker in Adelaide and, eventually, the director of crisis response for Amnesty International, documenting human rights violations in war zones around the world. “I’ve been deployed to the most complicated crises imaginable in places like Sierra Leone, Iraq and the Philippines,” she says.

PR E AC H IT

“Success begins at that magical moment when you declare to yourself, your friends and the universe that you believe you can 4?C?=5D89>749K5B5>DS – Natalie Massenet, founder of Net-a-Porter

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WO M E N AT WO R K IN NUMBERS

Average weekly hours worked by women over the age of 15*

Korea

40.6 Spain

34.74 UK

31.88 Australia

31.08 Netherlands

24.83

HER CAREER

“It’s my job to investigate war crimes. We get the facts so we can ensure action is taken to stop the violations happening,” explains Hassan, who is passionate about holding perpetrators to account. In order for justice to be served, Hassan must ask victims to recount the trauma they’ve suffered. “It’s difficult to ask a woman about the rape that has just occurred. But each time, I’m taken aback by the power and courage of people.” HER DRIVE

Seeing the darkest side of humanity isn’t the most challenging part of her job, says Hassan. “The most difficult thing is trying to get the people in power to take the right action.” What keeps her fighting is knowing she’s making a difference. “These fights can take a long time, but they’re worth it – for the mothers whose sons and daughters were killed.”

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL; COURTESY OF JADE HAMEISTER. EDITED BY ALLEY PASCOE. *ORGANISATION FOR ECONOMIC CO-OPERATION AND DEVELOPMENT, 2017

M O T I VAT I O N On January 10, Jade Hameister became the youngest person to trek unassisted from the Antarctic Coast to the South Pole, after a gruelling 37-day expedition pulling a 100-kilogram sled in howling −50° winds. If that wasn’t enough, the 16-year-old explorer returned to the pole the next day to take a photo of herself holding a ham and cheese sandwich – a way to mock the male online trolls who told her she should stay in the kitchen. “Initially I just wanted to do it for a laugh,” she says of the photo she posted on her Instagram account. “I really didn’t think any of the men who wrote those messages would ever see my post. Instead, it was a message for the young women who follow me – I wanted to show them how to use bullies as motivation.”


MC LOVES

WATC H I T

Arrive on time – and in fashion – with the Skagen Anita watch ($279, at theiconic.com. au), featuring a marble dial and leather band.

CALL ME

Let your colleagues know how you really feel with this Dsquared2 phone case ($38, at yoox.com).

WRITE ALL ABOUT IT

Paper notepads are out; digital handwriting is in. The Montblanc Augmented Paper set ($873, at mrporter.com) transmits your notes to your mobile.

byteME T HE L AT EST, GREAT EST A ND SHI NI EST I N T ECH

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES; EDWARD URRUTIA. TEXT BY ALLEY PASCOE, JOY FLAMMANG AND ELIZABETH GREEN.

B O O M B OX

The Apple HomePod ($499) automatically analyses the acoustics in your home/oice/garden and adjusts the sound accordingly. Even better, it learns your taste in music and curates your ultimate playlist.

FINE PRINT

Print polaroid-like photos straight from your Instagram account with the Prynt Smartphone Printer ($295, at asos.com/au). Perfect for decorating your desk with happy snaps or blackmailing your co-workers with photos from the Christmas party.

3 OF THE BEST

MONEYSAVING APPS Struggling to save money? There’s an app for that.

ACORNS

MONEYBRILLIANT

CARROTT

$1.25 a month from the app store

Free from the app store

Free from the app store

This app is like a virtual coin jar. Amongst other things, it takes spare change from your everyday purchases and automatically invests it in shares and bonds to help you grow your wealth.

If you think $76 is a reasonable amount to spend on cheese a week, you need MoneyBrilliant. The app automatically creates a budget based on both your income and spending.

Stop feeling nauseous every time you think about your superannuation – the Carrott app rounds your purchases to the nearest dollar and pops the extra into your super fund.

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MARIE CLAIRE ADVERTISING FEATURE

HERE & NOW OUR PICK OF THIS MONTH’S MUST-HAVES

TRANSFORM DULL HAIR INTO LUSCIOUS LOCKS

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Getting gorgeous, envyinducing tresses starts from using the right products. Agave Smoothing Shampoo is gentle enough to use every day, helping to remove styling build-up, debris and dirt, while it also controls frizz. RRP $37.95 for 250ml. Call 1300 764 437 for stockist.

TART TREATS Ocean Spray® Craisins® Dried Cranberries are a vibrant, sweet and tart snack packed with cranberry antioxidants. They also add bright taste and colour to salads, yoghurt, muesli, and baked goods. Each 40g serving is one serve of fruit and a good source of fibre.

DOUBLE THE BENEFIT The PhysioLift Smoothing Plumping Serum is unique because it is designed for immediate results, but also acts beneath the surface for longlasting action on wrinkles. It’s both a quick fix and long-term investment in your skin. RRP $69.95. Visit avene.com.au


R E BE L H E A RT This month, fashion knows no boundaries: sportswear gets sophisticated (page 90), pants are power players (page 102) and the international designer collections break new ground (page 108). Plus, winter classics are splashed with high-voltage colour, perfect for the sartorial rule-breaker (page 126).

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVID BELLEMERE.

Balenciaga cardigan, top, pants and bag, all POA, balenciaga.com/au; Vans socks, $19.95, at generalpants. com.au; Stella McCartney shoes, $845, stellamccartney.com.


Bottega Veneta trench coat, $3310, and bodysuit, $2320, 02-9239 0188; No Ka’Oi leggings, approx $290, shopnokaoi.com; jewellery worn throughout, model’s own.


SPEED PHOTOGRAPHED BY DAVID BELLEMÃ&#x2C6;RE. STYLED BY ELISABETTA MASSARI.

Extreme sports and extreme style collide; fast fashion never looked so good


Christian Dior jumpsuit, $9200, 02-9229 4600; Vans socks (worn throughout), $20, at generalpants.com.au; Reebok sneakers, POA, reebok.com.au. Opposite page: CĂŠline trench jacket, $9600, and pants, $6700, 02-9232 7051; Stella McCartney sneakers (worn throughout), $845, stellamccartney.com/au.


Diego M jacket, POA, from a selection at yoox.com; Fenty Puma by Rihanna parka, POA, au.puma.com; Guess bralette, $69, guess.com.au. Opposite page: Gucci jacket, $6020, one-piece, $470, pants, $1355, and sunglasses, POA, gucci.com.


Louis Vuitton dress, $3400, au.louisvuitton.com; Valentino Garavani socks, $200, 03-9568 7559. Opposite page: Fendi dress, $4600, bra and briefs, both POA, fendi.com; Adidas socks, $17, at asos.com/au.


Valentino jacket, $2760, jacket (worn underneath), $5300, top, $2760, and leather shorts, $5380, 03-9568 7559; Sergio Tacchini socks, POA, shop.sergiotacchini.com/au. Opposite page: Emporio Armani jacket, $1100, top, $680, and pants, $740, armani.com/ au; Sergio Tacchini socks, POA; Todâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoes, $1195, 02-8203 0901; Maison Margiela bag, POA, at farfetch.com/au.


Hair by Benoit Moeyaert/The Wall Group. Make-up by Deanna Hagan/Bridge Artists. Casting by Oliver Ress and Romain Dermouche for Creartvt.


Peuterey jacket, POA, peuterey.com; Chanel dress, $3200, and backpack, $4240, 1300 242 635; Matteau Swim swimsuit, $300, matteau-swim.com; Vans socks, $19.95, at generalpants. com.au; Stella McCartney shoes, $845, stellamccartney.com. Opposite page: Sportmax jacket, $1755, and jumpsuit, POA, sportmax. com; Max Mara top, $790, maxmara. com; Elisabetta Franchi leggings, POA, at yoox.com; Mother socks, approx $31, motherdenim.com; Ruco Line shoes, approx $490, rucoline.com.


=@F?4J^2C65@C]EE65 E96D62D@?\D36DE?6H EC@FD6CD2C6DJ?@?J>@FD H:E9DEJ=62?5DEC6?8E9

SHE WEARS THE

PA N T S

P H O T O G R A P H E D B Y S I M O N U P T O N S T Y L E D B Y TA R A M O R R I S


Max Mara singlet, $380, maxmara.com; Emporio Armani pants, $920, and Giorgio Armani shoes, $960, armani.com; IRO belt, $259, 02-9362 1165; ASOS earrings, $12, asos.com.au; Louise Olsen bangle, $420 (small), $525 (large), dinosaurdesigns.com. au. Opposite page: Marina Rinaldi Sport singlet, $330, 02-9221 5544; Grey Jason Wu pants, $599, 02-8987 3400; Prada shoes, $1350, 02-9223 1688; Dinosaur Designs earrings, $160, dinosaurdesigns. com.au; Kerry Rocks cuf, $425, kerryrocks.com.au.


Anna Quan jacket, $890, annaquan.com; Isabel Marant pants, $555, at parlourx.com; Stuart Weitzman shoes, $820, at hermanns.com.au; Lele Sadoughi earrings, $195, at pierrewinterfinejewels.com; Chanel bag, $5500, 1300 242 635. Opposite page: Gary Bigeni top, $380, garybigeni.com; H&M pants, $60, hm.com/au; Julie Vos earrings, $189, at pierrewinterfinejewels.com.


Grey Jason Wu dress, $699, 02-8987 3400; Iris & Ink leather pants, $325, at theoutnet. com; Louise Olsen earrings, $360, dinosaurdesigns.com.au. Opposite page: By Malene Birger top, $780, at Christensen Copenhagen, 02-9328 9755; Dion Lee pants, $550, dionlee. com; Prada shoes, $1400, 02-9223 1688; Kerry Rocks earrings, $349, and bangle, $395, kerryrocks.com.au. Hair and make-up by Sarah Tammer/Vivienâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creative using LUMA. Model: Billie/IMG.


Ready

Wear

to

This season’s international collections speak to the joys of dressing up. Here’s to high fashion P H OTO G R A P H E D BY DAV I D R O E M E R STYLED BY J AY N E P I C K E R I N G


GIORGIO ARMANI Black and multicoloured knit and Swarovski crystal jacket, $11,000, pants, $7900, and black hat, $2300, armani.com.


GUCCI Jacket, $4790, skirt, $4230, and necklace, $2825, gucci.com.


MAX MARA

Max Mara navy blazer, $1900, camel top, $580, camel skirt, $1845, and camel shoes, $885, maxmara.com.


PR A DA Coat, $3270, top, $1290, shirt (worn underneath), $1290, pants, $1480, and belt, $1290, 02-9223 1688.


LOUIS VUITTON Jacket, POA, top, POA, and shorts, POA, louisvuitton.com.au.


CÃ&#x2030;LINE Jacket, $4700, skirt, $2900, shoes, $1350, and brooch, $940, 02-9232 7051.


CHRISTIAN DIOR Jacket, $6700, shirt, $1650, pants, $2150, and hat, $1050, 02-9229 4600.


S A LVAT O R E F E R R AG A MO Dress, $3390, ferragamo.com.


DOLCE & GABBANA Multicoloured shirt, POA, multicoloured leggings, POA, and shoes, POA, 03-9639 9785.


CHANEL Silver, white and pink dress, $9640, transparent and white boots, $1940, hood, $1050, gloves, $580, and bracelet, $2410, 1300 242 635.


MICHAEL KO R S Shirt, $1289, and sequinned silk-georgette pants, $9659, 02-9233 8332; Manolo Blahnik shoes $1130, at harrolds.com.au. Hair by Olivier Lebrun/The London Style Agency using Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;OrĂŠal Professionnel. Make-up by Clare Read/ Caren using Nars. Manicure by Robbie Tomkins/Premier using O.P.I. Model: Karo/ M+P Models.


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FASHION GREEN IS THE NEW BLACK

Waste not, want this. H&M continues its eco evolution with its seventh Conscious Exclusive capsule, which sees discarded fishnets and candlesticks upcycled into fetching fashion. Original “Super” and activist Christy Turlington Burns fronts the range. Visit hm.com/au.

P A R T Y S TA R T E R

In the Prohibition era, flapper girls would flaunt their clandestine cocktails by piling their fingers with rings. Today, the cocktail ring endures. Luxe up your life with this pink-gold and amethyst Cartier beauty (POA; au.cartier.com). If the real thing eludes you, visit the Cartier exhibition at the NGA in Canberra, on now.

FA S H I O N H O U S E

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHILIP LE MASURIER. COMPILED BY JANA POKORNY. TEXT BY KATHRYN MADDEN.

Not content with sartorial domination, Gucci delves into interiors. Think cushions, candles and crockery all imbued with Alessandro Michele’s eclecticism. Now available at Gucci stores in Australia.

BEACHCOMBER MC LOVES

I N T I M A T E D E TA I L S

Something special: each silk-satin piece by Australian lingerie label Desvalido is sewn by hand. These French knickers and ruled bra sum up subtle sensuality; available from porteavie.com.

Uniqlo and J.W. Anderson’s latest collaboration will whisk you away to the pebbled shores and salty seas of Brighton, England. Unisex basics, airy linens, relaxed denim and sailor stripes conjure the consummate holiday wardrobe for home. Visit uniqlo.com/au.

Silk bralette, $119.95, and silk knickers, $89.95

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DESIGNER DOSSIER

Italian powerhouse brand Max Mara launched in 1951 with the lofty goal of making “the ordinary extraordinary”.

the COAT S P OT L I G H T O N

Max Mara’s trademark coveralls are global icons, personifying both power dressing and discreet luxury in one modern wrap

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’50s Futurist illustrator Erberto Carboni was the artist behind Max Mara’s first advertising campaign in 1958.

’80s Model Steevie Van Der Veen fronting the label’s 1987-’88 ad campaign.

’60s This decade welcomed a fresh array of designers, who collaborated on new lines such as the Pop range. Sketches (above) are from the 1966’67 collection.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARIO SORRENTI FOR MAX MARA; COURTESY OF MAX MARA.

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’ve got this trope that I adore of a movie star arriving at the studio in the morning in a white car with a white coat wrapped at the waist with a belt, dark glasses and her hair swept back—of-duty movie-star glamour is what I want to give every woman when she puts on her Max Mara coat,’’ says the label’s creative director, Ian Griiths. As the man at the helm of the company that produces arguably the world’s most coveted coats, he has probably achieved his dream. Synonymous with understated elegance, the Max Mara cover-ups are considered iconic symbols of modern power dressing. Worn with devotion by fashion’s elite and celebrity A-listers alike, they have been celebrated in books, galleries and even their own travelling exhibition, Coats!, which has toured Moscow, Beijing, Tokyo, Berlin and, most recently, Seoul. It’s exactly what founder Achille Maramotti hoped for when he launched his label in 1951 in the northern Italian town of Reggio Emilia on the back of one design: the humble camel coat. This was coupled with his aspiring motto to “make the ordinary extraordinary”. Maramotti’s initial cover-ups were

created with “the doctor’s or lawyer’s wife” in mind, which – in retrospect – was visionary genius. The designer had rightly identified a burgeoning new audience for luxury apparel, and placed the label’s camel design at its centre. Today, some 200,000 Max Mara coats are sold every year and the brand is one of nine in the fashion house’s global empire, which includes Sportmax, Marina Rinaldi and Max & Co. Griiths says the coat of his dreams “is still to come’’, adding that embracing innovation has been the cornerstone of Max Mara’s outerwear evolution. Heavily influenced by the punk and New Wave artists he befriended in London in the ’80s, Griiths is adept at drawing inspiration from many sources. “This season we pay homage to the poet Charles Baudelaire,” he says. “He always wore a coat with a freeness of his own.”

2000 ’90s Supermodel Linda Evangelista wearing the Manuela coat from the A/W 1997-’98 collection.

’70s The Pop collection proved so popular it eventually morphed into Sportmax. This ad was part of the 1977-’78 campaign.

Designed by Anne-Marie Beretta in 1981, the classic 101801 double-breasted overcoat is the label’s perennial bestseller.


MARIE CLAIRE ADVERTISING FEATURE

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CLEAN FOOD FOR BEAUTIFUL SKIN FASHION FORWARD The distinctive AW18 collection captures the essence of the confident woman. Bold, glamorous and considered, the collection packs a punch, with silhouette-loving shapes, vivacious prints and sumptuous fabrics. Satin Fold Mini Dress RRP $525. Visit karenmillen.com.au

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HIGH STREET HIT LIST

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GO RUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA.

Colourful, tick. Cosy, tick. Cool, tick. This monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shopping special makes It Girl style accessible and afordable for all.


Gelato brights meet toasty layers - who knew colour could be a year-round proposition?

Ganni coat, $449, at shopbop. com; H&M shirt, $59.99, hm.com/ au; Bianca Spender pants, $425, biancaspender.com; Sambag shoes, $190, sambag.com.au; Valet earrings, $149, valetstudio.com.


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Red alert: go bold by layering similar tones in diferent textures.

1 Pretty Little Thing jumper, $55, prettylittlething.com.au; Glassons pants, $59.99, glassons.com; ASOS earrings, $24, asos.com.au. 2 Elka Collective shirt, $169, elkacollective.com; Ganni pants, $218.52, at shopbop.com; SurĹ? earring, $200, surostudio.com; Marimekko bag, $350, marimekko. com. 3 H&M top, $39.99, hm.com/au; Kowtow pants, $259, kowtowclothing.com; Topshop shoes, $119.95, topshop.com.


Dress up a track top with tailored trousers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;street sportâ&#x20AC;? personified.

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1 Saba blazer, $349, saba. com.au; H&M dress, $54.99, hm.com/au. 2 COS top, $175, cosstores.com/au; Max & Co trousers, $420, at theiconic.com.au. 3 ASOS dress, $60, asos.com.au; Pretty Little Thing beret, $12, prettylittlething.com.au.

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101 ideas Jac + Jack shirt, $220, jacandjack.com; Veronika Maine jumper, $99, veronikamaine.com.au; COS skirt, $135, cosstores.com/au.


101 ideas Veronika Maine trench, $499, veronikamaine.com.au; Bonds T-shirt, $24.95, bonds.com.au; ASOS pants, $70, asos.com.au; Sol Sana shoes, $209, sol-sana.com.au. Visit StyledBymarieclaire.com.au to shop more autumn essentials


Make tan your neutral go-to, the perfect foil for high-impact hues.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY BOWEN ARICÒ. STYLED BY TARA MORRIS. HAIR BY GRAEME CUMMING/ WORK USING OUAI. MAKE-UP BY CAT SMITH/UNION USING M.A.C. MODEL: SOPHIE/VIVIEN’S.

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1 MNG jumper, $130, at theiconic.com.au; Notes du Nord pants, $280, at Christensen Copenhagen, 02-9328 9755; Tony Bianco shoes, $169.95, tonybianco. com.au; Oscar de la Renta earrings, $500, at shopbop. com. 2 Marimekko top, $295, marimekko.com; Theron skirt, $370, theron.com.au; Kenneth Jay Lane earrings, $102, at shopbop.com. 3 ASOS jacket, $94, asos.com.au; COS jumper, $115, cosstores.com/au; Boohoo earrings, $10, au.boohoo.com.

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HIGH STREET HITS Fashion-forward without the price tag? Sign up here, whatever your style directive

The Fifth Label blazer, $129.95, at fashionbunker.com

URBAN GIRL Big-city life calls for relaxed denim and a wear-anywhere blazer

Zara dress, $119, 02-9376 7600

Wittner shoes, $169.95, wittner.com.au

H&M jeans, $89.99, hm.com/au

JAG jacket, $159.95, jag.com.au

STYLE TIP Achieve an instant update through an artful earring.

Viktoria & Woods tee, $110, viktoriaandwoods.com.au

Veronika Maine coat, $379, veronikamaine.com.au Adorne earrings, $29.95, adorne.com.au

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Witchery heels, $169.95, witchery.com.au

Rollaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overalls, $169.95, rollas. com.au; Keepsake the Label knit, $149.95, at fashionbunker.com


SHOPPING

STYLE TIP Add a dash of colour with a smart, structured trouser.

H&M knit, $59.99, hm.com/au

ASOS culottes, $76, asos.com.au Cue skirt, $275, cue.cc

Topshop overalls, $120, topshop.com; Boden blouse, $150, bodenclothing.com.au

Mimco shoes, $199, mimco.com.au

ASOS beret, $24, asos.com.au Sambag cami, $140, sambag.com.au

Mimco earrings, $149, mimco.com.au

LADYLIKE

Old-world essentials get a thoroughly modern rework

Viktoria & Woods blazer, $570, viktoriaandwoods. com.au

ASOS dress, $65, asos.com.au

Witchery boots, $249.95, witchery.com.au

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SHOPPING Gorman earrings, $69, gormanshop.com.au

Zara cami, $39.95, 02-9376 7600 H&M top, $14.99, hm.com/au MINKPINK blazer, $109.95, minkpinkworld.com

By Johnny dress, $300, byjohnny.com.au

Boohoo pants, $70, au.boohoo.com

Zara shoes, $89.95, 02-9376 7600

STYLE TIP An embellished satin shoe is a day-to-night delight.

GLAM SôUAD This is glitter for grown-ups – good times guaranteed

Uniqlo dress, $29.90, uniqlo.com/au/

Rubi boots, $49.95, cottonon. com/au/rubishoes/

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PHOTOGRAPHED BY PHILIP LE MASURIER; GETTY IMAGES. COMPLIED BY MONICA RUSSELL. TEXT BY KATHRYN MADDEN.

H&M blazer, $79.99, hm.com/au

Olga Berg, $79.95, olgaberg.com


CHECK LIST

PHOTOGRAPHED BY PHILIP LE MASURIER; GETTY IMAGES. COMPILED BY MONICA RUSSELL. TEXT BY KATHRYN MADDEN.

E\D9:AE@36DBF2C6@S462AAC@G65A=2:5:D@S4:2==J6G6CJH96C6

Witchery coat, $299.95, and trousers, $99.95, witchery.com. au; Uniqlo cashmere jumper, $129.90, uniqlo.com/au/; Country Road heels, $199, countryroad. com.au.

Zara blouse, $119, 02-9376 7600; ASOS trousers, $60, asos.com.au; Senso heels, $189, senso. com.au.

COS dress, $135, cosstores.com/au; The Fifth Label blouse, $89.95, at fashionbunker. com; Senso shoes, $259, senso.com.au; Zara bag, $59.95, 02-9376 7600.

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MICRO MINIS

GIVENCHY S/S 2018

Rising hemlines are the season’s rising star

The coolest catwalk trends have dropped in a high-street store near you. Run, don’t walk

ACNE STUDIOS S/S 2018

H&M skirt, $44.99, hm.com/au

RUNWAY to REAL WAY CAT-EYE SUNGLASSES Winged shades meld the retro with the right-now

ISABEL MARANT S/S 2018

MINKPINK skirt, $79.95, minkpinkworld.com

CHECKED COATS

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Glassons coat, $99, glassons.com

Glassons coat, $109.99, glassons.com

BAUM UND PFERDGARTEN S/S 2018

H&M coat, $189, hm.com/au

HERMÈS S/S 2018

%FC@3D6DD:@?H:E9C:E:D9C@J2=EJ92D@S4:2==J:?]=EC2E65E9672D9:@?K6:E86:DE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY PHILIP LE MASURIER. COMPILED BY MONICA RUSSELL. TEXT BY KATHRYN MADDEN.

ASOS skirt, $56, asos.com/au

ASOS sunglasses, $24, asos.com/au


SIMONE ROCHA S/S 2018

SHOPPING

HAIR SLIDES Get a grip on this: another ’90s-noughties relic is back

RED BOOTS If Dorothy were a modern girl, her magical ruby slippers would be a sturdy boot

MARNI S/S 2018

CALVIN KLEIN S/S 2018

GET THE LOOK

GIVENCHY S/S 2018

Colette by Colette Hayman hairpins, $12.99 for a set of 4, colettehayman. com.au

Dotti hat, $25.95, dotti.com.au Tony Bianco boots, $239.95, tonybianco.com.au

Jaggar boots, $289.95, at fashionbunker.com

BURBERRY S/S 2018

Beau Coops boots, $469, beaucoops.com

CHRISTIAN DIOR S/S 2018

Seed Heritage bag, $69.95, seedheritage.com

JEWELLED EARRINGS Billini shoes, $109.95, billini.com

Dial up the drama – this season the more dazzling and dangly the better

ASOS earrings, $30, asos.com/au

Peter Lang earrings, $365, peterlang.com.au

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WHY YOU’RE LOSING IT Think thinning hair is a man’s world? Think again. Trichologist Peter Elchaar says more than three-quarters of his patients are women. Here are some reasons for the fallout

STRESS: “When the body is under a lot of stress, it can trigger health issues, and the first thing to give up is the hair,” says Elchaar. “If you are going through stress and two or three hairs are falling out at once, something’s not right.” DIET: “If you don’t eat right and you don’t sleep right, you’re going to have issues,” says Elchaar. “A good diet with good fats and good proteins

creates a better foundation for your health.” HORMONES: “A change in hormone levels or [pregnancy] can have an efect on hair loss,” says Elchaar. “Oestrogen and testosterone give you strength in the follicle; the more testosterone you have, the more hair.” TOO-TIGHT STYLES: “If you are typically pulling your

hair back in a tight bun, your hairline can fatigue,” explains Elchaar. “This can be associated with hair loss around the hairline.” PULLING: It’s time to reset your belief that playing with your hair is an alluring trait. “When somebody twists at their own hair, they’re pulling that follicle quite hard,” says Elchaar. “It’s almost like weeding the garden.”

D I D YO U K N O W ?

*96H2J:?H9:49H6E9:?:D5:R6C6?E36EH66?>6?2?5H@>6?  “Men thin at the front and the crown,” says Myriam Welsh from Phyto. Y@CH@>6?:E\D>@C66G6?=J5:DEC:3FE652?5=6DDE2C86E65 Z 140

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FA K E I T

NEED VOLU M E NOW ? A powder or mousse will give hair instant body. Eleven Australia Dry Powder Volume Paste, $24.95; O&M Rootalicious Root Lift Mousse, $35.15.


BEAUTY


DO THIS:

DI Y H E A D M A S SAGE “Massaging your scalp daily for 10 minutes has an incredible efect on the hair. It will relieve tension and also increase the blood flow for thicker, healthier, longer hair.” – Dr Tim Moore


BEAUTY

BRUSH UP ON THE FACTS We asked an expert to separate myth from truth when it comes to some enduring hair tales

MYTH: 100 brushstrokes a day makes hair silky. It turns out that constant brushing isn’t strictly required. “Your hair is delicate and should only be brushed when necessary,” advises Dr Tim Moore, PhD in microelectronics from Cambridge University and chief technology oicer at ghd. “Over-brushing can damage your scalp and hair cuticles.” To brush safely, Dr Moore suggests investing in a paddle brush. “It’s the gentlest brush; the big, flat shape is smoothing and anti-static.” TRUE: Brushing wet hair is a no-no. Just out of the shower? Put

the brush down. “A brush may actually tear your waterweakened locks, causing instant breakage,” says Dr Moore. “Use a wide-spaced comb, and go slowly to minimise damage.” Try 2 ghd Paddle Brush, $34, and the 3 Lady Jayne Detangler Comb, $5.99. TRUE: Washing hair every day is damaging. This is because hair becomes weak when it’s wet. “Reducing your hair exposure to being very wet for long periods and towel-drying will reduce breakage,” says Dr Moore. “Washing also removes the natural oils, which are helpful in reducing frizz and protecting

your hair.” The one exception to this rule is “ultra-fine and oily hair types”, says Dr Moore, which may need daily washing. For all other hair types “washing every other day is usually best”. Try 1 Aquis Luxe Hair Turban, $44, to cut down on the drying damage. MYTH: Leaving hair loose overnight is best. “Definitely tie your hair up when you sleep,” advises Dr Moore. “Clumping the hair together means it is more resistant to breakage. It is a bit like a rope – one fibre in a rope is very weak, but bundle them together and you can pull a ship. It is exactly the same with hair.”

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THE HEAT IS ON Not many of us can manage our hair without some form of heat styling. Here’s how to prevent hair breakage

3 0 - DA Y C H A L L E N G E For serious densifying, try the reformulated Kérastase Densifique Femme Cures, $160, an at-home program designed to enhance hair density. Bolstered with glycans and vitamins B3, B5 and B6, this once-a-day treatment promotes growth and fullness by kickstarting follicular activity.

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USE PROTECTION: “Women often forget to use a heat protect spray when heat styling,” says Dr Moore. “Using heat protection means heat styling every day is not a problem.” Try 1 Goldwell Kerasilk Style Forming Shape Spray, $39.95; 2 shu uemura Art of Hair Blow Dry Beautifier, $58.

4

DON’T GO TO EXTREMES: “You don’t need extreme heat to get styled hair,” says Dr

Moore, who recommends heat styling with tools set to no hotter than 184°C. “A higher temperature risks irreversible damage.” Try 3 ghd gold styler, $280, which boasts dual-zone technology to ensure consistent and hair-safe temperatures; and 4 Dyson Supersonic Hair Dryer, $549, which measures air temperature 20 times every second to keep the heat under control. marieclaire.com.au

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BEAUTY

WORD FROM A STYLIST We asked celebrity stylist Kevin Murphy for his tips on keeping locks long and flowing

the hair shaft from the inside out.” Try 1 Kevin.Murphy Maxi. Wash Detox Shampoo, $38; 2 Eleven Australia Hydrate My Hair Moisture Shampoo, $23.95 and Conditioner, $24.95.

Have regular trims. It sounds counterproductive, but if you want long hair, you should book in for regular cuts. “Hair that is chunky on the ends always sits better and appears healthier,” says Murphy.

Regular treatments are important. To keep hair healthy between hairdresser visits, hydration is top priority. “You must always be replacing lost moisture and protein,” says Murphy, who recommends both a weekly mask and a leave-in treatment between washes. Try 3 David Mallett Mask No.2 Le Volume, $99; 4 Phyto 7 Hydrating Day Cream, $22.

Treat your hair like skin. “Create a skincare routine for your hair,” suggests Murphy. “Exfoliate your hair and scalp with a detoxifying shampoo to remove dead cells and dry skin. Next, cleanse with the right shampoo for your scalp [to add] nutrients and hydration, and always use conditioner, which is full of lipid proteins to rebuild

H A IR BY N U MBE R S

100 The number of hairs we lose in one day. “Everyone loses about 100 hairs a day at any one time,” says Elchaar.

100k-130k 2

3

4

3-7

THICKEN UP

The average number of years a single Caucasian hair will grow.

According to experts, there are two main causes of hair loss. “Hereditary, which mainly concerns men, and reactional, such as hormones and stress, which is usually related to women,” says Myriam Welsh, regional marketing director at Phyto, a haircare brand that specialises in thinning hair. Here are six treatments to help densify and strengthen:

6-10 The average number of years a Sri Lankan or Indian hair strand will grow for. It is the longest growing hair in the world.

3

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4

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6

1 Aveda Invati Advanced Scalp Revitalizer, $94. 2 Bumble and bumble Full Potential Hair Preserving Booster Spray, $88. 3 Pureology Fullfyl Densifying Spray, $44.95. 4 Michael Van Clarke ‘3 more inches’ Thickening Blow-dry Spray, $32. 5 Joico K-Pak Deep-Penetrating Reconstructor, $28.99. 6 Roots Intensive Spray, $24.95.

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The number of cycles one strand of hair goes through. Anagen phase is the growth phase. Catagen is the rest phase when hair has stopped growing. Telogen is when your hair is released and falls out.

45-75 The average length in centimetres that hair grows to.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDWARD URRUTIA; CARINA JAHN/BLAUBLUT-EDITION.COM/RAVEN & SNOW.

1

The average number of strands we have on our head.


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NAIL IT

Â

Master your mani this season with shade, shape and maintenance inspo from some of the leading nail pros in the business W O R D S A N D S T Y L I N G S A L LY H U N W I C K P H OTO G R A P H Y E DWA R D U R R U T I A


BEAUTY

SHADE INSPO Three diferent go-to nail shade options this season. Take your pick:

1 O.P.I Infinite Shine Gel Lacquer in Lisbon Wants Moor, $22.95 B L U S H

From pale and pretty to understated rose, blush-pink tones will get you through any occasion. “I like to personalise [blush pink] by layering it with other nude polishes to create the perfect nude for individual skin tone,” says Jocelyn Petroni, oicial nail expert for Chanel Australia. JEWEL TONES

Popping ruby manis packed a sophisticated punch on A/W18 runways such as Adam Selman and Zadig &

Chanel Le Vernis Longwear Nail Colour in Rouge Essentiel, $41

JINsoon Nail Polish in Nifty, $26

Voltaire. “I love a deep jewel-toned red that is rich in pigment and vibrantly glossy,” says Petroni. M E TA L L I C

Subtly sci-fi, the shimmering shades seen on runways such as Ashish A/W18 add plenty of cool edge to your mani. “My [favourite] colours at the moment are a dusty metallic silver and a metallic rose gold with a silver glitter topping,” says celebrity nail artist Jin Soon Choi. “They liven up all skin tones.”

Looking for your perfect autumn shade? Try a vampy red. “Classic deep reds are great for transitioning from brighter colours into darker winter shades,” says Bronfman. Rimmel London Super Gel in Fatal Fling (1), $9.95; Guerlain Vernis à Ongles Nail Enamel in Black Cherry Ink (2), $36

2

FILE IT Still asking for squovals? These new-season shapes will update your mani BEST COLOURS FOR

ADAM SELMAN A/W18

EUDON CHOI A/W18

SHORT AND BLUNT Try: Chanel Le Vernis Longwear Nail Colour in Prune Dramatique, $41; Givenchy Le Vernis in Noir Interdit, $49

“My favourite nail length is short!” says Petroni. “Short is always neat and sophisticated. You can wear any shade on this length nail, from bright vibrant reds to dark near-black colours.”

BADGLEY MISCHKA A/W18

SHORT NAILS

P O I N T E D O VA L

“I shape the nail straight on the sides then I [create] a curve at the tip with soft corners,” says Jin Soon. “My nail technicians call this the JINsoon shape. It works best on a medium-length nail.”

ALMOND-SHAPED

“I love to play around with long tips and short nails,” says Hannah Bronfman, New York-based DJ and O.P.I ambassador. “Right now I have a short almond shape. Oval nails are definitely elongating.”

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BEAUTY

THE PITFALLS Sufering from chips, peeling and flaking? Here’s why: N OT E N O U G H P R E P

“Always lightly buf the nails, followed with a swipe of polish remover to remove all traces of oil so that the polish can ‘anchor’ to the plate rather than peel away,” says Petroni. “This makes the polish more chip-resistant for longer-lasting results.” OVERZEALOUS CUTICLE CUTTING

“Women often over-cut their cuticles,” says Jin Soon. “If your cuticles are cut

all the way, your fingers [immediately] look clean, but it results in peeling cuticles, which can be painful and cause infections. Trim only the loose portion of the cuticle.” A L AC K O F TO P COAT

GET ARTY

Don’t rely on the top coat your manicurist gives you; invest in your own and reapply often. “I keep a top coat handy to prevent chipping,” says Bronfman. Try O.P.I Infinite Shine Gel Efects Gloss Top Coat, $22.95.

New to nail art? “Start with simple line designs with contrasting colours,” says Jin Soon. Try the manicurist’s famed V-shape nail art, which involves a base colour with two curtain-like strokes of another shade draping the tips.

“For longer-lasting polish, every night I wash my hands with a mild soap, dry and D85>1@@<I1D?@3?1DD?1<<V>75BC 4? this 15 minutes before bed and then apply cuticle oil just before going to sleep”

Try: Chanel Le Vernis Longwear Nail Colour Rose Néon, $41 each.

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THE NEW NUDES Nude is always in style. Here’s how to keep yours chic and current F R E N C H M A N I U P DAT E

Nude manis, like those at Tom Ford A/W18, are an enduring favourite among manicurists. “A colour that makes you feel good is better than following a trend,” says Bronfman. Update your look with a teeny bit of nail length and a rounded edge.

“The first nail art ever created was a French manicure,” says Jin Soon. “Master this and you’ll be able to do lots of nail art. Vary the shape of the French line – or try a reverse French manicure.” Take inspo from the nails at the Bibju Mohapatra A/W18 show, where models’ nails sported jaunty white swooshes. ARTFUL NUDE

“I’m having a real moment with nude nails that have a pop of colour in the nail art,” says Bronfman. Try a slick of vibrant blue along the tip, like the models at Palmer Harding A/W18. KEEP IT PERFECT

Sally Hansen Complete Salon Manicure in Rose Colored Glasses, $14.95; JINsoon Nail Polish in Doux, $26

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Pristine presentation is key to enviable nude. “My idea of the perfect manicure are nails that look like they’ve just come from a photoshoot,” says Petroni, who recommends “meticulous treament” to improve nail health long-term.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GO RUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA.

TOM FORD A/W18

A CLASSIC REVISITED


Cream


beauy


BEAUTY

%L35 1@@B?@B91D5 4?5C>UD81F5 D?252?B9>7 PC1I85<<? D?D85>5G 75>5B1D9?>?6 3893G55;41I C35>DC  From top: Chloé Nomade EDP 75ml, $180. Kate Spade New York Walk On Air EDP 100ml, $140. Estée Lauder Modern Muse EDP 100ml, $180.

COLOUR POP

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Songstress-turned-makeup-mogul Rihanna can do no wrong with her cosmetics range. These new matt lipsticks ofer amazing colour payof and an ultra-slim bullet for ultimate control. As with everything Fenty Beauty, you may have to get in line for these. Fenty Beauty Mattemoiselle Plush Matte Lipstick in S1ngle, $28

Spa Lucca, at newly renovated The Anchorage at Port Stephens in NSW, is an ideal way to get away from the humdrum of the city. Ofering waterfront decadence, highly skilled therapists and next-level equipment, this destination spa is a haven for stressed-out urbanites. Book the Body Polish, Wrap and Spa Jet Capsule Experience, $235, which blissfully scrubs, masks, massages and Vichy showers the bod back to Zen. Visit anchorageportstephens.com.au.

COL D Cold plasma isn’t regularly seen on skincare ingredients lists, but hear us out. This clever addition optimises the absorption of key nutrients to reduce puiness and brighten tired eyes.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDWARD URRUTIA. TEXT BY SALLY HUNWICK; JORDYN CHRISTENSEN.

M I N I S PA B R E A K

Perricone MD Cold Plasma+ Eye, $160

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BEAUTY

BLING IT Jimmy Choo devotees can pimp their fragrance with these pretty limited 549D9?>W?G5B@5>41>DC B55G9D8 1>I 9==I8??@5B6E=5 

N I G H T-T I M E DOUBLE UP

On their own they’re good, together they’re genius – especially at night. We’re talking about the vitamin C and Q10 in new Nivea Q10 Plus C Skin Sleep Cream. While antioxidant powerhouse vit C brightens the skin, Q10 protects against oxidative stress and ageing. The morning results? Skin that looks fresh and smooth. Nivea Q10 Plus C Skin Sleep Cream, $19.99

GLITTERBUG

Another mask we can’t get enough of? This starry gem. Aside from being the most Instagram-friendly face mask to come across the MC beauty desk in a while, this glittering detoxer boasts liquorice and marshmallow leaf to firm and define facial contours after just one sparkle sesh. Consider it your (discoworthy) facelift in a jar. GlamGlow Gravitymud Firming Treatment Glitter Mask, $101

F O R M U L AT I O N U P D AT E : If you love hydration yet don’t like even a bit of product left on your skin, these gel-cream formulations are game-changers. Tatcha The Water Cream, $99 Take your skin notes from the Japanese. This light-as-air hydrator boasts green tea, algae and a hint of 23-carat gold for a shine-free and refined complexion. La Mer The Moisturizing Cool Gel Cream, $242 This reformulation of the original cult product boasts La Mer’s signature sea kelp for ultimate calming and soothing benefits. Olay Eyes Deep Hydrating Eye Gel, $48.99 Infused with hyaluronic acid, this cooling gel is the hydration boost tired eyes need. PA I N T B OX P R E T T Y

Take eyes from chic oice-worthy day to sophisticated night with this precision-edited Chanel palette. Chanel Les 9 Ombres Afresco Limited Edition Palette, $128

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDWARD URRUTIA; TOM CRAIG. STYLED BY ROB ZANGARDI AND MARIEL HAENN. HAIR BY MARA ROSZAK. MAKE-UP BY KATE SYNNOTT. TEXT BY SALLY HUNWICK; JORDYN CHRISTENSEN.

GEL CREAMS


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GLOW GETTER S E E W H A T O U R T R U ST E D R E V I E W/cre w PA N E L H A D T O S A Y A B O U T T R I A L L I N G T H E L A N C Ô M E A D VA N C E D G É N I F I Q U E R A D I A N C E S K I N CA R E S E R U M A N D H Y D R O G E L M E LT I N G M A S K Our REVIEW/crew panel put the two latest innovations from Lancôme to the test, the ‘Little Black Bottle’ of Advanced Génifique Youth Activating Concentrate and the new Advanced Génifique Hydrogel Melting Mask.

“My skin felt noticeably more supple” MICHELA BEAUTYCREW.COM. AU REVIEWER

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SCIENCE AND NATURE Lancôme Advanced Génifique Youth Activating Concentrate harnesses the best of science and nature. The first step in any beauty routine, the serum is a powerhouse of probiotic fractions working together to help plump and moisturise skin, restoring radiance in just one week.

Advanced Génifique Youth Activating Concentrate, 30ml, RRP $99.

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Lancôme Advanced Génifique Hydrogel Melting Mask, RRP $29.

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T H E WAY T O C A L M S W I T C H YO U R C L E A N S E R

Swap your gel formula for a cleansing milk. If skin is particularly sensitive, ditch water completely and use a pH-balanced micellar water instead.

1 S K I N FAC TS Eight out of 10 people have sensitised their skin in the past year.

Try: Arcona Four O’Clock Flower Gentle Cleansing Cream, $64 (1); A’kin Cleansing Micellar Water, $14.95 (2)

+

One in three people have cancelled a social commitment because of their complexion.*

C H E M I C A L E X F O L I AT I O N

Opt for fewer weekly sessions (one or two is best) and switch to a chemical exfoliant. “Salicylic acid, lactic acid or digestive enzymes (derived from pineapple and papaya) are good on sensitive skin,” says Hobson.

HOW TO DEAL WITH

SENSITIVE SKIN

Try: Ocinium Ecdysis Bio-Ferment Enzyme Cleanse (3), $70 GENTLE MASKING

Ditch the clay mask for a “calming, hydrating mask for 10 minutes, twice a week”, says Hobson. Try: QV Face Purifying Mask (4), $13.95 SO OT H I N G S E R U M S

THE REASONS FOR SKIN SENSITIVIT Y If your skin is feeling out of sorts, you’re not alone. “Nearly half the global population describes their skin as sensitive or very sensitive,” says Emma Hobson, education manager for the International 5B=1<>CD9DED51>45B=1<?7931 È*85B51C?>C6?BD89CF1BI RD 31>254E5D?@?<<ED9?><965CDI<5CDB5CC8?B=?>1<WE3DE1D9?>C medical procedures and environmental factors like smoking, 1<3?8?<1>4@??B495DSC1IC?2C?> *1;51<??;1DI?EBC;9>31B5 routine, too. “Ingredients such as alcohol, lanolin, fragrance and 1BD9V391<3?<?EBC31><514D?C5>C9D9C54C;9>SC1IC?2C?> 85BBI @93;9>76B?==E<D9@<52B1>4C*89C31>1<C?31EC51C;9>E@C5D 

Try: Dr. Barbara Sturm Hyaluronic Serum (5), $423 B A R R I E R R E PA I R

Step away from multi-tasking moisturisers and opt for a water-gel formulation designed to treat an impaired barrier. “They also control and protect skin [from moisture loss],” says Hobson. Try: Dermalogica Calm Water Gel (6), $73 C H O O S E S P F W I S E LY

SKIN CHECK

A physical sunscreen can be less irritating on upset skin. “Some skin only tolerates physical sunscreens, which use titanium dioxide and zinc oxide,” says Hobson. Chemical formulas, meanwhile, are “lightweight” and great for skin that can’t handle heaviness.

Sensitive skin can look and feel diferent from person to person, but the common trait is a compromised lipid barrier. “Some experience mild, occasional flare-ups while others deal with constant redness and [uncomfortable skin],” says Hobson. Here are the red flags: TIGHTNESS AND DISCOMFORT “This indicates dehydration, which can lead to skin reactions from products.”

REDNESS AND B LOTC H I N E S S “This signals overreactive capillaries or a tendency towards rosacea.”

FLAKING AND CRACKING “Indicates dehydrated skin and impaired barrier function.”

BLUSHING, ITCHING AND BURNING “Also a sign of overreactive capillaries.”

Try: La Roche-Posay 50+ Anti-Shine Gel-Cream (7), $28.95

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDWARD URRUTIA; GO RUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA. TEXT BY SALLY HUNWICK. *RESEARCH CONDUCTED BY THE INTERNATIONAL DERMAL INSTITUTE AND DERMALOGICA

Trade your active serum for one with anti-inflammatory and hydrating properties to rebuild the skin barrier. “When used on a regular basis they make skin less reactive,” says Hobson.


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDWARD URRUTIA. TEXT AND STYLING BY SALLY HUNWICK.

3

4 1 Aerin Tuberose Le Jour EDP 50ml, $295. 2 By Terry Baume de Rose Body Scrub, $104. 3 Chanel Rouge Coco Gloss in 804, $50. 4 Jo Malone Red Roses Bath Oil, $35. 5 African Botanics Rose Treatment Essence, $234. 6 YSL Beauté Tatouage Couture Liquid Matte Lip Stain in 03 Rose Ink, $57. 7 Sally Hansen Complete Salon Manicure in 721 Rose Colored Glasses, $14.95.

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soothing by nature

Hydrance Long-lasting hydration for sensitive skin Hydrance provides immediate, intense and long-lasting hydration for all types of dehydrated sensitive skin. Hydrance re-establishes water balance thanks to a combination of ingredients which promote diffusion of the Avène Thermal Spring Water into the skin and prevent its evaporation. Optimum skin comfort is restored.

Eau Thermale Avène is available at leading pharmacies nationwide; visit avene.com.au to find your nearest store.

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BEAUTY

Lumity Facial Oil, $85. Chanel Rouge Allure Velvet Luminous Matte Lip Colour in La Fascinante, $53. La Mer Crème De La Mer Moisturizing Cream, $242.

BEAUTY RULES

HELENA CHRISTENSEN Marc Jacobs Beauty Highliner Gel Eye Crayon Eyeliner in Blacquer, $36.

Nars Blush in Orgasm, $44.

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My daily skincare routine is super simple. I’m into natural beauty and glowing skin. I always make sure I cleanse, tone and moisturise to keep my skin more luminous and hydrated. If I could only have five make-up products in my make-up bag, I would have La Prairie Cellular Radiance Perfecting Fluide Pure Gold, a blush, Chanel’s La Fascinante lipstick, a Marc Jacobs Gel Eye Crayon and some Vaseline for gloss on my lids. My number one beauty tip is to make friends with the lighting guy as soon as you can! I also ensure I drink lots of water and keep active. I love having facials. When I’m in NY I go to [celebrity facialist] Joanna Vargas, who uses a special technique to stimulate your collagen. I also take Lumity supplements [not available in Australia] every morning and night. Nourishing your body on the inside will always show on the outside.

I love really natural and authentic scents. [Recently] I have been wearing Dead of Night, which is a perfume oil I collaborated on with my friend Elizabeth Gaynes. It’s diferent from anything I have ever smelt before! For red carpet events, I have a really great team of friends and talented people in my life to scrub me up. My long-haul travel beauty tip is moisturise your skin on the plane and always drinks lots of water to keep your skin and body hydrated. When it comes to my hair, I use [celebrity hairstylist] Harry Josh for my colour when I’m in NY. He always gives my hair such an amazing honey tone. In Denmark, I’ll visit my niece Sarah-Sofie Sonne and Marianne Jensen for a haircut. They both do the perfect imperfect choppy style. When I want to detox, facials and body massages are a great way for me to unwind.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY EDWARD URRUTIA; GETTY IMAGES. COMPILED BY SALLY HUNWICK.

La Prairie Cellular Radiance Perfecting Fluide Pure Gold, $685.

The legendary model shares her favourite New York and Denmark beauty haunts, her love of good lighting and the importance of inner beauty


Happy hormones How to keep yourself balanced the natural way

R E D U C E YO U R S T R E S S

Stress can impact nearly every area of health, including our hormones. Balance chronic stress and an overactive sympathetic nervous system by learning to say no, and stop overcommitting yourself. Other measures to take include short mindfulness sessions before bed; making time for regular walking; minimising cafeine, sugar and alcohol intake; and ensuring you’re eating a nutrient-dense diet. Liquorice tea is great for supporting adrenal gland heath; aim for two cups most days. T R Y A W A T E R F I LT E R

It’s important to drink water that is as fresh and pure as possible. A filter can ensure it contains no unwanted nasties from ageing household pipes, as well as biological contaminants such as parasites. Filtered water also tastes better. E AT O R G A N I C F O O D

Look for an organic delivery service or your local farmers’ market. This will

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reduce your exposure to the hormonedisrupting chemicals that can be sprayed on fruits and vegetables. Aim to eat organically produced meat, poultry, dairy foods and butter from animals that are preferably not treated with steroids and antibiotics. W A S H YO U R F R U I T & V E G I E S

Wash and peel your produce to remove any external chemical, organic and wax residues. A fruit and vegetable wash can be found at most health-food stores – a simple rinse under cold water often isn’t enough to remove fat-soluble residues. You can also wash fruit and vegies in a solution of three parts water to one part apple cider vinegar.

to exercise early in the day so as not to disrupt your sleep. S U P P O R T YO U R L I V E R

Eat foods that help the liver remove waste and detox, such as asparagus, spinach, watermelon, pears, pumpkin, potatoes, broccoli, cauliflower and other cruciferous vegetables. Increase your intake of garlic, shallots, onions and chives, as they stimulate glutathione production and help to protect the liver. AVO I D C A N S & P L A S T I C S

Many plastics and the linings of cans contain BPA, a chemical that has been identified as an endocrine disruptor. Consume hot drinks in a ceramic mug and avoid takeaway cofee cups, which have a plastic lid and a plastic lining. Instead of using plastic wrap, purchase BioBags from health stores, and use glass cookware in microwave cooking. GET ENOUGH SLEEP

Adequate rest is essential for happy hormones. Encourage a good sleep routine by going to bed and waking up at the same time each day. Make your bedroom as dark as possible and reduce clutter and electronic devices beside your bed (avoid digital distractions for at least half an hour before bedtime). Drink a cup of chamomile or valerian tea in the evening and, before sleeping, take 10 deep, slow breaths with your eyes closed to relax after the day.

E X E R C I S E R E G U L A R LY

Sweating eliminates all kinds of chemicals that would otherwise exit the body through your bladder and bowel. Exercise also helps calm the mind and gives you a good happy hormone buzz, which is beneficial to your overall health. Aim

This is an edited extract from Healthy Hormones by Belinda Kirkpatrick and Ainsley Johnstone (Murdoch Books, $35).

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FLORIAN SOMMET/TRUNK ARCHIVE/WWW.SNAPPERMEDIA.COM.

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ur hormones afect us more than you may realise. They give us energy, keep us happy, help us sleep, control our hunger, regulate periods, ensure ovulation, control menstrual symptoms and, of course, contribute to conception and pregnancy. Amazingly, there are more than 100 hormones working hard this very minute to keep us feeling healthy, and when the balance of just one hormone is disrupted, it can afect all the others. This can result in irritability, depression, anxiety, painful or irregular periods, weight gain, acne, fatigue, insomnia, hair thinning, digestion issues and fertility problems. And while you should always consult a health expert if you suspect you might have a hormone imbalance, there are some simple lifestyle changes you can make to help keep your hormones happy and healthy.


WELLNESS

USE MILDER CLEANING PRODUCTS Look for cleaning products that are 100 per cent natural and organic. Alternatively, make your own products using white vinegar and bicarb – you’ll be amazed how well they work and how much money they save you.

FILL YOUR HOME WITH PLANTS Some common household plants can actually help clear the air. For example, the peace lily (Spathiphyllum spp.) is a low-maintenance indoor plant that helps to reduce mould and clears chemicals from the air. The bamboo palm (Chamaedorea seifrizii) is also great at improving air quality.


WELLNESS

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SO WHY THE HYPE?

Well, boxing is all about intensity. Boxing fitness classes have you moving fast, using a variety of muscles so you’re working your whole body and keeping your mind active. Boxing movements improve your coordination and cardio fitness, but, most importantly, they’re a great stress reliever as well.

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And don’t worry about broken noses and cauliflower ears – you don’t have to throw punches in the ring to reap the benefits. Boxing for fitness puts the focus on the boxing moves instead. You’ll still be wearing gloves, but instead of using someone’s face as a target, you’ll use punching bags and training pads. This means you get the fitness benefits without the physical contact.

B O X I N G W I T H R E S I S TA N C E

If a solo sweat session is more your style, you can get fighting fit at home with a few simple moves. As with any workout, start by warming up. Most boxing routines start with skipping to loosen up the whole body, but jumping jacks work just as well if you don’t have a skipping rope. Once you’ve warmed up, grab some gloves and air-punch it out. If you haven’t got a pair yet, use some light free weights or, for less impact, try the latest boxing twist – a resistance band. “Boxing with resistance bands is the perfect mix of cardio and low-impact strength training, and the ultimate full-body workout,” says Renee Scott, owner of Sydney’s Balance Moves. “The resistance band works both ways so you can work on your strength and control while sculpting long, lean muscles.”

READY TO RUMBLE With boxing classes popping up across the country faster than you can swing a left hook, it’s clear that boxing is taking over the 2018 fitness scene. Finding a class shouldn’t be too hard as most gyms are now ofering sessions; however, if you’re new to boxing, start with a class that’s suitable for beginners to help you learn the right stance and technique to avoid injuries. Once you’ve got that down, you can progress to more challenging classes and incorporate kicks and even sparring (if that’s your thing).

PHOTOGRAPHY BY ATAKAN-ERKUT UZUN/STOCKSY.COM. TEXT BY FIONA O’CALLAGHAN.

I

f you don’t know your jab from your uppercut, you’re missing out on some of the powerful fitness results that boxing can achieve. In fact, some of the fittest models on the planet credit the activity with helping them stay toned, strong and runway ready. Gisele Bündchen regularly shares her boxing skills on Instagram, while Gigi Hadid is known to pull on gloves at New York’s exclusive Gotham Gym. Even model and mother of two Adriana Lima attributes boxing to keeping her career well and truly alive.


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WELLNESS

YO U ’ R E R E A L LY STRESSED OR ANXIOUS

When your body is already working overtime dealing with the effects of stress and anxiety, the last thing it needs is to be put under pressure with high-intensity exercise. “Stretching when you’re stressed will not only force you to take a moment to step away from the situation and calm your mind and breath, but it will also improve circulation, providing more oxygen to the brain to help you think clearer and focus better,” says Burdon.

Focus on: Slow movements, diaphragm stretches and breathing exercises. YO U ’ V E W O R K E D O U T E V E R Y D AY T H I S W E E K

THE ART OF

stretching When a workout just won’t cut it

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Focus on: The muscles you use the most in your current workouts.

YO U ’ V E B E E N AT A D E S K A L L D AY

Sitting for long periods has been proven to have serious long-term health effects, not to mention the postural problems and muscle stiffness it can cause. So, if you’ve had a long day, skip boot camp and settle in for some stretching, advises Burdon. “Stretching after a day [of ] sitting down will promote blood flow to the muscles, reducing soreness and tightness from the lack of movement throughout the day, and prevent chronic muscle tightness.”

Instead of jumping straight back into exercise after a break, start to prepare your muscles with stretching. “When muscles have been stagnant for quite some time, they can become tight and stiff,” explains Burdon. “Stretching will help loosen them by improving blood flow, leading to better movement and reducing your risk of injury like muscle strains or sprained ligaments.”

Focus on: Stretching your back, neck and shoulders.

Focus on: Stretches that work your flexibility, balance and coordination.

YO U H AV E N ’ T E X E R C I S E D IN A WHILE

STRETCH ME! CLASSES

Stretch Studio (stretchstudios.com.au) in Sydney and Melbourne ofers stretching sessions with trained flexologists.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY CLIQUE IMAGES/STOCKSY.COM. TEXT BY LUCY E COUSINS.

Y

ou know the old saying, a stretch is as good as a holiday … Well, at least that’s how the saying should go, because studies have shown that stretching can help with everything from stress relief and anxiety to flexibility and back pain. According to Victoria Burdon, personal trainer for workout and stretching app Zova (zova.com), there are times when a stretch might be the best form of exercise for tired muscles. “Although you might feel like a run or a gym session, sometimes what your body really needs is some dynamic stretching [where your body is moving during the stretch],” explains Burdon. “When our muscles get tight, our range of motion is limited and this can lead to bad posture, soreness, reduced strength and chronic pain, especially in the lower back.” Here are four situations where you should choose a stretching session over your usual workout:

Recovery is an important part of any exercise regime – even the world’s top athletes don’t go hard every day. According to Burdon, stretching is a “great active recovery technique to repair damage from the previous day’s training and help maintain a full range of motion, so you can continue to build strength.” That being said, she stresses that stretching should be done on a daily basis, not just as active recovery when your body needs a break.


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PHOTOGRAPHY BY WARREN HEATH.

FA M I L Y T I E S Spending quality time with your family is one of the great joys in life; whether it’s lounging around at a serene holiday house (pictured here) or enjoying a Friday night feast with platters of food spread out across your kitchen table (recipes on page 178) – everyone is welcome.


feast ON THIS

Jewish food is going peak millennial with Amanda Rubenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reboot of Friday night dinner 178

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Confit ocean trout with pickled cucumber and minted labne.-


FOOD

DECONSTRUCTED BABA GANOUSH SERVES 6–8

7 eggplants 3 tbsps olive oil 1 garlic clove, finely grated 1 lemon, juiced 245g cooked chickpeas 1 tsp sweet paprika 270g tahini dip (see below) 2 tbsps chopped flat-leaf parsley, to garnish (optional) TA H I N I D I P

1 cup tahini 1 tsp sea salt 1 garlic clove, finely grated 1 2 cup iced water 1 2 lemon, juiced

1 To make the tahini dip, combine the tahini, salt and garlic in a bowl. Whisk in the iced water and lemon juice until smooth. Set aside or store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 1 week. 2 Place the eggplants directly over a cooktop flame and chargrill until completely black on the outside and soft in the middle. Remove from the heat and leave to cool. Use a small sharp knife to make slits lengthways down the middle of 3 eggplants and

gently pry them open. Remove the skin from the remaining eggplants and put the flesh in a bowl. Drizzle 2 tablespoons of oil over the eggplant flesh. Add the garlic and lemon juice and mix well. Place the 3 open eggplants on a serving plate and top with the eggplant flesh. 3 Heat a frypan over a high heat and add the remaining oil. Fry the chickpeas and paprika in the oil for 2 minutes or until crispy. 4 Top eggplants with chickpeas, tahini and parsley, if using.

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CONFIT OCEAN TROUT WITH PICKLED CUCUMBER AND MINTED LABNE SERVES 6–8

315g rock salt 1kg skinless ocean trout 1 fennel bulb, sliced 1 lemon, sliced 1.5 litres olive oil SALAD

CHARGRILLED CORN, KALE AND QUINOA WITH SRIRACHA S E RV E S 8 –1 0

200g red quinoa 200g white quinoa 1 tsp salt 4 corn cobs 200g kale, stalks removed, shredded 200g roasted pepitas (pumpkin seeds), plus 1 tbsp to garnish 2 limes, juiced 75ml olive oil 1 2 bunch coriander (cilantro) leaves, chopped seeds of 12 pomegranate (optional)

1 fennel bulb, sliced on a mandolin 6 radishes, sliced on a mandolin 1 2 lemon, juiced 2 oranges, peeled and segmented 2 pink grapefruits, peeled and segmented 60g dill PICKLED CUCUMBERS

2 tbsps salt 2 tbsps caster sugar 250ml white vinegar 3 Lebanese cucumbers, sliced on a mandolin MINTED LABNE

HOMEMADE SRIRACHA SAUCE

250g fresh red chilli 400ml white vinegar 400g light brown sugar

80g mint 250g labne or sheep’s milk yoghurt 1 tsp salt VINAIGRETTE

1 Rinse the red and white quinoa in a fine-meshed sieve. Pour 1 litre of water into a saucepan and add the quinoa and salt. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to medium and simmer for 12–15 minutes, or until the quinoa has absorbed all the water and is tender and flufy. 2 Chargrill the corn cobs on a barbecue chargrill plate or in a chargrill pan for 2–3 minutes on each side, or until the corn is starting to blacken in places. Remove from the heat, then cut the kernels from the cobs. 3 To make the sriracha sauce, remove the stem and seeds from the chillies, then place in a saucepan with 800ml of water, the vinegar and the sugar. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer for about 1½ hours, stirring regularly. Remove from the heat and use a food processor or a handheld blender to blend the mixture to a smooth consistency, similar to tomato sauce. 4 To assemble the salad, combine the quinoa, chargrilled corn, kale, pepitas, lime juice and oil in a large serving bowl. Spoon through 1½ tablespoons of the sriracha sauce, adding more if you like it spicy. Season with sea salt, then sprinkle over the extra pepitas, coriander and pomegranate seeds, if using.

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60ml olive oil 60ml white wine vinegar 1 tsp fennel seeds, freshly ground 1 Prepare a brining solution by combining the salt with 1 litre of water in a saucepan. Bring to the boil to dissolve the salt, then set aside to cool completely. Immerse the trout in the cold

brine for 12 minutes. 2 To make the confit, place the fennel and lemon slices in a large roasting tray big enough to hold the fish. Cover with the oil and place over a very low heat. When the oil reaches 50°C when tested with a sugar thermometer, immerse the fish in the oil, remove from the heat and leave for 10–12 minutes to confit. 3 Prepare the salad by placing the fennel and radish slices in a bowl and cover with water and the lemon juice. 4 To make the pickled cucumbers, set a saucepan over low heat and add the salt, sugar and vinegar, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Place the cucumber slices in a bowl and pour over the warm pickling liquid. Allow to stand for 15 minutes, then drain. 5 To prepare the minted labne, combine the mint and 60ml (¼ cup) of water in a high-speed blender and blend until smooth. Put the labne in a bowl and mix in the mint paste and salt until combined. 6 To make the vinaigrette, whisk together all the ingredients in a small bowl and season to taste. 7 When you are ready to serve, drain the fennel and radish. Build the salad by layering up the citrus segments, fennel, radish and dill, then drizzle over the vinaigrette. Remove the fish from the oil and drain on some paper towel before placing on a serving platter. Top with the salad and serve with the minted labne and pickled cucumbers.

This is an edited extract from Feasting by Amanda Ruben (Hardie Grant Books, $49.99), available in stores nationally.


FOOD

N OT E To make the almond milk, drain and rinse the almonds. Combine them with the vanilla, date and 750ml water in a blender. Blitz until smooth, then strain through a nut milk bag or fine-meshed sieve lined with muslin. Nut milk will keep for 4–5 days, refrigerated in an airtight container.

MARBLE CAKE S E RV E S 1 0 –1 2

olive oil spray, for greasing 450g plain flour, plus extra for dusting 60g Dutch (unsweetened) cocoa powder 500g caster sugar 2 tsp baking powder 250ml extra virgin olive oil 1 tsp natural vanilla extract 5 cold eggs fresh raspberries, to serve HOMEMADE ALMOND MILK

155g almonds, soaked overnight in cold water dash of natural vanilla extract 1 medjool date, stone removed

1 Preheat oven to 175°C. Grease a 23 × 13 × 7cm loaf tin with the oil spray and dust with flour. In a large bowl, whisk together the cocoa powder, 100g of the sugar and 80ml water until well blended. Set aside. In another bowl, combine the flour and baking powder. 2 In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the remaining sugar, the oil and vanilla until well-combined. Add the eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition. Continue beating for another 3–5 minutes, until the mixture is thick and pale. Stop the mixer and add one third of the flour mixture. Beat on low speed until just blended. Stop the mixer again and add 125ml of the almond milk (see note). Beat until just blended. Repeat with another 1⁄3 of the flour, another 125ml of the almond milk, and then the remaining flour, beating the mixture after each addition. 3 Add 3 cups of the batter to the cocoa mixture and mix well. Pour 1⁄3 of the plain batter into the prepared tin and top with 1⁄3 of the chocolate batter. Continue adding the batter in layers until both mixtures are used. 4 Bake for 1 hour, or until a skewer inserted in the middle of the cake comes out clean. Leave the cake to cool in the tin, then turn it out onto a platter. Serve with fresh raspberries.


SHACK

CHIC A surf-obsessed family have created their perfect breakaway in the form of a beach house known as “The Ark”, in South Africa’s Plettenberg Bay P H OTO G R A P H E D B Y WA R R E N H E AT H S T Y L I N G B Y S V E N A L B E R D I N G

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LIFESTYLE

Reclaimed-wood cabinets in the living area belie the retractable television concealed within. The rugged texture sits comfortably with the timeworn leather chairs and overdyed kilim rug, while the more tailored white couch delivers freshness into the mix. Opposite page: Jan Beamish heads out to the lagoon in front of her house most afternoons.


LIFESTYLE

I

n the beginning, all South African Mike Beamish wanted was a space for his surfboards. His wife Jan simply dreamt of a shack made of shipping containers. The priority for their holiday house in South Africa’s Plettenberg Bay was directed outside, where the family spends their afternoons stand-up paddleboarding in the Keurbooms River Lagoon, taking their boat to pump for prawns, surfing and fishing. With time, the promise of so much outdoor bliss spilled over to the house itself, and the plan for the interior evolved to include a teenage-friendly den, a guest suite and an open-plan expanse dedicated to dining and relaxing. The couple turned to architect Tessa van Schaik of The Planet Thing to combine their ideas into a workable concept. “Tessa took my initial sketch and made it real with her practicality and attention to detail,” says Jan. Along with architect Luke Brown, Tessa chose to create a concrete structure but incorporated lots of reclaimed timber out of respect for the environment. “I love using wood, but I’m horrified by what the building industry is doing to our forests,” she says. “Besides, recycled wood brings in life, patina and has lots of personality to it.” A stash of beautiful Oregon pine was sourced at a nearby demolition site, and Jan and Mike also chose a combination of South African pine for the floors and iroko for the balconies. “I love the mixture of wooden textures and colours,” says Jan. Tessa also used slatted timber elements on the outer facades of the house – in part to meet the brief of a “surfer shack” but also to infuse the south-facing property with as much light as possible. “The slatted wood adds a casualness to the design of an otherwise sophisticated little house. It also brings in a lovely play with light,” says Tessa. “The Ark”, as it’s been dubbed, is a welcoming retreat after a day on the water. And even though the den – complete with bunks and a ping-pong table – is a beacon for friends of the couple’s children, Nick (20), Chris (17) and Ali (15), the big dining table in the main cooking and living area is the heart of the home. “We wanted meals to draw everyone to one place,” says Jan. Of course, the “easy, fast, fresh” meals she and Mike cook up in the concrete and timber kitchen have a gravitational force of their own. First thing in the morning, Jan and Mike get their surf report from the viewing platform up the ladder above the bathroom. At night, the guestroom and Jan and Mike’s bedroom, which both face the lagoon, share the best view of the village lights on the water’s surface, says Jan. “It’s really magical.” Mike’s original request for a spot for his surfboard was met with a ground-floor haven of storage, featuring an outdoor shower for boards and sandcovered feet. It’s these thoughtful touches that make life in the house so free and easy. “It’s exceeded our expectations,” says Jan of her sophisticated surf hut.

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Stackable glass doors link the living area to the balcony. Below left: Honed granite benchtops, a black stone wall and timber elements set a low-key tone in the ensuite. Below right: Family holidays are filled with water sports.


TEXT BY LORI COHEN/BUREAUX.CO.ZA.

Clockwise from above: The slatted timber balcony “delivers privacy without blocking views”, says Jan; inside, in the main bedroom, a timber bedhead conceals the wardrobe behind it; bunk beds in the den are just as clever, featuring charging stations and lights (“little things you have to think of for teenagers!” laughs Jan); in the kitchen, concrete and wood embody simple, sustainable design.


LIFESTYLE

ON THE TA B L E

We still love bare timber, but tablecloths are back in style. True to form, Country Road does it with subtlety. Esta tablecloth, $129, countryroad.com.au.

BOUQUET LIST This scented water is the ultimate triple threat – an eau de toilette, room spray and linen spray in one. Minimalists will adore it.

edit

D E S T I N AT I O N S H O P P I N G Fjord + Co in Armadale, Victoria, is dishing out retail therapy in spades with its refined approach to homewares. Divine rugs, textiles, ceramics and more are sourced from around the globe and artfully brought together in a high-street haven. Check out fjordandco.com.au.

Savour the last days of summer with one of these Nathan + Jac Savannah beanbags – perfect inside or out. $320, nathanjac.com.au.

STONY BEAUTY The new stoneware range from H&M Home is just right for entertaining. Stone carafe, $30, hm.com/au.

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY ARMELLE HABIB. STYLING BY JULIA GREEN AND SARAH HUCKETT FOR GREENHOUSE INTERIORS. TEXT BY ANNA MCCOOE.

the

Maison Balzac Le Soleil Scented Water 100ml, $69, maisonbalzac.com.

G A R D E N PA R T Y Autumn may be approaching, but artist Kimmy Hogan’s world is eternally in bloom. The artist and graphic designer has taken the nanna out of florals with her digitised prints. We’ll take the bunch. Visit greenhouseinteriors.com.au.


on the road G O T H E D I S TA N C E W I T H O U R CO O L- G I R L C A R G U I D E

my PERFECT PLAYLIST Caitlin Bassett is captain of the Australian Diamonds netball team and a Nissan Australia ambassador.

RI

PPIN .. .

ROA D

MOVING TO N E W YO R K by The Wombats “These guys are the soundtrack to one of my favourite TV shows, The Inbetweeners.”

T

3005 by Childish Gambino “I love Donald Glover! Not only is he a great rapper but he is an awesome actor and director, too.”

design) to create the world’s first convertible luxury SUV. H I T T H E R O A D : Think wind in your

hair and sun on your face but combined with the high seating position and killer view ofered by most SUVs.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY NARELLE SPANGHER/NETBALL AUSTRALIA; GETTY IMAGES. TEXT BY STEPHEN CORBY.

C A B I N F E V E R : With two doors and

N O W & L AT E R by Sage the Gemini “I just love the beat in this song and can’t help but nod along whenever it comes on.”

SHOOP by Salt-N-Pepa “Old-school R’n’B is my favourite music genre, and this classic track takes me straight back to my high school days.”

R A NG E ROV E R E VOQ U E CONVERTIBLE You’d be forgiven for thinking Australia, with its sunburnt plains and tourists, would be the spiritual home of the convertible car. And yet it’s actually the United Kingdom – yep, the grey and soggy UK – where convertibles do their very best business. So it’s no real surprise that it should be a British brand – Range Rover – that has uncovered what might be the most novel way to let the sunshine in to date, chopping the roof of the stunning Evoque (the very car Victoria Beckham helped

only four seats, the Evoque Convertible isn’t at the top of the family car list, and the cabin does feel tight for any full-sized humans squeezed into the backseat. That roof also takes up plenty of boot space, leaving about enough room to store a pair of soft overnight bags. S T Y L E R A T I N G : Like all convertibles, it looks a thousand times better with the roof down, but its true value is in its unique ofering. T H E W O W F A C T O R : Without a

doubt it is certainly that fabric roof, which opens or closes in just 18 seconds. What’s better is if it suddenly starts to rain you can still close it on the fly, even when travelling at speeds up to 48km/h.

T H E B O T T O M L I N E : Nobody ever said style was cheap, and so the Range Rover Evoque Convertible range starts from $85,203 to $93,450.

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The Versace story has it all – fashion, fame, drama, murder, rehab and rebirth. With the controversial miniseries about her brother Gianni’s death about to hit our screens, we celebrate the legacy Donatella Versace 92D4C62E65:?E962ñ6C>2E9 of tragedy, emerging as a fashion icon in her own right

Donatella

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES.

LIFE STORIES

Versace


1999

2017 Clockwise from top left: Gianni and Donatella (in New York in 1996) were close; the house championed the original supermodels; and still does so today.

S

he wasn’t there when it happened. No-one except the murderer was present to see Donatella Versace’s beloved brother Gianni being gunned down outside his Miami home. The morning of July 15, 1997 was cruelly beautiful as 50-year-old Gianni took his customary walk along South Beach. He liked to get out early while many residents of this party town slept. These walks gave Gianni space to think, but he always had time for a few words with a familiar face. He would chat to folks in the café, smile at people he’d pass in the street. Today, however, the kerbside was empty as he made his way back home. Or was it? There was someone behind him, calling out. As Gianni turned, 27-year-old serial killer Andrew Cunanan fired two shots into his head. “I first heard news of Gianni’s death while I was in Rome preparing a show for Versus [Versace’s younger difusion line],” Donatella later told Britain’s The Telegraph. “The day before, Gianni had left for Miami. He was supposed to stay for the show, but I told him, ‘I will manage.’ Anyway, the next morning at eight o’clock, Gianni was on the phone again, saying that he was thinking of coming back. I said, ‘Leave me alone, I need to do a show!’ And then the next call was from the hospital, saying that my brother was in an accident. And then they called to tell me the time he had died.” Cunanan was deranged and at the end of a three-month murderous spree that saw at least four other men die by his hand. (After shooting Gianni, he turned the gun on himself.)

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To lose a loved one is to play a horrendous game of “what if”? What if Donatella had encouraged her brother to return to Rome? What if he had been at the Versace HQ in Milan? How could she ever forgive herself, let alone continue to care about the family business? “I thought fashion would not exist without my brother,” she told Time magazine in 2008. “But then I thought, ‘Gianni wouldn’t like this. Gianni would want me ... to fight for the Versace brand to survive, to be better and better.’” At the time of his death, the company was valued at $500 million USD. It was now in the hands of 42-year-old Donatella and her older brother Santo (they inherited 20 per cent and 30 per cent, respectively). Donatella’s then-11year-old daughter, Allegra, who learnt of her uncle’s death on TV, was handed the controlling 50 per cent, to be settled on her 18th birthday. Donatella was grief-stricken and increasingly reliant on cocaine, but she believed no-one else could design the collections. She “had to show strength”, as she recalled later in a video interview with The New York Times. “I couldn’t show my pain to anybody.” Donatella was born on May 2, 1955, in the southern Italian town of Reggio

di Calabria, to Francesca (known as Franca) and Antonio Versace. The couple already had two boys, Gianni and Santo. Gianni was eight when baby Donatella arrived, and Santo, 10. Donatella was their princess, with a wardrobe full of beautiful clothes sewn by Franca, a locally renowned dressmaker. All the kids grew up understanding the business of cutting, sewing and selling clothes, but it was Gianni who was most drawn to it. He made his first dress, with Franca’s help, aged nine. On leaving school he went to work full time in her atelier. As Gianni put it, “Designing came to me. I didn’t have to move.” Gianni was creative; Santo the sensible one; Donatella was wild, gregarious, social and at her happiest in the centre of a crowd. Teenage Donatella loved to party. Gianni would drive her to Reggio’s only nightclub, where she would lie about her age and dance the night away. She and Gianni were close, laughing and telling jokes. For a while it seemed Donatella might calm down. She won a place at university in Florence, studying literature, which she recalls as one of the happiest times of her life. But she missed her brother. Gianni had moved to Milan in late 1972, working his way up in the burgeoning new Italian sportswear scene as a designer for hire for brands including Callaghan and Genny.


LIFE STORIES

Left: Donatella with her former husband Paul Beck and their children Daniel and Allegra in London in 1992. Below: Donatella and Allegra stand with Santo Versace at Gianni’s funeral in Italy in 1997.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY GETTY IMAGES; SPLASH; GO RUNWAY/SNAPPER MEDIA; INSTAGRAM/@DONATELLA_VERSACE. TEXT BY CLARE PRESS.

Left and above: Gigi Hadid (in red pants) models for Versace’s A/W18 show in Milan; Donatella and Gigi’s ex-boyfriend, singer Zayn Malik, collaborated on Versace’s Versus label last year.

By March 1978 he was ready to go out on his own, and asked his brother and sister to help him launch the Versace label. Gianni designed men’s and women’s collections and they opened a store in Milan’s Via Spiga. Santo became business manager, then president. Donatella acted as muse, design assistant and marketing and PR guru. Some of Milan’s elite dismissed them as brash southerners, but the siblings could deal with that. As the 1970s ticked over into the ’80s there was a hunger for sexy clothes with colour and punch that you could dance and flirt in. If you preferred something subtler there was always Armani. The Italian fashion set divided into two camps – those who loved Armani’s classy tailoring; and those who embraced Versace’s more-ismore mentality, buckled into Gianni’s gold Medusa-head belts and shimmied into his provocative metal mesh dresses. Donatella looked sensational in them, tanned a deep brown, her platinum hair shining. It was around this time that Donatella met her husband, Versace model Paul Beck. They were married in 1983, Allegra was born in 1986 and son Daniel came along in 1989, by which time Santo also had Right: models, including Cindy Crawford’s daughter Kaia Gerber (second from right), showcase Versace’s A/W18 collection.

children. But Allegra was obviously Gianni’s favourite – he doted on her. The demands of the business were growing. Gianni worked all hours, adding new collections and projects. He produced books and designed homewares, denim and ballet and theatre costumes – even Elton John’s tour wardrobe. Soon he was dressing royalty in the form of Diana, Princess of Wales. Donatella was put in charge of the difusion line Versus, and she was often out at night, courting celebrities and models who were key to the house’s success. They made good money, but by God could they spend it. Gianni began collecting art, shelled out $6.6 million USD for the Miami property and paid large bonuses to the new supermodels to walk for Versace exclusively. Most famously, for his autumn 1991 collection, Linda Evangelista,

Naomi Campbell, Cindy Crawford and Christy Turlington stormed Versace’s Milan fashion week catwalk to George Michael’s hit “Freedom! ’90”. Donatella was running up impressive bills of her own. According to Deborah Ball, author of House of Versace: The Untold Story of Genius, Murder, and Survival, Donatella was spending $150,000 USD a year on hair extensions alone by the early noughties. Her cocaine habit began as fun. “I had the best time of my life,” she told US Vogue in 2005, admitting to an 18-year addiction. “Unfortunately, it doesn’t continue that way.” A clean spell after Gianni’s death was followed by a worse one where she mixed it with sedatives. In 2004, Elton John persuaded Donatella into rehab. She spent five weeks at The Meadows clinic in Arizona and hasn’t looked back. Today, she has proven more than capable of continuing the Versace legacy as a designer in her own right. Donatella’s style is her own and, as last year’s collaboration with singer Zayn Malik showed, she is just as switched onto the zeitgeist as Gianni was. And it looks like she’s finally made peace with her demons and her brother’s legacy. Her spring ’18 collection at Milan fashion week, 20 years after his death, was a triumph. It celebrated his archival prints and silhouettes but all with a Donatella twist. And it closed with five supermodels – Cindy Crawford, Naomi Campbell, Claudia Schifer, Helena Christensen and Carla Bruni – reunited in Gianni’s gold mesh dresses.

Gianni was creative. Santo was the sensible one. Donatella was wild

The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story will screen in Australia on Showcase.

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JANELLE MONÁE

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Singer and actress Janelle Monáe owes much of her success to the strong women who raised her

M Y M OT H E R My mother, Janet, had me at a very young age and she made a lot of sacrifices in order for me to be the person I am today. She put me and my sister in front of her own needs, sacrificing both her own career decisions and her comfort. She endured 194

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a lot of sufering – including feeling the shame of being a young, single mother. I grew up watching my mum put on a uniform every day. She was a janitor. She also cleaned houses and was a maid at a hotel. I saw her work very hard and watched her live pay cheque to pay cheque. She never talked down about her job and we respected her because she was doing work that needed to be done. Without cleaners, our whole community would fall apart. My mum gave me the opportunity to grow and

M Y G R A N D M OT H E R My grandmother Bessie helped raise me. I remember going to live at her house – she had 11 kids living with her, but she never turned us away. Her house was a community centre of sorts. My grandmother would open her home to people who were recovering addicts, who had just lost their jobs, just got out of jail or who were trying to get back on their feet. It was humbling to watch this woman, this matriarch of the whole community, have so much influence over people. I saw convicted murderers treat my grandmother like a queen. I look at my grandmother as an example of how to love unconditionally. Some of the people who lived with her would steal from her and she would forgive them. It didn’t matter what you did to her, if you cussed her out, if you

harmed one of her kids; she forgave. She was a very spiritual woman. Now, I always try to forgive when I can and to give as much as I can to those who don’t have anywhere to turn – as a way to honour my grandmother’s spirit. MY AUNT My aunt Loretta passed away four years ago. She was a very outspoken woman and she never sugar-coated anything. She was also very sexually liberated. She taught me how to protect myself and embrace my sexuality. I appreciate her for being open with me about that. My aunt Loretta was also open about the tough times she went through. She dealt with drug abuse and a lot of dark things; but she turned it all around and became a flight attendant and learnt how to fly planes. She chose freedom over fear. She came from this dark past and ended up seeing the light. And that’s how I remember her: being a light for everyone in my family. She showed us that you can come from nothing and turn your life into something. Tiffany & Co.’s There’s Only One campaign starring Janelle Monáe is out now.

“My mum gave me the opportunity to grow and pursue my dreams instead of following her own. She =1451<?D?6C13B9V35C6?B=5S

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MARTIN SCHOELLER/AUGUST/RAVEN & SNOW; GETTY IMAGES. EDITED BY ALLEY PASCOE.

pursue my dreams instead of following her own. She was always very creative and she used to sketch a lot when I was little – I have tried to encourage her to do more art. Now, she’s going back to school and getting a degree. My mum is at a level in her life where she doesn’t give a damn about what you think. She is a free spirit with no inhibitions whatsoever.


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D I O R .C O M

Marie claire australia may 2018  
Marie claire australia may 2018  
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